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Doug DuBois

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Doug DuBois (born 1960) is an American photographer[1] based in Syracuse, New York. He is an associate professor and department chair of Art Photography at the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University.[2]

The bulk of DuBois' photography is portraiture, and he is well known for photographs of intimate familial scenes.[3] He is among a group of contemporary American photographers, including Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Laurie Simmons, Cindy Sherman, and Tina Barney, whose re-imagined depictions of domestic spaces anticipated the transformations of family life among a "tidal wave of late-capitalist individualism and aspiration."[4]

DuBois is a recipient of a 2012 Guggenheim Fellowship, and his work is in the collections of MoMA in New York, SFMOMA in San Francisco, LACMA and the Getty in Los Angeles, the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C., and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.[5]

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Photographer

Photographer

A photographer is a person who makes photographs.

Associate professor

Associate professor

Associate professor is an academic title with two principal meanings: in the North American system and that of the Commonwealth system.

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Philip-Lorca diCorcia

Philip-Lorca diCorcia is an American photographer, living in New York City. He teaches at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.

Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons

Laurie Simmons is an American artist, photographer and filmmaker. Since the mid-1970s, Simmons has staged scenes for her camera with dolls, ventriloquist dummies, objects on legs, and people, to create photographs that reference domestic scenes. She is part of The Pictures Generation, a name given to a group of artists who came to prominence in the 1970s. The Pictures Generation also includes Cindy Sherman, Barbara Kruger, and Louise Lawler.

Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman

Cynthia Morris Sherman is an American artist whose work consists primarily of photographic self-portraits, depicting herself in many different contexts and as various imagined characters.

Late capitalism

Late capitalism

Late capitalism, late-stage capitalism, or end-stage capitalism is a term first used in print by German economist Werner Sombart around the turn of the 20th century. In the late 2010s, the term began to be used in the United States and Canada to refer to perceived absurdities, contradictions, crises, injustices, inequality, and exploitation created by modern business development.

Individualism

Individualism

Individualism is the moral stance, political philosophy, ideology and social outlook that emphasizes the intrinsic worth of the individual. Individualists promote the exercise of one's goals and desires and to value independence and self-reliance and advocate that interests of the individual should achieve precedence over the state or a social group while opposing external interference upon one's own interests by society or institutions such as the government. Individualism is often defined in contrast to totalitarianism, collectivism and more corporate social forms.

Guggenheim Fellowship

Guggenheim Fellowship

Guggenheim Fellowships are grants that have been awarded annually since 1925 by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those "who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts."

Museum of Modern Art

Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is an art museum located on Wilshire Boulevard in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles. LACMA is on Museum Row, adjacent to the La Brea Tar Pits.

J. Paul Getty Museum

J. Paul Getty Museum

The J. Paul Getty Museum, commonly referred to as the Getty, is an art museum in Los Angeles, California housed on two campuses: the Getty Center and Getty Villa.

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the country. The library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains a conservation center in Culpeper, Virginia. The library's functions are overseen by the Librarian of Congress, and its buildings are maintained by the Architect of the Capitol. The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 470 languages."

Early life and education

DuBois was born in Dearborn, MI[1] and grew up in the suburban New Jersey community of Far Hills.[6] As a teenager he began taking photographs with a rangefinder camera he found in his father's closet. He has a younger sister Lise and a younger brother, the composer R. Luke DuBois,[7] who appear often in his early photographs.[8]

DuBois graduated from Hampshire College with a Bachelor of Arts in Film and Photography and subsequently received a Masters of Fine Arts in Photography from the San Francisco Art Institute.[9]

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Suburb

Suburb

A suburb is an area within a metropolitan area, which may include commercial and mixed-use, that is primarily a residential area. A suburb can exist either as part of a larger city/urban area or as a separate political entity. The name describes an area which is not as densely populated as an inner city, yet more densely populated than a rural area in the countryside. In many metropolitan areas, suburbs exist as separate residential communities within commuting distance of a city Suburbs can have their own political or legal jurisdiction, especially in the United States, but this is not always the case, especially in the United Kingdom, where most suburbs are located within the administrative boundaries of cities. In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner city areas, but in Australian English and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries, and the term encompasses inner city areas.

