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Eurovision Song Contest 1993

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Eurovision Song Contest 1993
Eurovision Song Contest 1993 logo.svg
Dates
Final15 May 1993
Host
VenueGreen Glens Arena,
Millstreet, Ireland
Presenter(s)Fionnuala Sweeney
Musical directorNoel Kelehan
Directed byAnita Notaro
Executive supervisorChristian Clausen
Executive producerLiam Miller
Host broadcasterRadio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ)
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/millstreet-1993 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries25
Debuting countries
Returning countriesNone
Non-returning countries Yugoslavia
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song ContestMorocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Slovakia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Hungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993Romania in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that lost Kvalifikacija za Millstreet     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1993
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song Ireland
"In Your Eyes"
1992 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1994

The Eurovision Song Contest 1993 was the 38th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Millstreet, Ireland, following the country's victory at the 1992 contest with the song "Why Me?" by Linda Martin. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ), the contest was held at the Green Glens Arena on 15 May 1993 and was hosted by Irish TV-reporter Fionnuala Sweeney, marking the first time since the 1987 contest that just one presenter had hosted the contest.

Twenty-five countries took part in the contest – the biggest number up until then. The breakup of Yugoslavia meant that many new countries wanted to participate in the competition. Therefore, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia all competed for the first time in the contest this year.

Ireland scored a second victory in a row this year with the song "In Your Eyes" by Niamh Kavanagh. This was Ireland's fifth victory, and equalled the tally of five Eurovision victories achieved by France in 1977 and Luxembourg in 1983. Ireland became the fourth country to win two years in a row, after Spain in 1968 and 1969, Luxembourg in 1972 and 1973, and Israel in 1978 and 1979. Additionally, the top two countries of this contest were the same as the top two countries in the previous year's contest, being Ireland and the United Kingdom.

Discover more about Eurovision Song Contest 1993 related topics

Eurovision Song Contest

Eurovision Song Contest

The Eurovision Song Contest, sometimes abbreviated to ESC and often known simply as Eurovision, is an international songwriting competition organised annually by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), featuring participants representing primarily European countries. Each participating country submits an original song to be performed on live television and radio, transmitted to national broadcasters via the EBU's Eurovision and Euroradio networks, with competing countries then casting votes for the other countries' songs to determine a winner.

European Broadcasting Union

European Broadcasting Union

The European Broadcasting Union is an alliance of public service media organisations whose countries are within the European Broadcasting Area or who are members of the Council of Europe. As of 2022, it is made up of 112 member organizations from 54 countries, and 31 associate members from a further 20 countries. It was established in 1950, and had its administrative headquarters in Geneva and technical office in Brussels.

Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest

Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest

Bosnia and Herzegovina has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 19 times since making its debut in 1993, after coming second in the qualification round "Kvalifikacija za Millstreet". Prior to 1993, Bosnia and Herzegovina participated in the Eurovision Song Contest as part of Yugoslavia.

Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest

Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest

Croatia has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 27 times since making its debut at the 1993 contest. Their entry has since 1993, excluding from 2012 to 2018, been selected at the Dora pop festival, an event organised by the national public broadcaster Croatian Radiotelevision (HRT). Croatia's best result in the contest is a fourth-place finish in 1996 and 1999.

Eurovision Song Contest 1977

Eurovision Song Contest 1977

The Eurovision Song Contest 1977 was the 22nd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in London, United Kingdom, following the country's victory at the 1976 contest with the song "Save Your Kisses for Me" by Brotherhood of Man. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), the contest was held at the Wembley Conference Centre on 7 May 1977, marking the first time the event took place in the month of May since the first contest in 1956. The contest was hosted by English journalist Angela Rippon.

