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Franklin County, Maine

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Franklin County
Franklin County Courthouse
Franklin County Courthouse
Map of Maine highlighting Franklin County
Location within the U.S. state of Maine
Map of the United States highlighting Maine
Maine's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 44°52′45″N 70°23′17″W / 44.879196°N 70.387917°W / 44.879196; -70.387917
Country United States
State Maine
FoundedMay 9, 1838
Named forBenjamin Franklin
SeatFarmington
Largest townFarmington
Area
 • Total1,743 sq mi (4,510 km2)
 • Land1,697 sq mi (4,400 km2)
 • Water47 sq mi (120 km2)  2.7%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total29,456 Decrease
 • Density17.4/sq mi (6.7/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitefranklincountymaine.gov

Franklin County is a county located in the state of Maine, in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 29,456,[1] making it the second-least populous county in Maine. Its county seat is Farmington.[2] The county was established on May 9, 1838 and named for Benjamin Franklin.[3]

Discover more about Franklin County, Maine related topics

County (United States)

County (United States)

In the United States, a county or county equivalent is an administrative or political subdivision of a state that consists of a geographic region with specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs, respectively. The specific governmental powers of counties vary widely between the states, with many providing some level of services to civil townships, municipalities, and unincorporated areas. Certain municipalities are in multiple counties; New York City is uniquely partitioned into five counties, referred to at the city government level as boroughs. Some municipalities have consolidated with their county government to form consolidated city-counties, or have been legally separated from counties altogether to form independent cities. Conversely, those counties in Connecticut, Rhode Island, eight of Massachusetts's 14 counties, and Alaska's Unorganized Borough have no government power, existing only as geographic distinctions.

U.S. state

U.S. state

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory where it shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders.

Maine

Maine

Maine is the easternmost state in the New England region of the Northeastern United States. It borders New Hampshire to the west, the Gulf of Maine to the southeast, and the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec to the northeast and northwest, respectively. The largest state by total area in New England, Maine is the 12th-smallest by area, the 9th-least populous, the 13th-least densely populated, and the most rural of the 50 U.S. states. It is also the northeasternmost among the contiguous United States, the northernmost state east of the Great Lakes, the only state whose name consists of a single syllable, and the only state to border exactly one other U.S. state. Approximately half the area of Maine lies on each side of the 45th parallel north in latitude. The most populous city in Maine is Portland, while its capital is Augusta.

United States

United States

The United States of America, commonly known as the United States or America, is a country primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 states, a federal district, five major unincorporated territories, nine Minor Outlying Islands, and 326 Indian reservations. The United States is also in free association with three Pacific Island sovereign states: the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau. It is the world's third-largest country by both land and total area. It shares land borders with Canada to its north and with Mexico to its south and has maritime borders with the Bahamas, Cuba, Russia, and other nations. With a population of over 333 million, it is the most populous country in the Americas and the third most populous in the world. The national capital of the United States is Washington, D.C. and its most populous city and principal financial center is New York City.

County seat

County seat

A county seat is an administrative center, seat of government, or capital city of a county or civil parish. The term is in use in Canada, China, Hungary, Romania, Taiwan, and the United States. The equivalent term shire town is used in the US state of Vermont and in some other English-speaking jurisdictions. County towns have a similar function in the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom, as well as historically in Jamaica.

Farmington, Maine

Farmington, Maine

Farmington is a town in and the county seat of Franklin County, Maine, United States. As of the 2020 census, its population was 7,592. Farmington is home to the University of Maine at Farmington, Nordica Memorial Auditorium, the Nordica Homestead, and the annual Farmington Fair.

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin Franklin was an American polymath who was active as a writer, scientist, inventor, statesman, diplomat, printer, publisher, forger and political philosopher. Among the leading intellectuals of his time, Franklin was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, a drafter and signer of the United States Declaration of Independence, and the first United States Postmaster General.

