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Floyd Patterson

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Floyd Patterson
Floyd Patterson 1962b.jpg
Floyd Patterson in January 1962
Statistics
Nickname(s)The Gentleman of Boxing
Weight(s)
Height5 ft 11+12 in (182 cm)[1][2]
Reach69+12 in (177 cm)[3][4]
Born(1935-01-04)January 4, 1935
Waco, North Carolina, U.S.
DiedMay 11, 2006(2006-05-11) (aged 71)
New Paltz, New York, U.S.
StanceOrthodox
Boxing record
Total fights64
Wins55
Wins by KO40
Losses8
Draws1

Floyd Patterson (January 4, 1935 – May 11, 2006) was an American professional boxer who competed from 1952 to 1972, and twice reigned as the world heavyweight champion between 1956 and 1962. At the age of 21, he became the youngest boxer in history to win the title, and was also the first heavyweight to regain the title after losing it. As an amateur, he won a gold medal in the middleweight division at the 1952 Summer Olympics.

In 1956 and 1960, Patterson was voted Fighter of the Year by The Ring magazine and the Boxing Writers Association of America. He was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.

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Heavyweight

Heavyweight

Heavyweight is a weight class in combat sports and professional wrestling.

Amateur boxing

Amateur boxing

Amateur boxing is a variant of boxing practiced at the collegiate level, at the Olympic Games, Pan American Games and Commonwealth Games, as well as many associations.

Middleweight

Middleweight

Middleweight is a weight class in combat sports.

1952 Summer Olympics

1952 Summer Olympics

The 1952 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XV Olympiad and commonly known as Helsinki 1952, were an international multi-sport event held from 19 July to 3 August 1952 in Helsinki, Finland.

The Ring magazine Fighter of the Year

The Ring magazine Fighter of the Year

The Ring magazine was established in 1922 and has named a Fighter of the Year since 1928, which this list covers. The award, selected by the magazine editors, is based on a boxer's performance in the ring.

Sugar Ray Robinson Award

Sugar Ray Robinson Award

The Sugar Ray Robinson Award is given to the Boxing Writers Association of America's Fighter of the Year.

International Boxing Hall of Fame

International Boxing Hall of Fame

The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame (IBHOF), located in Canastota, New York, honors boxers, trainers and other contributors to the sport worldwide. Inductees are selected by members of the Boxing Writers Association of America. The IBHOF started as a 1990 initiative by Ed Brophy to honour Canastota's world boxing champions, Carmen Basilio and Basilio's nephew, Billy Backus; the village of Canastota inaugurated the new museum, which showcases boxing's rich history. It is visited by boxing fans from all over the world.

Early life

Born January 4, 1935,[5] into a poor family in Waco, North Carolina, Patterson was one of eleven children. Savannah Joe Patterson was his first cousin from out of Arkansas, he went and visited during the early summer years. He experienced an insular and troubled childhood. His family moved to Brooklyn, New York, where Floyd was a truant and a petty thief. At age 10, he was sent to the Wiltwyck School for Boys, a reform School in West Park, New York, which he credited with turning his life around. He stayed there for almost two years. He attended high school in New Paltz, New York where he succeeded in all sports.[6]

Patterson took up boxing at age fourteen, and was training with the Bedford-Stuyvesant Boxing Association Gym.[7] Three years later, he won the gold medal in the 1952 Helsinki Olympics as a middleweight. In 1952, he won the National Amateur Middleweight Championship and New York Golden Gloves Middleweight Championship.[8] At that time he was spotted by Cus D'Amato, and trained at the Gramercy Gym.

Patterson's younger brother Raymond (born 1942) also became a professional heavyweight boxer and has lived in Gothenburg, Sweden, since 1965 and has worked as a truck driver at Volvo Lastvagnar after his boxing career.[9]

Olympic results

  • Round of 16: Defeated Omar Tebakka (France) on points, 3–0
  • Quarterfinal: Defeated Leonardus Jansen (Netherlands) by a first-round stoppage
  • Semifinal: Defeated Stig Sjölin (Sweden) by disqualification in the third round
  • Defeated Vasile Tiță (Romania) by a first-round knockout

Patterson's amateur record was 40 wins (37 by knockout) and 4 defeats.

Patterson carried his hands higher than most boxers, in front of his face. Sportswriters called Patterson's style a "peek-a-boo" stance.

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Waco, North Carolina

Waco, North Carolina

Waco is a town in Cleveland County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 321 at the 2010 census.

West Park, New York

West Park, New York

West Park is a hamlet on the west side of the Hudson River in the Town of Esopus, Ulster County, New York, United States. During the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the area became attractive to the well-to-do seeking second homes because it provided privacy, clean water and relatively inexpensive property.

New Paltz, New York

New Paltz, New York

New Paltz is a U.S. town in Ulster County, New York. The population was 14,003 at the 2010 U.S. Census. The town is located in the southeastern part of the county and is south of Kingston. New Paltz contains a village, also with the name New Paltz. The town is named for Palz, the dialect name of the Palatinate, called Pfalz in standard German.

Olympic Games

Olympic Games

The modern Olympic Games or Olympics are the leading international sporting events featuring summer and winter sports competitions in which thousands of athletes from around the world participate in a variety of competitions. The Olympic Games are considered the world's foremost sports competition with more than 200 teams, representing sovereign states and territories, participating. The Olympic Games are normally held every four years, and since 1994, have alternated between the Summer and Winter Olympics every two years during the four-year period.

