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Eurovision Song Contest 1992

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Eurovision Song Contest 1992
ESC 1992 logo.png
Dates
Final9 May 1992
Host
VenueMalmö Isstadion
Malmö, Sweden
Presenter(s)Lydia Capolicchio
Harald Treutiger
Musical directorAnders Berglund
Directed byKåge Gimtell
Executive supervisorFrank Naef
Host broadcasterSveriges Television (SVT)
Opening actCarola performing "All the Reasons to Live"
Interval actA Century of Dance
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/malmo-1992 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries23
Debuting countriesNone
Returning countries Netherlands
Non-returning countriesNone
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Italy in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Spain in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992France in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Yugoslavia in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Countries that participated in the past but not in 1992
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8-1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs
Nul points in finalNone
Winning song Ireland
"Why Me?"
1991 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 1993

The Eurovision Song Contest 1992 was the 37th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Malmö, Sweden, following the country's victory at the 1991 contest with the song "Fångad av en stormvind" by Carola. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT), the contest was held at the Malmö Isstadion on 9 May 1992 and was hosted by Swedish journalists Lydia Capolicchio and Harald Treutiger.[1]

Twenty-three countries took part in the contest with the Netherlands returning after being absent the year before. This set another record for the most participating countries in the history of the competition, which would be broken again the following year. The 1992 contest also saw the last participation of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, as they were banned from competing only a few weeks later due to the Yugoslav Wars.

The winner was Ireland with the song "Why Me?" by Linda Martin. The song was written by Johnny Logan, who had won the 1980 contest as singer and the 1987 contest as singer/songwriter. At 41 years of age, Linda Martin became (and remains) the oldest woman ever to win Eurovision.[2]

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Eurovision Song Contest

Eurovision Song Contest

The Eurovision Song Contest, sometimes abbreviated to ESC and often known simply as Eurovision, is an international songwriting competition organised annually by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), featuring participants representing primarily European countries. Each participating country submits an original song to be performed on live television and radio, transmitted to national broadcasters via the EBU's Eurovision and Euroradio networks, with competing countries then casting votes for the other countries' songs to determine a winner.

Eurovision Song Contest 1991

Eurovision Song Contest 1991

The Eurovision Song Contest 1991 was the 36th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Rome, Italy, following the country's victory at the 1990 contest with the song "Insieme: 1992" by Toto Cutugno and was organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radiotelevisione Italiana (RAI). The contest was held at Studio 15 di Cinecittà on 4 May 1991 and was hosted by former Italian winners Gigliola Cinquetti and Toto Cutugno.

Fångad av en stormvind

Fångad av en stormvind

"Fångad av en stormvind" is a song by Swedish singer-songwriter Carola Häggkvist. It was written and produced by Stephan Berg. The song is the best known as Sweden's winning entry at the Eurovision Song Contest 1991 held in Rome, Italy, with 146 points.

Carola Häggkvist

Carola Häggkvist

Carola Maria Häggkvist, commonly known simply as Carola, is a Swedish singer and songwriter. She has been among Sweden's most popular performers since the early 1980s and has released albums ranging from pop and disco to hymns and folk music. Her debut album, Främling (1983), sold around one million copies and remains the biggest-selling album in Swedish music history. She has also worked as a songwriter. During her career, she has recorded many top-selling albums and singles and is referred to as Sweden's most prominent female singer. Some of her biggest hits are "Främling", "Tommy tycker om mig", "Fångad av en stormvind", "All the Reasons to Live", "I Believe in Love", "Genom allt", and "Evighet". She has released records in various languages: Swedish, Dutch, German, English, Norwegian and Japanese.

European Broadcasting Union

European Broadcasting Union

The European Broadcasting Union is an alliance of public service media organisations whose countries are within the European Broadcasting Area (EBA) or who are members of the Council of Europe. As of 2022, it is made up of 112 member organizations from 54 countries, and 31 associate members from a further 20 countries. It was established in 1950, and had its administrative headquarters in Geneva and technical office in Brussels.

Lydia Capolicchio

Lydia Capolicchio

Lydia Capolicchio is a Swedish journalist and hostess.

Harald Treutiger

Harald Treutiger

Nils Harald Ossian Treutiger is a Swedish journalist and television host. Born in Göteborg, he is best known for co-hosting the 1992 Eurovision Song Contest held in Malmö after Carola Häggkvist won in 1991.

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Ireland entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with the song "Why Me?" by Linda Martin after she won the Irish national final.

