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Fred L. Baker

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Fred L. Baker
Fred L. Baker, industrialist, business owner, shipbuilder, president of the Automobile Club of Southern California.png
Baker in 1910
Member of the Los Angeles City Council for the 2nd ward
In office
December 16, 1896 – December 12, 1900
Preceded byMeredith P. Snyder
Succeeded byGeorge P. McLain
Personal details
Born1872 (1872)
Lansing, Michigan
DiedJanuary 9, 1927(1927-01-09) (aged 54–55)
Los Angeles, California

Fred L. Baker (1872 – January 9, 1927) was an industrialist, business owner, shipbuilder, president of the Automobile Club of Southern California and member of the Los Angeles City Council. One of his ships caught fire and sank on its maiden voyage between Los Angeles and Honolulu.

Personal

Family

Baker was born in 1872 in Lansing, Michigan, the son of Milo Stannard Baker, and in 1875 was brought to Los Angeles with the family when he was nine years old. He had a younger brother, Milo A., and a sister, Belle.[1][2][3]

Baker's wife was Lillian T. Baker, and they had a son, Lawrence T. Baker, and two daughters, Mrs. Guy C. Boynton and Mrs. Fulton Lane.[1] A 1913 article listed Walter J. Wallace, president of the Sierra Vista Ranch Company, as Fred L. Baker's son-in-law.[4]

Memberships

Baker was a member of the California Club, the Los Angeles Country Club, the Los Angeles Athletic Club, Midwick, California Yacht Club and the Uplifters.[1]

Death

After an illness of some fifteen months, Baker died on January 9, 1927, in his suite at the Gaylord Apartments, 3355 Wilshire Boulevard, the diagnosis being heart disease.[1] Cremation was at Forest Lawn Cemetery.[3]

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Lansing, Michigan

Lansing, Michigan

Lansing is the capital of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is mostly in Ingham County, although portions of the city extend west into Eaton County and north into Clinton County. The 2020 census placed the city's population at 112,644, making it the sixth largest city in Michigan. The population of its metropolitan statistical area (MSA) was 541,297 at the 2020 census, the third largest in the state after metropolitan Detroit and Grand Rapids. It was named the new state capital of Michigan in 1847, ten years after Michigan became a state.

California Club

California Club

Based in Los Angeles, California, the California Club is an by-invitation-only private club established in 1888.

Los Angeles Country Club

Los Angeles Country Club

The Los Angeles Country Club is a golf and country club on the west coast of the United States, located in Los Angeles, California.

Los Angeles Athletic Club

Los Angeles Athletic Club

Los Angeles Athletic Club (LAAC) is a privately owned athletic club and social club in Los Angeles, California, United States. Established in 1880, the club is today best known for its John R. Wooden Award presented to the outstanding men's and women's college basketball player of each year.

The Uplifters (club)

The Uplifters (club)

The Lofty and Exalted Order of Uplifters or simply The Uplifters is an invitation-only social club at the Los Angeles Athletic Club founded by Harry Marston Haldeman in 1913. The club is still in existence today.

Wilshire Boulevard

Wilshire Boulevard

Wilshire Boulevard is a prominent 15.83 mi (25.48 km) boulevard in the Los Angeles area of Southern California, extending from Ocean Avenue in the city of Santa Monica east to Grand Avenue in the Financial District of downtown Los Angeles. One of the principal east-west arterial roads of Los Angeles, it is also one of the major city streets through the city of Beverly Hills. Wilshire Boulevard runs roughly parallel with Santa Monica Boulevard from Santa Monica to the west boundary of Beverly Hills. From the east boundary it runs a block south of Sixth Street to its terminus.

Public service

In July 1896 Baker was a member of a committee to plan the reorganization of the city government.[5] And four days after the start of the Spanish–American War, he sent a telegram on behalf of the Merchants and Manufacturers Association to California Senator Stephen M. White[6] stating:

Whereas, the city of Los Angeles is totally without any defenses and absolutely at the mercy of invading forces no matter how small in number[,] Resolved that the Secretary of War be strongly urged to garrison Los Angeles with a battery of rapid-firing guns.[6]

Baker, a Republican, was elected to represent the 2nd Ward on the Los Angeles City Council in December 1896 and was re-elected in 1898, for four years altogether.[7]

In December 1898, Baker was appointed to a businessmen's committee authorized to call on "Lumbermen, Manufacturers, Packinghouses, etc." to gather funds on behalf of the Nicaragua Canal Association of Southern California.[8]

Baker was a member of the Board of Water Commissioners at the time of the building of the Los Angeles Aqueduct.[9]

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Spanish–American War

Spanish–American War

The Spanish–American War was a period of armed conflict between Spain and the United States. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to United States intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. The war led to the United States emerging predominant in the Caribbean region, and resulted in U.S. acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions. It led to United States involvement in the Philippine Revolution and later to the Philippine–American War.