Middleweight

Middleweight

Middleweight is a weight class in combat sports.

New York Golden Gloves

New York Golden Gloves

The New York Golden Gloves boxing tournament was considered by many boxing aficionados as one of the most elite Golden Gloves titles, along with the Chicago Golden Gloves. Named for the small golden gloves given out to the winners of each weight category, the New York Golden Gloves continued for decades under the sponsorship of the New York Daily News. Originally the tournament was known as "The New York Daily News Welfare Association's Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions" or simply "The New York."

Cus D'Amato

Cus D'Amato

Constantine "Cus" D'Amato was an Italian-American boxing manager and trainer who handled the careers of Mike Tyson, Floyd Patterson, and José Torres, all of whom went on to be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame. Several successful boxing trainers, including Teddy Atlas and Kevin Rooney, were tutored by D'Amato. He was a proponent of the peek-a-boo style of boxing, in which the fighter holds his gloves close to his cheeks and pulls his arms tight against his torso, which was criticized by some because it was believed that an efficient attack could not be launched from it.

Stig Sjölin

Stig Sjölin

Stig Karl Olof Sjölin was a Swedish middleweight boxer. He competed at the 1952 and 1956 Olympics and finished in third and ninth place, respectively. Between 1949 and 1955 he won four medals at European championships.

Vasile Tiță

Vasile Tiță

Vasile Tiţă was a Romanian amateur middleweight boxer. He won a silver medal at his first major international tournament, the 1952 Olympics, losing in the final to Floyd Patterson. After that he competed at the 1953, 1955 and 1957 European championships with the best result of reaching the quarterfinals in 1955. Domestically he won seven consecutive national titles in 1951–57, six in the 71 kg and one in the 75 kg division. He died aged 85 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease for a decade.

Professional career

Patterson turned pro and steadily rose through the ranks, his only early defeat being an eight-round decision to former Light Heavyweight Champion Joey Maxim on June 7, 1954, at the Eastern Parkway Arena in Brooklyn, New York.

Championship

Patterson in 1957
Patterson in 1957

Although Patterson fought around the light heavyweight limit for much of his early career, he and manager Cus D'Amato always had plans to fight for the Heavyweight Championship. In fact, D'Amato made these plans clear as early as 1954, when he told the press that Patterson was aiming for the heavyweight title.[10] However, after Rocky Marciano announced his retirement as World Heavyweight Champion on April 27, 1956, Patterson was ranked by The Ring magazine as the top light heavyweight contender. After Marciano's announcement, Jim Norris of the International Boxing Club stated that Patterson was one of the six fighters who would take part in an elimination tournament to crown Marciano's successor. The Ring then moved Patterson into the heavyweight rankings, at number five.[11]

Patterson vs. Moore

After beating Tommy "Hurricane" Jackson in an elimination fight, Patterson faced Light Heavyweight Champion Archie Moore on November 30, 1956, for the World Heavyweight Championship. He beat Moore by a knockout in five rounds and became the youngest World Heavyweight Champion in history, at the age of 21 years, 10 months, 3 weeks and 5 days. He was the first Olympic gold medalist to win a professional heavyweight title.

Ingemar Johansson knocks out Floyd Patterson and becomes boxing heavyweight champion of the world, June 26, 1959.
Ingemar Johansson knocks out Floyd Patterson and becomes boxing heavyweight champion of the world, June 26, 1959.

Patterson vs. Johansson I, II & III

After a series of defenses against fringe contenders (Hurricane Jackson, Pete Rademacher, Roy Harris,[12] and Brian London), Patterson met Ingemar Johansson of Sweden, the number one contender, in the first of three fights. Johansson triumphed over Patterson on June 26, 1959, with the referee Ruby Goldstein stopping the fight in the third round after the Swede had knocked Patterson down seven times. Johansson became Sweden's first World Heavyweight Champion, thus becoming a national hero as the first European to defeat an American for the title since 1933.

Patterson knocked out Johansson in the fifth round of their rematch on June 20, 1960, to become the first man in history to regain the Undisputed World Heavyweight Championship. Johansson hit the canvas hard, seemingly out before he landed flat on his back. With glazed eyes, blood trickling from his mouth and his left foot quivering, he was counted out. Johansson lay unconscious for five minutes before he was helped onto a stool.

A third fight between them was held on March 13, 1961 and while Johansson put Patterson on the floor, Patterson retained his title by knockout in the sixth round to win the rubber match in which Patterson was decked twice and Johansson, once in the first round. Johansson had landed both right hands over Floyd's left jab. After getting up from the second knockdown, Floyd abandoned his jab and connected with a left hook that knocked down Johansson. After that, Patterson came on with a strong body attack that wore down Johansson. In the 6th round, Johansson caught Patterson with a solid right. But the power in Ingemar's punches was gone. Patterson won the fight in the 6th round by knockout.[13]

After the third Johansson fight, Patterson defended the title in Toronto on December 4 against Tom McNeeley and retained the title with a fourth-round knockout.[14][15] However he did not fight number-one contender Sonny Liston. This was due in part to Cus D'Amato, who did not want Patterson in the ring with a boxer with mob connections. As a result, D'Amato turned down any challenges involving the IBC. Eventually, due to a monetary dispute with Jimmy Jacobs, Patterson removed D'Amato from handling his business affairs and agreed to fight Liston.