Eurovision Song Contest 1983

Eurovision Song Contest 1983

The Eurovision Song Contest 1983 was the 28th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held in Munich, then West Germany, following the country's victory at the 1982 contest with the song "Ein bißchen Frieden" by Nicole. Despite their first victory the year before, this was the second time Germany had hosted the contest, having previously done so in 1957. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcasters Arbeitsgemeinschaft der öffentlich-rechtlichen Rundfunkanstalten der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (ARD) and Bayerischer Rundfunk (BR), the contest was held at the Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle on 23 April 1983 and was hosted by German dancer Marlene Charell.

Eurovision Song Contest 1968

Eurovision Song Contest 1968

The Eurovision Song Contest 1968 was the 13th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in London, United Kingdom, following the country's first victory at the 1967 contest with the song "Puppet on a String" by Sandie Shaw. Despite having won for the first time the year before, it was actually the third time that the United Kingdom had hosted the competition, having previously done so in 1960 and 1963, both of which also took place in London. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), the contest was held at Royal Albert Hall on 6 April 1968, and was hosted by Katie Boyle for the third time. It was notably also the first time that the contest was broadcast in colour.

Eurovision Song Contest 1969

Eurovision Song Contest 1969

The Eurovision Song Contest 1969 was the 14th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Madrid, Spain, following the country's victory at the 1968 contest with the song "La, la, la" by Massiel. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Televisión Española (TVE), the contest was held at the Teatro Real on 29 March 1969 and was hosted by Spanish television presenter and actress Laurita Valenzuela.

Eurovision Song Contest 1972

Eurovision Song Contest 1972

The Eurovision Song Contest 1972 was the 17th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Edinburgh, United Kingdom and was organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), who agreed to stage the event after Monaco, who won in 1971, were unable to meet the demands of hosting the event and could not find a suitable venue. The contest was held at the Usher Hall on 25 March 1972 and was hosted by Scottish ballet dancer Moira Shearer.

Eurovision Song Contest 1973

Eurovision Song Contest 1973

The Eurovision Song Contest 1973 was the 18th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, following the country's victory at the 1972 contest with the song "Après toi" by Vicky Leandros. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Compagnie Luxembourgeoise de Télédiffusion (CLT), the contest was held at the Grand Théâtre on 7 April 1973 and was hosted by German television presenter Helga Guitton.

Eurovision Song Contest 1978

Eurovision Song Contest 1978

The Eurovision Song Contest 1978 was the 23rd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Paris, France, following the country's victory at the 1977 contest with the song "L'oiseau et l'enfant" by Marie Myriam. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Télévision Française 1 (TF1), the contest was held at the Palais des Congrès on 22 April 1978 and was hosted by French television presenters Denise Fabre and Léon Zitrone. This was the first time that more than one presenter had hosted the contest as well as the first to have a male presenter since 1956. In addition to hosting, the two presenters also served as commentators for France.

Eurovision Song Contest 1979

Eurovision Song Contest 1979

The Eurovision Song Contest 1979 was the 24th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Jerusalem, Israel, following the country's victory at the 1978 contest with the song "A-Ba-Ni-Bi" by Izhar Cohen and the Alphabeta. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Israeli Broadcasting Authority (IBA), the contest was held at the International Convention Centre on 31 March 1979 and was hosted by Israeli television presenter Daniel Pe'er and singer Yardena Arazi. This was the first time that the Eurovision Song Contest was held outside Europe.

Location

Location of Millstreet and the capital, Dublin, which hosted all the previous Irish-held contests.

The location for this year's edition of the contest was unique, in that Millstreet, with a population at the time of just 1,500 people, was the smallest host town ever chosen for the Eurovision Song Contest.

The owner of the Green Glens Arena, Noel C. Duggan, wrote to the RTÉ on the same night of the Irish victory in the 1992 edition, proposing the free use of the venue to host the contest. The venue, a large indoor and well- equipped equestrian centre that could accommodate a 3500 seated audience was deemed more than suitable as the location by host broadcaster RTÉ. With huge support from local and national authorities, plus several businesses in the region, the town's infrastructure was greatly enhanced in order to accommodate an event of this scale. Killarney, a larger town located 30 kilometres from Millstreet was chosen as a second host town, accommodating the majority of the contestants and delegates. It was also the largest outside broadcast ever attempted by state broadcaster RTÉ and was deemed a technical and logistical success for all involved.

