Get Our Extension

Derry Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
The Lord Irvine of Lairg
Coronet of a British Baron.svg
Irvine of Lairg Escutcheon.png
Lord Chancellor
In office
2 May 1997 – 12 June 2003
Prime MinisterTony Blair
Preceded byThe Lord Mackay of Clashfern
Succeeded byThe Lord Falconer of Thoroton
Shadow Lord Chancellor
In office
18 July 1992 – 2 May 1997
LeaderJohn Smith
Margaret Beckett (Acting)
Tony Blair
Preceded byThe Lord Mishcon
Succeeded byThe Lord Mackay of Clashfern
Member of the House of Lords
Lord Temporal
Assumed office
25 March 1987
Life Peerage
Personal details
Born (1940-06-23) 23 June 1940 (age 82)
Inverness, Scotland, UK
Political partyLabour
SpouseAlison McNair
Alma materUniversity of Glasgow
Christ's College, Cambridge

Alexander Andrew Mackay Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg, PC, KC (born 23 June 1940), known as Derry Irvine, is a Scottish lawyer, judge and political figure who served as Lord Chancellor under his former pupil barrister, Tony Blair.

Discover more about Derry Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg related topics

King's Counsel

King's Counsel

In the United Kingdom and in some Commonwealth countries, a King's Counsel during the reign of a king, or Queen's Counsel during the reign of a queen, is a lawyer who is typically a senior trial lawyer. Technically appointed by the monarch of the country to be one of 'His [Her] Majesty's Counsel learned in the law', the position originated in England and Wales. Some Commonwealth countries have either abolished the position, or renamed it so as to remove monarchical connotations, for example, 'Senior counsel' or 'Senior Advocate'.

Lawyer

Lawyer

A lawyer is a person who practices law. The role of a lawyer varies greatly across different legal jurisdictions. A lawyer can be classified as an advocate, attorney, barrister, canon lawyer, civil law notary, counsel, counselor, solicitor, legal executive, or public servant — with each role having different functions and privileges. Working as a lawyer generally involves the practical application of abstract legal theories and knowledge to solve specific problems. Some lawyers also work primarily in advancing the interests of the law and legal profession.

Judge

Judge

A judge is a person who presides over court proceedings, either alone or as a part of a panel of judges. A judge hears all the witnesses and any other evidence presented by the barristers or solicitors of the case, assesses the credibility and arguments of the parties, and then issues a ruling in the case based on their interpretation of the law and their own personal judgment. A judge is expected to conduct the trial impartially and, typically, in an open court.

Lord Chancellor

Lord Chancellor

The lord chancellor, formally the lord high chancellor of Great Britain, is the highest-ranking traditional minister among the Great Officers of State in Scotland and England in the United Kingdom, nominally outranking the prime minister. The lord chancellor is appointed by the sovereign on the advice of the prime minister. Prior to their Union into the Kingdom of Great Britain, there were separate lord chancellors for the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland; there were lord chancellors of Ireland until 1922.

Pupillage

Pupillage

A pupillage, in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, Kenya, Malaysia, Pakistan and Hong Kong, is the final, vocational stage of training for those wishing to become practising barristers. Pupillage is similar to an apprenticeship, during which bar graduates build on what they have learnt during the Bar Professional Training Course or equivalent by combining it with practical work experience in a set of barristers' chambers or pupillage training organisation.

Barrister

Barrister

A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching law and giving expert legal opinions.

Tony Blair

Tony Blair

Sir Anthony Charles Lynton Blair is a British former politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1994 to 2007. He previously served as Leader of the Opposition from 1994 to 1997, and had served in various shadow cabinet posts from 1987 to 1994. Blair was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Sedgefield from 1983 to 2007. He is the second longest serving prime minister in modern history after Margaret Thatcher, and is the longest serving Labour politician to have held the office.

Education

Irvine was born in Inverness, Scotland, the son of a roofer and a waitress. He was educated at the fee-paying private school, Hutchesons' Boys' Grammar School in Glasgow.

Later Irvine read Scots law at the University of Glasgow and became involved in debating with the Glasgow University Dialectic Society and at the Glasgow University Union, where he befriended contemporary Labourites Donald Dewar and John Smith. After reading English law at Christ's College, Cambridge, he taught law briefly at the London School of Economics and was called to the Bar in 1967. In the late 1960s, Dewar's wife, Alison, left Dewar for Irvine. Irvine later stated that the two men had remained on speaking terms, contrary to reports of a rift.[1] They later served in the same Cabinet. His first marriage ended in divorce, with his ex-wife subsequently moving to Canada.[1]

Discover more about Education related topics

Inverness

Inverness

Inverness is a city in the Scottish Highlands. It is the administrative centre for The Highland Council and is regarded as the capital of the Highlands. Historically it served as the county town of the county of Inverness-shire. Inverness lies near two important battle sites: the 11th-century battle of Blàr nam Fèinne against Norway which took place on the Aird, and the 18th century Battle of Culloden which took place on Culloden Moor. It is the northernmost city in the United Kingdom and lies within the Great Glen at its northeastern extremity where the River Ness enters the Beauly Firth. At the latest, a settlement was established by the 6th century with the first royal charter being granted by Dabíd mac Maíl Choluim in the 12th century. Inverness and Inverness-shire are closely linked to various influential clans, including Clan Mackintosh, Clan Fraser and Clan MacKenzie.