Stephen M. White

Stephen M. White

Stephen Mallory White was an American attorney and politician from California. A Democrat, he was most notable for his service as a U.S. Senator from 1893 to 1899.

Los Angeles City Council, 1889–1909

Los Angeles City Council, 1889–1909

The Los Angeles City Council, 1889–1909, was the legislative body of Los Angeles, California, under the first charter of the city, granted by the Legislature in 1889. The first election under that charter was held on February 21, 1889, and the last on December 4, 1906.

Los Angeles Aqueduct

Los Angeles Aqueduct

The Los Angeles Aqueduct system, comprising the Los Angeles Aqueduct and the Second Los Angeles Aqueduct, is a water conveyance system, built and operated by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. The Owens Valley aqueduct was designed and built by the city's water department, at the time named The Bureau of Los Angeles Aqueduct, under the supervision of the department's Chief Engineer William Mulholland. The system delivers water from the Owens River in the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains to Los Angeles, California.

Vocation

Foundry

Baker began work as an apprentice in Los Angeles machine shops, in both mechanical and office positions. He continued with the foundry and machine shop Milo S. Baker & Co., established by his father and James C. Bower. He progressed in responsibility and took over as president when his father died.[1]

Upon Baker's return from a buying, recruitment and inspection trip to the East in October 1900, he predicted the re-election of Republican President William McKinley, which, with the continuation of prosperity, would enable him to "more than double the capacity of the Baker Iron Works", which, he said, was "the largest of its kind in the country." He said that "there is no more possibility of the election of [Democrat William Jennings] Bryan this or any other year than there is of my succeeding the Emperor of Germany.[10]

Mount Lowe Railway

In 1896 Baker took over as general manager of the Mount Lowe Railway, a tourist attraction running up and down the side of a mountain overlooking Los Angeles and Pasadena. It was, said an article in the Los Angeles Times, an initiative to put the railroad "on a paying basis" and "the prospect at this time is excellent for the complete carrying out of the programme as originally outlined." The reorganization took place at a meeting of the railway's principal creditors where Baker, J.M. Johnson and I.B. Newton were added to the board of directors.[11]

Mr. Baker will, from now until the debts of the concern are paid, have the actual management of the railroad as may recommend themselves to his judgment. He is a mechanical engineer, and as head of the Baker Iron Works has demonstrated his ability to organize and secure the best results from big enterprises.[11]

In April 1897, a gathering of the unsecured creditors appointed another three-man committee, including Baker, J.M. Johnston of the Union Metal and Hardware Company and L.E. Mosher of the Los Angeles Times, to meet with a committee of bondholders under a power of attorney "to settle or compromise all unsecured claims against the railway."[12]

Maritime

In 1916 he joined in a project to construct a shipbuilding and maritime repair yard at the Los Angeles Harbor, an enterprise that became the Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. With the end of World War I, the yard was partially converted into a lumber manufacturing facility, "with its own ships to carry raw material from Graham Island, Canada." That venture led Baker to form the Los Angeles Steamship Company.[1]

Two years later, during World War I, Baker declared in a speech to "the joint technical societies"[13] that:

We shipbuilders are none of us in the game for profit. What we want is production. We are all just one great big body with nothing else to do but get together and produce for the government and the winning of the war. The President of the United States and the War Board have said there shall be no strikes or walk-outs during the period of the war. Any man who stands outside your gate and t tells your men to walk out is a traitor. I hope some day to see a maximum as well as a minimum wage paid to workers, for I believe that every man should be paid a living wage. From then on he ought to be paid in proportion to what his brain and industry can earn for him.[13]

In 1918 Baker appeared before the City Council to ask it to pay for a new road at the harbor leading to his plant, which he said had $54 million worth of contracts with the government's Emergency Fleet Corporation.[14]

The next year, 1919, Baker's Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company was hit with a strike by 2,200 of its 6,000 employees. Baker said he was willing to meet with Mayor Frederick T. Woodman to discuss the strike but that he would "not meet with anyone coming from labor-union circles."[15]