History

Franklin County was formed on 9 May 1838 from portions of Kennebec, Oxford and Somerset counties. Smaller adjustments were made during the following fourteen years.[4]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,743 square miles (4,510 km2), of which 1,697 square miles (4,400 km2) is land and 47 square miles (120 km2) (2.7%) is water.[5] The county high point is Sugarloaf Mountain, the ski mountain in Carrabassett Valley whose elevation is 4237 feet.

Adjacent counties and municipalities

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Sugarloaf Mountain (Franklin County, Maine)

Sugarloaf Mountain (Franklin County, Maine)

Sugarloaf Mountain is a ski mountain located in Carrabassett Valley, Franklin County, Maine. It is the third highest peak in the state, after Mount Katahdin's Baxter and Hamlin peaks. Sugarloaf is flanked to the south by Spaulding Mountain.

Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Carrabassett Valley is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 673 at the 2020 census.

Somerset County, Maine

Somerset County, Maine

Somerset County is a county in the state of Maine, in the United States. As of the 2020 census, the population was 50,477. Its county seat is Skowhegan.

Kennebec County, Maine

Kennebec County, Maine

Kennebec County is a county located in the South-central portion of the U.S. state of Maine. At the 2020 census, the population was 123,642. Its county seat is Augusta, the state capital. The county was established on February 20, 1799, from portions of Cumberland and Lincoln Counties. The name Kennebec comes from the Eastern Abenaki /kínipekʷ/, meaning "large body of still water, large bay."

Androscoggin County, Maine

Androscoggin County, Maine

Androscoggin County is a county in the U.S. state of Maine. As of the 2020 census, the county's population was 111,139. Its county seat is Auburn and its largest city is Lewiston.

Oxford County, Maine

Oxford County, Maine

Oxford County is a county in the state of Maine, United States. As of the 2020 Census, the county had a population of 57,777. Its county seat is the town of Paris. The county was formed on March 4, 1805, by the Massachusetts General Court in the Maine District from northerly portions of York and Cumberland counties. It borders the Canadian province of Quebec. Part of Oxford County is included in the Lewiston-Auburn, Maine metropolitan New England City and Town Area while a different part of Oxford County is included in the Portland-South Portland-Biddeford, Maine metropolitan New England City and Town Area.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
184020,801
185020,027−3.7%
186020,4031.9%
187018,807−7.8%
188018,180−3.3%
189017,053−6.2%
190018,4448.2%
191019,1193.7%
192019,8253.7%
193019,9410.6%
194019,896−0.2%
195020,6824.0%
196020,069−3.0%
197022,44411.8%
198027,09820.7%
199029,0087.0%
200029,4671.6%
201030,7684.4%
202029,456−4.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2016[10]

2015

As of 2015 the largest self-reported ancestry groups in Franklin County, Maine are:[11]

Largest ancestries (2015) Percent
English England 22.4%
French or French Canadian France 19.1%
Irish Republic of Ireland 14.9%
"American" United States 8.5%
German Germany 6.1%
Scottish Scotland 5.0%
Italian Italy 4.2%
Scots-Irish Ulster 1.7%

2000 census

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 29,467 people, 11,806 households, and 7,744 families living in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (7/km2). There were 19,159 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile (4/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 97.96% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. 0.54% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 26.3% were of English, 13.8% United States or American, 12.2% French, 9.2% Irish, 7.9% French Canadian, and 5.3% Scottish ancestry according to Census 2000. 95.7% spoke English and 2.9% French as their first language.