Scotland

Scotland

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. Covering the northern third of the island of Great Britain, mainland Scotland has a 96-mile (154-kilometre) border with England to the southeast and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast and east, and the Irish Sea to the south. It also contains more than 790 islands, principally in the archipelagos of the Hebrides and the Northern Isles. Most of the population, including the capital Edinburgh, is concentrated in the Central Belt—the plain between the Scottish Highlands and the Southern Uplands—in the Scottish Lowlands.

Hutchesons' Grammar School

Hutchesons' Grammar School

Hutchesons' Grammar School is a co-educational independent day school for pupils aged 3-18 in Glasgow, Scotland. It was founded as Hutchesons' Boys' Grammar School by George Hutcheson and Thomas Hutcheson in 1641. Prospective pupils must sit an entrance test to gain admission. "Hutchie", as the school is known informally, now has around 1,300 pupils across its Pre-school, Junior and Senior Schools.

Glasgow

Glasgow

Glasgow is the most populous city in Scotland and the fourth-most populous city in the United Kingdom, as well as being the 27th largest city by population in Europe. In 2020, it had an estimated population of 635,640. The city was made a county of itself in 1893, prior to which it had been in the historic county of Lanarkshire. The city now forms the Glasgow City Council area, one of the 32 council areas of Scotland, and is governed by Glasgow City Council. It is situated on the River Clyde in the country's West Central Lowlands.

Debate

Debate

Debate is a process that involves formal discourse on a particular topic, often including a moderator and audience. In a debate, arguments are put forward for often opposing viewpoints. Debates have historically occurred in public meetings, academic institutions, debate halls, coffeehouses, competitions, and legislative assemblies. Debate has also been conducted for educational and recreational purposes, usually associated with educational establishments and debating societies. These debates put an emphasis upon logical consistency, factual accuracy, and emotional appeal to an audience. Modern forms of competitive debate also include rules for participants to discuss and decide upon the framework of the debate.

Glasgow University Dialectic Society

Glasgow University Dialectic Society

The Glasgow University Dialectic Society, re-instituted in 1861, is a student society at the University of Glasgow, Scotland, committed to the promotion of debating, logic, ethics and literary discussion at the university. The society is independent and open to all students of the university, but maintains strong links with debating at Glasgow University Union.

Glasgow University Union

Glasgow University Union

Glasgow University Union (GUU) is one of the largest and oldest students' unions in the UK, serving students and alumni of the University of Glasgow since 1885.

Donald Dewar

Donald Dewar

Donald Campbell Dewar was a Scottish politician who served as the inaugural First Minister of Scotland and Leader of the Labour Party in Scotland from 1999 until his death in 2000. He previously served as Secretary of State for Scotland from 1997 to 1999. He was Member of Parliament (MP) for Glasgow Anniesland from 1978 to 2000. Dewar was also Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) for the equivalent seat from 1999 to 2000.

John Smith (Labour Party leader)

John Smith (Labour Party leader)

John Smith was a British Labour Party politician who served as Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his death from a heart attack in May 1994. He was also the Member of Parliament (MP) for Monklands East.

Christ's College, Cambridge

Christ's College, Cambridge

Christ's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college includes the Master, the Fellows of the College, and about 450 undergraduate and 170 graduate students. The college was founded by William Byngham in 1437 as God's House. In 1505, the college was granted a new royal charter, was given a substantial endowment by Lady Margaret Beaufort, and changed its name to Christ's College, becoming the twelfth of the Cambridge colleges to be founded in its current form. Alumni of the college include some of Cambridge University’s most famous members, including Charles Darwin and John Milton.

London School of Economics

London School of Economics

The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is a public research university located in London, England and a constituent college of the federal University of London. Founded in 1895 by Fabian Society members Sidney Webb, Beatrice Webb, Graham Wallas, and George Bernard Shaw, LSE joined the University of London in 1900 and established its first degree courses under the auspices of the university in 1901. LSE began awarding its degrees in its own name in 2008, prior to which it awarded degrees of the University of London. It became a university in its own right within the University of London in 2022.

