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FIFA World Cup top goalscorers

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Miroslav Klose celebrating his record-breaking 16th World Cup goal
Miroslav Klose celebrating his record-breaking 16th World Cup goal

A total of over 2,500 goals have been scored in the 21 editions of the FIFA World Cup final tournaments, not counting penalties scored during shoot-outs.[1] Since the first goal scored by French player Lucien Laurent at the 1930 FIFA World Cup,[2] 1,298 footballers have scored goals in the World Cup final tournaments,[3] of whom just 98 have scored five or more.

Numbers of goalscorers[3][4][5]
Goals ≥11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Total
Nos. of players 7 6 10 8 8 26 33 >50 >90 >200 >750 >1,250

The top goalscorer of the inaugural competition was Argentina's Guillermo Stábile with eight goals. Since then, only 22 players have scored more at all the games played at the World Cup than Stábile did throughout the 1930 tournament. The first was Hungary's Sándor Kocsis with eleven in 1954. At the next tournament, France's Just Fontaine improved on this record with 13 goals in only six games. Gerd Müller scored 10 for West Germany in 1970 and broke the overall record when he scored his 14th goal in the World Cup final tournament during West Germany's win in the 1974 final. His record stood for more than three decades until Ronaldo's 15 goals between 1998 and 2006 for Brazil. Germany's Miroslav Klose went on to score a record 16 goals across four consecutive tournaments between 2002 and 2014.

Of all the players who have played in the World Cup finals, only six have achieved an average of two goals or more per game played: Kocsis, Fontaine, Stábile, Russia's Oleg Salenko, Switzerland's Josef Hügi, and Poland's Ernst Wilimowski — the last of these scored four in his single World Cup game in 1938.[6] The top 97 goalscorers have represented 28 nations, with 14 players scoring for Brazil, and another 14 for Germany or West Germany. In total, 64 footballers came from UEFA (Europe), 29 from CONMEBOL (South America), and only four from elsewhere: Cameroon, Ghana, Australia, and the United States.

Fontaine holds the record for the most goals scored at a single tournament, with 13 goals in 1958. The players that came closest were Kocsis in 1954, Müller in 1970 and Portugal's Eusébio in 1966, with 11, 10 and 9, respectively. The lowest scoring top scorer was in 1962, when six players tied at only four goals each. Across the 21 editions of the World Cup finals, 30 footballers have been credited with the most tournament goals, and no one has achieved this feat twice. Nine of them scored at least seven goals in a tournament, while Brazil's Jairzinho became the only footballer to score at least seven goals without being the top goalscorer of that tournament in 1970. These 30 top goalscorers played for 19 nations, the most (five) for Brazil. Another five came from other South American countries, with the remaining 20 coming from Europe.

Discover more about FIFA World Cup top goalscorers related topics

1930 FIFA World Cup

1930 FIFA World Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in Uruguay from 13 to 30 July 1930. FIFA, football's international governing body, selected Uruguay as host nation, as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its first constitution and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

1954 FIFA World Cup

1954 FIFA World Cup

The 1954 FIFA World Cup was the fifth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament for senior men's national teams of the nations affiliated to FIFA. It was held in Switzerland from 16 June to 4 July. Switzerland was selected as the host country in July 1946. At the tournament several all-time records for goal-scoring were set, including the highest average number of goals scored per game. The tournament was won by West Germany, who defeated tournament favourites Hungary 3–2 in the final, their first World Cup title.

1958 FIFA World Cup

1958 FIFA World Cup

The 1958 FIFA World Cup was the sixth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams, and was played in Sweden from 8 to 29 June 1958. It was the first FIFA World Cup to be played in a Nordic country.

1970 FIFA World Cup

1970 FIFA World Cup

The 1970 FIFA World Cup was the ninth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for men's senior national teams. Held from 31 May to 21 June in Mexico, it was the first World Cup tournament held outside Europe and South America, and it was also the first held in North America. Teams representing 75 nations from all six populated continents entered the competition, and its qualification rounds began in May 1968. Fourteen teams qualified from this process to join host nation Mexico and defending champions England in the 16-team final tournament. El Salvador, Israel and Morocco made their debut appearances at the final stage.

1974 FIFA World Cup Final

1974 FIFA World Cup Final

The 1974 FIFA World Cup Final was the final match of the 1974 FIFA World Cup, the 10th FIFA World Cup, a competition to determine the world champion among national men's football sides. The match was contested by the Netherlands and West Germany, with West Germany winning 2–1. The Netherlands opened the scoring via a Johan Neeskens penalty in the second minute, only for Paul Breitner to equalise with another penalty in the 25th minute before Gerd Müller scored the winning goal in the 43rd minute, claiming West Germany's second FIFA World Cup.

1998 FIFA World Cup

1998 FIFA World Cup

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the football world championship for men's national teams. The finals tournament was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. The country was chosen as the host nation by FIFA for the second time in the history of the tournament, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. It was the second time that France staged the competition and the ninth time that it was held in Europe. Spanning 32 days, it is the longest World Cup tournament ever held.