Patterson vs. Liston I & II

Leading up to the fight, Liston was the major betting-line favorite, though Sports Illustrated predicted that Patterson would win in 15 rounds. Jim Braddock, Jersey Joe Walcott, Ezzard Charles, Rocky Marciano and Ingemar Johansson picked Patterson to win. The fight also carried a number of social implications. Liston's connections with the mob were well known and the NAACP was concerned about having to deal with Liston's visibility as World Champion and had encouraged Patterson not to fight Liston, fearing that a Liston victory would tarnish the civil rights movement.[16] Patterson said John F. Kennedy also did not want him to fight Liston.[17]

Patterson lost his title to Liston in Chicago on September 25, 1962, by a first-round knockout in front of 18,894 fans. The two fighters were a marked contrast. In the ring, Liston's size and power proved too much for Patterson's guile and agility. However, Patterson did not use his speed to his benefit. According to Sports Illustrated writer Gilbert Rogin, Patterson did not punch enough and frequently tried to clinch with Liston. Liston battered Patterson with body shots and then shortened up and connected with two double hooks high on the head. The result at the time was the third-fastest knockout in boxing history.[18] After being knocked out, Patterson left Comiskey Park in Chicago wearing dark glasses and a fake beard for the drive back to New York. After the fight, questions were raised on whether the fight was fixed to set up a more lucrative rematch. Overnight, Patterson seemed to lose his public support as a result of his swift knockout.[19] Despite the defeat, Patterson won $2 million, to be paid over 17 years.[20]

The rematch was set for April 1963; however, Liston injured his knee swinging a golf club and the fight was delayed three months to July 22. In Las Vegas that night, Patterson attempted to become the first boxer to win the heavyweight title three times, but Liston once again knocked him out in the first round. Patterson lasted four seconds longer than in the first bout.

After the title

Following these defeats, Patterson went through a depression. However, he eventually recovered and began winning fights again, including top victories over Eddie Machen and George Chuvalo; the Chuvalo match won The Ring's "Fight of the Year" award.[21]

Muhammad Ali

Patterson was now the number-one challenger for the title held by Muhammad Ali. On November 22, 1965 in Las Vegas, in yet another attempt to be the first to win the world heavyweight title three times, he went into the fight with an injured sacro-iliac joint in a bout in which Ali was clearly dominant.[22] Ali called Patterson an "Uncle Tom" for refusing to call him Muhammad Ali (Patterson continued to call him Cassius Clay) and for his outspokenness against black Muslims.[23] Before the match, Patterson had said:

"This fight is a crusade to reclaim the title from the Black Muslims. As a Catholic, I am fighting Clay as a patriotic duty. I am going to return the crown to America."

Instead of scoring a quick knockout, Ali mocked, humiliated and punished Patterson throughout the fight but was unable to knock him out before the referee finally stopped the fight in the 12th round.[24][25]

End of career

Patterson remained a legitimate contender. In 1966 he traveled to England and knocked out British boxer Henry Cooper in just four rounds at Wembley Stadium.

Patterson tried his hand at acting. He is seen in this 1968 The Wild Wild West episode as a landowner who is in danger of losing his property.[26]
Patterson tried his hand at acting. He is seen in this 1968 The Wild Wild West episode as a landowner who is in danger of losing his property.[26]

When Ali was stripped of his title for refusing induction into the military, the World Boxing Association staged an eight-man tournament to determine his successor. Patterson fought Jerry Quarry to a draw in 1967. In a rematch four months later, Patterson lost a controversial 12-round decision to Quarry. Subsequently, in a third and final attempt at winning the title a third time, Patterson lost a controversial 15-round referee's decision to Jimmy Ellis in Stockholm, in 1968, despite breaking Ellis's nose and scoring a disputed knockdown.

In September 1969 he divorced his first wife, Sandra Hicks Patterson, who wanted him to quit boxing, while he still had hopes for another title shot.

Patterson continued on, defeating Oscar Bonavena in a close fight over ten rounds in early 1972.

At age 37, Patterson was stopped after seven rounds with a cut eye while still competitive in a rematch with Muhammad Ali for the NABF heavyweight title on September 20, 1972.[27] The defeat proved to be Patterson's last fight, although there was never an announcement of retirement.

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Joey Maxim

Joey Maxim

Giuseppe Antonio Berardinelli was an American professional boxer. He was a World Light Heavyweight Champion. He took the ring-name Joey Maxim from the Maxim gun, the world's first self-acting machine gun, based on his ability to rapidly throw a large number of left jabs.

Eastern Parkway Arena

Eastern Parkway Arena

Eastern Parkway Arena was a sports venue located in Brownsville, Brooklyn. First operated as an indoor roller rink, in 1944 it was bought by dress manufacturer Emil Lence and his father John Lence, who converted it to a boxing club in 1947.

Heavyweight

Heavyweight

Heavyweight is a weight class in combat sports and professional wrestling.