Cabinet (government)

Cabinet (government)

A cabinet is a body of high-ranking state officials, typically consisting of the executive branch's top leaders. Members of a cabinet are usually called cabinet ministers or secretaries. The function of a cabinet varies: in some countries, it is a collegiate decision-making body with collective responsibility, while in others it may function either as a purely advisory body or an assisting institution to a decision-making head of state or head of government. Cabinets are typically the body responsible for the day-to-day management of the government and response to sudden events, whereas the legislative and judicial branches work in a measured pace, in sessions according to lengthy procedures.

Career

Irvine joined chambers headed by Morris Finer QC (later as a judge, Sir Morris Finer). In 1970, he contested the Hendon North constituency as a Labour Party candidate.[2] He became a QC in 1978 and head of chambers in 1981, on founding 11 King's Bench Walk Chambers. Among his pupil barristers were Tony Blair and Cherie Booth; at their wedding he dubbed himself "Cupid QC"[3] for having introduced them. In the 1980s he became a Recorder and then a Deputy High Court Judge.

He was a legal adviser to the Labour Party through the 1980s, and he was given a life peerage as Baron Irvine of Lairg, of Lairg in the District of Sutherland, on 25 March 1987.[4] He was appointed as Lord Chancellor after Blair's election victory in 1997 following five years as Shadow Lord Chancellor. Blair's predecessor as Labour leader, John Smith, had chosen Irvine as Shadow Lord Chancellor.

A highlight of Irvine's period in office was the incorporation of the European Convention on Human Rights into United Kingdom law. Irvine devised a measure to maintain the supremacy of Parliament while allowing judges to declare Acts of Parliament not to be in compliance with the Convention. He caused controversy by ditching part of the Lord Chancellor's traditional attire.[5][6]

In addition to his traditional role of supervising the legal system, in 2001 he gained responsibility for a wide range of constitutional issues, including human rights and freedom of information.

Discover more about Career related topics

Morris Finer

Morris Finer

Sir Morris Finer QC was a British lawyer and judge.

Hendon North (UK Parliament constituency)

Hendon North (UK Parliament constituency)

Hendon North was a constituency in the former Municipal Borough of Hendon which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It was created for the 1945 general election as the existing Hendon constituency was too large, and lasted until the 1997 general election when the London Borough of Barnet's Parliamentary representation was reduced from four seats to three.

Labour Party (UK)

Labour Party (UK)

The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom that has been described as an alliance of social democrats, democratic socialists and trade unionists. The Labour Party sits on the centre-left of the political spectrum. In all general elections since 1922, Labour has been either the governing party or the Official Opposition. There have been six Labour prime ministers and thirteen Labour ministries. The party holds the annual Labour Party Conference, at which party policy is formulated.

Barrister

Barrister

A barrister is a type of lawyer in common law jurisdictions. Barristers mostly specialise in courtroom advocacy and litigation. Their tasks include taking cases in superior courts and tribunals, drafting legal pleadings, researching law and giving expert legal opinions.

Tony Blair

Tony Blair

Sir Anthony Charles Lynton Blair is a British former politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1997 to 2007 and Leader of the Labour Party from 1994 to 2007. He previously served as Leader of the Opposition from 1994 to 1997, and had served in various shadow cabinet posts from 1987 to 1994. Blair was the Member of Parliament (MP) for Sedgefield from 1983 to 2007. He is the second longest serving prime minister in modern history after Margaret Thatcher, and is the longest serving Labour politician to have held the office.

Cherie Blair

Cherie Blair

Cherie, Lady Blair,, also known professionally as Cherie Booth, is an English barrister and writer. She is married to the former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Sir Tony Blair.

Life peer

Life peer

In the United Kingdom, life peers are appointed members of the peerage whose titles cannot be inherited, in contrast to hereditary peers. In modern times, life peerages, always created at the rank of baron, are created under the Life Peerages Act 1958 and entitle the holders to seats in the House of Lords, presuming they meet qualifications such as age and citizenship. The legitimate children of a life peer are entitled to style themselves with the prefix "The Honourable", although they cannot inherit the peerage itself.

Lairg

Lairg

Lairg is a village and parish in Sutherland, Scotland. It has a population of 891 and is at the south-eastern end of Loch Shin.

Sutherland

Sutherland

Sutherland is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area in the Highlands of Scotland. Its county town is Dornoch. Sutherland borders Caithness and Moray Firth to the east, Ross-shire and Cromartyshire to the south and the Atlantic to the north and west. Like its southern neighbour Ross-shire, Sutherland has some of the most dramatic scenery in Europe, especially on its western fringe where the mountains meet the sea. These include high sea cliffs, and very old mountains composed of Precambrian and Cambrian rocks.

John Smith (Labour Party leader)

John Smith (Labour Party leader)

John Smith was a British Labour Party politician who served as Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Labour Party from July 1992 until his death from a heart attack in May 1994. He was also the Member of Parliament (MP) for Monklands East.