2006 FIFA World Cup

2006 FIFA World Cup

The 2006 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Germany 2006, was the 18th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which had won the right to host the event in July 2000. Teams representing 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams qualified from this process along with hosts Germany for the finals tournament. It was the second time that Germany staged the competition and the first as a unified country along with the former East Germany with Leipzig as a host city, and the 10th time that the tournament was held in Europe.

2002 FIFA World Cup

2002 FIFA World Cup

The 2002 FIFA World Cup, also branded as Korea Japan 2002, was the 17th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial football world championship for men's national teams organized by FIFA. It was held from 31 May to 30 June 2002 at sites in South Korea and Japan, with its final match hosted by Japan at International Stadium in Yokohama.

2014 FIFA World Cup

2014 FIFA World Cup

The 2014 FIFA World Cup was the 20th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial world championship for men's national football teams organised by FIFA. It took place in Brazil from 12 June to 13 July 2014, after the country was awarded the hosting rights in 2007. It was the second time that Brazil staged the competition, the first being in 1950, and the fifth time that it was held in South America. Fans and pundits alike consider this edition of the World Cup to be one of the greatest ever held.

1966 FIFA World Cup

1966 FIFA World Cup

The 1966 FIFA World Cup was the eighth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was played in England from 11 July to 30 July 1966. England defeated West Germany 4-2 in the final to win their first and so far only ever title; the match had finished at 2–2 after 90 minutes and went to extra time, when Geoff Hurst scored two goals to complete his hat-trick, the first to be scored in a men's World Cup final, with a handful of spectators wandering on to the pitch during the fourth goal. England were the fifth nation to win the event, and the third host nation to win after Uruguay in 1930 and Italy in 1934. Brazil were the defending champions, but they failed to progress from the group stage.

1962 FIFA World Cup

1962 FIFA World Cup

The 1962 FIFA World Cup was the seventh edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams. It was held from 30 May to 17 June 1962 in Chile. The qualification rounds took place between August 1960 and December 1961, with 56 teams entering from six confederations, and fourteen qualifying for the finals tournament alongside Chile, the hosts, and Brazil, the defending champions.

Overall top goalscorers

Thomas Müller is the top goalscorer among the players participating in the 2022 FIFA World Cup
Thomas Müller is the top goalscorer among the players participating in the 2022 FIFA World Cup
Ronaldo ranks second among players with the most goals, scoring 15, including two in the 2002 FIFA World Cup Final.
Ronaldo ranks second among players with the most goals, scoring 15, including two in the 2002 FIFA World Cup Final.
Lothar Matthäus scored 6 goals in his record 25 matches at the World Cup.
Lothar Matthäus scored 6 goals in his record 25 matches at the World Cup.
Gary Lineker is the top goalscorer for England with ten
Gary Lineker is the top goalscorer for England with ten
Gabriel Batistuta is the top goalscorer for Argentina with ten
Gabriel Batistuta is the top goalscorer for Argentina with ten
Grzegorz Lato (left) during the 1974 World Cup became the top goalscorer of Poland with ten
Grzegorz Lato (left) during the 1974 World Cup became the top goalscorer of Poland with ten
Teófilo Cubillas is the top goalscorer for Peru with ten
Teófilo Cubillas is the top goalscorer for Peru with ten
Asamoah Gyan with six goals for Ghana, is the only player outside of Europe or South America to score more than five goals at the World Cup
Asamoah Gyan with six goals for Ghana, is the only player outside of Europe or South America to score more than five goals at the World Cup
Table key
Denotes national top scorers (or joint top scorers) at the World Cup
# Denotes players still active at international level
[ ] Denotes tournaments where the player was part of the squad, but did not play in a match
( ) Denotes tournaments where the player played in a match, but did not score a goal
Players with at least 5 goals at the FIFA World Cup tournaments[6][7]
Rank Player Team Goals
scored
Matches
played
Goals
per
game