Rocky Marciano

Rocky Marciano

Rocco Francis Marchegiano, better known as Rocky Marciano, was an American professional boxer who competed from 1947 to 1955, and held the world heavyweight title from 1952 to 1956. He is the only heavyweight champion to have finished his career undefeated. His six title defenses were against Jersey Joe Walcott, Roland La Starza, Ezzard Charles (twice), Don Cockell and Archie Moore.

Archie Moore

Archie Moore

Archie Moore was an American professional boxer and the longest reigning World Light Heavyweight Champion of all time. He had one of the longest professional careers in the history of the sport, competing from 1935 to 1963. Nicknamed "The Mongoose", and then "The Old Mongoose" in the latter half of his career, Moore was a highly strategic and defensive boxer. As of December 2020, BoxRec ranks Moore as the third greatest pound-for-pound boxer of all time. He also ranks fourth on The Ring's list of "100 greatest punchers of all time". Moore was also a trainer for a short time after retirement, training Muhammad Ali, George Foreman and James Tillis.

Knockout

Knockout

A knockout is a fight-ending, winning criterion in several full-contact combat sports, such as boxing, kickboxing, muay thai, mixed martial arts, karate, some forms of taekwondo and other sports involving striking, as well as fighting-based video games. A full knockout is considered any legal strike or combination thereof that renders an opponent unable to continue fighting.

Ingemar Johansson

Ingemar Johansson

Jens Ingemar "Ingo" Johansson was a Swedish professional boxer who competed from 1952 to 1963. He held the world heavyweight title from 1959 to 1960, and was the fifth heavyweight champion born outside the United States. Johansson won the title by defeating Floyd Patterson via third-round stoppage, after flooring him seven times in that round. For this achievement, Johansson was awarded the Hickok Belt as top professional athlete of the year—the only non-American in its entire 27-year first run—and was named the Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year and Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year.

Pete Rademacher

Pete Rademacher

Thomas Peter Rademacher was an American heavyweight boxer. A gold medalist at the 1956 Olympics, he became the only person to challenge for the world heavyweight championship in his first professional bout when he faced Floyd Patterson in Seattle on August 22, 1957. He compiled a 15-8-1 record over 23 professional bouts.

Brian London

Brian London

Brian Sidney Harper, known professionally as Brian London, was an English professional boxer who competed from 1955 to 1970. He held the British and Commonwealth heavyweight title from 1958 to 1959, and twice challenged for the world heavyweight title, losing to Floyd Patterson in 1959 and Muhammad Ali in 1966, both times via knockout. He was one of a quartet of British boxers, with Henry Cooper, Joe Erskine, and Dick Richardson, who dominated the British boxing scene throughout the 1950s and 1960s.

Ruby Goldstein

Ruby Goldstein

Reuven "Ruby" Goldstein, the "Jewel of the Ghetto", was an American boxer and prize fight referee. He was a serious World Lightweight Championship contender in the 1920s, and became one of U.S. most trusted and respected boxing referees in the 1950s. During his boxing career, he was trained and managed by Hymie Cantor.

Maple Leaf Gardens

Maple Leaf Gardens

Maple Leaf Gardens is a historic building located at the northwest corner of Carlton Street and Church Street in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The building was initially constructed in 1931 as an arena to host ice hockey games, though it has since been reconstructed for other uses.

American Mafia

American Mafia

The American Mafia, commonly referred to in North America as the Italian American Mafia, the Mafia, or the Mob, is a highly organized Italian American criminal society and organized crime group. The organization is often referred to by its members as Cosa Nostra and by the American government as La Cosa Nostra (LCN). The organization's name is derived from the original Mafia or Cosa nostra, the Sicilian Mafia, with "American Mafia" originally referring simply to Mafia groups from Sicily operating in the United States, as the organization initially emerged as an offshoot of the Sicilian Mafia formed by Italian immigrants in the United States. However, the organization gradually evolved into a separate entity partially independent of the original Mafia in Sicily, and it eventually encompassed or absorbed other Italian immigrant and Italian-American gangsters and Italian-American crime groups active in the United States and Canada that were not of Sicilian origin. In North America, it is often colloquially referred to as the Italian Mafia or Italian Mob, though these terms may also apply to the separate yet related Sicilian Mafia or other organized crime groups in Italy or ethnic Italian crime groups in other countries.

Retired life

In retirement, he and Ingemar Johansson became good friends who flew across the Atlantic to visit each other every year and he served two terms as chairman of the New York State Athletic Commission.[28] He was also inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 1991.[29]

Patterson lived in New Paltz, New York for many years with his second wife, Janet Seaquist.[30] They had two daughters, Jennifer and Janene.[31] In 1982 and 1983 he ran the Stockholm Marathon together with Ingemar Johansson.[32] He completed the 1983 New York City Marathon in 3:35:27.[33]

His adopted son, Tracy Harris Patterson, was a world champion boxer in the 1990s and was trained by Floyd during part of his career. They are the first father and son to win world titles in boxing.[34] Floyd also trained Canadian heavyweight Donovan "Razor" Ruddock in 1992 for his fights with Greg Page, Phil Jackson, and Lennox Lewis.[35]

The New Paltz High School football field was named "Floyd Patterson Field" in 1985.[36]

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New York State Athletic Commission

New York State Athletic Commission

The New York State Athletic Commission or NYSAC, also known as the New York Athletic Commission, is a division of the New York State Department of State which regulates all contests and exhibitions of unarmed combat within the state of New York, including licensure and supervision of promoters, boxers, professional wrestlers, seconds, ring officials, managers, and matchmakers. In 2016, the NYSAC was authorized to oversee all mixed martial arts contests in New York.