Baker established two shipping firms, Los Angeles Pacific Navigation and Los Angeles Steamship, and announced to a meeting of Chinatown businessmen in September 1920 that a new $15 million line would be set up by "Los Angeles men and your progressive merchants in China."[16]

In 1922, Baker was associated with Earl M. Leaf in the old firm, Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Dry Dock, It commissioned the reconstruction of two ships, City of Los Angeles and City of Honolulu, for travel between California and Hawaii.[17]

After departing on its maiden voyage, City of Honolulu caught fire around 5:30 a.m. on October 12, 1922, in mid-Pacific, some 670 mi (1,080 km) from Los Angeles. The captain ordered everyone to the lifeboats after it became apparent that the fire could not be brought under control. None of the passengers or crew were killed or seriously injured during either the firefighting attempts or the orderly evacuation of the liner.[18][19] The passengers were rescued by the freighter West Faralon, the first ship on the scene, and were transferred to the U.S. Army transport ship Thomas for passage to Los Angeles.[20] The City of Honolulu, which was eventually scuttled by U.S. Coast Guard guns, was replaced by the President Harrison.[21]

Baker was named to the new position of chairman of the board of Los Angeles Shipbuilding and Dry Dock in 1924, as well as to the same position with Los Angeles Lumber Products Co. Earl M. Leaf became president of all the associated companies.[22]

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Machining

Machining

Machining is a process in which a material is cut to a desired final shape and size by a controlled material-removal process. The processes that have this common theme are collectively called subtractive manufacturing, which utilizes machine tools, in contrast to additive manufacturing, which uses controlled addition of material.

Foundry

Foundry

A foundry is a factory that produces metal castings. Metals are cast into shapes by melting them into a liquid, pouring the metal into a mold, and removing the mold material after the metal has solidified as it cools. The most common metals processed are aluminum and cast iron. However, other metals, such as bronze, brass, steel, magnesium, and zinc, are also used to produce castings in foundries. In this process, parts of desired shapes and sizes can be formed.

Recruitment

Recruitment

Recruitment is the overall process of identifying, sourcing, screening, shortlisting, and interviewing candidates for jobs within an organization. Recruitment also is the process involved in choosing people or unpaid roles. Managers, human resource generalists and recruitment specialists may be tasked with carrying out recruitment, but in some cases public-sector employment, commercial recruitment agencies, or specialist search consultancies are used to undertake parts of the process. Internet-based technologies which enhance all aspects of recruitment have become widespread, including the use of artificial intelligence (AI).

Eastern United States

Eastern United States

The Eastern United States, often abbreviated as simply The East or The East Coast, is a region of the United States located east of the Mississippi River. It includes 26 states and the national capital of Washington, D.C. As of 2011, the region had an estimated population exceeding 179 million, representing over 58 percent of the total U.S. population.

Prosperity

Prosperity

Prosperity is the flourishing, thriving, good fortune and successful social status. Prosperity often produces profuse wealth including other factors which can be profusely wealthy in all degrees, such as happiness and health.

Wilhelm II, German Emperor

Wilhelm II, German Emperor

Wilhelm II was the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, reigning from 15 June 1888 until his abdication on 9 November 1918. Despite strengthening the German Empire's position as a great power by building a powerful navy, his tactless public statements and erratic foreign policy greatly antagonized the international community and are considered by many to be one of the underlying causes of World War I. When the German war effort collapsed after a series of crushing defeats on the Western Front in 1918, he was forced to abdicate, thereby marking the end of the German Empire and the House of Hohenzollern's 300-year reign in Prussia and 500-year reign in Brandenburg.

Mount Lowe Railway

Mount Lowe Railway

The Mount Lowe Railway was the third in a series of scenic mountain railroads in the United States created as a tourist attraction on Echo Mountain and Mount Lowe, north of Los Angeles, California. The railway, originally incorporated by Thaddeus S. C. Lowe as the Pasadena and Mt. Wilson Railroad Co., existed from 1893 until its official abandonment in 1938, and was the only scenic mountain, electric traction railroad ever built in the United States. Lowe's partner and engineer was David J. Macpherson, a civil engineer graduate of Cornell University. The Mount Lowe Railway was a fulfillment of 19th century Pasadenans' desire to have a scenic mountain railroad to the crest of the San Gabriel Mountains.