The stage was created by Alan Farquharson, who was also chief production designer two years later in Dublin. The design resembled a scalene triangular shaped performance area, under lit by multicoloured cable lighting and featured a hydraulically controlled walkway, with a mirrored ceiling structure suspended above the stage that mirrored the floor shape and reflected lighting.

BBC newsreader Nicholas Witchell caused controversy by asking Noel Duggan, live on air and shortly before the contest, how he felt about holding a major international cultural event "in a cowshed in Ireland". Duggan replied that, unlike the chaotic 1993 Grand National (which had taken place the previous month, but which was declared void following two false starts and the unsuccessful recall of the second), the 1993 Eurovision would start on time, it would finish on time and there would be a winner. Duggan also noted that the Green Glens Arena was "a horseshed". Witchell subsequently apologized for his question.[1]

Discover more about Location related topics

Dublin

Dublin

Dublin is the capital and largest city of Ireland. On a bay at the mouth of the River Liffey, it is in the province of Leinster, bordered on the south by the Dublin Mountains, a part of the Wicklow Mountains range. At the 2016 census, it had a population of 1,173,179, while the population of County Dublin as a whole was 1,347,359, and the Greater Dublin Area was 1,904,806.

Millstreet

Millstreet

Millstreet is a town in north County Cork, Ireland, with a population of 1,555.

Green Glens Arena

Green Glens Arena

The Green Glens Arena is a public entertainment location in Millstreet, in County Cork, Ireland. There is a 20 hectares outdoor estate for equestrian sporting events and an indoor arena measuring 80 metres by 40 metres.

RTÉ

RTÉ

Raidió Teilifís Éireann (RTÉ) is the national broadcaster of Ireland headquartered in Dublin. It both produces and broadcasts programmes on television, radio and online. The radio service began on 1 January 1926, while regular television broadcasts began on 31 December 1961, making it one of the oldest continuously operating public service broadcasters in the world. RTÉ also publishes a weekly listings and lifestyle magazine, the RTÉ Guide.

Killarney

Killarney

Killarney is a town in County Kerry, southwestern Ireland. The town is on the northeastern shore of Lough Leane, part of Killarney National Park, and is home to St Mary's Cathedral, Ross Castle, Muckross House and Abbey, the Lakes of Killarney, MacGillycuddy's Reeks, Purple Mountain, Mangerton Mountain, Paps Mountain, the Gap of Dunloe and Torc Waterfall. Its natural heritage, history and location on the Ring of Kerry make Killarney a popular tourist destination.

Eurovision Song Contest 1995

Eurovision Song Contest 1995

The Eurovision Song Contest 1995 was the 40th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest, held on 13 May 1995 at the Point Theatre in Dublin, Ireland. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ) and presented by Irish journalist and television presenter Mary Kennedy, the contest was held in Ireland following the country's victory at the 1994 contest with the song "Rock 'n' Roll Kids" by Paul Harrington and Charlie McGettigan. It was the third consecutive contest to be held in Ireland, and the second consecutive edition to be held in the Point Theatre in Dublin.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London, England. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

Nicholas Witchell

Nicholas Witchell

Nicholas Newton Henshall Witchell OStJ FRGS is an English journalist and news presenter. The latter half of his career has been as royal correspondent for BBC News.

1993 Grand National

1993 Grand National

The 1993 Grand National was scheduled on 3 April 1993 to be the 147th running of the Grand National horse race, held annually at Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England.

