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Fonthill (1783 ship)

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History
French Navy EnsignFrance
Launched1781[1]
Captured1782
Great Britain
NameFonthill
Owner
  • 1783:Wildman & Co.[1]
  • 1791:Shodbread & Co., or Schoolbred[2]
  • 1796:W. Sims,[3] or Simms
Acquiredc.1782 (by purchase?)
FateLast listed in 1810
General characteristics
Tons burthen266,[3] or 300,[1] or 313[4] (bm)
Armament6 × 6-pounder guns[5]

Fonthill was a ship built in France in 1781 and was probably taken in prize in 1782. Fonthill sailed as a West Indiaman between 1783 and 1791, then became a whaler southern whale fishery and made four whaling voyages between 1791 and 1799. On her third voyage she took back from Cape Town a Dutch captain whose vessel had been captured bringing in arms and ammunition from Batavia to stir up unrest against the British at the Cape. After refitting, in 1800, Fonthill became a whaler in the northern whale fishery. Fonthill was last listed, with stale data, in 1810, but whose last reported whaling voyage took place in 1806.

Discover more about Fonthill (1783 ship) related topics

West Indiaman

Fonthill entered Lloyd's Register in 1783 with P. Seward, master, Wildman & Co., owner, and trade London–Jamaica.[1]

Southern whaler

Lloyd's Register for 1791 showed Fonthill with P. Seward, master, changing to Pinkham, Wildman, owner, changing to Shodbread, and trade London–Jamaica, changing to London–South Seas.[6]

1st southern whaling voyage (1791-1793): Captain Elisha Pinkham sailed from London on 4 December 1791, bound for the Pacific.[a] In 1792 Fonthill sailed in company in the Pacific with the American whaler Rebecca, Seth Folger, master.[7] Fonthill returned to London on 4 July 1793 with 86 tuns of sperm oil, six tuns of whale oil, and 11,476 seal skins.[3]

2nd southern whaling voyage (1793-1795): Captain Jethro Daggett sailed from London in 1793, bound for Peru. Fonthill returned on 19 December 1795 with 105 tuns of sperm oil, 104 tuns of whale oil, and 78 Cwt. of whale bone.[3]

3rd southern whaling voyage (1796-1797): Captain William Allen Day sailed from London on 30 November 1796.[3] Fonthill arrived at the Cape of Good Hope on 12 October 1797 from Delagoa Bay.[8] She sailed two days later with a prisoner, Jacob de Freyn (or Joh. de Frein). Governor Macartney, of the Cape Colony, was sending him back to be detained in England for as long as possible.[b] Fonthill arrived back at London on 19 December 1797.[3]

4th southern whaling voyage (1798-1799): Captain Day sailed from London in 1798, bound for the east coast of Africa. Fonthill returned on 12 November 1799.[3]

Discover more about Southern whaler related topics

Barrel

Barrel

A barrel or cask is a hollow cylindrical container with a bulging center, longer than it is wide. They are traditionally made of wooden staves and bound by wooden or metal hoops. The word vat is often used for large containers for liquids, usually alcoholic beverages; a small barrel or cask is known as a keg.

Sperm oil

Sperm oil

Sperm oil is a waxy liquid obtained from sperm whales. It is a clear, yellowish liquid with a very faint odor. Sperm oil has a different composition from common whale oil, obtained from rendered blubber. Although it is traditionally called an "oil", it is technically a liquid wax. It is composed of wax esters with a small proportion of triglycerides, an ester of an unsaturated fatty acid, and a branched-chain fatty alcohol. It is a natural antioxidant and heat-transfer agent. In the late-18th and early-19th centuries, sperm oil was prized as an illuminant for its bright, odorless flame and as a lubricant for its low viscosity and stability. It was supplanted in the late 19th century by less expensive alternatives such as kerosene and petroleum-based lubricants. With the 1987 international ban on whaling, sperm oil is no longer legally sold.