Board of directors

Board of directors

A board of directors is an executive committee that jointly supervises the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit or a nonprofit organization such as a business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency.

Power of attorney

Power of attorney

A power of attorney (POA) or letter of attorney is a written authorization to represent or act on another's behalf in private affairs, business, or some other legal matter. The person authorizing the other to act is the principal, grantor, or donor. The one authorized to act is the agent, attorney, or in some common law jurisdictions, the attorney-in-fact.

Shipbuilding

Shipbuilding

Shipbuilding is the construction of ships and other floating vessels. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history.

Dry dock

Dry dock

A dry dock is a narrow basin or vessel that can be flooded to allow a load to be floated in, then drained to allow that load to come to rest on a dry platform. Dry docks are used for the construction, maintenance, and repair of ships, boats, and other watercraft.

Port of Los Angeles

Port of Los Angeles

The Port of Los Angeles is a seaport managed by the Los Angeles Harbor Department, a unit of the City of Los Angeles. It occupies 7,500 acres (3,000 ha) of land and water with 43 miles (69 km) of waterfront and adjoins the separate Port of Long Beach. Promoted as "America's Port", the port is located in San Pedro Bay in the San Pedro and Wilmington neighborhoods of Los Angeles, approximately 20 miles (32 km) south of downtown.

Advocacy

Business

Baker was a part of the Manufacturers' Association in Los Angeles before it merged with the Merchants' Association to become the Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association, of which he was elected president in 1898. He was the first president of the Founders' and Employers' Association, later known as the Metal Trades Manufacturers' Association, which worked on behalf of maintaining the open shop in Los Angeles. He served until 1911.[1]

Auto Club

Baker helped organize the Automobile Club of Southern California, serving as its president from 1910 until 1920.[1] One of the club's campaigns, in 1914, was to prohibit the use of firearms on public highways because of the destruction wrought to directional signs erected by the Auto Club on roadsides. Baker said the matter had been "precipitated" by the "recent defacing of the transcontinental metal signs in the Cajon Pass, where motorists from the East will have their first glimpse of the Southern California roads which have made this part of the State famous."[23] In a newspaper column he said that the club maintained 7,600 signs over 5,000 miles of road.[24]

Another project favored by Baker was his suggestion to take sand from the Los Angeles River bed and spread it over city streets during rainy weather. He said that in London, England, it had "become the custom for the Boy Scouts, during foggy or rainy weather, to spread out over the city, sprinkling the streets with a thin film of sand, which they carry in bags strapped to their backs," but he suggested that in Los Angeles "the sand be spread on the … streets by means of a whirling sand spray attached to a light automobile truck."[25]

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Employers Group

Employers Group

Employers Group was founded as the Merchants and Manufacturers Association (M&M) in 1896 in California. It has become a worldwide organization advocating for employers and giving guidance about employment laws and regulations, professional development, consulting projects, and compensation and workplace trends surveys.

Open shop

Open shop

An open shop is a place of employment at which one is not required to join or financially support a union as a condition of hiring or continued employment.

Automobile Club of Southern California

Automobile Club of Southern California

The Automobile Club of Southern California is the Southern California affiliate of the American Automobile Association (AAA) federation of motor clubs. The Auto Club was founded on December 13, 1900, in Los Angeles as one of the nation's first motor clubs dedicated to improving roads, proposing traffic laws, and improvement of overall driving conditions. Today, it is the single largest member of the AAA federation, with almost 8 million members in its home territory of Southern California, more than 16 million members across all subsidiaries in 21 states, and an annual budget in excess of $2 billion.

Cajon Pass

Cajon Pass

Cajon Pass is a mountain pass between the San Bernardino Mountains to the east and the San Gabriel Mountains to the west in Southern California. Created by the movements of the San Andreas Fault, it has an elevation of 3,777 ft (1,151 m). Located in the Mojave Desert, the pass is an important link from the Greater San Bernardino Area to the Victor Valley, and northeast to Las Vegas. The Cajon Pass area is on the Pacific Crest Trail.

Southern California

Southern California

Southern California is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. It includes the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the second most populous urban agglomeration in the United States. The region generally contains ten of California's 58 counties: Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties.