Linda Martin

Linda Martin

Linda Martin is an Irish singer and television presenter. She is best known as the winner of the 1992 Eurovision Song Contest during which she represented Ireland with the song "Why Me?". She is also known within Ireland as a member of the band Chips.

Johnny Logan (singer)

Johnny Logan (singer)

Seán Patrick Michael Sherrard, better known by his stage name Johnny Logan, is an Irish singer and composer. He is known as being the only performer to have won the Eurovision Song Contest twice, in 1980 and 1987. He also composed the winning song in 1992.

Eurovision Song Contest 1980

Eurovision Song Contest 1980

The Eurovision Song Contest 1980 was the 25th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in The Hague, Netherlands, and was organised by host broadcaster Nederlandse Omroep Stichting (NOS) – which agreed to stage the event after Israel, having won in both 1978 and 1979, declined to host it for a second successive year – and the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). The contest was held at the Nederlands Congresgebouw on 19 April 1980 and was hosted by Dutch actress Marlous Fluitsma, although each song was introduced by a presenter from the participating nation.

Eurovision Song Contest 1987

Eurovision Song Contest 1987

The Eurovision Song Contest 1987 was the 32nd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Brussels, Belgium, following the country's victory at the 1986 contest with the song "J'aime la vie" by Sandra Kim. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio-télévision belge de la Communauté française (RTBF), the contest was held at the Centenary Palace on 9 May 1987 and was hosted by French-Belgian singer Viktor Lazlo.

Location

Malmö Isstadion, Malmö – host venue of the 1992 contest.
Malmö Isstadion, Malmö – host venue of the 1992 contest.

Malmö is the capital and largest city of the Swedish county of Scania. The metropolis is a gamma world city (as listed by the GaWC) and is the third-largest city in Sweden, after Stockholm and Gothenburg, and the sixth-largest city in Scandinavia, with a population of above 300,000.[3]

Malmö Isstadion, an indoor ice hockey arena, was chosen to host Eurovision.[1]

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Malmö Isstadion

Malmö Isstadion

Malmö Isstadion is an indoor sports arena located in the Stadionområdet area of Malmö, Sweden. The capacity of the arena is 5,800 and it was built in 1968. It is the former home arena of the Malmö Redhawks ice hockey team, and was replaced as such by Malmö Arena, which was inaugurated in November 2008. In addition to sporting events, the arena was also used for concerts until the opening of the larger Malmö Arena.

Malmö

Malmö

Malmö is the largest city in the Swedish county (län) of Scania (Skåne). It is the third-largest city in Sweden, after Stockholm and Gothenburg, and the sixth-largest city in the Nordic region, with a municipal population of 350,647 in 2021. The Malmö Metropolitan Region is home to over 700,000 people, and the Øresund Region, which includes Malmö and Copenhagen, is home to 4 million people.

Counties of Sweden

Counties of Sweden

The counties of Sweden are the top-level geographic subdivisions of Sweden. Sweden is today divided into 21 counties; however, the number of counties has varied over time, due to territorial gains/losses and to divisions and/or mergers of existing counties. This level of administrative unit was first established in the 1634 Instrument of Government on Lord Chancellor Count Axel Oxenstierna's initiative, and superseded the historical provinces of Sweden in order to introduce a more efficient administration of the realm. At that time, they were what the translation of län into English literally means: fiefdoms. The county borders often follow the provincial borders, but the Crown often chose to make slight relocations to suit its purposes.

List of urban areas in Sweden by population

List of urban areas in Sweden by population

This is a list of urban areas in Sweden by population.

Stockholm

Stockholm

Stockholm is the capital and largest city of Sweden as well as the largest urban area in Scandinavia. Approximately 980,000 people live in the municipality, with 1.6 million in the urban area, and 2.4 million in the metropolitan area. The city stretches across fourteen islands where Lake Mälaren flows into the Baltic Sea. Outside the city to the east, and along the coast, is the island chain of the Stockholm archipelago. The area has been settled since the Stone Age, in the 6th millennium BC, and was founded as a city in 1252 by Swedish statesman Birger Jarl. It is also the county seat of Stockholm County. For several hundred years, Stockholm was the capital of Finland as well, which then was a part of Sweden. The population of the municipality of Stockholm is expected to reach one million people in 2024.

Gothenburg

Gothenburg

Gothenburg is the second-largest city in Sweden, fifth-largest in the Nordic countries, and capital of the Västra Götaland County. It is situated by the Kattegat, on the west coast of Sweden, and has a population of approximately 590,000 in the city proper and about 1.1 million inhabitants in the metropolitan area.