New Jersey

New Jersey

New Jersey is a state in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by Delaware Bay and the state of Delaware. At 7,354 square miles (19,050 km2), New Jersey is the fifth-smallest state in land area; but with close to 9.3 million residents, it ranks 11th in population and first in population density. The state capital is Trenton, and the most populous city is Newark. With the exception of Warren County, all of the state's 21 counties lie within the combined statistical areas of New York City or Philadelphia.

Far Hills, New Jersey

Far Hills, New Jersey

Far Hills is a borough in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 919, reflecting an increase of 60 (+7.0%) from the 859 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 202 (+30.7%) from the 657 counted in the 1990 Census.

Rangefinder camera

Rangefinder camera

A rangefinder camera is a camera fitted with a rangefinder, typically a split-image rangefinder: a range-finding focusing mechanism allowing the photographer to measure the subject distance and take photographs that are in sharp focus. Most varieties of rangefinder show two images of the same subject, one of which moves when a calibrated wheel is turned; when the two images coincide and fuse into one, the distance can be read off the wheel. Older, non-coupled rangefinder cameras display the focusing distance and require the photographer to transfer the value to the lens focus ring; cameras without built-in rangefinders could have an external rangefinder fitted into the accessory shoe. Earlier cameras of this type had separate viewfinder and rangefinder windows; later the rangefinder was incorporated into the viewfinder. More modern designs have rangefinders coupled to the focusing mechanism so that the lens is focused correctly when the rangefinder images fuse; compare with the focusing screen in non-autofocus SLRs.

R. Luke DuBois

R. Luke DuBois

Roger Luke DuBois is an American composer, performer, conceptual new media artist, programmer, record producer and pedagogue based in New York City.

Hampshire College

Hampshire College

Hampshire College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts. It was opened in 1970 as an experiment in alternative education, in association with four other colleges in the Pioneer Valley: Amherst College, Smith College, Mount Holyoke College, and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Together they are known as the Five College Consortium. The campus also houses the National Yiddish Book Center and Eric Carle Museum, and hosts the annual Hampshire College Summer Studies in Mathematics.

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate program in the arts, or, in some cases, other disciplines. A bachelor of arts degree course is generally completed in three or four years, depending on the country and institution.Degree attainment typically takes four years in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Brunei, China, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, Georgia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, the United States and Zambia. Degree attainment typically takes three years in Albania, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Caribbean, Iceland, India, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, the Canadian province of Quebec, the United Kingdom and most of the European Union. In Bangladesh, three-year BA (associates) courses are also available.

San Francisco Art Institute

San Francisco Art Institute

San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) was a private college of contemporary art in San Francisco, California. Founded in 1871, SFAI was one of the oldest art schools in the United States and the oldest west of the Mississippi River. Approximately 220 undergraduates and 112 graduate students were enrolled in 2021. The institution was accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD), and was a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD). The school closed permanently in July 2022.

Photography

In between his undergraduate and graduate educations, his father suffered a near-fatal fall from a commuter train and spent several years convalescing in the home,[10] and DuBois documented this process as a "kind of emotional protection."[6] These family portraits formed the basis of a body of work surrounding his family that would continue for twenty-four years and eventually come to be published by Aperture as a photo-book titled All the Days and Nights.[11] The photographs in this series document his changing family: his father's recovery from his injuries juxtaposed with the descent of his mother, his father's sole caretaker, into the depths of depression and mental illness, the subsequent dissolution of his parents' marriage, as well as the maturation of his brother and sister.[8]

DuBois's interest in the family, both his and others, is also evident in a subsequent photo series, "Avella," which chronicles life in the deindustrialized coal-mining town of Avella, Pennsylvania, where his father grew up.[6] To learn about his family's hometown DuBois would drive his grandmother around in his aunt's car while she identified local landmarks and told stories, often taking pictures as they traveled.[3] He documents the decay and blight of the town,[12] but also the families which live among such an environment of insularity and lack of opportunity.[8] The photographs challenge American "myths" surrounding upward economic mobility and question how American families survive amid economic uncertainty.[3]

The themes of economic uncertainty and provincial life are likewise central to DuBois' recent photo series, which was published as the book My Last Day at Seventeen. These photographs depict working class teenagers in a housing estate in Cobh, County Cork, Ireland after the collapse of the Celtic Tiger economy as a result of the 2008 financial crisis.[13] The series represents the anxiety inherent to the transition from adolescence to adulthood, and how the subjects' anxiety regarding the future is mirrored by their economic uncertainty.[14][15] Shot over five summers, the series presents an "endless summer" in which precariously-situated teenagers perform identities informed by an international popular visual culture but mediated through a local context.[13]