[nb 1]
Tournaments Notes
1 Miroslav Klose  Germany 16 24 0.67 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014 list[9]
2 Ronaldo  Brazil 15 19 0.79 [1994], 1998, 2002, 2006 list[10]
3 Gerd Müller  West Germany 14 13 1.08 1970, 1974 list[11]
4 Just Fontaine  France 13 6 2.17 1958 list[12]
5 Pelé  Brazil 12 14 0.86 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970 list[13]
6 Sándor Kocsis  Hungary 11 5 2.20 1954 list[14]
Jürgen Klinsmann  West Germany
 Germany
17 0.65 1990,
1994, 1998
list[15]
8 Helmut Rahn  West Germany 10 10 1.00 1954, 1958 list[16]
Gary Lineker  England 12 0.83 1986, 1990 list[17]
Gabriel Batistuta  Argentina 12 0.83 1994, 1998, 2002 list[18]
Teófilo Cubillas  Peru 13 0.77 1970, 1978, (1982) list[19]
Thomas Müller#  Germany 18 0.56 2010, 2014, (2018), (2022) list[20][21]
Grzegorz Lato  Poland 20 0.50 1974, 1978, 1982 list[22]
14 Ademir  Brazil 9 6 1.50 1950 list[nb 2][25]
Eusébio  Portugal 6 1.50 1966 list[26]
Christian Vieri  Italy 9 1.00 1998, 2002 list[27]
Vavá  Brazil 10 0.90 1958, 1962 [28]
David Villa  Spain 12 0.75 2006, 2010, 2014 list[29]
Paolo Rossi  Italy 14 0.64 1978, 1982, [1986] list[30]
Jairzinho  Brazil 16 0.56 (1966), 1970, 1974 list[31]
Roberto Baggio  Italy 16 0.56 1990, 1994, 1998 list[32]
Karl-Heinz Rummenigge  West Germany 19 0.47 1978, 1982, 1986 list[33]
Uwe Seeler  West Germany 21 0.43 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970 [34]
24 Guillermo Stábile  Argentina 8 4 2.00 1930 list[35]
Leônidas  Brazil 5 1.60 1934, 1938 list[nb 3][37]
Óscar Míguez  Uruguay 7 1.14 1950, 1954 [38]
Rivaldo  Brazil 14 0.57 1998, 2002 list[39]
Rudi Völler  West Germany
 Germany
15 0.53 1986, 1990,
1994
list[40]
Cristiano Ronaldo#  Portugal 19 0.42 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018, 2022 list[41][42]
Diego Maradona  Argentina 21 0.38 1982, 1986, (1990), 1994 list[43]
Lionel Messi#  Argentina 22 0.36 2006, (2010), 2014, 2018, 2022 list[41][44]
31 Oldřich Nejedlý  Czechoslovakia 7 6 1.17 1934, 1938 [nb 4][45]
Lajos Tichy  Hungary 8 0.88 1958, 1962, [1966] list[46]
Careca  Brazil 9 0.78 1986, 1990 [47]
Kylian Mbappe#  France 10 0.70 2018, 2022 list
Johnny Rep  Netherlands 13 0.54 1974, 1978 [48]
Andrzej Szarmach  Poland 13 0.54 1974, 1978, 1982 [49]
Hans Schäfer  West Germany 15 0.47 1954, 1958, (1962) [50]
Luis Suárez#  Uruguay 15 0.47 2010, 2014, 2018, (2022) list[51][41]
40 Josef Hügi  Switzerland 6 3 2.00 1954 [52]
Oleg Salenko  Russia 3 2.00 1994 list[53]
György Sárosi  Hungary 5 1.20 1934, 1938 [54]
Max Morlock  West Germany 5 1.20 1954 [55]
Erich Probst  Austria 5 1.20 1954 [56]
Enner Valencia#  Ecuador 6 1.00 2014, 2022
Salvatore Schillaci  Italy 7 0.86 1990 list[57]
Davor Šuker  Yugoslavia
 Croatia
8 0.75 [1990],
1998, (2002)
list[nb 5][58]
James Rodríguez#  Colombia 8 0.75 2014, (2018) list[59][60]
Helmut Haller  West Germany 9 0.67 (1962), 1966, (1970) [61]
Harry Kane#  England 9 0.67 2018, (2022) list[62]
Hristo Stoichkov  Bulgaria 10 0.60 1994, (1998) list[63]
Diego Forlán  Uruguay 10 0.60 2002, 2010, (2014) list[64]
Asamoah Gyan  Ghana 11 0.55 2006, 2010, 2014 list[65]
Neymar#  Brazil 11 0.55 2014, 2018, (2022) list[41][66]
Dennis Bergkamp  Netherlands 12 0.50 1994, 1998 list[67]
Rob Rensenbrink  Netherlands 13 0.46 1974, 1978 [68]
Rivellino  Brazil 15 0.40 1970, 1974, (1978) [69]
Bebeto  Brazil 15 0.40 (1990), 1994, 1998 list[70]
Arjen Robben  Netherlands 15 0.40 2006, 2010, 2014 list[71]
Zbigniew Boniek  Poland 16 0.38 1978, 1982, (1986) list[72]
Thierry Henry  France 17 0.35 1998, (2002), 2006, (2010) list[73]
Robin van Persie  Netherlands 17 0.35 2006, 2010, 2014 list[74]
Wesley Sneijder  Netherlands 17 0.35 (2006), 2010, 2014 list[75]
Mario Kempes  Argentina 18 0.33 (1974), 1978, (1982) list[76]
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany
 Germany
25 0.24 (1982), 1986, 1990,
1994, (1998)
[77]
66 Pedro Cea  Uruguay 5 4 1.25 1930 list[78]
Silvio Piola  Italy 4 1.25 1938 [79]
Gyula Zsengellér  Hungary 4 1.25 1938 [80]
Peter McParland  Northern Ireland 5 1.00 1958 list[81]
Tomáš Skuhravý  Czechoslovakia 5 1.00 1990 [82]
Juan Alberto Schiaffino  Uruguay 6 0.83 1950, 1954 [83]
Geoff Hurst  England 6 0.83 1966, 1970 list[84]
Jon Dahl Tomasson  Denmark 6 0.83 2002, 2010 list[85]
Alessandro Altobelli  Italy 7 0.71 1982, 1986 [86]
Kennet Andersson  Sweden 7 0.71 1994 list[87]
Fernando Morientes  Spain 7 0.71 1998, 2002 list[88]
Romário  Brazil 8 0.63 (1990), 1994 list[89]
Marc Wilmots  Belgium 8 0.63 [1990], (1994), 1998, 2002 list[90]
Mario Mandžukić  Croatia 8 0.63 2014, 2018 list[41][91]
Valentin Ivanov  Soviet Union 9 0.56 1958, 1962 list[92]
Emilio Butragueño  Spain 9 0.56 1986, (1990) list[93]
Roger Milla  Cameroon 9 0.56 (1982), 1990, 1994 [94]
Tim Cahill  Australia 9 0.56 2006, 2010, 2014, (2018) list[95][96]
Hans Krankl  Austria 10 0.50 1978, 1982 list[97]
Raúl  Spain 11 0.45 1998, 2002, 2006 list[98]
Romelu Lukaku#  Belgium 11 0.45 2014, 2018, (2022) list[99]
Garrincha  Brazil 12 0.42 (1958), 1962, 1966 [100]
Johan Neeskens  Netherlands 12 0.42 1974, (1978) [101]
Fernando Hierro  Spain 12 0.42 [1990], 1994, 1998, 2002 list[102]
Zinedine Zidane  France 12 0.42 1998, (2002), 2006 [103]
Landon Donovan  United States 12 0.42 2002, (2006), 2010 list[104]
Ivan Perišić#  Croatia 12 0.42 2014, 2018, (2022) list[41][105]
Henrik Larsson  Sweden 13 0.38 1994, 2002, 2006 list[106]
Michel Platini  France 14 0.36 1978, 1982, 1986 [107]
Zico  Brazil 14 0.36 1978, 1982, (1986) [108]
Gonzalo Higuaín  Argentina 14 0.36 2010, 2014, (2018) list[109][110]
Lukas Podolski  Germany 15 0.33 2006, 2010, (2014) list[111]
Edinson Cavani#  Uruguay 16 0.31 2010, 2014, 2018, (2022) list[41][112]
Franz Beckenbauer  West Germany 18 0.28 1966, 1970, (1974) list[113]