There were 11,806 households, out of which 29.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.40% were married couples living together, 9.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.40% were non-families. 25.80% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 23.50% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 26.40% from 25 to 44, 24.80% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,459, and the median income for a family was $37,863. Males had a median income of $30,475 versus $20,442 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,796. About 10.70% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.90% of those under age 18 and 9.50% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 30,768 people, 13,000 households, and 8,129 families living in the county.[13] The population density was 18.1 inhabitants per square mile (7.0/km2). There were 21,709 housing units at an average density of 12.8 per square mile (4.9/km2).[14] The racial makeup of the county was 97.3% white, 0.4% Asian, 0.4% American Indian, 0.2% black or African American, 0.2% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.0% of the population.[13] In terms of ancestry, 23.3% were English, 14.2% were Irish, 7.7% were French Canadian, 7.5% were German, 6.4% were Scottish, and 5.0% were American.[15]

Of the 13,000 households, 26.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 37.5% were non-families, and 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.76. The median age was 43.4 years.[13]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,831 and the median income for a family was $48,634. Males had a median income of $38,563 versus $30,024 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,838. About 10.2% of families and 15.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.2% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.[16]

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1840 United States census

1840 United States census

The United States census of 1840 was the sixth census of the United States. Conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1840, it determined the resident population of the United States to be 17,069,453 – an increase of 32.7 percent over the 12,866,020 persons enumerated during the 1830 census. The total population included 2,487,355 slaves. In 1840, the center of population was about 260 miles (418 km) west of Washington, near Weston, Virginia.

1850 United States census

1850 United States census

The United States census of 1850 was the seventh census of the United States. Conducted by the Census Office, it determined the resident population of the United States to be 23,191,876—an increase of 35.9 percent over the 17,069,453 persons enumerated during the 1840 census. The total population included 3,204,313 slaves.

1860 United States census

1860 United States census

The United States census of 1860 was the eighth census conducted in the United States starting June 1, 1860, and lasting five months. It determined the population of the United States to be 31,443,322 in 33 states and 10 organized territories. This was an increase of 35.4 percent over the 23,069,876 persons enumerated during the 1850 census. The total population included 3,953,762 slaves.

1870 United States census

1870 United States census

The United States census of 1870 was the ninth United States census. It was conducted by the Census Bureau from June 1, 1870, to August 23, 1871. The 1870 census was the first census to provide detailed information on the African American population, only five years after the culmination of the Civil War when slaves were granted freedom. The total population was 38,925,598 with a resident population of 38,558,371 individuals, a 22.6% increase from 1860.

1880 United States census

1880 United States census

The United States census of 1880 conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880 was the tenth United States census. It was the first time that women were permitted to be enumerators. The Superintendent of the Census was Francis Amasa Walker. This was the first census in which a city—New York City—recorded a population of over one million.

1890 United States census

1890 United States census

The United States census of 1890 was taken beginning June 2, 1890, but most of the 1890 census materials were destroyed in 1921 when a building caught fire and in the subsequent disposal of the remaining damaged records. It determined the resident population of the United States to be 62,979,766—an increase of 25.5 percent over the 50,189,209 persons enumerated during the 1880 census. The data reported that the distribution of the population had resulted in the disappearance of the American frontier.

1900 United States census

1900 United States census

The United States census of 1900, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.01% from the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 census.

1910 United States census

1910 United States census

The United States census of 1910, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 census. The 1910 census switched from a portrait page orientation to a landscape orientation.

1920 United States census

1920 United States census

The United States census of 1920, conducted by the Census Bureau during one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 census.

1930 United States census

1930 United States census

The United States census of 1930, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 census.

1940 United States census

1940 United States census

The United States census of 1940, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 132,164,569, an increase of 7.6 percent over the 1930 population of 122,775,046 people. The census date of record was April 1, 1940.

1950 United States census

1950 United States census

The United States census of 1950, conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States to be 150,697,361, an increase of 14.5 percent over the 131,669,275 persons enumerated during the 1940 census.