DuBois carefully composes his compositions with supplementary lighting, and uses either a medium format or a large format folding camera with a cloak.[11][12] He does not consider his work to be documentary, rather he views each photo as a collaborative endeavor between artist and subject which is based in truth.[16][14] DuBois will often stage or recreate photographs, sometimes even alluding to visual works which are not his own, and has borrowed the literary term "creative nonfiction" to describe his work.[17]

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Aperture Foundation

Aperture Foundation

Aperture Foundation is a nonprofit arts institution, founded in 1952 by Ansel Adams, Minor White, Barbara Morgan, Dorothea Lange, Nancy Newhall, Beaumont Newhall, Ernest Louie, Melton Ferris, and Dody Warren. Their vision was to create a forum for fine art photography, a new concept at the time. The first issue of the magazine Aperture was published in spring 1952 in San Francisco.

Photo-book

Photo-book

A photo book or photobook is a book in which photographs make a significant contribution to the overall content. A photo book is related to and also often used as a coffee table book.

Deindustrialization

Deindustrialization

De-industrialization is a process of social and economic change caused by the removal or reduction of industrial capacity or activity in a country or region, especially of heavy industry or manufacturing industry.

Avella, Pennsylvania

Avella, Pennsylvania

Avella is a census-designated place in Independence Township, Washington County, Pennsylvania, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 804 residents. It is located at 40.27° north & 80.45° west.

Socioeconomic mobility in the United States

Socioeconomic mobility in the United States

Socioeconomic mobility in the United States refers to the upward or downward movement of Americans from one social class or economic level to another, through job changes, inheritance, marriage, connections, tax changes, innovation, illegal activities, hard work, lobbying, luck, health changes or other factors.

Housing estate

Housing estate

A housing estate is a group of homes and other buildings built together as a single development. The exact form may vary from country to country.

Cobh

Cobh

Cobh, known from 1849 until 1920 as Queenstown, is a seaport town on the south coast of County Cork, Ireland. With a population of around 13,000 inhabitants, Cobh is on the south side of Great Island in Cork Harbour and home to Ireland's only dedicated cruise terminal. Tourism in the area draws on the maritime and emigration legacy of the town.

Celtic Tiger

Celtic Tiger

The "Celtic Tiger" is a term referring to the economy of Ireland from the mid-1990s to the late 2000s, a period of rapid real economic growth fuelled by foreign direct investment. The boom was dampened by a subsequent property bubble which resulted in a severe economic downturn.

Medium format

Medium format

Medium format has traditionally referred to a film format in photography and the related cameras and equipment that use film. Nowadays, the term applies to film and digital cameras that record images on media larger than the 24 mm × 36 mm used in 35 mm photography, but smaller than 4 in × 5 in.

Large format

Large format

Large format refers to any imaging format of 9 cm × 12 cm or larger. Large format is larger than "medium format", the 6 cm × 6 cm or 6 cm × 9 cm size of Hasselblad, Mamiya, Rollei, Kowa, and Pentax cameras, and much larger than the 24 mm × 36 mm frame of 35 mm format.

Folding camera

Folding camera

A folding camera is a camera type. Folding cameras fold into a compact and rugged package for storage. The lens and shutter are attached to a lens-board which is connected to the body of the camera by a light-tight folding bellows. When the camera is fully unfolded it provides the correct focus distance from the film. The key advantage of folding cameras is their excellent physical-size to film-size ratio when the camera is folded for storage.

Creative nonfiction

Creative nonfiction

Creative nonfiction is a genre of writing that uses literary styles and techniques to create factually accurate narratives. Creative nonfiction contrasts with other nonfiction, such as academic or technical writing or journalism, which are also rooted in accurate fact though not written to entertain based on prose style. Many writers view creative nonfiction as overlapping with the essay.

Educator

He is an associate professor and department chair of Art Photography at the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University.[18]

Publications by DuBois

  • All the Days and Nights. New york: Aperture, 2009. ISBN 978-1597110983.
  • My Last Day at Seventeen. New York: Aperture, 2015. Includes a graphic novel component illustrated by Patrick Lynch. ISBN 978-1-59711-313-7.