Timeline

Leônidas scored a record 8 goals for Brazil at the 1934 and 1938 FIFA World Cup.
Leônidas scored a record 8 goals for Brazil at the 1934 and 1938 FIFA World Cup.
Ademir scored a record 9 goals for Brazil at the 1950 FIFA World Cup.
Ademir scored a record 9 goals for Brazil at the 1950 FIFA World Cup.
Sándor Kocsis was the first player to have scored 10 or more goals in an edition. He scored record 11 goals in just 5 matches.
Sándor Kocsis was the first player to have scored 10 or more goals in an edition. He scored record 11 goals in just 5 matches.
Just Fontaine scored a record 13 goals at the 1958 FIFA World Cup.
Just Fontaine scored a record 13 goals at the 1958 FIFA World Cup.
Key
Goal set a new record
Goal equalled the existing record
Progressive list of footballers that have held the record for most goals scored at the FIFA World Cup final tournaments
Goals Date Player Team Goal Opponent Score Tournament & Stage Previous goals Ref
1 13 July 1930 Lucien Laurent  France 1–0 Mexico 4–1 1930, Uruguay
Group stage
N/A [nb 6]
Bart McGhee  United States 1–0 Belgium 3–0
Marcel Langiller  France 2–0 Mexico 4–1
André Maschinot  France 3–0 Mexico 4–1
Tom Florie  United States 2–0 Belgium 3–0
Bert Patenaude  United States 3–0 Belgium 3–0
Juan Carreño  Mexico 1–3 France 1–4
2 André Maschinot  France 4–1 Mexico 4–1
16 July 1930 Carlos Vidal  Chile 3–0 Mexico 3–0 [116]
17 July 1930 Ivan Bek  Yugoslavia 1–0 Bolivia 4–0 [117]
3 3–0
Bert Patenaude  United States 2–0 Paraguay 3–0 [118]
4 3–0
22 July 1930 Guillermo Stábile  Argentina 1–0 Chile 3–1 [119]
5 2–0
6 26 July 1930 3–0 United States 6–1 1930, Uruguay
Semi-final
7 6–0
8 30 July 1930 2–1 Uruguay 2–4 1930, Uruguay
Final
19 June 1938 Leônidas  Brazil 3–2 Sweden 4–2 1938, France
3rd place play-off
[120]
13 July 1950 Ademir  Brazil 1–0 Spain 6–1 1950, Brazil
Final round
[25]
9 5–0
27 June 1954 Sándor Kocsis  Hungary 4–2 Brazil 4–2 1954, Switzerland
Quarter-final
[121]
10 30 June 1954 3–2 Uruguay 4–2aet 1954, Switzerland
Semi-final
11 4–2
28 June 1958 Just Fontaine  France 3–1 West Germany 6–3 1958, Sweden
3rd place play-off
[122]
12 5–2
13 6–3
3 July 1974 Gerd Müller  West Germany 1–0 Poland 1–0 1974, West Germany
Second round
[11]
14 6 July 1974 2–1 Netherlands 2–1 1974, West Germany
Final
22 June 2006 Ronaldo  Brazil 4–1 Japan 4–1 2006, Germany
Group stage
[123]
15 27 June 2006 1–0 Ghana 3–0 2006, Germany
Round of 16
21 June 2014 Miroslav Klose  Germany 2–2 Ghana 2–2 2014, Brazil
Group stage
[124]
16 8 July 2014 2–0 Brazil 7–1 2014, Brazil
Semi-final