Scandinavia

Scandinavia

Scandinavia is a subregion in Northern Europe, with strong historical, cultural, and linguistic ties between its constituent peoples. In English usage, Scandinavia most commonly refers to Denmark, Norway, and Sweden. It can sometimes also refer more narrowly to the Scandinavian Peninsula, or more broadly to include Finland, Iceland, and the Faroe Islands.

Contest overview

The contest took place at the Malmö Isstadion, where the stage set was in the shape of a Viking ship's bow with a dragon in the centre and stars on each side. The opening sequence included women dressed in the Swedish colours of yellow and blue, twirling ribbons. The filmic postcard tradition was continued with clips based on each country. Last year's winner, Carola, appeared on stage in a white dress with sheer sleeves, a rhinestone collar and cuffs and sang “All The Reasons To Live”.

The 1992 Eurovision was the biggest contest at that time, with 23 countries competing. Only Monaco and Morocco failed to compete out of all the countries which had entered the contest in the past.

This contest marked the last participation of Yugoslavia, although it was not the same country that had participated from 1961 to 1991, but actually, Serbia and Montenegro, formally known as the "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia". That was the country's last entry until 2004, as it was banned from the contest following the sanctions on the United Nations Security Council Resolution 757, following the Bosnian War and Croatian War of Independence.

After scoring second place consecutively (1988, 1989) and scoring some disappointing results (1990, 1991), the United Kingdom sent Michael Ball with a contemporary pop song "One Step Out Of Time", which was the hot favourite to win the contest. The British delegation was greeted in Malmö with a banner reading "Welcome Untied Kingdom".[4]

However, the Irish sent Linda Martin, who had the past experience of coming in 2nd place in the 1984 contest and as then paired up once again with Johnny Logan, who had won the contest twice before as a performer. In the end, Linda the contest won for Ireland with a 16-point lead over the United Kingdom, starting the chain of Irish wins in the 1990s. Malta with "Little Child", performed by Mary Spiteri, also scored very well coming in 3rd place with 123 points. This was the first time that the three highest-placed songs had all been in English. Sweden, the host country, finished 2nd last.

Switzerland had to replace its original choice of entry, "Soleil, soleil" which was to have been performed by Géraldine Olivier. The song did not comply with some of the rules of the national selection contest and so, despite having won, it did not go to Malmö.

The top three songs were all performed in English which led to some delegations complaining that English-speaking countries had an unfair advantage.

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Malmö Isstadion

Malmö Isstadion

Malmö Isstadion is an indoor sports arena located in the Stadionområdet area of Malmö, Sweden. The capacity of the arena is 5,800 and it was built in 1968. It is the former home arena of the Malmö Redhawks ice hockey team, and was replaced as such by Malmö Arena, which was inaugurated in November 2008. In addition to sporting events, the arena was also used for concerts until the opening of the larger Malmö Arena.

Carola Häggkvist

Carola Häggkvist

Carola Maria Häggkvist, commonly known simply as Carola, is a Swedish singer and songwriter. She has been among Sweden's most popular performers since the early 1980s and has released albums ranging from pop and disco to hymns and folk music. Her debut album, Främling (1983), sold around one million copies and remains the biggest-selling album in Swedish music history. She has also worked as a songwriter. During her career, she has recorded many top-selling albums and singles and is referred to as Sweden's most prominent female singer. Some of her biggest hits are "Främling", "Tommy tycker om mig", "Fångad av en stormvind", "All the Reasons to Live", "I Believe in Love", "Genom allt", and "Evighet". She has released records in various languages: Swedish, Dutch, German, English, Norwegian and Japanese.

Bosnian War

Bosnian War

The Bosnian War was an international armed conflict that took place in Bosnia and Herzegovina between 1992 and 1995. The war is commonly seen as having started on 6 April 1992, following a number of earlier violent incidents. The war ended on 14 December 1995 when the Dayton accords were signed. The main belligerents were the forces of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and those of Herzeg-Bosnia and Republika Srpska, proto-states led and supplied by Croatia and Serbia, respectively.

Croatian War of Independence

Croatian War of Independence

The Croatian War of Independence was fought from 1991 to 1995 between Croat forces loyal to the Government of Croatia—which had declared independence from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY)—and the Serb-controlled Yugoslav People's Army (JNA) and local Serb forces, with the JNA ending its combat operations in Croatia by 1992. In Croatia, the war is primarily referred to as the "Homeland War" and also as the "Greater-Serbian Aggression". In Serbian sources, "War in Croatia" and (rarely) "War in Krajina" are used.