Hundredweight

Hundredweight

The hundredweight, formerly also known as the centum weight or quintal, is a British imperial and US customary unit of weight or mass. Its value differs between the US and British imperial systems. The two values are distinguished in American English as the "short" and "long" hundredweight and in British English as the "cental" and the "imperial hundredweight".The short hundredweight or cental of 100 pounds (45.36 kg) is used in the United States. The long or imperial hundredweight of 8 stone or 112 pounds (50.80 kg) is defined in the imperial system.

Baleen

Baleen

Baleen is a filter-feeding system inside the mouths of baleen whales. To use baleen, the whale first opens its mouth underwater to take in water. The whale then pushes the water out, and animals such as krill are filtered by the baleen and remain as a food source for the whale. Baleen is similar to bristles and consists of keratin, the same substance found in human fingernails, skin and hair. Baleen is a skin derivative. Some whales, such as the bowhead whale, have longer baleen than others. Other whales, such as the gray whale, only use one side of their baleen. These baleen bristles are arranged in plates across the upper jaw of whales.

Cape of Good Hope

Cape of Good Hope

The Cape of Good Hope is a rocky headland on the Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula in South Africa.

Maputo Bay

Maputo Bay

Maputo Bay, formerly also known as Delagoa Bay from Baía da Lagoa in Portuguese, is an inlet of the Indian Ocean on the coast of Mozambique, between 25° 40' and 26° 20' S, with a length from north to south of over 90 km long and 32 km wide.

Cape Colony

Cape Colony

The Cape Colony, also known as the Cape of Good Hope, was a British colony in present-day South Africa named after the Cape of Good Hope, which existed from 1795 to 1802, and again from 1806 to 1910, when it united with three other colonies to form the Union of South Africa.

Northern whaler

Fonthill left the Register of Shipping in 1801, but re-entered in 1802 with Peacock, master, W. Sims, owner, and trade London–Greenland. She had been almost rebuilt in 1800 with new top and sides, and some repair of damages.[4]

The Register of Shipping for 1806 showed Fonthill with Robinson, master, W. Sims, owner, and trade London–Greenland. She had undergone damage repairs in 1802, 1803, and 1804.[5]

In July 1804, Fonthill, Kitchen, master, returned to London from the northern fisheries having taken four "fish" (whales).

In July 1805, Fonthill, "of and for London", was reported to have returned from the whaling grounds at Davis Strait as a "full ship", having taken ten fish.

In early July 1806, Fonthill, of London, Peacock, master, was reported to have returned with four fish.

Fate

Fonthill was last listed in the Register of Shipping in 1806, and in Lloyd's Register in 1810, with stale data.

Source: "Fonthill (1783 ship)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fonthill_(1783_ship).

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Notes
  1. ^ Pinkham was a Nantucket Quaker.
  2. ^ de Freyn had been captain of a brig, a packet, belonging to the Dutch East India Company: (Haasje; Hare) that had been fitted out at Batavia by the Dutch to sail to Delagoa Bay to land arms and ammunition to be transferred to Graaff-Reinet to raise unrest there against the British. The Portuguese had seized the brig at Delagoa and put de Freyn on Fonthill, which carried him to the Cape.[9] Macartney wrote to War Secretary Henry Dundas, advising that the British government should delay releasing or exchanging de Freyn as he was a "very shrewd and dangerous fellow".[10] Actually, the British whaler Hope had seized Hare and a prize crew had brought her into the Cape.[11]
References
  • Clayton, Jane M (2014). Ships employed in the South Sea Whale Fishery from Britain: 1775–1815: An alphabetical list of ships. Berforts Group. ISBN 9781908616524.
  • Stackpole, Edouard A. (1972). Whales: the rivalry between America, France, and Britain for control of the southern whale fishery, 1785-1825. University of Massachusetts. ISBN 978-0870231049.
  • Theal, George McCall, ed. (1898). Records of the Cape Colony: Dec 1796-Dec. 1799. Government of the Cape Colony.

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