International Boxing Hall of Fame

International Boxing Hall of Fame

The modern International Boxing Hall of Fame (IBHOF), located in Canastota, New York, honors boxers, trainers and other contributors to the sport worldwide. Inductees are selected by members of the Boxing Writers Association of America. The IBHOF started as a 1990 initiative by Ed Brophy to honour Canastota's world boxing champions, Carmen Basilio and Basilio's nephew, Billy Backus; the village of Canastota inaugurated the new museum, which showcases boxing's rich history. It is visited by boxing fans from all over the world.

New Paltz (village), New York

New Paltz (village), New York

New Paltz is a village in Ulster County located in the U.S. state of New York. It is approximately 80 miles (130 km) north of New York City and 70 miles (110 km) south of Albany. The population was 7,324 at the 2020 census.

Stockholm Marathon

Stockholm Marathon

The Stockholm Marathon, known as the adidas Stockholm Marathon for sponsorship reasons, is an annual marathon arranged in Stockholm, Sweden, since 1979. It serves as the Swedish marathon championship race. At the 2009 Stockholm Marathon more than 18,500 participants were registered. The marathon is categorized as a Bronze Label Road Race by World Athletics.

1983 New York City Marathon

1983 New York City Marathon

The 1983 New York City Marathon was the 14th edition of the New York City Marathon and took place in New York City on 23 October.

Tracy Harris Patterson

Tracy Harris Patterson

Tracy Harris Patterson,, is an American former boxer who became a two weight world champion. Born Tracy Harris in Grady, Alabama, he is the adopted son of former Golden Gloves and world heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson, turned Golden Gloves success into a solid pro career. He won the WBC super bantamweight title with a two-round TKO of Thierry Jacob and defended the title for two years before losing the belt to Hector Acero-Sanchez in 1994. He later won the IBF super featherweight title against Eddie Hopson in 1995. Patterson retired in 2001 with a pro record of 63-8-2.

Donovan Ruddock

Donovan Ruddock

Donovan "Razor" Ruddock is a Jamaican-born Canadian former professional boxer who competed from 1982 to 2001 and in 2015. He is known for his two fights against Mike Tyson in 1991 and a fight against Lennox Lewis in 1992. Ruddock was also known for his exceptionally heavy punching; one of the best examples of his left hand power was his knockout of former WBA heavyweight champion Michael Dokes in 1990. His favoured weapon at the ring proved to be a highly versatile half-hook, half-uppercut left-handed punch he called "The Smash" which accounted for the majority of his knockout wins -- it also happened to be his major downside throughout his career. Being a left-handed puncher fighting out of the orthodox stance, he didn't throw a single right hand during most knockout flurries.

Greg Page (boxer)

Greg Page (boxer)

Greg Page was an American professional boxer who competed from 1979 to 2001, and held the WBA heavyweight title from 1984 to 1985. He was also a regular sparring partner for Mike Tyson, famously knocking down the then-undefeated world champion during a 1990 session.

Phil Jackson (boxer)

Phil Jackson (boxer)

Phil Jackson is an American former professional boxer, best known for challenging Lennox Lewis for the WBC Heavyweight Title in 1994.

Lennox Lewis

Lennox Lewis

Lennox Claudius Lewis is a boxing commentator and former professional boxer who competed from 1989 to 2003. He is a three-time world heavyweight champion, a two-time lineal champion, and the last heavyweight to hold the undisputed championship. Holding dual British and Canadian citizenship, Lewis represented Canada as an amateur at the 1984 and 1988 Olympics; in the latter, he won a gold medal in the super-heavyweight division after defeating Riddick Bowe in the final.

New Paltz High School

New Paltz High School

New Paltz Central High School is situated in the town of New Paltz in New York, on South Putt Corners Road. It serves students in grades 9-12 from the New Paltz Central School District, which serves most of New Paltz and Gardiner, New York, as well as parts of several other towns adjacent.

Death

Floyd Patterson's grave.
Floyd Patterson's grave.

Patterson suffered from Alzheimer's disease and prostate cancer in his final years. He died at home in New Paltz, on May 11, 2006, at the age of 71.[37] His body was buried at New Paltz Rural Cemetery in New Paltz, Ulster County, New York.[38][39]

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Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease that usually starts slowly and progressively worsens. It is the cause of 60–70% of cases of dementia. The most common early symptom is difficulty in remembering recent events. As the disease advances, symptoms can include problems with language, disorientation, mood swings, loss of motivation, self-neglect, and behavioral issues. As a person's condition declines, they often withdraw from family and society. Gradually, bodily functions are lost, ultimately leading to death. Although the speed of progression can vary, the typical life expectancy following diagnosis is three to nine years.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is cancer of the prostate. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancerous tumor worldwide and is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortality among men. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system that surrounds the urethra just below the bladder. It is located in the hypogastric region of the abdomen. To give an idea of where it is located, the bladder is superior to the prostate gland as shown in the image The rectum is posterior in perspective to the prostate gland and the ischial tuberosity of the pelvic bone is inferior. Only those who have male reproductive organs are able to get prostate cancer. Most prostate cancers are slow growing. Cancerous cells may spread to other areas of the body, particularly the bones and lymph nodes. It may initially cause no symptoms. In later stages, symptoms include pain or difficulty urinating, blood in the urine, or pain in the pelvis or back. Benign prostatic hyperplasia may produce similar symptoms. Other late symptoms include fatigue, due to low levels of red blood cells.