Politics

Voter registration

Voter registration and party enrollment as of May 2019 [17]
Unenrolled 8,693 35.87%
Democratic 6,768 27.93%
Republican 7,594 31.33%
Green Independent 1,177 4.86%
Libertarian 4 0.02%
Total 24,236 100%
United States presidential election results for Franklin County, Maine[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 8,754 50.34% 8,069 46.40% 567 3.26%
2016 7,918 48.02% 7,016 42.55% 1,554 9.43%
2012 6,369 39.12% 9,367 57.53% 546 3.35%
2008 6,627 38.58% 10,113 58.87% 438 2.55%
2004 7,378 42.74% 9,465 54.83% 418 2.42%
2000 6,459 41.81% 7,593 49.15% 1,396 9.04%
1996 3,757 25.74% 7,759 53.16% 3,080 21.10%
1992 4,608 27.89% 6,739 40.79% 5,176 31.33%
1988 7,180 54.16% 5,960 44.96% 116 0.88%
1984 8,330 62.40% 4,954 37.11% 65 0.49%
1980 5,680 46.83% 4,979 41.05% 1,469 12.11%
1976 5,799 50.94% 5,140 45.15% 445 3.91%
1972 5,958 66.50% 2,988 33.35% 14 0.16%
1968 4,127 48.01% 4,307 50.10% 162 1.88%
1964 2,887 33.29% 5,784 66.69% 2 0.02%
1960 6,136 65.00% 3,304 35.00% 0 0.00%
1956 6,307 78.97% 1,680 21.03% 0 0.00%
1952 5,885 73.23% 2,137 26.59% 14 0.17%
1948 3,741 63.19% 2,135 36.06% 44 0.74%
1944 4,127 60.90% 2,646 39.04% 4 0.06%
1940 4,548 58.47% 3,224 41.44% 7 0.09%
1936 4,957 62.53% 2,859 36.06% 112 1.41%
1932 4,521 58.46% 3,171 41.01% 41 0.53%
1928 4,923 76.54% 1,487 23.12% 22 0.34%
1924 3,389 72.40% 1,123 23.99% 169 3.61%
1920 3,820 69.13% 1,668 30.18% 38 0.69%
1916 1,988 49.89% 1,908 47.88% 89 2.23%
1912 668 17.57% 1,421 37.37% 1,714 45.07%
1908 2,173 68.40% 930 29.27% 74 2.33%
1904 2,135 72.25% 755 25.55% 65 2.20%
1900 2,235 65.99% 1,085 32.03% 67 1.98%
1896 2,578 72.60% 886 24.95% 87 2.45%
1892 1,964 55.50% 1,456 41.14% 119 3.36%
1888 2,485 60.95% 1,518 37.23% 74 1.82%
1884 2,387 57.80% 1,375 33.29% 368 8.91%
1880 2,390 51.49% 2,178 46.92% 74 1.59%
1876 2,116 57.58% 1,559 42.42% 0 0.00%
1872 2,187 70.30% 924 29.70% 0 0.00%
1868 2,429 63.32% 1,407 36.68% 0 0.00%
1864 2,248 55.67% 1,790 44.33% 0 0.00%
1856 2,529 64.71% 1,358 34.75% 21 0.54%
1852 997 34.34% 1,310 45.13% 596 20.53%
1848 886 28.33% 1,431 45.76% 810 25.90%
1844 1,132 36.13% 1,609 51.36% 392 12.51%
1840 1,848 47.05% 2,058 52.39% 22 0.56%

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2016 United States presidential election in Maine

2016 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2016 United States presidential election in Maine was held on Tuesday, November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Maine voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote, pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and her running mate Virginia Senator Tim Kaine. Maine has four electoral votes in the Electoral College. Unlike all other states except Nebraska, Maine awards two electoral votes based on the statewide vote, and one vote for each congressional district. The last time it did so was in 1828.

2012 United States presidential election in Maine

2012 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2012 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 6, 2012, as part of the 2012 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Maine voters chose four electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama and his running mate, Vice President Joe Biden, against Republican challenger and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and his running mate, Congressman Paul Ryan. Obama and Biden carried Maine with 56.27% of the popular vote to Romney's and Ryan's 40.98%, thus winning the state's four electoral votes.