Discover more about Overall top goalscorers related topics

2002 FIFA World Cup Final

2002 FIFA World Cup Final

The 2002 FIFA World Cup Final was the final match of the 2002 World Cup, the 17th edition of FIFA's competition for national football teams. The match was played at the International Stadium in Yokohama, Japan, on 30 June 2002, and was contested by Germany and Brazil. The tournament comprised hosts Japan and South Korea, holders France, and 29 other teams who emerged from the qualification phase, organised by the six FIFA confederations. The 32 teams competed in a group stage, from which 16 teams qualified for the knockout stage. En route to the final, Germany finished first in Group E, with two wins and a draw, after which they defeated Paraguay in the round of 16, the United States in the quarter-finals and South Korea in the semi-finals. Brazil finished top of Group C with three wins, before defeating Belgium in the round of 16, England in the quarter-final, and Turkey in the semi-final. The final took place in front of 69,029 supporters, with an estimated 1.5 billion watching on television, and was refereed by Pierluigi Collina from Italy.

1974 FIFA World Cup

1974 FIFA World Cup

The 1974 FIFA World Cup was the tenth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams, and was played in West Germany between 13 June and 7 July. The tournament marked the first time that the current trophy, the FIFA World Cup Trophy, created by the Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, was awarded. The previous trophy, the Jules Rimet Trophy, had been won for the third time by Brazil in 1970 and awarded permanently to the Brazilians. This was the first out of three World Cups to feature two rounds of group stages.

Miroslav Klose

Miroslav Klose

Miroslav Josef Klose is a German professional football manager and former player who is the head coach of Austrian Bundesliga club Rheindorf Altach. A striker, Klose is the all-time top scorer for Germany and holds the record for the most goals scored in FIFA World Cups.

Germany national football team

Germany national football team

The Germany national football team represents Germany in men's international football and played its first match in 1908. The team is governed by the German Football Association, founded in 1900. Between 1949 and 1990, separate German national teams were recognised by FIFA due to Allied occupation and division: the DFB's team representing the Federal Republic of Germany, the Saarland team representing the Saar Protectorate (1950–1956) and the East Germany team representing the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). The latter two were absorbed along with their records; the present team represents the reunified Federal Republic. The official name and code "Germany FR (FRG)" was shortened to "Germany (GER)" following reunification in 1990.

List of international goals scored by Miroslav Klose

List of international goals scored by Miroslav Klose

Miroslav Klose is the all-time top scorer for the Germany national football team, with 71 goals in 137 games between 2001 and 2014. He is also the top scorer in the history of the FIFA World Cup, with 16 goals in 24 appearances across four editions from 2002 to 2014. In the 13 years Klose played for the national team, Germany never lost a game in which he scored.

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Gerd Müller

Gerd Müller

Gerhard "Gerd" Müller was a German professional footballer. A striker renowned for his clinical finishing, especially in and around the six-yard box, he is widely regarded as one of the greatest goalscorers in the history of the sport.

List of international goals scored by Gerd Müller

List of international goals scored by Gerd Müller

Gerd Müller (1945–2021) was a German professional footballer who represented the West Germany national football team as a striker between 1966 and 1974. He scored his first international goal on 8 April 1967, when he netted four goals in a UEFA Euro 1968 qualifier against Albania. Since then, Müller become his country's all-time top scorer with 68 goals in 62 games until being overtaken by Miroslav Klose on 6 June 2014. He held the record for goals scored in FIFA World Cup tournaments between 1974 and 2006. This record was bettered in 2006 by Brazil's Ronaldo, and eight years later by fellow country man Miroslav Klose, who also broke Müller's record for goals for Germany.

Just Fontaine

Just Fontaine

Just Louis Fontaine is a French former professional footballer. A prolific forward, he is best known for scoring the most goals in a single edition of the FIFA World Cup, with thirteen in six matches in 1958. In 2004, Pelé named him one of the 125 Greatest Living Footballers at a FIFA Awards Ceremony.

France national football team

France national football team

The France national football team represents France in men's international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF. The team's colours are blue, white, and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus. They are the reigning world champions, having won the most recent World Cup final in 2018.

Pelé

Pelé

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pelé, is a Brazilian former professional footballer who played as a forward. Regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, and labelled "the greatest" by FIFA, he was among the most successful and popular sports figures of the 20th century. In 1999, he was named Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee and was included in the Time list of the 100 most important people of the 20th century. In 2000, Pelé was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), and was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the Century. His 1,279 goals in 1,363 games, which includes friendlies, is recognised as a Guinness World Record.

Hungary national football team

Hungary national football team

The Hungary national football team represents Hungary in men's international football and is controlled by the Hungarian Football Federation. The team has made 9 appearances in the FIFA World Cup and 4 appearances in the European Championship, and plays its home matches at the Puskás Aréna, which opened in November 2019.

