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G. P. Schafer Architect

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G. P. Schafer Architect
IndustryArchitecture
FoundedNew York City, New York, United States (2002 (2002))
FounderGil Schafer III
HeadquartersNew York City
Area served
International
Key people
Gil Schafer III
ServicesArchitecture, Interior design
Number of employees
35
WebsiteG. P. Schafer Architect

G. P. Schafer Architect is a New York City-based architectural firm established in 2002 and led by founder and principal Gil Schafer III. Its work has been featured in Architectural Digest, Town & Country, Veranda and The New York Times, and in books on classical and residential architecture, restoration and interior design. G. P. Schafer Architect has won Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA), Palladio and American Institute of Architects awards, as well as the Veranda "Art of Design" Award in Architecture.[1][2][3][4][5] Architectural Digest has named the firm to the AD100 since 2012 and describes its residences as contemporary tributes to traditional craftsmanship that are "appreciative of the vernacular expression of 18th- and 19-century design movements."[6][7][8][9] Martin Filler wrote that the firm's work is distinguished by its "sense of proportion and restraint, not only in measurement but also in terms of what is correct in a given setting."[10] Rizzoli International has published two books by Gil Schafer, The Great American House (2012) and A Place to Call Home (2017).[11][12]

G. P. Schafer Architect, Middlefield, Dutchess County, New York, 1999
G. P. Schafer Architect, Middlefield, Dutchess County, New York, 1999

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Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest is an American monthly magazine founded in 1920. Its principal subjects are interior design and landscaping, rather than pure external architecture. The magazine is published by Condé Nast, which also publishes international editions of Architectural Digest in Italy, China, France, Germany, India, Spain, Mexico/Latin America and the Middle East

Town & Country (magazine)

Town & Country (magazine)

Town & Country, formerly the Home Journal and The National Press, is a monthly American lifestyle magazine. It is the oldest continually published general interest magazine in the United States.

Veranda (magazine)

Veranda (magazine)

Veranda is an American lifestyle magazine with a focus on the home, and has a circulation of 464,357 copies as of 2020. The magazine is one of the Hearst Corporation's shelter magazine titles, alongside Elle Décor and House Beautiful. The magazine's headquarters was originally in Atlanta, GA, but relocated to Hearst's editorial offices in Manhattan circa 2013, and then to Hearst's editorial offices in Birmingham, Alabama at the end of 2018.

The New York Times

The New York Times

The New York Times is a daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership reported in 2022 to comprise 740,000 paid print subscribers, and 8.6 million paid digital subscribers. It also is a producer of popular podcasts such as The Daily. Founded in 1851, it is published by The New York Times Company. The Times has won 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any newspaper, and has long been regarded as a national "newspaper of record". For print, it is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the United States.

American Institute of Architects

American Institute of Architects

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., the AIA offers education, government advocacy, community redevelopment, and public outreach to support the architecture profession and improve its public image. The AIA also works with other members of the design and construction community to help coordinate the building industry.

Martin Filler

Martin Filler

Martin Myles Filler is an American architecture critic. He is best known for his long essays on modern architecture that have appeared in The New York Review of Books since 1985, and which served as the basis for his 2007 book Makers of Modern Architecture, published by New York Review Books.

History

Gil Schafer III (born 1961 in Cleveland) founded G. P. Schafer Architect in 2002 in New York City.[13][14][15] The firm occupied space in a SoHo high-rise on Lafayette Street for several years, and by 2007, had executed 25 projects with a staff that had grown to fifteen.[16] By 2018, its staff numbered thirty-five, and the practice took over a fourth-floor aerie on Union Square West in Manhattan.[17][18][7]

Schafer is the grandson and great, great grandson of architects.[18] He spent his childhood in places including New Jersey and the Midwest, California, and the Bahamas; including his grandmother's antebellum plantation in Thomasville, Georgia.[15][16][7] He studied Growth & Structure of Cities at Haverford College and Bryn Mawr (BA, 1984), before attending Yale School of Architecture (MA, 1988).[18][16] At Yale, he trained as a modernist under Thomas Beeby, Frank Gehry, Josef Paul Kleihues, Bernard Tschumi and Robert Venturi, and earned the school's H. I. Feldman Prize for studio work in his final semester.[18][19][16][20]

