Get Our Extension
Enjoying Wikipedia Content? DONATE TO WIKIPEDIA

Fan Ben

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way

Fan Ben (Chinese: 范賁; died 349), was a politician and emperor of the Cheng Han dynasty during the Sixteen Kingdoms. He was the son of Fan Changsheng, and after the fall Cheng Han to the Jin dynasty (266–420) in 347, he led a restoration of the state, briefly ruling over it before his defeat and death in 349. Despite proclaiming himself emperor, most, if not all, historians do not acknowledge his reign and consider Li Shi as the last true ruler of Cheng Han.

Discover more about Fan Ben related topics

Chinese language

Chinese language

Chinese is a group of languages that form the Sinitic branch of the Sino-Tibetan languages family, spoken by the ethnic Han Chinese majority and many minority ethnic groups in Greater China. About 1.3 billion people speak a variety of Chinese as their first language.

Cheng Han

Cheng Han

Cheng Han was a dynastic state of China listed as one of the Sixteen Kingdoms in Chinese historiography. Ruled by the Di people, its territory was based in what is modern-day Sichuan Province, China.

Sixteen Kingdoms

Sixteen Kingdoms

The Sixteen Kingdoms, less commonly the Sixteen States, was a chaotic period in Chinese history from AD 304 to 439 when northern China fragmented into a series of short-lived dynastic states. The majority of these states were founded by the "Five Barbarians", non-Han peoples who had settled in northern and western China during the preceding centuries, and had launched a series of rebellions and invasions against the Western Jin dynasty in the early 4th century. However, several of the states were founded by the Han people, and all of the states—whether ruled by Xiongnu, Xianbei, Di, Jie, Qiang, Han, or others—took on Han-style dynastic names. The states frequently fought against both one another and the Eastern Jin dynasty, which succeeded the Western Jin in 317 and ruled southern China. The period ended with the unification of northern China in 439 by the Northern Wei, a dynasty established by the Xianbei Tuoba clan. This occurred 19 years after the Eastern Jin collapsed in 420, and was replaced by the Liu Song dynasty. Following the unification of the north by Northern Wei, the Northern and Southern dynasties era of Chinese history began.

Fan Changsheng

Fan Changsheng

Fan Changsheng was a Taoist hermit who was instrumental in the establishment of the Cheng Han state during the Sixteen Kingdoms era in China. He led a Taoist community of over one thousand families on Mount Qingcheng, Sichuan. During a critical famine, Fan Changsheng provided Li Xiong's army with food from his community's bounty. With Fan's help, Li Xiong achieved victory over Luo Shang's army during Li Xiong's siege of Chengdu.

Jin dynasty (266–420)

Jin dynasty (266–420)

The Jin dynasty or the Jin Empire, sometimes distinguished as the Sima Jin (司馬晉) or the Two Jins (兩晉), was an imperial dynasty of China that existed from 266 to 420. It was founded by Sima Yan, eldest son of Sima Zhao, who had previously been declared the King of Jin. The Jin dynasty was preceded by the Three Kingdoms period, and was succeeded by the Sixteen Kingdoms in northern China and the Liu Song dynasty in southern China.

Li Shi (emperor)

Li Shi (emperor)

Li Shi, courtesy name Ziren (子仁), historically known by his Jin dynasty-bestowed title Marquess of Guiyi (歸義侯), was the last emperor of the Di-led Cheng Han dynasty of China. During his reign, the Cheng Han state continued the deterioration that occurred through his father Li Shou's reign, and in 347, Li Shi's forces failed against the Jin expedition force commanded by Huan Wen. Li Shi fled the capital Chengdu but eventually surrendered, and Emperor Mu of Jin spared him and created him a marquess, a title he carried for the rest of his life.

Life

Fan Ben's family was from Danxing County (丹興縣; in present-day Qianjiang District, Chongqing) in Fuling Commandery (涪陵郡). His father, Fan Changsheng, was a famous Taoist leader who supported the Ba-Di rebel, Li Xiong, in forming the state of Cheng Han in 304. Li Xiong showed him great favour and appointed him Prime Minister. Fan Ben also served in Cheng Han's government as a Palace Attendant. After Changsheng's death in 318, his office was inherited by Fan Ben.[1]

In 347, the Jin general, Huan Wen, conquered Cheng Han and received the emperor, Li Shi's surrender. However, some remnants of Cheng Han continued to resist Jin despite their takeover. In May 347, after Huan Wen left Yi province, the rebel generals, Deng Ding (鄧定) and Kui Wen (隗文), captured Chengdu.[2] Due to Changsheng's immense reputation in the region, they proclaimed Fan Ben as their leader. According to historical records, he supposedly tricked many people of Shu into joining them through the use of the occult and mysticism.[3]

Fan Ben's rule lasted until 349. In the summer of that year, Jin's Inspector of Yizhou, Zhou Fu and the general, Zhu Dao (朱燾) campaigned against him. They were able to kill him and restore order to the province.[4]

Discover more about Life related topics

Qianjiang District

Qianjiang District

Qianjiang District, formerly Qianjiang Tujia and Miao Autonomous County, is a district, in the southeastern part of Chongqing, China, bordering Hubei province to the east and northeast. While it is governed as a district, in practice Qianjiang is its own city proper far removed from the urban centre of Chongqing. Qianjiang is nicknamed "The Throat of Sichuan and Hubei" (川鄂咽喉) because it sits on the intersection of Sichuan-Hubei and Sichuan-Hunan Roads.