2008 United States presidential election in Maine

2008 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2008 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 4, 2008, and was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Maine is one of two states in the U.S. that instead of all of the state's four electors of the Electoral College to vote based upon the statewide results of the voters, two of the individual electors vote based on their congressional district because Maine has two congressional districts. The other two electors vote based upon the statewide results. See below in the section of Electors for more information.

2004 United States presidential election in Maine

2004 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2004 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 2, 2004, and was part of the 2004 United States presidential election. Starting which, Maine is one of two states in the U.S. that instead of all of the state's four electors of the Electoral College to vote based upon the statewide results of the voters, two of the individual electors vote based on their congressional district because Maine has two congressional districts. The other two electors vote based upon the statewide results.

2000 United States presidential election in Maine

2000 United States presidential election in Maine

The 2000 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 7, 2000, and was part of the 2000 United States presidential election. Maine is one of two states in the U.S. that instead of all of the state's four electors of the Electoral College to vote based upon the statewide results of the voters, two of the individual electors vote based on their congressional district because Maine has two congressional districts. The other two electors vote based upon the statewide results.

1996 United States presidential election in Maine

1996 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1996 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 5, 1996, as part of the 1996 United States presidential election. Maine is one of two states in the U.S. that chooses two of its four representatives in the Electoral College based on the plurality vote in both its congressional districts instead of all four electors being chosen based on the statewide plurality vote.

1992 United States presidential election in Maine

1992 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1992 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 3, 1992, as part of the 1992 United States presidential election. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

1988 United States presidential election in Maine

1988 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1988 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 8, 1988, as part of the 1988 United States presidential election, which was held throughout all 50 states and D.C. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

1984 United States presidential election in Maine

1984 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1984 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 6, 1984. All fifty states and the District of Columbia, were part of the 1984 United States presidential election. Voters chose four electors to the Electoral College, which selected the president and vice president of the United States. Maine was won by incumbent United States President Ronald Reagan of California, who was running against former Vice President Walter Mondale of Minnesota. Reagan ran for a second time with former C.I.A. Director George H. W. Bush of Texas, and Mondale ran with Representative Geraldine Ferraro of New York, the first major female candidate for the vice presidency.

1980 United States presidential election in Maine

1980 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1980 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 4, 1980. All fifty states and The District of Columbia were part of the 1980 United States presidential election. Voters chose four electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president. Maine was won by former California Governor Ronald Reagan (R) by a slim margin of 3%, carrying fourteen out of sixteen counties. In recent years, however, the state has grown much more liberal, and no Republican presidential nominee has carried it since 1988.

1976 United States presidential election in Maine

1976 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1976 presidential election in Maine took place on November 2, 1976, as part of the 1976 United States presidential election, which took place across all 50 states plus the District of Columbia. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the electoral college, to vote for president and vice president.

1972 United States presidential election in Maine

1972 United States presidential election in Maine

The 1972 United States presidential election in Maine took place on November 7, 1972, as part of the 1972 United States presidential election which was held throughout all fifty states and the District of Columbia. Voters chose four representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Government

Franklin County is governed by a three-member county commission. Commissioners meet at 10am on the first and third Monday of each month and are elected in the November general election, serving four year terms. Currently, the three commissioners are:[19]

District One: Gary McGrane (Jay, Wilton, Temple, Carthage)

District Two: Charles Webster (Farmington, Chesterville, New Sharon)

District Three: Clyde Barker (Avon, Carrabassett Valley, Coplin Plantation, Dallas Plantation, Eustis, Industry, Kingfield, New Vineyard, Phillips, Rangeley Plantation, Rangeley, Sandy River Plantation, Strong, Weld, and unorganized territories of East Central Franklin, North Franklin, South Franklin, West Central Franklin and Wyman)

Commissioner Charles Webster was appointed by Governor Paul LePage in 2015 to serve out the rest of Fred Hardy's term, who died on July 4.[20] Webster and Barker are members of the Republican Party, while McGrane belongs to the Democratic Party.