New York (state)

New York (state)

New York, officially the State of New York, is a state in the Northeastern United States. It is often called New York State to distinguish it from its largest city, New York City. With a total area of 54,556 square miles (141,300 km2), New York is the 27th-largest U.S. state by area. With 20.2 million people, it is the fourth-most-populous state in the United States as of 2021, with approximately 44% living in New York City, including 25% of the state's population within Brooklyn and Queens, and another 15% on the remainder of Long Island, the most populous island in the United States. The state is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest.

Quotes

  • "It's easy to do anything in victory. It's in defeat that a man reveals himself."[40]
  • "They said I was the fighter who got knocked down the most, but I also got up the most."[41] (This quote was used in the tenth episode of the 2009 TV series V.)
  • "When you have millions of dollars, you have millions of friends."[42]
  • On boxing: "It's like being in love with a woman. She can be unfaithful, she can be mean, she can be cruel, but it doesn't matter. If you love her, you want her, even though she can do you all kinds of harm. It's the same with me and boxing. It can do me all kinds of harm but I love it."[43]

Professional boxing record

64 fights 55 wins 8 losses
By knockout 40 5
By decision 15 3
Draws 1
No. Result Record Opponent Type Round, time Date Age Location Notes
64 Loss 55–8–1 Muhammad Ali RTD 7 (12), 3:00 Sep 20, 1972 37 years, 260 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S. For NABF heavyweight title
63 Win 55–7–1 Pedro Agosto TKO 6 (10), 3:00 Jul 14, 1972 37 years, 192 days Singer Bowl, New York City, New York, U.S.
62 Win 54–7–1 Oscar Bonavena UD 10 Feb 11, 1972 37 years, 38 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
61 Win 53–7–1 Charlie Harris KO 6 (10), 2:31 Nov 23, 1971 36 years, 323 days Multnomah County Exposition Center, Portland, Oregon, U.S.
60 Win 52–7–1 Vic Brown UD 10 Aug 21, 1971 36 years, 229 days Peace Bridge Arena, Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada
59 Win 51–7–1 Charley Polite UD 10 Jul 17, 1971 36 years, 194 days Erie Arena, Erie, Pennsylvania, U.S.
58 Win 50–7–1 Terry Daniels UD 10 May 26, 1971 36 years, 142 days Cleveland Arena, Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.
57 Win 49–7–1 Roger Russell TKO 9 (10), 1:29 Mar 29, 1971 36 years, 84 days Philadelphia Arena, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
56 Win 48–7–1 Levi Forte KO 2 (10), 2:20 Jan 16, 1971 36 years, 12 days Convention Center, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
55 Win 47–7–1 Charley Green KO 10 (10), 1:15 Sep 15, 1970 35 years, 254 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
54 Loss 46–7–1 Jimmy Ellis PTS 15 Sep 14, 1968 33 years, 254 days Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm, Sweden For WBA heavyweight title
53 Loss 46–6–1 Jerry Quarry MD 12 Oct 28, 1967 32 years, 297 days Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
52 Draw 46–5–1 Jerry Quarry MD 12 Jun 9, 1967 32 years, 156 days Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
51 Win 46–5 Bill McMurray KO 1 (10), 2:37 Mar 30, 1967 32 years, 85 days Civic Arena, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.
50 Win 45–5 Willie Johnson KO 3 (10), 2:05 Feb 13, 1967 32 years, 40 days Municipal Auditorium, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S.
49 Win 44–5 Henry Cooper KO 4 (10), 2:10 Sep 20, 1966 31 years, 259 days Empire Pool, London, England
48 Loss 43–5 Muhammad Ali TKO 12 (15), 2:18 Nov 22, 1965 30 years, 322 days Las Vegas Convention Center, Winchester, Nevada, U.S. For WBC, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
47 Win 43–4 Tod Herring TKO 3 (10), 0:40 May 14, 1965 30 years, 130 days Johanneshovs Isstadion, Stockholm, Sweden
46 Win 42–4 George Chuvalo UD 12 Feb 1, 1965 30 years, 28 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
45 Win 41–4 Charlie Powell KO 6 (10), 1:21 Dec 12, 1964 29 years, 343 days Hiram Bithorn Stadium, San Juan, Puerto Rico
44 Win 40–4 Eddie Machen PTS 12 Jul 5, 1964 29 years, 183 days Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm, Sweden
43 Win 39–4 Santo Amonti TKO 8 (10), 2:25 Jan 6, 1964 29 years, 2 days Stockholm, Sweden
42 Loss 38–4 Sonny Liston KO 1 (15), 2:10 Jul 22, 1963 28 years, 199 days Las Vegas Convention Center, Winchester, Nevada, U.S. For WBA, NYSAC, The Ring, and inaugural WBC heavyweight titles
41 Loss 38–3 Sonny Liston KO 1 (15), 2:06 Sep 25, 1962 27 years, 264 days Comiskey Park, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Lost WBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
40 Win 38–2 Tom McNeeley KO 4 (15), 2:51 Dec 4, 1961 26 years, 334 days Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
39 Win 37–2 Ingemar Johansson KO 6 (15), 2:45 Mar 13, 1961 26 years, 68 days Exhibition Hall, Miami Beach, Florida, U.S. Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