European Convention on Human Rights

European Convention on Human Rights

The European Convention on Human Rights is an international convention to protect human rights and political freedoms in Europe. Drafted in 1950 by the then newly formed Council of Europe, the convention entered into force on 3 September 1953. All Council of Europe member states are party to the Convention and new members are expected to ratify the convention at the earliest opportunity.

Reputation

Irvine regularly faced controversy as Lord Chancellor. Soon after his appointment in 1998, the Lord Chancellor's official residence in the Palace of Westminster was redecorated at a cost to the taxpayer of £650,000. Hand-printed wallpaper alone accounted for £59,000.[7] Much of the criticism devolved on Irvine, despite responsibility for the renovations lying with the House of Lords authorities rather than Irvine himself. Contractors working on the renovations were forced to sign the Official Secrets Act to avoid revelations of the expenditure leaking out to the public.[7] Irvine came under further criticism after saying that the expenditure was worth it because the redecorations wouldn't "collapse after a year" like products from B&Q, a well-known British D-I-Y store.[8]

Early in 2003 he was awarded a pay rise of £22,691 as a result of a formula designed to keep his salary ahead of that of the Lord Chief Justice. After an outcry he accepted a more modest increase. Irvine became an object of ridicule after he provided a copy of a speech – initially given at a private event – in which he compared himself to Cardinal Wolsey, to a reporter from The Times newspaper.[9] He was frequently thereafter drawn by political cartoonists wearing a cardinal's hat and robes.

Discover more about Reputation related topics

Removal

After Blair dismissed him in June 2003, Lord Falconer of Thoroton was named his successor. At the same time, it was announced that the post of Lord Chancellor would be abolished. The plan to abolish the office was later abandoned, though it was partially reformed in the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, and is now used as a secondary title to the Secretary of State for Justice.

Family

In October 2002, Irvine's son, Alastair Irvine, who went to the US to be treated for drug addiction, pleaded guilty to stalking and vandalism. He threatened the boyfriend of Nicole Healy, Karel Taska, damaging his pick-up truck with caustic acid. Derry Irvine and his wife, Alison, had not visited Alastair following his arrest or during his trial. The Newport Beach court heard allegations that Irvine fell for Ms Healy, who was working at the Newport Tanning Club, Newport Beach, a wealthy yachting enclave in southern California. Alastair Irvine pleaded guilty to six charges, including stalking and carrying a concealed weapon without a permit. Irvine, who had already served four months in Orange County jail, was sentenced to 16 months. The maximum sentence the court could have handed down was 16 years. The deputy district attorney, Mike Fell, said he was grateful Lord Irvine had not attempted to interfere.[10][11]

Arms

Coat of arms of Derry Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg
Crest
A man in the attire of the Lord Chancellor's purse bearer and carrying the Lord Chancellor's purse Proper.
Escutcheon
Argent three holly leaves Proper on a chief Azure two bears' heads couped of the first muzzled Gules.
Supporters
Dexter a salmon Proper having in its mouth a signet ring Or sinister a lion per fess Or and Sable.
Motto
Do The Right[12]

Source: "Derry Irvine, Baron Irvine of Lairg", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry_Irvine,_Baron_Irvine_of_Lairg.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b "BBC News | UK Politics | Lord Irvine's guilt over Dewar's wife". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  2. ^ "The fall of Derry Irvine". scotsman.com. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  3. ^ White, Michael (20 February 2001). "Why Tony and Cherie love 'Cupid QC'". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  4. ^ "No. 50874". The London Gazette (1st supplement). 30 March 1987. p. 4265.
  5. ^ "Peers tense over tights". BBC News. 13 October 1998.
  6. ^ "Lord Irvine angry over wigs". BBC News. 10 November 1998.
  7. ^ a b Sylvester, Rachel; Winnett, Robert (29 March 2008). "Michael Martin's home gets £1.7m makeover". The Daily Telegraph. London. Archived from the original on 2 April 2008. Retrieved 4 November 2012.
  8. ^ "BBC News | UK | Irvine's attempt to paper over cracks". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  9. ^ "The Godfather". The Independent. 11 October 1998. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  10. ^ "Irvine's son jailed for 16 months in US". TheGuardian.com. 25 October 2002.
  11. ^ "Irvine son held on stalking charges". 12 April 2012.
  12. ^ Debrett's Peerage. 2019. p. 3148.
Political offices
Preceded by Shadow Lord Chancellor
1992–1997
Succeeded by
Preceded by Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain
1997–2003
Succeeded by
Orders of precedence in the United Kingdom
Preceded by Gentlemen
Baron Irvine of Lairg
Followed by
The Lord Stevens of Ludgate


Derry Irvine, Baron}}

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.