Qualification

In the run-up to this contest, the European Broadcasting Union finally started to grapple with the explosion in the number of potential participating countries, caused by the dissolution of the Eastern bloc, and also by the disintegration of Yugoslavia, which had traditionally been the only communist country to take part in the contest. For the first time, a pre-qualifying round was introduced, but only for countries that had either never participated in the contest at all, or in the case of former republics of Yugoslavia, had not previously competed as nations in their own right. This was, however, merely a 'sticking-plaster' measure that was plainly not a sustainable solution for future years, as it would not be seen as remotely equitable. But in the meantime, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Hungary, Slovenia, Slovakia, Romania and Estonia were left to battle it out in a special competition called Kvalifikacija za Millstreet in Ljubljana on 3 April for the mere three places available at the grand final in Millstreet. After some extremely tight voting, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Slovenia edged through.

Participating countries

Conductors

Each performance had a conductor who directed the orchestra.[2][3]

Returning artists

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Tony Wegas  Austria 1992
Katri Helena  Finland 1979
Tommy Seebach  Denmark 1979, 1981 (with Debbie Cameron)

Participants and results

R/O Country Artist Song Language[4][5] Points Place[6]
1  Italy Enrico Ruggeri "Sole d'Europa" Italian 45 12
2  Turkey Burak Aydos "Esmer Yarim" Turkish 10 21
3  Germany Münchener Freiheit "Viel zu weit" German 18 18
4  Switzerland Annie Cotton "Moi, tout simplement" French 148 3
5  Denmark Tommy Seebach Band "Under stjernerne på himlen" Danish 9 22
6  Greece Katy Garbi "Ellada, hora tou fotos" (Ελλάδα, χώρα του φωτός) Greek 64 9
7  Belgium Barbara "Iemand als jij" Dutch 3 25
8  Malta William Mangion "This Time" English 69 8
9  Iceland Inga [is] "Þá veistu svarið" Icelandic 42 13
10  Austria Tony Wegas "Maria Magdalena" German 32 14
11  Portugal Anabela "A cidade (até ser dia)" Portuguese 60 10
12  France Patrick Fiori "Mama Corsica" French, Corsican 121 4
13  Sweden Arvingarna "Eloise" Swedish 89 7
14  Ireland Niamh Kavanagh "In Your Eyes" English 187 1
15  Luxembourg Modern Times "Donne-moi une chance" French, Luxembourgish 11 20
16  Slovenia 1X Band "Tih deževen dan" Slovene 9 22
17  Finland Katri Helena "Tule luo" Finnish 20 17
18  Bosnia and Herzegovina Fazla "Sva bol svijeta" Bosnian 27 16
19  United Kingdom Sonia "Better the Devil You Know" English 164 2
20  Netherlands Ruth Jacott "Vrede" Dutch 92 6
21  Croatia Put "Don't Ever Cry" Croatian, English 31 15
22  Spain Eva Santamaría "Hombres" Spanish 58 11
23  Cyprus Zymboulakis and Van Beke "Mi stamatas" (Μη σταματάς) Greek 17 19
24  Israel Lehakat Shiru "Shiru" (שירו) Hebrew, English 4 24
25  Norway Silje Vige "Alle mine tankar" Norwegian 120 5

Discover more about Participating countries related topics

Conducting

Conducting

Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert. It has been defined as "the art of directing the simultaneous performance of several players or singers by the use of gesture." The primary duties of the conductor are to interpret the score in a way which reflects the specific indications in that score, set the tempo, ensure correct entries by ensemble members, and "shape" the phrasing where appropriate. Conductors communicate with their musicians primarily through hand gestures, usually with the aid of a baton, and may use other gestures or signals such as eye contact. A conductor usually supplements their direction with verbal instructions to their musicians in rehearsal.

Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest

Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest

Italy has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 47 times since making its debut at the first contest in 1956. It was one of the seven countries that competed at the first contest, which took inspiration from the Sanremo Music Festival. Italy competed at the contest without interruption until 1980, discontinuing its participation on a number of occasions during the 1980s and 1990s. After a 13-year absence starting in 1998, the country returned to the contest in 2011. Italy has won the contest three times, along with an additional 15 top-five finishes. Italy hosted the contest in Naples (1965), Rome (1991) and Turin (2022).

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest

Germany has officially participated in every Eurovision Song Contest since its beginning in 1956, except in 1996 when its entry did not qualify past the audio-only pre‐selection round, and consequently was not seen in the broadcast final and does not count as one of Germany's 65 appearances. No other country has been represented as many times. Along with France, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, Germany is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). The final is broadcast in Germany on ARD's flagship channel, Das Erste.

Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest

Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest

Denmark has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 50 times, making its first appearance in 1957. Having competed in ten consecutive contests until 1966, Denmark was absent for eleven consecutive contests from 1967 to 1977. Since 1978, it has been absent from only four contests. Denmark has won the contest three times: in 1963, 2000 and 2013. The Danish national selection for the contest is the Dansk Melodi Grand Prix.

Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest

Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest

Greece has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 42 times since its debut in 1974, missing six contests in that time. Greece's first win came in 2005 with "My Number One", sung by Helena Paparizou. The Greek national broadcaster, Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT), broadcasts the event each year and organises the process for the selection of the Greek entry. Greece has never finished last in the contest.

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest

Belgium has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 63 times since making its debut as one of seven countries at the first contest in 1956. The only countries with more appearances are Germany (65), France (64) and the United Kingdom (64). Belgium have been absent only three times in total, in 1994, 1997 and 2001, due to low scores in the previous contests that relegated them from the contest. Belgium has won the contest once, in 1986.

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 34 times since its debut in 1986, missing only two contests since then, in 1998 and 2002, when prevented from competing due to finishing outside qualification places the preceding years. The country's best result is two second-place finishes, with Selma in 1999 and Yohanna in 2009.

Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest

Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest

Austria has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 54 times since its debut in 1957. The country has won twice, in 1966 and 2014, and such it holds the record for the longest gap between consecutive wins — 48 years. The contest is broadcast in Austria by ORF. Vienna was the host city on both of the occasions that the contest was held in Austria, in 1967 and 2015.

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 64 times since its debut at the first contest in 1956. France is one of only seven countries to be present at the first contest, and has been absent from only two contests in its history, missing the 1974 and 1982 contests. Along with Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, France is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). France has won the contest five times.

Curt-Eric Holmquist

Curt-Eric Holmquist

Curt-Eric Gunnar Holmquist was a Swedish conductor.

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Ireland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 55 times since making its debut at the 1965 contest in Naples, missing only two contests since then. The contest final is broadcast in Ireland on RTÉ One. Ireland has a record total of seven wins, and is the only country to have won three times consecutively.

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest

Luxembourg has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 37 times since making its debut at the first contest in 1956. Between 1956 and 1993, Luxembourg missed only the 1959 contest. Luxembourg has not participated in the contest since its last participation in 1993. Luxembourg has won the contest five times. Only Ireland (seven) and Sweden (six) have more wins.

Detailed voting results

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs.

The 1993 contest was the last time juries would deliver their votes via telephone lines, with satellite video links introduced the following year.