Top goalscorers for each tournament

Guillermo Stábile scored a record 8 goals for Argentina at the 1930 FIFA World Cup.
Guillermo Stábile scored a record 8 goals for Argentina at the 1930 FIFA World Cup.
Eusébio scored nine goals for Portugal at the 1966 World Cup.
Eusébio scored nine goals for Portugal at the 1966 World Cup.
Gerd Müller scored ten goals for West Germany at the 1970 World Cup.
Gerd Müller scored ten goals for West Germany at the 1970 World Cup.
Top goalscorers at each FIFA World Cup final tournament[125][126][127]
World Cup Player Team Goals
scored
Matches
played
Golden
Boot
Other FIFA Awards
 Uruguay 1930 Guillermo Stábile  Argentina 8 4 Yes Silver Ball
 Italy 1934 Oldřich Nejedlý  Czechoslovakia 5 4 Yes Bronze Ball
 France 1938 Leônidas  Brazil 7 4 Yes Golden Ball
 Brazil 1950 Ademir  Brazil 9 6 Yes Bronze Ball
 Switzerland 1954 Sándor Kocsis  Hungary 11 5 Yes Silver Ball
 Sweden 1958 Just Fontaine  France 13 6 Yes Bronze Ball
 Chile 1962 Garrincha  Brazil 4 6 Yes Golden Ball
Vavá  Brazil 6 Yes
Leonel Sánchez  Chile 6 Yes Bronze Ball
Flórián Albert  Hungary 3 Yes Best Young Player
Valentin Ivanov  Soviet Union 4 Yes
Dražan Jerković  Yugoslavia 6 Yes
 England 1966 Eusébio  Portugal 9 6 Yes Bronze Ball
 Mexico 1970 Gerd Müller  West Germany 10 6 Yes Best Young Player, Bronze Ball
 West Germany 1974 Grzegorz Lato  Poland 7 7 Yes
 Argentina 1978 Mario Kempes  Argentina 6 7 Yes Golden Ball
 Spain 1982 Paolo Rossi  Italy 6 7 Yes Golden Ball
 Mexico 1986 Gary Lineker  England 6 5 Yes
 Italy 1990 Salvatore Schillaci  Italy 6 7 Yes Golden Ball
 United States 1994 Hristo Stoichkov  Bulgaria 6 7 Yes Bronze Ball
Oleg Salenko  Russia 3 Yes
 France 1998 Davor Šuker  Croatia 6 7 Yes Silver Ball
 South Korea and
 Japan 2002
Ronaldo  Brazil 8 7 Yes Silver Ball
 Germany 2006 Miroslav Klose  Germany 5 7 Yes
 South Africa 2010 Thomas Müller  Germany 5 6 Yes Best Young Player
Wesley Sneijder  Netherlands 7 No Bronze Boot, Silver Ball
David Villa  Spain 7 No Silver Boot, Bronze Ball
Diego Forlán  Uruguay 7 No Golden Ball
 Brazil 2014 James Rodríguez  Colombia 6 5 Yes
 Russia 2018 Harry Kane  England 6 6 Yes
 Qatar 2022

Discover more about Top goalscorers for each tournament related topics

FIFA World Cup awards

FIFA World Cup awards

At the end of each FIFA World Cup final tournament, several awards are presented to the players and teams which have distinguished themselves in various aspects of the game.

1930 FIFA World Cup

1930 FIFA World Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in Uruguay from 13 to 30 July 1930. FIFA, football's international governing body, selected Uruguay as host nation, as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its first constitution and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

Guillermo Stábile

Guillermo Stábile

Guillermo Stábile was an Argentine professional football player and manager who played as a centre forward. At club level, Stábile won two national championships with Huracán and played in Italy and France. He was the top scorer of 1930 World Cup, the inaugural iteration of the tournament. As manager, he led Argentina to victory at six South American Championships and Racing Club to three league titles.

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

1934 FIFA World Cup

1934 FIFA World Cup

The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams. It took place in Italy from 27 May to 10 June 1934.

Czechoslovakia national football team

Czechoslovakia national football team

The Czechoslovakia national football team was the national football team of Czechoslovakia from 1920 to 1993. The team was controlled by the Czechoslovak Football Association, and the team qualified for eight World Cups and three European Championships. It had two runner-up finishes in World Cups, in 1934 and 1962, and won the European Championship in the 1976 tournament.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a transcontinental country predominantly located in Western Europe and spanning overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Due to its several coastal territories, France has the largest exclusive economic zone in the world. France borders Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, Switzerland, Monaco, Italy, Andorra, and Spain in continental Europe, as well as the Netherlands, Suriname, and Brazil in the Americas via its overseas territories in French Guiana and Saint Martin. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain close to 68 million people. France is a unitary semi-presidential republic with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city and main cultural and commercial centre; other major urban areas include Marseille, Lyon, Toulouse, Lille, Bordeaux, and Nice.

1938 FIFA World Cup

1938 FIFA World Cup

The 1938 FIFA World Cup was the third edition of the World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams and was held in France from 4 June until 19 June 1938. Italy defended its title in the final, beating Hungary 4–2. Italy's 1934 and 1938 teams hold the distinction of being the only men's national team to win the World Cup multiple times under the same coach, Vittorio Pozzo. It would be the last World Cup until 1950 due to the disruption of World War II.

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Brazil

Brazil

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers (3,300,000 sq mi) and with over 217 million people, Brazil is the world's fifth-largest country by area and the seventh most populous. Its capital is Brasília, and its most populous city is São Paulo. The federation is composed of the union of the 26 states and the Federal District. It is the largest country to have Portuguese as an official language and the only one in the Americas; one of the most multicultural and ethnically diverse nations, due to over a century of mass immigration from around the world; and the most populous Roman Catholic-majority country.