As a student, Schafer worked for Charles Moore and William Turnbull Jr., and upon graduating, for Bernard Tschumi.[21][20][18][19] He joined Ferguson Shamamian & Rattner in 1991, working there until 1999, when he started his own practice.[22][15] Between 1999–2006, he was president, and then chairman, of the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art.[18][23][21] Schafer writes and lectures on traditional residential architecture, and has served on Yale School of Architecture’s Dean’s Council, the Dutchess Land Conservancy, and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation.[24][6][23][25]

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SoHo, Manhattan

SoHo, Manhattan

SoHo, sometimes written Soho, is a neighborhood in Lower Manhattan, New York City. Since the 1970s, the neighborhood has been the location of many artists' lofts and art galleries, and has also been known for its variety of shops ranging from trendy upscale boutiques to national and international chain store outlets. The area's history is an archetypal example of inner-city regeneration and gentrification, encompassing socioeconomic, cultural, political, and architectural developments.

Antebellum South

Antebellum South

In the history of the Southern United States, the Antebellum Period spanned the end of the War of 1812 to the start of the American Civil War in 1861. The Antebellum South was characterized by the use of slavery and the culture it fostered. As the era proceeded, Southern intellectuals and leaders gradually shifted from portraying slavery as an embarrassing and temporary system, to a defense of slavery as a positive good, and harshly criticized the nascent abolitionist movement.

Thomasville, Georgia

Thomasville, Georgia

Thomasville is the county seat of Thomas County, Georgia, United States. The population was 18,413 at the 2010 United States Census, making it the second largest city in southwest Georgia after Albany.

Haverford College

Haverford College

Haverford College is a private liberal arts college in Haverford, Pennsylvania. It was founded as a men's college in 1833 by members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), began accepting non-Quakers in 1849, and became coeducational in 1980.

Bryn Mawr College

Bryn Mawr College

Bryn Mawr College is a women's liberal arts college in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Founded as a Quaker institution in 1885, Bryn Mawr is one of the Seven Sister colleges, a group of elite, historically women's colleges in the United States, and the Tri-College Consortium along with Haverford College and Swarthmore College. The college has an enrollment of about 1,350 undergraduate students and 450 graduate students. It was the first women's college to offer graduate education through a PhD.

Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry

Frank Owen Gehry,, FAIA is a Canadian-born American architect and designer. A number of his buildings, including his private residence in Santa Monica, California, have become world-renowned attractions.

Josef Paul Kleihues

Josef Paul Kleihues

Josef Paul Kleihues was a German architect, most notable for his decades long contributions to the "critical reconstruction" of Berlin. His design approach has been described as "poetic rationalist".

Bernard Tschumi

Bernard Tschumi

Bernard Tschumi is an architect, writer, and educator, commonly associated with deconstructivism. Son of the well-known Swiss architect Jean Tschumi and a French mother, Tschumi is a dual French-Swiss national who works and lives in New York City and Paris. He studied in Paris and at ETH in Zurich, where he received his degree in architecture in 1969.

Robert Venturi

Robert Venturi

Robert Charles Venturi Jr. was an American architect, founding principal of the firm Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates, and one of the major architectural figures of the twentieth century.

Charles Moore (architect)

Charles Moore (architect)

Charles Willard Moore was an American architect, educator, writer, Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and winner of the AIA Gold Medal in 1991. He is often labeled as the father of postmodernism. His work as an educator was important to a generation of American architects who read his books or studied with him at one of the several universities where he taught.

William Turnbull Jr.

William Turnbull Jr.

William Turnbull Jr., FAIA, was an American Bay Area architect whose unique building designs challenged the more traditional architecture of California's West Coast. His design style is most closely associated with the Sea Ranch community in Sonoma County, California. The Baker House (1968), within that community, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Thomas Jefferson Foundation

Thomas Jefferson Foundation

The Thomas Jefferson Foundation, originally known as the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, is a private, nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation founded in 1923 to purchase and maintain Monticello, the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States. The Foundation's initial focus was on architectural preservation, with the goal of restoring Monticello as close to its original appearance as possible. It has since grown to include other historic and cultural pursuits and programs such as its Annual Independence Day Celebration and Naturalization Ceremony. It also publishes and provides a center for scholarship on Jefferson and his era.