Los Angeles River

Los Angeles River

The Los Angeles River, historically known as the Porciúncula River, is a major river in Los Angeles County, California. Its headwaters are in the Simi Hills and Santa Susana Mountains, and it flows nearly 51 miles (82 km) from Canoga Park through the San Fernando Valley, Downtown Los Angeles, and the Gateway Cities to its mouth in Long Beach, where it flows into San Pedro Bay. While the river was once free-flowing and frequently flooding, forming alluvial flood plains along its banks, it is currently notable for flowing through a concrete channel on a fixed course, which was built after a series of devastating floods in the early 20th century.

Scouting and Guiding in the United Kingdom

Scouting and Guiding in the United Kingdom

Scouting and Guiding in the United Kingdom is served by several different organisations:The Scout Association, member of World Organization of the Scout Movement Girlguiding UK, member of World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts Trefoil Guild, corporate member of Girlguiding UK and member of International Scout and Guide Fellowship Baden-Powell Scouts' Association, member of World Federation of Independent Scouts Pathfinder Scouts Association and Rover Explorer Scouts Association European Scout Federation, member of Confédération Européenne de Scoutisme The British Boy Scouts and British Girl Scouts Association, member of Order of World Scouts Plast-Ukrainian Scouting in Great Britain Boys' Brigade Girls' Brigade Royal Rangers in The United Kingdom Pathfinders, a youth organisation of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, member of Pathfinders International British Camp Fire Girls' Association Adult Scout Alliance, which includes B-P Scout Guild Scotland and Baden-Powell Guild of Great Britain, member of International Scout and Guide Fellowship Student Scout and Guide Organisation Scout and Guide Graduate Association

Source: "Fred L. Baker", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_L._Baker.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Death Takes Fred L. Baker," Los Angeles Times,' January 10, 1927, page A-1
  2. ^ [1] "Baker Iron Works." Colorado & Southern Rolling Stock
  3. ^ a b "Funeral of F.L. Baker Tomorrow," Los Angeles Times, January 11, 1927, page A-5
  4. ^ "City News in Brief: Fred Baker, Grandfather," Los Angeles Times, September 29, 1913, page 18
  5. ^ "Better City Government," Los Angeles Times, July 26, 1896, page 27
  6. ^ a b "Protection Asked for Los Angeles," Los Angeles Times, April 29, 1898, page 10
  7. ^ Chronological Record of Los Angeles City Officials 1850–1938, Municipal Reference Library, March 1938, reprinted 1946
  8. ^ "Nicaragua Canal: Committees Appointed to Solicit Funds for Expenses," Los Angeles Times, December 22, 1898, page 11
  9. ^ [2] OwensValleyHistory.com
  10. ^ "Big Increase: Baker Iron Works to Be Doubled," Los Angeles Times, October 14, 1900, page III-9
  11. ^ a b "Complete Shake-Up: Mount Lowe Railway in the Hands of a New Manager," Los Angeles Times, July 4, 1896, page 21
  12. ^ "Unsecured Creditors: Mount Lowe Railway Creditors Hold a Session," Los Angeles Times, April 3, 1897, page 5
  13. ^ a b "Says Object Is to Win War," Los Angeles Times, June 28, 1918, page II-7
  14. ^ "To Build New Harbor Road," Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1918, page II-2
  15. ^ "No Conference With Unions," Los Angeles Times, June 7, 1919, page II-1
  16. ^ "For New Steamship Line," Los Angeles Times, September 18, 1920, page II-1
  17. ^ "Seek Delivery of Steamers," Los Angeles Times, May 16, 1922, page I-7
  18. ^ "Sea Fire Refugees on Way to Bay City Today". Los Angeles Times. 1922-10-13. p. I1.
  19. ^ "Rescue in Midocean Averts Huge Sea Tragedy; No Lives Lost as Passengers Leave Ship". Los Angeles Times. 1922-10-13. p. I7.
  20. ^ "Great Throng to Great Honolulu's Passengers". Los Angeles Times. 1922-10-16. p. I1.
  21. ^ "New Liner to Go on Run Soon," Los Angeles Times, October 17, 1922, page II-1
  22. ^ "Fred L. Baker to New Post," Los Angeles Times, June 20, 1924, page 8
  23. ^ "Highway Shots Unpopular Now," Los Angeles Times, November 22, 1914, page VII-4
  24. ^ Fred L. Baker, "Need for More Signposts to Guide Autoists Through Southern California," Los Angeles Times, February 28, 1915, page VII-3
  25. ^ "Has Panacea for Skidding," Los Angeles Times, December 24, 1915, page III-4

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