1950 FIFA World Cup

1950 FIFA World Cup

The 1950 FIFA World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship for senior men's national teams and held in Brazil from 24 June to 16 July 1950. The planned 1942 and 1946 World Cups were cancelled due to World War II. This tournament ended the hiatus. Uruguay, who had won the inaugural competition in 1930, defeated the host nation, Brazil, in the deciding match of the four-team group of the final round. This was the only tournament not decided by a one-match final. It was also the inaugural tournament where the trophy was referred to as the Jules Rimet Cup, to mark the 25th anniversary of Jules Rimet's presidency of FIFA.

1954 FIFA World Cup

1954 FIFA World Cup

The 1954 FIFA World Cup was the fifth edition of the FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football tournament for senior men's national teams of the nations affiliated to FIFA. It was held in Switzerland from 16 June to 4 July. Switzerland was selected as the host country in July 1946. At the tournament several all-time records for goal-scoring were set, including the highest average number of goals scored per game. The tournament was won by West Germany, who defeated tournament favourites Hungary 3–2 in the final, their first World Cup title.

Goalscorers at multiple tournaments

Players who scored at 3 or more separate World Cups
Rank Player Team Tournaments
with
goals
Goals
scored
Matches
played
Goals
per
game
Tournaments
with goals
1 Cristiano Ronaldo  Portugal 5 8 19 0.42 2006, 2010, 2014, 2018, 2022
2 Pelé  Brazil 4 12 14 0.86 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970
Uwe Seeler  West Germany 9 21 0.43 1958, 1962, 1966, 1970
Miroslav Klose  Germany 16 24 0.67 2002, 2006, 2010, 2014
Lionel Messi  Argentina 8 22 0.36 2006, 2014, 2018, 2022
6 Joe Jordan  Scotland 3 4 7 0.57 1974, 1978, 1982
Grzegorz Lato  Poland 10 20 0.50 1974, 1978, 1982
Andrzej Szarmach  Poland 7 13 0.54 1974, 1978, 1982
Michel Platini  France 5 14 0.36 1978, 1982, 1986
Dominique Rocheteau  France 4 10 0.40 1978, 1982, 1986
Karl-Heinz Rummenigge  West Germany 9 19 0.47 1978, 1982, 1986
Diego Maradona  Argentina 8 21 0.38 1982, 1986, 1994
Lothar Matthäus  West Germany
 Germany
6 25 0.24 1986, 1990,
1994
Rudi Völler  West Germany
 Germany
8 15 0.53 1986, 1990,
1994
Roberto Baggio  Italy 9 16 0.56 1990, 1994, 1998
Jürgen Klinsmann  West Germany
 Germany
11 17 0.65 1990,
1994, 1998
Gabriel Batistuta  Argentina 10 12 0.83 1994, 1998, 2002
Fernando Hierro  Spain 5 12 0.42 1994, 1998, 2002
Sami Al-Jaber  Saudi Arabia 3 9 0.33 1994, 1998, 2006
Henrik Larsson  Sweden 5 13 0.38 1994, 2002, 2006
David Beckham  England 3 13 0.23 1998, 2002, 2006
Raúl  Spain 5 11 0.45 1998, 2002, 2006
Ronaldo  Brazil 15 19 0.79 1998, 2002, 2006
Cuauhtémoc Blanco  Mexico 3 11 0.27 1998, 2002, 2010
Park Ji-sung  South Korea 3 14 0.21 2002, 2006, 2010
Tim Cahill  Australia 5 9 0.56 2006, 2010, 2014
Clint Dempsey  United States 4 10 0.40 2006, 2010, 2014
Asamoah Gyan  Ghana 6 11 0.55 2006, 2010, 2014
Rafael Márquez  Mexico 3 19 0.16 2006, 2010, 2014
Arjen Robben  Netherlands 6 15 0.40 2006, 2010, 2014
Robin van Persie  Netherlands 6 17 0.35 2006, 2010, 2014
David Villa  Spain 9 12 0.75 2006, 2010, 2014
Edinson Cavani  Uruguay 5 16 0.31 2010, 2014, 2018
Javier Hernández  Mexico 4 12 0.33 2010, 2014, 2018
Keisuke Honda  Japan 4 10 0.40 2010, 2014, 2018
Luis Suárez  Uruguay 7 15 0.47 2010, 2014, 2018

Discover more about Goalscorers at multiple tournaments related topics

Cristiano Ronaldo

Cristiano Ronaldo

Cristiano Ronaldo dos Santos Aveiro is a Portuguese professional footballer who plays as a forward and captains the Portugal national team. He is currently a free agent. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Ronaldo has won five Ballon d'Or awards and four European Golden Shoes, the most by a European player. He has won 32 trophies in his career, including seven league titles, five UEFA Champions Leagues, and the UEFA European Championship. Ronaldo holds the records for most appearances (183), goals (140), and assists (42) in the Champions League, goals in the European Championship (14), international goals (118), and international appearances by a European (193). He is one of the few players to have made over 1,100 professional career appearances, and has scored over 800 official senior career goals for club and country. He is the only male player to score in five World Cup tournaments.

