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Denver Broncos

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Denver Broncos
Current season
Established August 15, 1959; 63 years ago (August 15, 1959)[1]
First season: 1960
Play in Empower Field at Mile High
Denver, Colorado
Headquartered at UCHealth Training Center in Dove Valley, Colorado[2]
Denver Broncos logo
Denver Broncos wordmark
LogoWordmark
League/conference affiliations

American Football League (1960–1969)

  • Western Division (1960–1969)

National Football League (1970–present)

Current uniform
Broncos uniforms.png
Team colorsOrange, navy blue, white[3][4][5]
     
MascotThunder (live horse)
Miles (costume suit)
Personnel
Owner(s)Walton-Penner Family Group[6][7]
CEOGreg Penner
PresidentDamani Leech
General managerGeorge Paton[8]
Head coachVacant
Team history
  • Denver Broncos (1960–present)
Team nicknames
Championships
League championships (3)
Conference championships (8)
Division championships (15)
Playoff appearances (22)
Home fields

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver. The Broncos compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division. The team is headquartered in Dove Valley, Colorado.

The team began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL) and joined the NFL as part of the merger in 1970. The Broncos are currently owned by the Walton-Penner group, and play their home games at Empower Field at Mile High; Denver previously played its home games at Mile High Stadium from its inception in 1960 through the 2000 season.

The Broncos were barely competitive during their 10-year run in the AFL and their first seven years in the NFL. They did not have a winning season until 1973 and qualified for their first playoffs in 1977, eventually advancing to Super Bowl XII that season. Since 1975, the Broncos have become one of the NFL's most successful teams, having suffered only eleven losing seasons.[9] They have won eight AFC Championships (1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, 2015), and three Super Bowl championships (1997 (XXXII), 1998 (XXXIII), 2015 (50)), and share the NFL record for most Super Bowl losses (5 — tied with the New England Patriots). The Broncos have eight primary members enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame: John Elway, Floyd Little, Shannon Sharpe, Gary Zimmerman, Terrell Davis, Champ Bailey, and Steve Atwater, along with late club owner Pat Bowlen.[10]

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AFC West

AFC West

The American Football Conference – Western Division or AFC West is one of the four divisions of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The division comprises the Denver Broncos, Kansas City Chiefs, Las Vegas Raiders, and Los Angeles Chargers.

1973 Denver Broncos season

1973 Denver Broncos season

The 1973 Denver Broncos season was the team's 14th year in professional football and its fourth with the National Football League (NFL). Led by second-year head coach and general manager John Ralston, the Broncos posted a winning record for the first time in franchise history, with seven wins, five losses, and two ties, which tied for sixth-best in the conference. Denver tied for second in the AFC West, 1½ games behind the Oakland Raiders.

1977 Denver Broncos season

1977 Denver Broncos season

The 1977 Denver Broncos season was the team's 18th year in professional football and its eighth with the National Football League (NFL).

AFC Championship Game

AFC Championship Game

The AFC Championship Game is the annual championship game of the American Football Conference (AFC) and one of the two semifinal playoff games of the National Football League (NFL), the largest professional American football league in the world. The game is played on the last Sunday in January by the two remaining playoff teams, following the AFC postseason's first two rounds. The AFC champion then advances to face the winner of the NFC Championship Game in the Super Bowl.

1977 NFL season

1977 NFL season

The 1977 NFL season was the 58th regular season of the National Football League. The two second-year expansion teams switched conferences, with the Seattle Seahawks moving from the NFC West to the AFC West, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers transferring from the AFC West to the NFC Central.

1986 NFL season

1986 NFL season

The 1986 NFL season was the 67th regular season of the National Football League. Defending Super Bowl Champion Chicago Bears shared the league’s best record with the Giants at 14–2, with the Giants claiming the spot in the NFC by tiebreakers. In the AFC, the Cleveland Browns earned home-field advantage with a record of 12–4, and they hosted the New York Jets in round one of the AFC playoffs. The Jets had started the season at 10–1 before losing their final five contests. The game went to double OT, with the Browns finally prevailing 23–20. The following Sunday, John Elway and the Denver Broncos defeated the Browns by an identical score in a game known for The Drive, where Elway drove his team 98 yards to send the game to overtime to win. The Giants would defeat their rival Washington Redskins in the NFC title game, blanking them 17–0 to advance to their first Super Bowl. The season ended with Super Bowl XXI when the New York Giants defeated the Denver Broncos 39–20 at the Rose Bowl to win their first league title in 30 years.

1987 NFL season

1987 NFL season

The 1987 NFL season was the 68th regular season of the National Football League. This season featured games predominantly played by replacement players, as the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) players were on strike from weeks four to six with week three being cancelled in its entirety. This remains the last NFL season in which regular-season games were impacted by a labor conflict.

1989 NFL season

1989 NFL season

The 1989 NFL season was the 70th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle announced his retirement. Paul Tagliabue was eventually chosen to succeed him, taking over on November 5.