Eurovision Song Contest 1988

Eurovision Song Contest 1988

The Eurovision Song Contest 1988 was the 33rd edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Dublin, Ireland, following Johnny Logan's win at the 1987 contest with the song "Hold Me Now". Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radio Telefís Éireann (RTÉ), the contest was held at the RDS Simmonscourt on 30 April 1988 and was hosted by Irish broadcaster Pat Kenny and the Miss Ireland 1980 Michelle Rocca, marking the first time since the 1979 contest that two presenters had hosted the contest.

Eurovision Song Contest 1989

Eurovision Song Contest 1989

The Eurovision Song Contest 1989 was the 34th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, following Céline Dion's victory at the 1988 contest with the song "Ne partez pas sans moi". Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Swiss Broadcasting Corporation, the contest was held at Palais de Beaulieu on 6 May 1989 and was hosted by Swiss model Lolita Morena and journalist Jacques Deschenaux.

Eurovision Song Contest 1990

Eurovision Song Contest 1990

The Eurovision Song Contest 1990 was the 35th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It was held in Zagreb, SR Croatia, Yugoslavia, following the country's victory at the 1989 contest with the song "Rock Me" by Riva. It was the only time Yugoslavia hosted the contest. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcasters Yugoslav Radio Television (JRT) and Radiotelevision Zagreb (RTZ), the contest was held at Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall on 5 May 1990 and was hosted by Croatian television presenters Helga Vlahović and Oliver Mlakar. It was the first Eurovision Song Contest held in the Balkans as well as the first and only contest held in a communist or socialist state.

Eurovision Song Contest 1991

Eurovision Song Contest 1991

The Eurovision Song Contest 1991 was the 36th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Rome, Italy, following the country's victory at the 1990 contest with the song "Insieme: 1992" by Toto Cutugno and was organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Radiotelevisione Italiana (RAI). The contest was held at Studio 15 di Cinecittà on 4 May 1991 and was hosted by former Italian winners Gigliola Cinquetti and Toto Cutugno.

Linda Martin

Linda Martin

Linda Martin is an Irish singer and television presenter. She is best known as the winner of the 1992 Eurovision Song Contest during which she represented Ireland with the song "Why Me?". She is also known within Ireland as a member of the band Chips.

Eurovision Song Contest 1984

Eurovision Song Contest 1984

The Eurovision Song Contest 1984, the 29th edition of the annual Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg, following the country's victory at the 1983 contest with the song "Si la vie est cadeau" by Corinne Hermes. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster RTL Télévision (RTL), the contest was held at the Théâtre Municipal on 5 May 1984 and was hosted by Luxembourgish multimedia Désirée Nosbusch, who was only 19 years at the date, making her the youngest presenter in adult Eurovision history.

Johnny Logan (singer)

Johnny Logan (singer)

Seán Patrick Michael Sherrard, better known by his stage name Johnny Logan, is an Irish singer and composer. He is known as being the only performer to have won the Eurovision Song Contest twice, in 1980 and 1987. He also composed the winning song in 1992.

Malta

Malta

Malta, officially the Republic of Malta, is an island country in the Mediterranean Sea. It consists of an archipelago, between Italy and Libya, and is often considered a part of Southern Europe. It lies 80 km (50 mi) south of Sicily (Italy), 284 km (176 mi) east of Tunisia, and 333 km (207 mi) north of Libya. The official languages are Maltese and English, and 66% of the current Maltese population is at least conversational in the Italian language.

Participating countries

Conductors

Each performance had a conductor who led the orchestra.[5][6] Musical Director Anders Berglund both conducted the entries for Sweden and Yugoslavia and played the accordion parts for the latter.