Projects

G. P. Schafer Architect is best known for what writers call "new old houses"—contemporary adaptations of classical styles suggesting long histories and regional authenticity—and restorations of historic homes.[13][14][26][27] Architect and architectural historian Robert A. M. Stern places the practice among the "leaders in a new generation of Classical and traditional architects."[19] The firm's influences include 18th- and 19-century American design movements and figures such as Colonial Revival architects Charles A. Platt and William Lawrence Bottomley, Sir Edwin Lutyens, and David Adler and Frances Adler Elkins.[28][8][6][29]

Architecture critics distinguish G. P. Schafer Architect's approach by its concern for context, climate, and lifestyle; interplay between historical precedent, details, materials and craftsmanship; mix of classical order, proportion and contemporary function; and integration of architecture, landscape and decoration.[16][13][23][8] The latter aim often involves collaborations that serve as complements or foils to the firm's classicism, such as those with interior designers Rita Konig, David Netto, Miles Redd and Michael S. Smith, landscape designer Deborah Nevins, decorator Bunny Williams, and color consultant Eve Ashcraft.[30][31][32][33][34][14][35]

G. P. Schafer Architect, Longfield Farm, Dutchess County, New York, 2006
G. P. Schafer Architect, Longfield Farm, Dutchess County, New York, 2006

"New old houses"

Schafer's early project, "Middlefield" (Dutchess County, New York, 1999), demonstrates the approach elaborated in his first book and set the mold for the firm's new-old aesthetic.[16][2][15] Following a long and unsuccessful attempt to find a suitable nineteenth-century Greek Revival house to renovate, he decided to design and build a new, modern rendition, carefully sited to integrate into a 45-acre land parcel.[26][14][36][37] The residence combines contemporary features and regional farmhouse vernacular, with classically proportioned details derived from 19-century builder pattern books by Asher Benjamin and Minard Lafever and a two-story, Greek Doric columned entry portico that Martin Filler wrote "would likely win the approval of Thomas Jefferson."[38][2][39][40][10]

Several later projects demonstrate the firm's creation of organic, architectural mythologies in new constructions.[23][41] Architectural Digest described the amalgam of styles at "Longfield Farm (Dutchess County, New York, 2006) as embodying "a picturesque historical narrative" of successive additions—Colonial Revival main house of rugged fieldstone, Federal-style wing, neo-Victorian carriage barn, and Greek Revival entry portico and back porch—blended into a "transcendent whole."[23] "New Plantation Residence" (South Georgia, 2016) combines an "original" mid-19th-century Greek Revival structure with what appears to be a 1930s Colonial Revival hunting lodge addition.[21][42]

The simple exterior shapes, ambience and details of the Colonial Revival "Willow Grace Farm" (Millbrook, New York, 2007) were modeled after a nearby dilapidated, loosely Federal-style dwelling its client had purchased; the 9,000-square-foot residence and outbuildings incorporate wide-plank floorboards, door hinges, beams and fixtures salvaged from the older structure alongside elements detailed to match.[43][44][45] "New Classical House" (Hudson Valley, 2007) blends Jeffersonian palladian classical precedents and regional Greek Revival elements in a five-part symmetrical design with a contemporary interior layout in a palette of teals, blues, and greens.[46][47]

G. P. Schafer Architect, William C. Gatewood House, Charleston, South Carolina, 2008
G. P. Schafer Architect, William C. Gatewood House, Charleston, South Carolina, 2008

Restorations & renovations

The firm executed a four-year restoration of the 1843 Greek Revival "William C. Gatewood House" (Charleston, 2008), a four-story residence whose Tuscan columns, arched colonnade and multistory piazza, and high second-floor parlor rooms typify the antebellum Charleston single house.[48][49][50][51] The commission stipulated the retention of all original walls, but entailed a literal disassembly and reconstruction (due to structural damage), as well as detection for traces of original features that had been altered.[51][49][52] The restoration integrated modern function and flow patterns into the original historic framework with Greek Revival and vernacular decoration, period furnishings and fixtures, Charlestonian pumpkin-hued walls, hand-painted scenic wallpaper, and restored nine-foot triple-hung windows, mantels and woodwork.[50][49][51][52][53]