Detailed voting results[7][8]
Total score
Italy
Turkey
Germany
Switzerland
Denmark
Greece
Belgium
Iceland
Austria
Portugal
France
Sweden
Ireland
Luxembourg
Slovenia
Finland
Bosnia and Herzegovina
United Kingdom
Netherlands
Croatia
Spain
Cyprus
Israel
Norway
Malta
Contestants
Italy 45 1 10 5 10 8 2 2 7
Turkey 10 1 2 1 6
Germany 18 8 2 3 4 1
Switzerland 148 10 12 10 7 8 4 6 1 12 6 7 12 8 4 10 8 2 3 6 4 3 5
Denmark 9 1 3 5
Greece 64 2 2 2 7 6 5 8 12 7 7 6
Belgium 3 3
Malta 69 7 5 4 7 5 5 4 2 2 4 2 4 6 4 4 1 3
Iceland 42 4 4 1 7 1 5 2 7 5 2 2 2
Austria 32 4 1 3 3 6 12 3
Portugal 60 1 1 2 2 5 8 2 4 2 1 12 12 3 5
France 121 7 4 12 3 8 7 12 8 10 6 4 1 4 3 8 10 8 6
Sweden 89 8 8 7 10 7 10 4 5 6 7 7 10
Ireland 187 12 1 5 12 6 6 2 3 8 6 10 12 7 12 3 8 12 10 6 10 7 5 12 12
Luxembourg 11 1 10
Slovenia 9 4 3 1 1
Finland 20 3 8 5 2 2
Bosnia and Herzegovina 27 3 12 1 4 3 4
United Kingdom 164 1 8 6 5 8 12 12 12 7 6 10 8 8 10 5 3 4 10 5 4 12 8
Netherlands 92 6 6 7 7 6 3 5 12 7 10 3 7 10 3
Croatia 31 3 4 5 8 1 6 4
Spain 58 5 6 5 2 2 10 6 7 5 1 1 8
Cyprus 17 2 10 5
Israel 4 3 1
Norway 120 10 10 10 12 6 10 8 5 1 3 12 7 6 12 8

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
7  Ireland  Italy,  Malta,  Norway,  Slovenia,  Sweden,  Switzerland,  United Kingdom
4  United Kingdom  Austria,  Belgium,  Iceland,  Israel
3  Norway  Croatia,  Finland,  Greece
 Switzerland  France,  Germany,  Luxembourg
2  France  Denmark,  Portugal
 Portugal  Netherlands,  Spain
1  Austria  Bosnia and Herzegovina
 Bosnia and Herzegovina  Turkey
 Greece  Cyprus
 Netherlands  Ireland

Spokespersons

  1.  Italy – Peppi Franzelin [it]
  2.  Turkey – Ömer Önder
  3.  Germany – Carmen Nebel
  4.  Switzerland – Michel Stocker
  5.  Denmark – Bent Henius [dk][9]
  6.  Greece – Fotini Giannoulatou
  7.  Belgium – An Ploegaerts
  8.  Iceland – Guðrún Skúladóttir
  9.  Austria – Andy Lee
  10.  Portugal – Margarida Mercês de Melo [pt]
  11.  France – Olivier Minne[10]
  12.  Sweden – Gösta Hanson[11]
  13.  Ireland – Eileen Dunne[12]
  14.  Luxembourg – TBC
  15.  Slovenia – Miša Molk
  16.  Finland – Solveig Herlin
  17.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Dejan Zagorac
  18.  United Kingdom – Colin Berry[3]
  19.  Netherlands – Joop van Os[13]
  20.  Croatia – Velimir Đuretić
  21.  Spain – María Ángeles Balañac
  22.  Cyprus – Anna Partelidou
  23.  Israel – Danny Rup
  24.  Norway – Sverre Christophersen [no]
  25.  Malta – Kevin Drake[b][14]

Discover more about Detailed voting results related topics

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Ireland was the host country of the Eurovision Song Contest 1993, held in Millstreet's Green Glens Arena, after Linda Martin won the 1992 Contest with "Why Me?". Radió Telfís Éireann (RTÉ) held a national final to select the Irish entry for the contest, which was won by Niamh Kavanagh and the song "In Your Eyes".

Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Malta took part at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 in Millstreet, Ireland. Their entry was singer William Mangion with the song "This Time".

Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Norway was represented by 16-year-old Silje Vige, with the song "Alle mine tankar", at the 1993 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 15 May in Millstreet, Ireland. "Alle mine tankar" was chosen as the Norwegian entry at the Melodi Grand Prix on 6 March.

Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Slovenia made its debut to the Eurovision Song Contest in 1993, having previously competed as part of Yugoslavia. The Slovene broadcaster Radiotelevizija Slovenija (RTVSLO) held a national final to select the first independent Slovene entry for the Eurovision Song Contest.

Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Sweden entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1993, held in Millstreet, Ireland.

Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Switzerland took part at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 in Millstreet, Ireland. Their entry was Canadian singer Annie Cotton with the song "Moi, tout simplement".

Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Austria took part at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 in Millstreet, Ireland, represented by Tony Wegas with the song "Maria Magdalena".

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Belgium was represented by Barbara Dex at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993, which took place in Millstreet, Ireland, performing "Iemand als jij". Dex was the winner of the Flemish national final for the contest, Eurosong '93.

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Iceland was represented at the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 by Inga with the song "Þá veistu svarið". Inga was the winner of the Icelandic national final, Söngvakeppni Sjónvarpsins 1993, organised by Icelandic broadcaster Ríkisútvarpið (RÚV).

Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Israel entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1993 with the song "Shiru" by Lehakat Shiru after they won the Israeli national final, Kdam Eurovision.

Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Croatia entered the Eurovision Song Contest for the first time as an independent country in 1993. The country's first entry was by Put with the song "Don't Ever Cry".

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1993

Finland was represented by Katri Helena, with the song "Tule luo", at the 1993 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place on 15 May in Millstreet, Ireland. "Tule luo" was chosen as the Finnish entry at the national final on 6 March and was Katri Helena's second Eurovision appearance, 14 years after her performance in Jerusalem in 1979.

Broadcasts

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating EBU member broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[15] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF ORF 1 Ernst Grissemann [de] [16][17][18][19]
 Belgium BRTN BRTN TV1 André Vermeulen [20][21][22]
 Bosnia and Herzegovina RTVBiH Unknown Unknown [23]
 Croatia HRT HTV 1 Aleksandar Kostadinov [24][25][26]
 Cyprus CyBC Unknown Evi Papamichail [27][28]
 Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [29][30]
DR P3 Jens Michael Nielsen
 Finland YLE YLE TV1 Erkki Pohjanheimo and Kirsi-Maria Niemi [31][32][33]
Radiomafia Sanna Kojo and Outi Popp [fi]
 France France Télévision France 2 Patrice Laffont [18][34]
 Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Jan Hofer [17][21][35][36]
 Greece ERT Unknown Dafni Bokota [37][38]
 Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Jakob Frímann Magnússon [39][40]
 Ireland RTÉ Unknown Pat Kenny [41][42][43]
Unknown Larry Gogan
 Israel IBA Unknown Unknown [44]
 Italy RAI RAI Uno[c] Ettore Andenna [18][45][46][47]
 Luxembourg CLT Unknown Unknown [48]
 Malta PBS TVM Unknown [49][50]
 Netherlands NOS Nederland 3 Willem van Beusekom [21][51]
 Norway NRK NRK and NRK P2 Leif Erik Forberg [52][53][54]
 Portugal RTP RTP Canal 1 and RTP Internacional[d] Unknown [18][55][56]
 Slovenia RTV SLO SLO 1 [sl] Unknown [57][58]
 Spain TVE La Primera José Luis Uribarri [59][60][61]
 Sweden SVT TV2 Jan Jingryd [sv] [11][53][62]
SR SR P3 Claes-Johan Larsson and Susan Seidemar [11]
 Switzerland SRG SSR SF DRS Bernard Thurnheer [de] [17][18][63]
TSR[e] Jean-Marc Richard
TSI[e] Unknown
 Turkey TRT Unknown Unknown [64]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [3][65][66][67]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS SBS TV[f] Unknown [68]
 Estonia ETV Unknown [33]
 Hungary MTV MTV1 István Vágó [69]
 Poland TVP Unknown Artur Orzech and Maria Szabłowska [pl] [70]
 Russia RTR RTR[g] Unknown [33][71]
 Slovakia STV STV2[h] Unknown [72]