Returning artists

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Wind  Germany 1985, 1987
Sigríður Beinteinsdóttir (part of Heart 2 Heart)  Iceland 1990 (part of Stjórnin)
Linda Martin  Ireland 1984
Mia Martini  Italy 1977
Evridiki  Cyprus 1983 (backing singer for Stavros & Constantina), 1987 (Backing Vocals for Alexia)

Participants and results

R/O Country Artist Song Language[7][8] Points Place[9]
1  Spain Serafín "Todo esto es la música" Spanish 37 14
2  Belgium Morgane "Nous, on veut des violons" French 11 20
3  Israel Dafna "Ze Rak Sport" (זה רק ספורט) Hebrew 85 6
4  Turkey Aylin Vatankoş "Yaz Bitti" Turkish 17 19
5  Greece Cleopatra "Olou tou kosmou i Elpida" (Όλου του κόσμου η Ελπίδα) Greek 94 5
6  France Kali Monte la riviè [fr] French, Antillean Creole 73 8
7  Sweden Christer Björkman "I morgon är en annan dag" Swedish 9 22
8  Portugal Dina "Amor d'água fresca" Portuguese 26 17
9  Cyprus Evridiki "Teriazoume" (Ταιριάζουμε) Greek 57 11
10  Malta Mary Spiteri "Little Child" English 123 3
11  Iceland Heart 2 Heart "Nei eða já" Icelandic 80 7
12  Finland Pave "Yamma, yamma" Finnish 4 23
13  Switzerland Daisy Auvray "Mister Music Man" French 32 15
14  Luxembourg Marion Welter and Kontinent "Sou fräi" Luxembourgish 10 21
15  Austria Tony Wegas "Zusammen geh'n" German 63 10
16  United Kingdom Michael Ball "One Step Out of Time" English 139 2
17  Ireland Linda Martin "Why Me?" English 155 1
18  Denmark Lotte Nilsson and Kenny Lübcke "Alt det som ingen ser" Danish 47 12
19  Italy Mia Martini "Rapsodia" Italian 111 4
20 Yugoslavia Extra Nena "Ljubim te pesmama" (Љубим те песмама) Serbian 44 13
21  Norway Merethe Trøan "Visjoner" Norwegian 23 18
22  Germany Wind "Träume sind für alle da" German 27 16
23  Netherlands Humphrey Campbell "Wijs me de weg" Dutch 67 9

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Conducting

Conducting

Conducting is the art of directing a musical performance, such as an orchestral or choral concert. It has been defined as "the art of directing the simultaneous performance of several players or singers by the use of gesture." The primary duties of the conductor are to interpret the score in a way which reflects the specific indications in that score, set the tempo, ensure correct entries by ensemble members, and "shape" the phrasing where appropriate. Conductors communicate with their musicians primarily through hand gestures, usually with the aid of a baton, and may use other gestures or signals such as eye contact. A conductor usually supplements their direction with verbal instructions to their musicians in rehearsal.

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest

Belgium has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 63 times since making its debut as one of seven countries at the first contest in 1956. The only countries with more appearances are Germany (65), France (64) and the United Kingdom (64). Belgium have been absent only three times in total, in 1994, 1997 and 2001, due to low scores in the previous contests that relegated them from the contest. Belgium has won the contest once, in 1986.

Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest

Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest

Israel has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 44 times since making its debut in 1973. Israel was able to enter the contest as the Israel Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was an active member of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU), which was responsible for the event. The IBA was succeeded as the broadcaster in charge of the Israeli entry by the Israeli Public Broadcasting Corporation (IPBC/Kan) in 2018. Israel has won the contest four times, and has hosted the contest in Jerusalem twice in 1979 and 1999. Israel hosted the contest for the third time in Tel Aviv in 2019.

Kobi Oshrat

Kobi Oshrat

Kobi Oshrat is an Israeli composer and conductor. He composed and conducted the winning entry at the 1979 Eurovision Song Contest Hallelujah sung by the vocal ensemble Milk and Honey.

Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest

Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest

Greece has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 42 times since its debut in 1974, missing six contests in that time. Greece's first win came in 2005 with "My Number One", sung by Helena Paparizou. The Greek national broadcaster, Hellenic Broadcasting Corporation (ERT), broadcasts the event each year and organises the process for the selection of the Greek entry. Greece has never finished last in the contest.

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France in the Eurovision Song Contest

France has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 64 times since its debut at the first contest in 1956. France is one of only seven countries to be present at the first contest, and has been absent from only two contests in its history, missing the 1974 and 1982 contests. Along with Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom, France is one of the "Big Five" countries that are automatically prequalified for the final, due to being the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). France has won the contest five times.

Anders Berglund

Anders Berglund

Anders Olof Berglund is a Swedish arranger, composer, conductor, pianist and musician.

Cyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest

Cyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest

Cyprus has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 38 times since making its debut in 1981. Cyprus' first entry was the group Island, who finished sixth. The country's best result in the contest is a second-place finish with Eleni Foureira in 2018.