The Georgian farmhouse "Boxwood" (Nashville, 2010) involved working on a residence designed by one of Schafer's influences, American classicist Charles A. Platt.[37] The renovation sought to restore the understated classical formality that had been diluted by significant alterations, while contemporizing the home with modern living space, decoration and detail.[54][31] On the exterior, the firm created a more unified aesthetic by redesigning a 1950s portico to match Platt's vision and painting the re-clad brick white.[54][37][55] Inside, it restored the loggia's French doors and eliminated outmoded barriers between utilitarian, formal public and informal areas by opening the space and adding enfilades.[54][31][56]

G. P. Schafer Architect, House by the Sea, Brooklin, Maine, 2017
G. P. Schafer Architect, House by the Sea, Brooklin, Maine, 2017

The renovation of Schafer's "House by the Sea" (Brooklin, Maine, 2017) represents a departure from the firm's historical houses that The New York Times describes as "breezily modern."[57][58] Initially an undistinguished, early-1990s chalet lacking an architectural back story, the barn-like near-A-frame (including a double-height, 30 x 30-foot great room) offered the opportunity for experimentation.[21][57] It was gutted to the timber frames and rebuilt inside and out, with large windows, tall glass sliding doors, and dormer windows installed to maximize light and views of Blue Hill Bay.[57][58] The interior—painted all white to enhance the light and views—bridges New England tradition and modernity with painted wood-plank walls and hardware reflecting rural history alongside eclectic, centuries-spanning furnishings.[58][59]

Additional residences

Schafer's second book, A Place to Call Home, explores the roles of geography, place and lifestyle in design, a theme visible in several projects that draw on regional vocabularies and context.[60][21][30] The new "Waterfront House in the Adirondacks" (Lake Placid, New York, 2013) is a modern adaptation of the Gilded-Age family compound; the exterior of the asymmetrical structure employs a tailored, less-known Adirondack-style of brown clapboard siding, green-shingled roof and white trim.[60][40] "Mill Valley Hillside Residence" (California, 2013) entailed the transformation of a derelict assemblage of structures on a small, sloped lot (originally an 1880s YWCA bunkhouse) into a larger, modern family cottage.[61][62]

Two New York residences demonstrate the firm's approach to city life, which writers describe as seeking a balance between traditional and modern, sophistication and comfort.[63][64][65] The renovation, "Greenwich Village Townhouse Apartment" (2003), restored period style and craftsmanship to an 1850s residence covered over with modernist additions, while updating its layout.[29][1][66] "Fifth Avenue Apartment" (2016) combines formal architectural details—including a columned entry foyer right off the elevator framing a panoramic view of Central Park—with a relaxed, open plan and modern colors to create a residence amenable to formal entertaining, family life, and a contemporary art collection.[67][21][42]

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Colonial Revival architecture

Colonial Revival architecture

The Colonial Revival architectural style seeks to revive elements of American colonial architecture.

Charles A. Platt

Charles A. Platt

Charles Adams Platt was a prominent American architect, garden designer, and artist of the "American Renaissance" movement. His garden designs complemented his domestic architecture.

Edwin Lutyens

Edwin Lutyens

Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens was an English architect known for imaginatively adapting traditional architectural styles to the requirements of his era. He designed many English country houses, war memorials and public buildings. In his biography, the writer Christopher Hussey wrote, "In his lifetime (Lutyens) was widely held to be our greatest architect since Wren if not, as many maintained, his superior". The architectural historian Gavin Stamp described him as "surely the greatest British architect of the twentieth century".

David Adler (architect)

David Adler (architect)

David Adler was an American architect who largely practiced around Chicago, Illinois. He was prolific throughout his career, designing over 200 buildings in over thirty-five years. He was also a long-time board member of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Frances Adler Elkins

Frances Adler Elkins

Frances Adler Elkins, was one of the twentieth century's most prominent interior designers. According to one magazine editor, she was "the first great California decorator". According to The New York Times, Elkins "pioneered vibrant interiors, in which solid historical references met effervescent modernist fantasy." She was the sister of the architect David Adler.

