Get Our Extension

Emily Steel

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Emily Steel
Pulitzer2018-emily-steel-20180530-wp.jpg
Steel at the 2018 Pulitzer Prizes
Alma mater

Emily Steel is an American business journalist who has contributed to several news publications and has covered the media industry at The New York Times since 2014.[1] Steel published an investigative report on Fox News Host Bill O'Reilly that may have contributed to his firing.[2][3] Mediaite identified Steel as one of the 75 most influential people in American news media in 2017.[2]

Investigative reports

Bill O'Reilly

Steel published an investigative piece in 2017 with Michael S. Schmidt about sexual misconduct and settlements by former Fox News host Bill O'Reilly called "Bill O'Reilly Settled New Harassment Claim, Then Fox Renewed His Contract". In 2018, her writing received the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service along with Michael S. Schmidt, Jodi Kantor, and Megan Twohey,[4] and the Gerald Loeb Award for Investigative business journalism.[5] This piece received widespread media attention and may have helped lead to O'Reilly's firing from Fox News.[6]

Dave Portnoy controversy:

Discover more about Investigative reports related topics

Michael S. Schmidt

Michael S. Schmidt

Michael S. Schmidt is an American journalist, author, and correspondent for The New York Times in Washington, D.C. He covers national security and federal law enforcement, has broken several high-profile stories and is also a national security contributor for MSNBC and NBC News.

Bill O'Reilly (political commentator)

Bill O'Reilly (political commentator)

William James O'Reilly Jr. is an American conservative commentator, journalist, author, and television host.

2018 Pulitzer Prize

2018 Pulitzer Prize

The 2018 Pulitzer Prizes were awarded by the Pulitzer Prize Board for work during the 2017 calendar year. Prize winners and nominated finalists were announced by Dana Canedy at 3:00 p.m. EST on April 16, 2018.

Pulitzer Prize for Public Service

Pulitzer Prize for Public Service

The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service is one of the fourteen American Pulitzer Prizes annually awarded for journalism. It recognizes a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper or news site through the use of its journalistic resources, which may include editorials, cartoons, photographs, graphics, video and other online material, and may be presented in print or online or both.

Jodi Kantor

Jodi Kantor

Jodi Kantor is an American journalist. She is a New York Times correspondent whose work has covered the workplace, technology, and gender. She has been the paper's Arts & Leisure editor and covered two presidential campaigns, chronicling the transformation of Barack and Michelle Obama into the President and First Lady of the United States. Kantor was a recipient of the Pulitzer Prize in 2018 for her reporting on sexual abuse by Harvey Weinstein.

Megan Twohey

Megan Twohey

Megan Twohey is an American journalist with The New York Times. She has written investigative reports for Reuters, the Chicago Tribune, and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Twohey's investigative reports have exposed exploitative doctors, revealed untested rape kits, and uncovered a secret underground network of abandoned unwanted adopted children. Her investigative reports have led to criminal convictions and helped prompt new laws aimed at protecting vulnerable people and children.

Gerald Loeb Award

Gerald Loeb Award

The Gerald Loeb Award, also referred to as the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism, is a recognition of excellence in journalism, especially in the fields of business, finance and the economy. The award was established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, a founding partner of E.F. Hutton & Co. Loeb's intention in creating the award was to encourage reporters to inform and protect private investors as well as the general public in the areas of business, finance and the economy.

Fox News

Fox News

The Fox News Channel, abbreviated FNC, commonly known as Fox News, and stylized in all caps, is an American multinational conservative cable news television channel based in New York City. It is owned by Fox News Media, which itself is owned by the Fox Corporation. The channel broadcasts primarily from studios at 1211 Avenue of the Americas in Midtown Manhattan. Fox News provides service to 86 countries and overseas territories worldwide, with international broadcasts featuring Fox Extra segments during ad breaks.

Biography

Steel was born in Salt Lake City but moved to Lincoln, Nebraska and East Lyme, Connecticut before she graduated from the University of North Carolina. She lives in New York City.[1] Steel says she became interested in journalism after writing a piece in her high school newspaper about how to be happy and grateful in the wake of 9/11; she said a janitor approached her to say her piece had brightened her day, and she knew in that moment she wanted to become a writer.[6]

Steel worked at The Wall Street Journal for 8 years, where she shared the 2011 Gerald Loeb Award for Online Enterprise business journalism for "What They Know."[7] She worked for two years at the Financial Times before joining The New York Times in 2014 after Brian Stelter left for CNN.[1][8]

Discover more about Biography related topics

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City is the capital and most populous city of Utah, as well as the seat of Salt Lake County, the most populous county in Utah. With a population of 200,133 in 2020, the city is the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which had a population of 1,257,936 at the 2020 census. Salt Lake City is further situated within a larger metropolis known as the Salt Lake City–Ogden–Provo Combined Statistical Area, a corridor of contiguous urban and suburban development stretched along a 120-mile (190 km) segment of the Wasatch Front, comprising a population of 2,606,548, making it the 22nd largest in the nation. It is also the central core of the larger of only two major urban areas located within the Great Basin.