George Theofanous

George Theofanous

Giorgos (George) Theofanous is a Greek Cypriot composer and producer. He has sold more than two million records and written more than 500 songs in the 1990s and 2000s. Recording artists for whom he has written and produced for include Nana Mouskouri, George Dalaras. His work has received a total of nine Arion Awards, which was an award show by IFPI Greece. He served as a judge on five seasons of the Greek edition of The X Factor.

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Iceland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 34 times since its debut in 1986, missing only two contests since then, in 1998 and 2002, when prevented from competing due to finishing outside qualification places the preceding years. The country's best result is two second-place finishes, with Selma in 1999 and Yohanna in 2009.

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest

Finland has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 55 times since its debut in 1961. Finland won the contest for the first – and to date only – time in 2006 with Lordi's "Hard Rock Hallelujah". The country's best result before then was achieved by Marion Rung with the song "Tom Tom Tom" in 1973, which placed sixth.

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest

Luxembourg has participated in the Eurovision Song Contest 37 times since making its debut at the first contest in 1956. Between 1956 and 1993, Luxembourg missed only the 1959 contest. Luxembourg has not participated in the contest since its last participation in 1993. Luxembourg has won the contest five times. Only Ireland (seven) and Sweden (six) have more wins.

Detailed voting results

Each country had a jury who awarded 12, 10, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 point(s) for their top ten songs.

Detailed voting results[10][11]
Total score
Spain
Belgium
Israel
Turkey
Greece
France
Sweden
Portugal
Cyprus
Malta
Iceland
Finland
Switzerland
Luxembourg
Austria
United Kingdom
Ireland
Denmark
Italy
Yugoslavia
Norway
Germany
Netherlands
Contestants
Spain 37 1 1 4 6 2 3 3 2 1 1 7 5 1
Belgium 11 3 4 3 1
Israel 85 10 2 8 4 7 4 7 4 8 1 7 2 12 2 4 3
Turkey 17 8 3 6
Greece 94 7 8 7 3 5 12 2 5 10 4 12 7 8 4
France 73 6 12 3 3 7 12 5 6 10 3 6
Sweden 9 1 4 4
Portugal 26 8 2 2 1 5 8
Cyprus 57 3 10 2 2 1 8 2 6 4 8 3 8
Malta 123 12 10 7 12 12 1 8 5 12 8 10 8 3 10 5
Iceland 80 8 4 4 6 6 6 3 5 7 12 5 5 1 6 2
Finland 4 1 3
Switzerland 32 5 12 4 1 10
Luxembourg 10 10
Austria 63 2 8 8 1 3 8 4 10 12 7
United Kingdom 139 5 12 2 10 10 5 6 6 4 6 8 7 12 7 12 8 12 7
Ireland 155 1 7 12 12 10 4 5 12 7 10 6 10 10 8 10 2 2 7 10 10
Denmark 47 4 6 7 1 6 6 3 3 6 5
Italy 111 5 3 12 8 8 10 5 10 12 7 6 12 1 12
Yugoslavia 44 10 6 1 5 2 3 5 4 2 4 2
Norway 23 3 2 1 1 4 5 6 1
Germany 27 6 10 6 2 3
Netherlands 67 7 2 5 7 5 4 7 3 1 5 2 8 4 7

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
4  Italy  Finland,  France,  Netherlands,  Norway
 Malta  Luxembourg,  Portugal,  Spain,  Sweden
 United Kingdom  Austria,  Belgium,  Denmark,  Germany
3  Ireland  Greece,  Malta,  Turkey
2  France  Israel,  Switzerland
 Greece  Cyprus,  Italy
1  Austria  Ireland
 Iceland  United Kingdom
 Israel Yugoslavia
 Switzerland  Iceland

Spokespersons

Each country announced their votes in the order of performance. The following is a list of spokespersons who announced the votes for their respective country.

Discover more about Detailed voting results related topics

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Finland entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with "Yamma, yamma", sung by Pave Maijanen after they won the Finnish national final.

Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Netherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

The Netherlands returned at the Eurovision Song Contest at the Eurovision Song Contest 1992, after withdrawing from the 1991 contest.

Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Norway entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with Merethe Trøan and "Visjoner" after she won the Norwegian pre-selection for the contest, Melodi Grand Prix 1992. At Eurovision, her performance received 23 points, placing her 18th of 23 competing countries.

Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Malta continued their participation in the Eurovision Song Contest, entering the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 in Malmö, Sweden. The Maltese entry was Mary Spiteri with the song "Little Child", which came third at Eurovision, receiving 123 points.