Greek Revival architecture

Greek Revival architecture

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement which began in the middle of the 18th century but which particularly flourished in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in northern Europe and the United States and Canada, but also in Greece itself following independence in 1832. It revived many aspects of the forms and styles of ancient Greek architecture, in particular the Greek temple, with varying degrees of thoroughness and consistency. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture, which had for long mainly drawn from Roman architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

Asher Benjamin

Asher Benjamin

Asher Benjamin was an American architect and author whose work transitioned between Federal architecture and the later Greek Revival architecture. His seven handbooks on design deeply influenced the look of cities and towns throughout New England until the Civil War. Builders also copied his plans in the Midwest and in the South.

Federal architecture

Federal architecture

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815, which was heavily based on the works of Andrea Palladio with several innovations on Palladian architecture by Thomas Jefferson and his contemporaries first for Jefferson's Monticello estate and followed by many examples in government building throughout the United States. An excellent example of this is the White House. This style shares its name with its era, the Federalist Era. The name Federal style is also used in association with furniture design in the United States of the same time period. The style broadly corresponds to the classicism of Biedermeier style in the German-speaking lands, Regency architecture in Britain, and to the French Empire style. It may also be termed Adamesque architecture. The White House and Monticello were setting stones for federal architecture.

Jeffersonian architecture

Jeffersonian architecture

Jeffersonian architecture is an American form of Neo-Classicism and/or Neo-Palladianism embodied in the architectural designs of U.S. President and polymath Thomas Jefferson, after whom it is named. These include his home (Monticello), his retreat, the university he founded, and his designs for the homes of friends and political allies. More than a dozen private homes bearing his personal stamp still stand today. Jefferson's style was popular in the early American period at about the same time that the more mainstream Greek Revival architecture was also coming into vogue (1790s–1830s) with his assistance.

Italianate architecture

Italianate architecture

The Italianate style was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture. Like Palladianism and Neoclassicism, the Italianate style drew its inspiration from the models and architectural vocabulary of 16th-century Italian Renaissance architecture, synthesising these with picturesque aesthetics. The style of architecture that was thus created, though also characterised as "Neo-Renaissance", was essentially of its own time. "The backward look transforms its object," Siegfried Giedion wrote of historicist architectural styles; "every spectator at every period—at every moment, indeed—inevitably transforms the past according to his own nature."

Charleston single house

Charleston single house

A Charleston single house is a form of house found in Charleston, South Carolina. A single house has its narrow side with a gable end along the street and a longer side running perpendicular to the street. The house is well-suited to long, narrow lots which were laid out in early Charleston. Despite the popularity of the story, single houses were not built to avoid taxes that were, according to the tales, based on the width of the house; no evidence supports anything about such fanciful myths.

Brooklin, Maine

Brooklin, Maine

Brooklin is a town in Hancock County, Maine, United States. The population was 827 at the 2020 census.

Awards and recognition

G. P. Schafer Architect won the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art's (ICAA) Arthur Ross Award in 2019 and ICAA Stanford White Awards for two residences (Longfield Farm and Fifth Avenue Apartment, both 2013), the New York Historical Society Library project (Interior Design and Decoration Award, 2014), and a collaboration with Voith & Mactavish Architects on Thorndale Farm Corporate Offices (Commercial, Civic and Institutional Architecture Award, 2016).[68][69][3] In 2009, G. P. Schafer Architect received two American Institute of Architects awards: a New York State Award of Merit for the William C. Gatewood House and a Westchester/Hudson Valley Citation Award for Willow Grace Farm.[4] It has also received Palladio Awards for Thorndale Farm Corporate Offices (2018), Willow Grace Farm (2009), Greenwich Village Townhouse Apartment (2004), and Middlefield (2002).[3][1][2] The firm has been recognized with Veranda magazine's "Art of Design" Award in Architecture (2010) and been regularly named to the Architectural Digest annual AD100 since 2012.[7][8][28][70][9]

Publications

Schafer has written two books, The Great American House (2012) and A Place to Call Home (2017).[37][42] He has also contributed forewords to The New Old House by Marc Kristal (2016) and Thomasville: History, Home and Southern Hospitality by William R. Mitchell (2014), a chapter to Bunny Williams's A House by the Sea (2016), and a section to the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art book, A Decade of Art & Architecture 1992–2002 (2002).[71][72][73][13]

Source: "G. P. Schafer Architect", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G._P._Schafer_Architect.

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