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Germany national football team

Germany national football team

The Germany national football team represents Germany in men's international football and played its first match in 1908. The team is governed by the German Football Association, founded in 1900. Between 1949 and 1990, separate German national teams were recognised by FIFA due to Allied occupation and division: the DFB's team representing the Federal Republic of Germany, the Saarland team representing the Saar Protectorate (1950–1956) and the East Germany team representing the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). The latter two were absorbed along with their records; the present team represents the reunified Federal Republic. The official name and code "Germany FR (FRG)" was shortened to "Germany (GER)" following reunification in 1990.

Miroslav Klose

Miroslav Klose

Miroslav Josef Klose is a German professional football manager and former player who is the head coach of Austrian Bundesliga club Rheindorf Altach. A striker, Klose is the all-time top scorer for Germany and holds the record for the most goals scored in FIFA World Cups.

Lionel Messi

Lionel Messi

Lionel Andrés Messi, also known as Leo Messi, is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a forward for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain and captains the Argentina national team. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Messi has won a record seven Ballon d'Or awards, a record six European Golden Shoes, and in 2020 was named to the Ballon d'Or Dream Team. Until leaving the club in 2021, he had spent his entire professional career with Barcelona, where he won a club-record 35 trophies, including ten La Liga titles, seven Copa del Rey titles and four UEFA Champions Leagues. A prolific goalscorer and creative playmaker, Messi holds the records for most goals in La Liga (474), most goals in a La Liga and European league season (50), most hat-tricks in La Liga (36) and the UEFA Champions League (8), and most assists in La Liga (192), a La Liga season (21) and the Copa América (17). He also holds the record for most international goals by a South American male (93). Messi has scored over 785 senior career goals for club and country, and has the most goals by a player for a single club (672).

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

Joe Jordan

Joe Jordan

Joseph Jordan is a Scottish football player, coach and manager. He is currently a first-team coach at AFC Bournemouth.

Grzegorz Lato

Grzegorz Lato

Grzegorz Bolesław Lato is a Polish former professional football player and manager who played as a winger. He was a member of Poland's golden generation of football players who rose to fame in the 1970s and early 80s. Over a decade, he represented Poland at five major tournaments starting with gold at the 1972 Summer Olympic Games in Munich and ending with a third-place finish at the 1982 FIFA World Cup in Spain. He reached the peak of his career at the 1974 World Cup, where he was the leading scorer and the only Pole to-date to have won the honor. After retiring from his playing career he had a brief stint as manager in several clubs in and out of Poland.

Andrzej Szarmach

Andrzej Szarmach

Andrzej Szarmach is a former Polish football player.

Michel Platini

Michel Platini

Michel François Platini is a French football administrator and former player and manager. Regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time, Platini won the Ballon d'Or three times in a row, in 1983, 1984 and 1985, and came seventh in the FIFA Player of the Century vote. In recognition of his achievements, he was named a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur in 1985 and became an Officier in 1998. As the president of UEFA in 2015 he was banned from involvement in football under FIFA's organisation, over ethics violations. The ban will last until 2023.

France national football team

France national football team

The France national football team represents France in men's international football and is controlled by the French Football Federation, also known as FFF. The team's colours are blue, white, and red, and the coq gaulois its symbol. France are colloquially known as Les Bleus. They are the reigning world champions, having won the most recent World Cup final in 2018.

Dominique Rocheteau

Dominique Rocheteau

Dominique Claude Rocheteau is a French former professional footballer who played as a winger. A French international, he played in three FIFA World Cups, scoring at least one goal in each of them, and was part of the team that won UEFA Euro 1984. At club level, he won four Division 1 titles, three Coupes de France and played in the 1976 European Cup Final.

Source: "FIFA World Cup top goalscorers", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, December 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIFA_World_Cup_top_goalscorers.

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Notes
  1. ^ Outside this list is Ernst Wilimowski of Poland, the player with the highest goals-to-games ratio in the World Cup. His ratio is 4.00 as he scored four goals in his only World Cup appearance, in 1938.[8]
  2. ^ There was a controversy regarding the number of goals scored by Ademir in 1950 because of incomplete data from the final group round game against Spain, that ended in a 6–1 victory for Brazil. The first Brazilian goal was credited as own goal and the fifth was credited to Jair,[23] but both are now credited to Ademir.[24]
  3. ^ FIFA initially credited Leônidas with eight goals in the 1938 tournament, but in November 2006, FIFA revised it to seven (he scored one additional goal in the 1934 tournament).[36]
  4. ^ FIFA initially credited Nejedlý with only four goals in 1934. However, FIFA changed it to five goals in November 2006, meaning he scored a total of seven goals overall (he scored two goals in 1938).[36]
  5. ^ Davor Šuker was part of Yugoslavia's squad in the 1990 FIFA World Cup but did not play any games. After the breakup of Yugoslavia, he joined the Croatian national team.
  6. ^ The two initial games of the 1930 FIFA World Cup (France vs Mexico[114] and United States vs Belgium[115]) were played at the same time, as seven players scored, with André Maschinot scoring two goals. The order in which these players are listed reflects the actual elapsed time in the games when their goals were scored.
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