Collections

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J. Paul Getty Museum

J. Paul Getty Museum

The J. Paul Getty Museum, commonly referred to as the Getty, is an art museum in Los Angeles, California housed on two campuses: the Getty Center and Getty Villa.

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

The Library of Congress (LC) is the research library that officially serves the United States Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the country. The library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains a conservation center in Culpeper, Virginia. The library's functions are overseen by the Librarian of Congress, and its buildings are maintained by the Architect of the Capitol. The Library of Congress is the largest library in the world. Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 470 languages."

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

Los Angeles County Museum of Art

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) is an art museum located on Wilshire Boulevard in the Miracle Mile vicinity of Los Angeles. LACMA is on Museum Row, adjacent to the La Brea Tar Pits.

Museum of Modern Art

Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues.

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) is a modern and contemporary art museum located in San Francisco, California. A nonprofit organization, SFMOMA holds an internationally recognized collection of modern and contemporary art, and was the first museum on the West Coast devoted solely to 20th-century art. The museum's current collection includes over 33,000 works of painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, design, and media arts, and moving into the 21st century. The collection is displayed in 170,000 square feet (16,000 m2) of exhibition space, making the museum one of the largest in the United States overall, and one of the largest in the world for modern and contemporary art.

Victoria and Albert Museum

Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London is the world's largest museum of applied arts, decorative arts and design, housing a permanent collection of over 2.27 million objects. It was founded in 1852 and named after Queen Victoria and Prince Albert.

Source: "Doug DuBois", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doug_DuBois.

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References
  1. ^ a b Hirsch, Robert; Erf, Greg (CON) (2010-12-28). Exploring Color Photography: From Film to Pixels. Focal Press. pp. 72–. ISBN 978-0-240-81335-6. Retrieved 29 June 2011.
  2. ^ "Doug DuBois". College of Visual and Performing Arts. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  3. ^ a b c Collins, Gillie (2016-04-11). "Doug DuBois and the Photography of Family". Guernica. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  4. ^ Knelman, Sara (Spring 2020). "Domestic Comfort". Aperture. 238: 106–111 – via EBSCOhost.
  5. ^ a b c d "John Simon Guggenheim Foundation | Douglas DuBois". Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  6. ^ a b c Gotthardt, Alexxa (2016-03-25). "Doug DuBois's Portraits Capture the Intimacy of Aging and the American Family". Artsy. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  7. ^ Sheets, Hilarie M. (2014-01-09). "Portraits From Clips and Bytes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  8. ^ a b c Asokan, Ratik (2016-04-22). "Doug DuBois's Beautiful Photos of Youth, Age, and His Parents' Failing Marriage". Vice. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  9. ^ "Doug DuBois - 20 Artworks, Bio & Shows on Artsy". www.artsy.net. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  10. ^ Asokan, Doug DuBois, Words by Ratik (2016-04-21). "Doug DuBois's Beautiful Photos of Youth, Age, and His Parents' Failing Marriage". Vice. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  11. ^ a b Mahoney, John (November–December 2013). "Intimate Portraits". American Photo. 24: 60–69 – via EBSCOhost.
  12. ^ a b Ryder, Katie. "History, Time, Trauma: The Photography of Doug DuBois". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  13. ^ a b McBride, Stephanie (2016). "At Seventeen". Irish Arts Review. 33: 100–103 – via EBSCOhost.
  14. ^ a b "From Ireland, Photographer Doug DuBois's Images of Fading Youth". Hyperallergic. 2015-11-07. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  15. ^ Griggs, Tom (Spring 2015). "The End of Youth: Doug DuBois's My Last Day at Seventeen". Exposure. 48: 26–33.
  16. ^ Davies, Lucy (July 2015). "Teenage Truths". Journal of the Royal Photographic Society. 155: 528–531 – via EBSCOhost.
  17. ^ McCauley, Adam. "The Lingering Light of Childhood: Doug DuBois' Ireland". Time. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  18. ^ "Doug DuBois". College of Visual and Performing Arts. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  19. ^ "Doug DuBois (American, born 1960) (Getty Museum)". The J. Paul Getty in Los Angeles. Retrieved 2020-08-05.
  20. ^ dubois, doug. "Search results from Available Online, Dubois, Doug". Library of Congress. Retrieved 2020-08-05.
  21. ^ "Doug Dubois". Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Retrieved 2020-08-05.
  22. ^ "Your Search Results". Victoria and Albert Museum. Retrieved 2020-08-05.
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