Chongqing

Chongqing

Chongqing, alternately romanized as Chungking, is a municipality in Southwest China. The official abbreviation of the city, "Yú", was approved by the State Council on 18 April 1997. This abbreviation is derived from the old name of a part of the Jialing River that runs through Chongqing and feeds into the Yangtze River.

Taoism

Taoism

Taoism or Daoism refers to either a school of philosophical thought or to a religion, both of which share ideas and concepts of Chinese origin and emphasize living in harmony with the Tao ; the Tao is generally defined as the source of everything and the ultimate principle underlying reality. The Tao Te Ching, a book containing teachings attributed to Laozi (老子), together with the later writings of Zhuangzi, are both widely considered the keystone works of Taoism.

Ba (state)

Ba (state)

Ba was an ancient state in eastern Sichuan, China. Its original capital was Yicheng, Hubei. Ba was conquered by Qin in 316 BC. The historical Bo people and the modern Tujia people trace some of their origins back to the people of Ba.

Di (Five Barbarians)

Di (Five Barbarians)

The Di (Chinese: 氐; pinyin: Dī; Wade–Giles: Ti1; < Eastern Han Chinese *tei < Old Chinese (B-S): *tˤij) were an ancient ethnic group that lived in western China, and are best known as one of the non-Han Chinese peoples known as the Five Barbarians that overran northern China during the Jin dynasty (266–420) and the Sixteen Kingdoms period. This ethnic group should not be confused with the earlier Dí 狄, which refers to unrelated nomadic peoples in northern China during the earlier Zhou dynasty. The Di are thought to have been of proto-Tibetan origin, though there is a widespread belief among Chinese scholars that the Di spoke a Turkic language.

Li Xiong

Li Xiong

Li Xiong (李雄) (274–334), courtesy name Zhongjuan (仲雋), formally Emperor Wu of Cheng (Han), was the first emperor of the Di-led Chinese Cheng Han dynasty and commonly regarded as its founder. Li Xiong's declaration of himself as the Prince of Chengdu in 304 is commonly regarded as the start of the Sixteen Kingdoms era. The Book of Jin describes Li Xiong as a beautiful-looking and courageous man who was over two meters tall.

Huan Wen

Huan Wen

Huan Wen (桓溫) (312–373), courtesy name Yuanzi (元子), formally Duke Xuanwu of Nan Commandery (南郡宣武公), was a general and regent of the Jin Dynasty (266–420), as well as the leader of Huan clan of Qiaoguo (谯国桓氏). He is commonly viewed as one of the greatest generals since Jin's loss of northern China, as he led the campaign that destroyed Cheng Han and annexed its lands to Jin, and had some successes against the northern states Former Qin and Former Yan. After his death, the Huan clan would be entrenched in the Jin power struction for decades, after his son Huan Xuan temporarily usurped the Jin throne in 403 as the emperor of Chu (楚), he was posthumously honored as Emperor Xuanwu of Chu with the temple name of Taizu (太祖).

Yizhou (Southwest China)

Yizhou (Southwest China)

Yizhou (益州), Yi Province or Yi Prefecture, was a zhou (province) of ancient China. Its capital city was Chengdu. During the Han dynasty, it included the commanderies Hanzhong, Ba, Guanghan, Shu, Wenshan, Jianwei, Zangke, Yuexi, Yizhou and Yongchang. It was bordered in the north by Liang Province and Yong Province. At its greatest extent, Yi covered present-day central and eastern Sichuan, Chongqing, southern Shaanxi and parts of Yunnan and Guizhou.

Chengdu

Chengdu

Chengdu, alternatively romanized as Chengtu, is a sub-provincial city which serves as the capital of the Chinese province of Sichuan. With a population of 20,937,757 inhabitants during the 2020 Chinese census, it is the fourth most populous city in China, and it is the only city apart from the four direct-administered municipalities with a population of over 20 million. It is traditionally the hub in Southwest China.

Shu (state)

Shu (state)

Shu was an ancient state in what is now Sichuan Province. It was based on the Chengdu Plain, in the western Sichuan basin with some extension northeast to the upper Han River valley. To the east was the Ba tribal confederation. Further east down the Han and Yangtze rivers was the State of Chu. To the north over the Qinling Mountains was the State of Qin. To the west and south were tribal peoples of little military power.

Source: "Fan Ben", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan_Ben.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ (八年四月,范長生卒,以其子侍中賁為丞相。) Shiliuguo Chuqiu, vol.6
  2. ^ (丁巳,鄧定、隗文復入據成都...) Jin Shu, vol.8
  3. ^ (隗文、鄧定等立故國師範長生之子賁為帝而奉之,以妖異惑眾,蜀人多歸之。) Zizhi Tongjian, vol. 97
  4. ^ (夏,四月,益州刺史周撫、龍驤將軍朱燾出範賁,斬之,益州平。) Zizhi Tongjian, vol.98

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.