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Dorothy B. Waage

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Dorothy Boylan Waage (January 8, 1905 - December 11, 1997[1]) was an American numismatist, who published the catalogue of 14,000 Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader coins excavated by Princeton University in the 1930s. This has been described as "the best catalogue of Antiochene coinage".[2]

Early life

Born in Kalamazoo, she attended Kalamazoo Central High School and Kalamazoo College.[1] She married Frederick O. Waage on August 28, 1935.[1] He was Professor of the History of Art and Archaeology at Cornell University from 1945 to 1971.[3]

Numismatics

Both she and her husband worked on the archaeological and numismatic assemblages from the excavations undertaken at Antioch, which were undertaken by Princeton University from 1932 to 1939.[4] In particular Waage worked on the non-Islamic material from the site, producing a catalogue of the 14,000 Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusader coins.[5][6][7][8] It was published in 1952 as Antioch-on-the-Orontes. IV.: Part Two: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins.[9]

Her analysis included the recognition of a new variant monogram on bronze coins of Seleucus II, originating the Antioch.[10][11] She took an innovative approach to numismatic cataloguing, arranging the coins from Antioch according to period, but featuring the reverse side first.[6] Her work was described by Professor Kevin Butcher as "the best catalogue of Antiochene coinage".[2]

Discover more about Numismatics related topics

Antioch

Antioch

Antioch on the Orontes was a Hellenistic, and later, a Biblical Christian city, founded by Seleucus I Nicator in 300 BC. This city served as the capital of the Seleucid Empire and later as regional capital to both the Roman and Byzantine Empire. During the Crusades, Antioch served as the capital of the Principality of Antioch, one of four Crusader states that were founded in the Levant. Its inhabitants were known as Antiochenes; the city's ruin lies on the Orontes River, near Antakya, the modern city in Hatay Province of Turkey (Türkiye), to which the ancient city lends its name.

Princeton University

Princeton University

Princeton University is a private Ivy League research university in Princeton, New Jersey. Founded in 1746 in Elizabeth as the College of New Jersey, Princeton is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. It is one of the highest-ranked universities in the world. The institution moved to Newark in 1747, and then to the current site nine years later. It officially became a university in 1896 and was subsequently renamed Princeton University.

Seleucus II Callinicus

Seleucus II Callinicus

Seleucus II Callinicus Pogon, was a ruler of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire, who reigned from 246 BC to 225 BC. Faced with multiple enemies on various fronts, and not always successful militarily, his reign was a time of great turmoil and fragmentation for the Seleucid empire, before its eventual restoration under his second son and eventual successor, Antiochus III.

Numismatics

Numismatics

Numismatics is the study or collection of currency, including coins, tokens, paper money, medals and related objects.

Personal life

Waage kept a life-long correspondence with the soprano Lotte Lehmann.[12]

Source: "Dorothy B. Waage", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dorothy_B._Waage.

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References
  1. ^ a b c "Collection: Dorothy B. Waage Collection | ArchivesSpace at Western Michigan University Libraries". aspace.library.wmich.edu. Retrieved 2022-11-22.
  2. ^ a b Butcher, Kevin (2004). Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC-AD 253. Royal Numismatic Society. pp. 2, 362. ISBN 978-0-901405-58-6.
  3. ^ "Frederick O. Waage | Britannica". www.britannica.com. Retrieved 2022-11-22.
  4. ^ Broneer, Oscar (1950-01-01). "Antioch-on-the-Orontes IV, Part One, Ceramics and Islamic Coins. By Frederick O. Waagé". American Journal of Archaeology. 54 (1): 85–89. doi:10.2307/500648. ISSN 0002-9114.
  5. ^ Carson, R. a. G. (1954). "Antioch-on-the-Orontes, IV, Part 2. Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. By Dorothy B. Waage. 13½ × 11. Pp. xii + 187. Princeton: Princeton University Press. London: Oxford University Press. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1953. 163s. 6d". The Antiquaries Journal. 34 (1–2): 92–93. doi:10.1017/S0003581500073388. ISSN 1758-5309.
  6. ^ a b Jenkins, G. K. (1954). "Antioch-on-the-Orontes, IV, part 2: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. By Dorothy B. Waage. Princeton: University Press, 1952 (London: Oxford Univeristy Press). Pp. xii + 187, 8 pll. £8 2s. 6d". The Journal of Hellenic Studies. 74: 233–233. doi:10.2307/627648. ISSN 2041-4099.
  7. ^ Metcalf, David Michael; Museum, Ashmolean (1995). Coinage of the Crusades and the Latin East in the Ashmolean Museum Oxford. Royal Numismatic Society. ISBN 978-1-85444-062-4.
  8. ^ The Numismatic Chronicle. Royal Numismatic Society. 2001.
  9. ^ Waage, Dorothy B. Antioch-on-the-Orontes. IV.: Part Two: Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Crusaders' Coins. University Press, 1952.
  10. ^ Schindel, Nikolaus. "Zur Minimus-Prägung des Kaisers Anastasius I." Jahrbuch für Numismatik und Geldgeschichte 61 (2011): 109-130.
  11. ^ Society, American Numismatic (1980). Museum Notes. American Numismatic Society.
  12. ^ "Lehmann (Lotte) and Dorothy Waage correspondence collection". oac.cdlib.org. Retrieved 2022-11-22.

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