38 Win 36–2 Ingemar Johansson KO 5 (15), 1:51 Jun 20, 1960 25 years, 168 days Polo Grounds, New York City, New York, U.S. Won NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
37 Loss 35–2 Ingemar Johansson TKO 3 (15), 2:03 Jun 26, 1959 24 years, 173 days Yankee Stadium, New York City, New York, U.S. Lost NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
36 Win 35–1 Brian London KO 11 (15), 0:51 May 1, 1959 24 years, 117 days Fairgrounds Coliseum, Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
35 Win 34–1 Roy Harris RTD 12 (15) Aug 18, 1958 23 years, 226 days Wrigley Field, Los Angeles, California, U.S. Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
34 Win 33–1 Pete Rademacher KO 6 (15), 2:57 Aug 22, 1957 22 years, 230 days Sick's Stadium, Seattle, Washington, U.S. Retained NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
33 Win 32–1 Tommy Jackson TKO 10 (15), 1:52 Jul 29, 1957 22 years, 206 days Polo Grounds, New York City, New York, U.S. Retained NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
32 Win 31–1 Archie Moore KO 5 (15), 2:27 Nov 30, 1956 21 years, 331 days Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S. Won vacant NBA, NYSAC, and The Ring heavyweight titles
31 Win 30–1 Tommy Jackson SD 12 Jun 8, 1956 21 years, 156 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
30 Win 29–1 Alvin Williams KO 3 (10), 1:58 Apr 10, 1956 21 years, 97 days Memorial Hall, Kansas City, Missouri, U.S.
29 Win 28–1 Jimmy Walls TKO 2 (10), 2:29 Mar 12, 1956 21 years, 68 days New Britain, Connecticut, U.S.
28 Win 27–1 Jimmy Slade TKO 7 (10), 2:05 Dec 8, 1955 20 years, 338 days Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
27 Win 26–1 Calvin Brad KO 1 (10), 2:58 Oct 13, 1955 20 years, 282 days Grand Olympic Auditorium, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
26 Win 25–1 Dave Whitlock KO 3 (10), 0:52 Sep 29, 1955 20 years, 268 days Winterland Arena, San Francisco, California, U.S.
25 Win 24–1 Alvin Williams TKO 8 (10), 2:28 Sep 8, 1955 20 years, 247 days Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
24 Win 23–1 Archie McBride KO 7 (10), 1:46 Jul 6, 1955 20 years, 183 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
23 Win 22–1 Yvon Durelle RTD 5 (10) Jun 23, 1955 20 years, 170 days Newcastle, New Brunswick, Canada
22 Win 21–1 Esau Ferdinand TKO 10 (10), 2:49 Mar 17, 1955 20 years, 72 days Civic Auditorium, Oakland, California, U.S.
21 Win 20–1 Don Grant TKO 5 (10), 1:13 Jan 17, 1955 20 years, 13 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
20 Win 19–1 Willie Troy TKO 5 (8) Jan 7, 1955 20 years, 3 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
19 Win 18–1 Jimmy Slade UD 8 Nov 19, 1954 19 years, 319 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
18 Win 17–1 Joe Gannon UD 8 Oct 22, 1954 19 years, 291 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
17 Win 16–1 Esau Ferdinand UD 8 Oct 11, 1954 19 years, 280 days St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
16 Win 15–1 Tommy Harrison TKO 1 (8), 1:29 Aug 2, 1954 19 years, 210 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
15 Win 14–1 Jacques Royer Crecy TKO 7 (8) Jul 12, 1954 19 years, 189 days St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
14 Loss 13–1 Joey Maxim UD 8 Jun 7, 1954 19 years, 154 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
13 Win 13–0 Jesse Turner UD 8 May 10, 1954 19 years, 126 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
12 Win 12–0 Alvin Williams UD 8 Apr 19, 1954 19 years, 105 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
11 Win 11–0 Sammy Brown TKO 2 (10), 1:40 Mar 30, 1954 19 years, 85 days Turner's Arena, Washington, D.C., U.S.
10 Win 10–0 Yvon Durelle UD 8 Feb 15, 1954 19 years, 42 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
9 Win 9–0 Dick Wagner TKO 5 (8), 2:29 Dec 14, 1953 18 years, 344 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
8 Win 8–0 Wes Bascom UD 8 Oct 19, 1953 18 years, 288 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
7 Win 7–0 Gordon Wallace TKO 3 (8), 0:52 Jun 1, 1953 18 years, 148 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
6 Win 6–0 Dick Wagner SD 8 Apr 13, 1953 18 years, 99 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
5 Win 5–0 Chester Mieszala TKO 5 (6), 1:25 Jan 28, 1953 18 years, 24 days Chicago Stadium, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
4 Win 4–0 Lalu Sabotin TKO 5 (8), 1:30 Dec 29, 1952 17 years, 360 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
3 Win 3–0 Lester Johnson TKO 3 (6), 1:26 Oct 31, 1952 17 years, 301 days Madison Square Garden, New York City, New York, U.S.
2 Win 2–0 Sammy Walker TKO 2 (6), 0:47 Oct 6, 1952 17 years, 276 days Eastern Parkway Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.
1 Win 1–0 Eddie Godbold KO 4 (6), 1:39 Sep 12, 1952 17 years, 252 days St. Nicholas Arena, New York City, New York, U.S.