Franklin County belongs to Maine Prosecutorial District Three, which is composed of Franklin, Oxford and Androscoggin Counties. The current district attorney is Andrew S. Robinson, of Farmington who was elected to his first term in 2014. The deputy district attorney is James A. Andrews, who was appointed to that post by Robinson in 2015.[21]

The current county treasurer is Pamela Prodan. She was elected to that position in 2014 and will serve a four term through December 2018. Prodan succeed Mary Frank, who decided to retire instead of run for a second term. The duties of county treasurer include, overseeing fiscal accounting matters, including paying bills, collecting amounts owed the County, reserve/investment accounts, maintaining the County's financial records and other matters related to the County's finances.[22]

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Paul LePage

Paul LePage

Paul Richard LePage is an American politician who served as the 74th Governor of Maine from 2011 to 2019. A member of the Republican Party, LePage served two terms as a city councilor in Waterville, Maine, before being elected Mayor of Waterville in 2004, serving until 2011.

Republican Party (United States)

Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. The GOP was founded in 1854 by anti-slavery activists who opposed the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which allowed for the potential expansion of chattel slavery into the western territories. It has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party since the mid-1850s. Like them, the Republican Party is a big tent of competing and often opposing ideologies. Presently, the Republican Party contains prominent conservative, centrist, populist, and right-libertarian factions.

Democratic Party (United States)

Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States. Founded in 1828, it was predominantly built by Martin Van Buren, who assembled politicians in every state behind war hero Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s, with both parties being big tents of competing and often opposing viewpoints. Modern American liberalism — a variant of social liberalism — is the party's majority ideology. The party also has notable centrist, social democratic, and left-libertarian factions.

Farmington, Maine

Farmington, Maine

Farmington is a town in and the county seat of Franklin County, Maine, United States. As of the 2020 census, its population was 7,592. Farmington is home to the University of Maine at Farmington, Nordica Memorial Auditorium, the Nordica Homestead, and the annual Farmington Fair.

Law enforcement

Only five municipalities in Franklin County have their own police department (Carrabassett Valley, Farmington, Jay, Rangeley, and Wilton). The Franklin County Sheriff's Department is responsible for patrol and emergency calls in the remaining communities in the county without their own agency. The current sheriff is Scott Nichols, of New Sharon. Nichols was elected to that post in November 2012, defeating incumbent sheriff, Dennis Pike. Pike had spent 46 years in Franklin County law enforcement prior to being defeated by Nichols.[23]

The status of the Franklin County Jail has been contentiously debated issue within the county and state for several years. In 2008, Governor John Baldacci signed into law a bill which consolidated county jails in an effort to reduce costs. As a result, the Franklin County jail was designated a 72-hour holding facility. Any inmates who needed to be held longer than the three-day maximum had to be transported to the Somerset County Jail in East Madison, which county jail officials said was a waste of department time and money. Jail consolidation has also led to jail overcrowding statewide.[24] When the Somerset Jail reached its maximum capacity, inmates were forced to be transported to another jail within the state, sometimes hours away which Franklin County officials again said wasted time and money.

In 2012, the Somerset County Commissioners voted not to accept any more inmates from outside the county as the state Board of Corrections withheld its third quarter payment. While the vote allowed current inmates to stay at the jail, it required all future inmates to be sent to Two Bridges Regional Jail in Wiscasset. In 2013, the Maine Legislature's Public Safety and Criminal Justice Committee voted 11-0 to allow the Franklin County jail to return to full service status.[25]

In 2014, the Franklin County Commissioners voted to withhold all payments to the state for jail inmates. Public outrage over the jail issue also pressured the state to give the county full service rights. In 2014 an 800-member Facebook group was created and several protests were staged in front of the county courthouse. In 2015, the State Board of Corrections voted to grant the county a fully operational jail, officially ending the seven year conflict between the county and the state.[26]

Communities

Smalls Falls Rest Area on Route 4 just south of Rangeley, Maine
Smalls Falls Rest Area on Route 4 just south of Rangeley, Maine

Towns

Plantations

Census-designated places

Unorganized territories

Unincorporated communities

Discover more about Communities related topics

Avon, Maine

Avon, Maine

Avon is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 450 at the 2020 census. Avon is home to Mount Blue, part of Mount Blue State Park.

Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Carrabassett Valley, Maine

Carrabassett Valley is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 673 at the 2020 census.

Carthage, Maine

Carthage, Maine

Carthage is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 509 at the 2020 census.

Chesterville, Maine

Chesterville, Maine

Chesterville is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 1,328 at the 2020 census.

Eustis, Maine

Eustis, Maine

Eustis is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 641 at the 2020 census. Eustis, which includes the village of Stratton, is a popular recreation area.

Farmington, Maine

Farmington, Maine

Farmington is a town in and the county seat of Franklin County, Maine, United States. As of the 2020 census, its population was 7,592. Farmington is home to the University of Maine at Farmington, Nordica Memorial Auditorium, the Nordica Homestead, and the annual Farmington Fair.

Industry, Maine

Industry, Maine

Industry is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 788 at the 2020 census. It was named from the industrious habits of its citizens.

Jay, Maine

Jay, Maine

Jay is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 4,620 at the 2020 United States Census. Jay includes the village of Chisholm.

Kingfield, Maine

Kingfield, Maine

Kingfield is a town in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 960 at the 2020 census. Kingfield, the primary village in the town, is a census-designated place.

New Sharon, Maine

New Sharon, Maine

New Sharon is a town in Franklin County, Maine, incorporated in 1794. The population was 1,458 at the 2020 census. The town is roughly bisected by the Sandy River, a tributary of the Kennebec River.

Coplin Plantation, Maine

Coplin Plantation, Maine

Coplin Plantation is a plantation in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 131 at the 2020 census.

Dallas Plantation, Maine

Dallas Plantation, Maine

Dallas Plantation is a plantation in Franklin County, Maine, United States. The population was 304 at the 2020 census.

Source: "Franklin County, Maine", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franklin_County,_Maine.

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References
  1. ^ "Census - Geography Profile: Franklin County, Maine". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 21, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 131.
  4. ^ Maine – An Encyclopedia: Franklin County. Accessed 20 Feb 2023.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 9, 2014. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 27, 2010. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  10. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved August 19, 2013.
  11. ^ Bureau, U.S. Census. "American FactFinder - Results". factfinder.census.gov. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  13. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  14. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  15. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  16. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  17. ^ Bureau of Corporations, Elections & Commissions (May 5, 2019). "Registered & Enrolled Voters - Statewide" (PDF). Department of the Secretary of State, State of Maine. p. 11. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 7, 2019. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  19. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  20. ^ Perry, Donna M.; Journal, Sun. "LePage appoints Charlie Webster as Franklin County commissioner". The Bangor Daily News. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  21. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  22. ^ "franklincountyme-gov". franklincountyme-gov. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  23. ^ Schroeder, Karen (December 30, 2012). "After 46 years, Franklin County Sheriff Dennis Pike hits the road". Central Maine. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  24. ^ "Overcrowding intensifies problems at Maine's county jails - The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram". The Portland Press Herald / Maine Sunday Telegram. January 19, 2015. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  25. ^ "Bill to return local jail to full service fails; Somerset County refuses Franklin County's detainees | Daily Bulldog". www.dailybulldog.com. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  26. ^ Schroeder, Kaitlin (January 13, 2015). "Franklin County jail to return to full-time lockup status". Central Maine. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
External links

Coordinates: 44°59′N 70°26′W / 44.98°N 70.44°W / 44.98; -70.44

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