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Luxembourg in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Luxembourg made its penultimate Eurovision entry at the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 in Malmö, Sweden with the song "Sou fräi", sung by Marion Welter and Kontinent.

Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Portugal entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992, held in Malmö, Sweden, with Dina with the song "Amor d'água fresca" after she won the Portuguese national final, Festival da Canção 1992. At Eurovision, she received 26 points, placing 17th in a field of 23 competing countries.

Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

After Carola Häggkvist's win in the 1991 contest, Sweden was the host of the Eurovision Song Contest 1992, held in Malmö. Sveriges Television, the Swedish broadcaster, continued to use the Melodifestivalen format to select their entry.

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Belgium competed at the Eurovision Song Contest 1992, represented by Morgane with "Nous, on veut des violons".

Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Denmark entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with "Alt det som ingen ser", sung by Lotte Nilsson and Kenny Lübcke after they won the Danish national final, Dansk Melodi Grand Prix 1992.

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Germany entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with "Träume sind für alle da" by Wind, after they won the German national final. It was called "Ein Lied für Malmö". The song was composed by Ralph Siegel and Bernd Meinunger.

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Ireland entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with the song "Why Me?" by Linda Martin after she won the Irish national final.

Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 1992

Turkey entered the Eurovision Song Contest 1992 with the song "Yaz Bitti" by Aylin Vatankoş after it won the Turkish national final. The song was composed by Aldoğan Şimşekyay and Aylin Uçanlar.

Broadcasts

Each participating broadcaster was required to relay the contest via its networks. Non-participating broadcasters were also able to relay the contest as "passive participants". Broadcasters were able to send commentators to provide coverage of the contest in their own native language and to relay information about the artists and songs to their television viewers.[15] The contest was broadcast in 44 countries, including Australia, New Zealand and South Korea.[6][16] Known details on the broadcasts in each country, including the specific broadcasting stations and commentators are shown in the tables below.

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Austria ORF FS1 Ernst Grissemann [de] [17][18][19]
 Belgium RTBF RTBF1 Claude Delacroix [20][21][22][23]
BRTN BRTN TV1 André Vermeulen [21][24]
 Cyprus CyBC Unknown Evi Papamichail [25][26]
 Denmark DR DR TV Jørgen de Mylius [27][28]
DR P3 Jesper Bæhrenz and Andrew Jensen [dk]
 Finland YLE YLE TV1 Erkki Pohjanheimo and Kati Bergman [29][30][31]
Radiomafia Pekka and Pätkä
 France France Télévision Antenne 2 Thierry Beccaro [18][21][32][33]
 Germany ARD Erstes Deutsches Fernsehen Jan Hofer [21][22][34][35]
 Greece ERT Unknown Dafni Bokota [36][37]
 Iceland RÚV Sjónvarpið Árni Snævarr [38][39]
 Ireland RTÉ Unknown Pat Kenny [40][41][42]
Unknown Larry Gogan
 Israel IBA Unknown Unknown [43]
 Italy RAI Rai Due[a] Peppi Franzelin [it] [45][44][46]
 Luxembourg CLT Unknown Unknown [47]
 Malta PBS TVM and Radio Malta 2 Anna Bonanno [14][48][49]
 Netherlands NOS Nederland 3 Willem van Beusekom [22][50]
 Norway NRK NRK John Andreassen [51][52][53]
NRK P2 Leif Erik Forberg and Vidar Lønn-Arnesen
 Portugal RTP RTP Canal 1 Eládio Clímaco [54][55][56]
 Spain TVE Unknown José Luis Uribarri [57][58]
 Sweden SVT TV2 Jesper Aspegren [sv] [13][30][52][59]
SR SR P3 Kalle Oldby and Lotta Engberg [13]
 Switzerland SRG SSR TV DRS Mariano Tschuor [18][32][60][61]
TSR[b] Ivan Frésard [fr]
TSI[b] Unknown
 Turkey TRT Unknown Unknown [62]
 United Kingdom BBC BBC1 Terry Wogan [6][63][64][65]
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Yugoslavia JRT Unknown Unknown [66]
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Broadcaster Channel Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia SBS SBS TV[c] Unknown [67]
 Czechoslovakia ČT F1[d] Unknown [68]
 Estonia ETV Unknown [30][31]
 Hungary MTV MTV1 István Vágó [69]
 Poland TVP TVP1 Artur Orzech and Maria Szabłowska [pl] [70][71]
 Russia RTR RTR Unknown [30][31][72]
 Slovenia RTV SLO SLO 1 [sl] Unknown [73]

Discover more about Broadcasts related topics

ORF (broadcaster)

ORF (broadcaster)

Österreichischer Rundfunk is an Austrian national public broadcaster. Funded from a combination of television licence fee revenue and limited on-air advertising, ORF is the dominant player in the Austrian broadcast media. Austria was the last country in continental Europe after Albania to allow nationwide private television broadcasting, although commercial TV channels from neighbouring Germany have been present in Austria on pay-TV and via terrestrial overspill since the 1980s.