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Source: "Floyd Patterson", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floyd_Patterson.

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References
  1. ^ "The tale of the tape offers a physical comparison between challenger".
  2. ^ 03/03/1961-New York: The tale of the tape offers a physical comparison between challenger Ingemar Johansson (left) and heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson (right). They meet for the third time for the heavyweight title in Miami, Florida, on March 13th.
  3. ^ "The tale of the tape offers a physical comparison between challenger".
  4. ^ 03/03/1961-New York: The tale of the tape offers a physical comparison between challenger Ingemar Johansson (left) and heavyweight champion Floyd Patterson (right). They meet for the third time for the heavyweight title in Miami, Florida, on March 13th.
  5. ^ "UPI Almanac for Friday, Jan. 4, 2019". United Press International. January 4, 2019. Archived from the original on January 5, 2019. Retrieved September 4, 2019. former heavyweight boxing champion Floyd Patterson in 1935
  6. ^ Springer, Steve (February 5, 1987). "Ex-Boxing Champion Floyd Patterson Saves a Lad, Gains a Son : Youngster Escapes a Bleak Past". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  7. ^ Big Apple rates edge vs. Chicago, By Tom Hanrahan, Daily News from New York, April 24, 1981, p. 46.
  8. ^ Litsky, Frank (May 11, 2006). "Floyd Patterson, Boxing Champion, Dies at 71". The New York Times. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  9. ^ Abrahamsson, Hans (12 May 2006). "Brodern Raymond: Jag vill komma ihåg honom som han var" [Brother Raymond: I want to remember him as he was]. Aftonbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  10. ^ Weston, Stanley, ed. (1996). The Best of the Ring. Chicago: Bonus Books. p. 183. ISBN 1-56625-056-0.
  11. ^ Daniel, Dan (August 2005). ""I Won't Be Back," Says Marciano". The Ring. 84 (8): 90–91.
  12. ^ "Tale of the tape". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. Associated Press. August 18, 1958. p. 15.
  13. ^ "The 10 Greatest Heavyweight Fights of All Time, Floyd Patterson vs. Ingemar Johansson 3". boxingmemories.com. Archived from the original on 2011-08-12. Retrieved 2011-03-22.
  14. ^ "Patterson defends his title". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. December 4, 1961. p. 6.
  15. ^ "Patterson knocks out dead-game McNeeley in fourth". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. December 5, 1961. p. 8.
  16. ^ "Esquire covers commemorate boxing's prime". ESPN.com. May 8, 2008.
  17. ^ "Ex-Champ Floyd Patterson Dies At 71". CBS News. May 11, 2006.
  18. ^ Gregory, Sam. "Sonny Liston: The Facts". thesweetscience.com
  19. ^ Rogin, Gilbert (October 8, 1962) "The Facts About The Big Fight". sportsillustrated.cnn.com
  20. ^ Arneel, Gene (September 26, 1962). "Patterson's $2-Mil. 'One-Night-Stand'". Variety. p. 1.
  21. ^ "On This Day: Floyd Patterson and George Chuvalo clash in unforgettable non-title fight". Boxing News. February 1, 2018. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
  22. ^ Johnson, Chuck (2006-05-11). "Ex-heavyweight boxer Floyd Patterson, 71, dies". USA Today. Retrieved 2010-05-02.
  23. ^ Hauser, Thomas (November 2, 2003) Ali: The Legacy. The Guardian
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  26. ^ ""The Wild Wild West" The Night of the Juggernaut". IMDb. Retrieved July 16, 2018.
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  29. ^ Mitch Abramson (April 16, 2014). "Daily News Golden Gloves Hall of Fame: Floyd Patterson". Daily News (New York).
  30. ^ Stratton, W. K. (2012). Floyd Patterson : the fighting life of boxing's invisible champion. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 190. ISBN 978-0-15-101430-9. OCLC 666239937.
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  43. ^ Cosell, Howard (1973). COSELL. Playboy Press. p. 167. ISBN 119931000X.
Further reading
External links
Sporting positions
Amateur boxing titles
Previous:
Thomas Nelson
U.S. middleweight champion
1952
Next:
Bryant Thompson
World boxing titles
Vacant
Title last held by
Rocky Marciano
NYSAC heavyweight champion
November 30, 1956 – June 26, 1959
Succeeded by
NBA heavyweight champion
November 30, 1956 – June 26, 1959
The Ring heavyweight champion
November 30, 1956 – June 26, 1959
Undisputed heavyweight champion
November 30, 1956 – June 26, 1959
Preceded by
Ingemar Johansson
NSYAC heavyweight champion
June 20, 1960 – September 25, 1962
Succeeded by
WBA heavyweight champion
June 20, 1960 – September 25, 1962
The Ring heavyweight champion
June 20, 1960 – September 25, 1962
Undisputed heavyweight champion
June 20, 1960 – September 25, 1962
Records
Previous:
Joe Louis
Youngest world heavyweight champion
November 30, 1956 – November 22, 1986
Next:
Mike Tyson
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