Lincoln, Nebraska

Lincoln, Nebraska

Lincoln is the capital city of the U.S. state of Nebraska and the county seat of Lancaster County. The city covers 100.4 square miles (260.035 km2) with a population of 292,657 in 2021. It is the second-most populous city in Nebraska and the 73rd-largest in the United States. The city is the economic and cultural anchor of a substantially larger metropolitan area in the southeastern part of the state called the Lincoln Metropolitan and Lincoln-Beatrice Combined Statistical Areas. The statistical area is home to 361,921 people, making it the 104th-largest combined statistical area in the United States.

East Lyme, Connecticut

East Lyme, Connecticut

East Lyme is a town in New London County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 18,693 at the 2020 census. The villages of Niantic and Flanders are located in the town.

University of North Carolina

University of North Carolina

The University of North Carolina is the multi-campus public university system for the state of North Carolina. Overseeing the state's 16 public universities and the NC School of Science and Mathematics, it is commonly referred to as the UNC System to differentiate it from its flagship, UNC-Chapel Hill.

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC for short, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. New York is the most photographed city in the world. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, an established safe haven for global investors, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

September 11 attacks

September 11 attacks

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamist extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States on Tuesday, September 11, 2001. That morning, nineteen terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners scheduled to travel from the Northeastern United States to California. The hijackers crashed the first two planes into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and the third plane into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia. The fourth plane was intended to hit a federal government building in Washington, D.C., but crashed in a field following a passenger revolt. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and instigated the war on terror.

The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal is an American business-focused, international daily newspaper based in New York City, with international editions also available in Chinese and Japanese. The Journal, along with its Asian editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser. The Journal is regarded as a newspaper of record, particularly in terms of business and financial news. The newspaper has won 38 Pulitzer Prizes, the most recent in 2019.

Gerald Loeb Award

Gerald Loeb Award

The Gerald Loeb Award, also referred to as the Gerald Loeb Award for Distinguished Business and Financial Journalism, is a recognition of excellence in journalism, especially in the fields of business, finance and the economy. The award was established in 1957 by Gerald Loeb, a founding partner of E.F. Hutton & Co. Loeb's intention in creating the award was to encourage reporters to inform and protect private investors as well as the general public in the areas of business, finance and the economy.

Financial Times

Financial Times

The Financial Times (FT) is a British daily newspaper printed in broadsheet and published digitally that focuses on business and economic current affairs. Based in London, England, the paper is owned by a Japanese holding company, Nikkei, with core editorial offices across Britain, the United States and continental Europe. In July 2015, Pearson sold the publication to Nikkei for £844 million after owning it since 1957. In 2019, it reported one million paying subscriptions, three-quarters of which were digital subscriptions. The newspaper has a prominent focus on financial journalism and economic analysis over generalist reporting, drawing both criticism and acclaim. The daily sponsors an annual book award and publishes a "Person of the Year" feature.

Brian Stelter

Brian Stelter

Brian Patrick Stelter is an American journalist best known as the former chief media correspondent for CNN and host of the CNN program Reliable Sources, roles he held from 2013 to 2022. Stelter is also a former media reporter for The New York Times and editor of TVNewser.

CNN

CNN

The Cable News Network (CNN) is a multinational cable news channel headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld as a 24-hour cable news channel, and presently owned by the Manhattan-based media conglomerate Warner Bros. Discovery, CNN was the first television channel to provide 24-hour news coverage and the first all-news television channel in the United States.

Source: "Emily Steel", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_Steel.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b c "Emily Steel". 20 December 2017 – via NYTimes.com.
  2. ^ a b "Most Influential in Media 2017". www.mediaite.com.
  3. ^ Wolcott, James. "Vanity Fair Hall of Fame: The Times Reporters Who Brought Sexual Harassment Out of the Shadows". The Hive. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  4. ^ Steel, Emily; Schmidt, Michael S. (2017-10-21). "Bill O'Reilly Settled New Harassment Claim, Then Fox Renewed His Contract". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  5. ^ "UCLA Anderson School of Management Announces 2018 Gerald Loeb Award Winners". PR Newswire. June 25, 2018. Retrieved January 31, 2019.
  6. ^ a b "Meet the Woman Who Took Bill O'Reilly Down". Marie Claire. 2017-04-27. Retrieved 2018-01-18.
  7. ^ "Loeb Award Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. June 28, 2011. Archived from the original on March 21, 2019. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  8. ^ "Emily Steel Headed to New York Times".

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.