La Une

La Une

La Une is a Belgian national television channel, owned and operated by the French-language public-service broadcasting organization RTBF. La Une is the equivalent of Flemish station Eén, of the Flemish broadcaster VRT.

Claude Delacroix

Claude Delacroix

Claude Delacroix is a Belgian musician and radio presenter.

André Vermeulen

André Vermeulen

André Leopold Adiel Vermeulen is a Belgian-Flemish journalist and television personality for VRT.

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation

Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation, or CyBC, is Cyprus' public broadcasting service. It transmits island-wide on four radio and two domestic television channels, and uses one satellite channel for the Cypriot diaspora. It also transmits on a separate high definition channel.

DR (broadcaster)

DR (broadcaster)

DR, officially the Danish Broadcasting Corporation in English, is a Danish public-service radio and television broadcasting company. Founded in 1925 as a public-service organization, it is Denmark's oldest and largest electronic media enterprise. DR is a founding member of the European Broadcasting Union.

DR1

DR1

DR1 is the flagship television channel of the Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR). It became Denmark's first television station when it began broadcasting in 1951 – at first only for an hour a day three times a week.

Jørgen de Mylius

Jørgen de Mylius

Jørgen de Mylius is a Danish radio and TV personality that is best known for his work in connection with the Dansk Melodi Grand Prix as a host and commentator. Sometimes he is referred to as Jørgen Mylius or by his nickname Mylle.

DR P3

DR P3

DR P3 is a Danish current-based hit music radio station operated by the Danish Broadcasting Corporation. It is broadcast on FM radio, DAB, and Internet radio.

Jesper Baehrenz

Jesper Baehrenz

Jesper Baehrenz is a Danish radio host, television host, producer, board game developer and screenwriter. In the 1990s he was a popular Danish radio and TV host, interviewing a wide range of Danish and international popstars.

Erkki Pohjanheimo

Erkki Pohjanheimo

Erkki Pohjanheimo is a Finnish television producer and director.

Kati Bergman

Kati Bergman

Kati Bergman is a Finnish singer, pianist, actress and radio and television presenter for Yle. She is married to Finnish singer Jukka Tapio Karjalainen.

Note

  1. ^ Delayed broadcast at 23:50 CEST (21:50 UTC)[44]
  2. ^ a b Broadcast through a second audio program on SF DRS[60]
  3. ^ Delayed broadcast on 10 May 1992 at 20:30 AEST (10:30 UTC)[67]
  4. ^ Delayed broadcast on 15 May 1992 at 21:35 CEST (19:35 UTC)[67]

Discover more about Note related topics

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometimes referred to as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Eastern European Time, Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time, Egypt Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Coordinated Universal Time

Coordinated Universal Time

Coordinated Universal Time or UTC is the primary time standard by which the world regulates clocks and time. It is within about one second of mean solar time at 0° longitude and is not adjusted for daylight saving time. It is effectively a successor to Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

Second audio program

Second audio program

Second audio program (SAP), also known as secondary audio programming, is an auxiliary audio channel for analog television that can be broadcast or transmitted both over-the-air and by cable television. Used mostly for audio description or other languages, SAP is part of the multichannel television sound (MTS) standard originally set by the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) in 1984 in the United States. The NTSC video format and MTS are also used in Canada and Mexico.

SRF 1

SRF 1

SRF 1 is a German-language Swiss television channel, one of three produced by the SRG SSR public-service broadcasting group. The channel, formerly known as SF1, was renamed on 16 December 2005, together with its sister German-speaking TV channels and five radio channels, as part of an exercise aimed at emphasizing their common ownership as well as establishing a shared web presence for all of them.

Time in Australia

Time in Australia

Australia uses three main time zones: Australian Western Standard Time, Australian Central Standard Time, and Australian Eastern Standard Time. Time is regulated by the individual state governments, some of which observe daylight saving time (DST). Australia's external territories observe different time zones.

Source: "Eurovision Song Contest 1992", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurovision_Song_Contest_1992.

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