Discover more about Broadcasts related topics

ORF (broadcaster)

ORF (broadcaster)

Österreichischer Rundfunk is an Austrian national public broadcaster. Funded from a combination of television licence fee revenue and limited on-air advertising, ORF is the dominant player in the Austrian broadcast media. Austria was the last country in continental Europe after Albania to allow nationwide private television broadcasting, although commercial TV channels from neighbouring Germany have been present in Austria on pay-TV and via terrestrial overspill since the 1980s.

ORF 1

ORF 1

ORF 1 is an Austrian public television channel owned by ORF. It was the first television channel in Austria, started in 1955.

André Vermeulen

André Vermeulen

André Leopold Adiel Vermeulen is a Belgian-Flemish journalist and television personality for VRT.

HRT 1

HRT 1

HRT 1 is the first Croatian television channel, operated by Hrvatska Radiotelevizija. It is a generalist channel, whose diverse programming lineup includes documentaries, history, school, mosaics, news, sitcoms, movies, talk-shows, and game-shows.

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation, or CyBC, is Cyprus' public broadcasting service. It transmits island-wide on four radio and two domestic television channels, and uses one satellite channel for the Cypriot diaspora. It also transmits on a separate high definition channel.

DR (broadcaster)

DR (broadcaster)

DR, officially the Danish Broadcasting Corporation in English, is a Danish public-service radio and television broadcasting company. Founded in 1925 as a public-service organization, it is Denmark's oldest and largest electronic media enterprise. DR is a founding member of the European Broadcasting Union.

DR1

DR1

DR1 is the flagship television channel of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR). It became Denmark's first television station when it began broadcasting in 1951 – at first only for an hour a day three times a week.

Jørgen de Mylius

Jørgen de Mylius

Jørgen de Mylius is a Danish radio and TV personality that is best known for his work in connection with the Dansk Melodi Grand Prix as a host and commentator. Sometimes he is referred to as Jørgen Mylius or by his nickname Mylle.

DR P3

DR P3

DR P3 is a Danish current-based hit music radio station operated by the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. It is broadcast on FM radio, DAB, and Internet radio.

Erkki Pohjanheimo

Erkki Pohjanheimo

Erkki Pohjanheimo is a Finnish television producer and director.

France Télévisions

France Télévisions

France Télévisions is the French national public television broadcaster. It is a state-owned company formed from the integration of the public television channels France 2 and France 3, later joined by the legally independent channels France 4, and France 5.

France 2

France 2

France 2 is a French public national television channel. It is part of the state-owned France Télévisions group, along with France 3, France 4 and France 5. France Télévisions also participates in Arte and Euronews.

Notes and references

Footnotes

  1. ^ The nominated conductor for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sinan Alimanović, was unable to safely commute to the flight to Ireland due to the ongoing Bosnian War; the contest's musical director, Noel Kelehan, subsequently led the orchestra during the Bosnian entry.
  2. ^ Malta was originally scheduled to announce their votes as the 8th country, but instead voted 25th, after all the other countries announced their votes. The reason for this was technical difficulties in the minutes running up to the voting presentation.
  3. ^ Deferred broadcast at 23:05 CEST (21:05 UTC)[18][45]
  4. ^ Deferred broadcast on RTP Internacional at 21:45 WEST (20:45 UTC)[18]
  5. ^ a b Broadcast through a second audio program on SF DRS[17]
  6. ^ Delayed broadcast on 16 May 1993 at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC)[68]
  7. ^ Delayed broadcast at 23:30 MSD (19:30 UTC) [33][71]
  8. ^ Delayed broadcast on 16 May 1993 at 21:35 CEST (20:35 UTC) [33][71]

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Source: "Eurovision Song Contest 1993", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 30th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurovision_Song_Contest_1993.

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