1997 NFL season

1997 NFL season

The 1997 NFL season was the 78th regular season of the National Football League. The Oilers relocated from Houston, Texas to Nashville, Tennessee. The newly renamed Tennessee Oilers played their home games during this season at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tennessee while construction of a new stadium in Nashville started. Houston would rejoin the NFL with the expansion Texans in 2002.

1998 NFL season

1998 NFL season

The 1998 NFL season was the 79th regular season of the National Football League.

2013 NFL season

2013 NFL season

The 2013 NFL season was the 94th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL) and the 48th of the Super Bowl era. The season saw the Seattle Seahawks capture the first championship in the franchise's 38 years in the league with a lopsided victory over the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XLVIII, the league's championship game. The Super Bowl was played at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, on Sunday, February 2, 2014. It was the first Super Bowl hosted by New Jersey and the first to be held outdoors in a cold weather environment. The Seahawks scored 12 seconds into the game and held the lead the rest of the way on the back of their Legion of Boom defense.

2015 NFL season

2015 NFL season

The 2015 NFL season was the 96th season in the history of the National Football League (NFL), and the 50th in the Super Bowl era. To celebrate the 50th season of the Super Bowl, a gold-plated NFL logo and other various gold-themed promotions were used throughout the season. It began on Thursday, September 10, 2015, with the annual kickoff game featuring the defending Super Bowl XLIX champion New England Patriots defeating the Pittsburgh Steelers. The season concluded with Super Bowl 50, the league's championship game, on Sunday, February 7, 2016, at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, California, with the Denver Broncos defeating the Carolina Panthers.

Franchise history

Bob Howsman/Gerald Phipps era (1960–1980)

The Denver Broncos were founded on August 14, 1959, when minor league baseball owner Bob Howsam was awarded an American Football League (AFL) charter franchise.[11] The Broncos won the first-ever AFL game over the Boston Patriots 13–10, on September 9, 1960. Seven years later on August 5, 1967, they became the first-ever AFL team to defeat an NFL team, with a 13–7 win over the Detroit Lions in a preseason game.[11] However, the Broncos were not successful in the 1960s, winning more than five games only once (7–7, 1962), compiling a 39–97–4 (.293) record during the ten seasons of the AFL.[12]

Denver came close to losing its franchise in 1965, until a local ownership group took control,[13][14] and rebuilt the team.[15] The team's first superstar, "Franchise" Floyd Little, was instrumental in keeping the team in Denver, due to his signing in 1967 as well as his Pro Bowl efforts on and off the field. The Broncos were the only original AFL team that never played in the title game, as well as the only original AFL team never to have a winning season while a member of the AFL during the upstart league's 10-year history.[16]

In 1972, the Broncos hired former Stanford University coach John Ralston as their head coach. In 1973, he was the UPI's AFC Coach of the Year, after Denver achieved its first winning season at 7–5–2. In five seasons with the Broncos, Ralston guided the team to winning seasons three times. Though Ralston finished the 1976 season with a 9–5 record, the team, as was the case in Ralston's previous winning seasons, still missed the playoffs. Following the season, several prominent players publicly voiced their discontent with Ralston, which soon led to his resignation.[17]

The Broncos defeated the Raiders in the 1977–78 AFC Championship Game to earn their first trip to the Super Bowl.
The Broncos defeated the Raiders in the 1977–78 AFC Championship Game to earn their first trip to the Super Bowl.

Red Miller, a long-time assistant coach, was hired and along with the Orange Crush Defense (a nickname originated in 1977, also the brand of the popular orange-flavored soft drink) and aging quarterback Craig Morton, took the Broncos to what was then a record-setting 12–2 regular-season record and their first playoff appearance in 1977, and ultimately made their first Super Bowl appearance in Super Bowl XII, in which they were defeated by the Dallas Cowboys (Morton's former team), 27–10.[18]

Edgar Kaiser/Pat Bowlen era (1981–2018)

In 1981, Broncos' owner Gerald Phipps, who had purchased the team in May 1961 from the original owner Bob Howsam, sold the team to Canadian financier Edgar Kaiser Jr., grandson of shipbuilding industrialist Henry J. Kaiser.[19] In 1984, the team was purchased by another Canadian, Pat Bowlen, who placed team ownership into a family trust sometime before 2004 and remained in day-to-day control until his battle with Alzheimer's disease forced him to cede the team to Joe Ellis in 2014.[20][21][22]

Dan Reeves years (1981–1992)

Dan Reeves became the youngest head coach in the NFL when he joined the Broncos in 1981 as vice president and head coach. Quarterback John Elway, who played college football at Stanford, arrived in 1983 via a trade. Originally drafted by the Baltimore Colts as the first pick of the draft, Elway proclaimed that he would shun football in favor of baseball (he was drafted by the New York Yankees to play center field and was also a pitching prospect), unless he was traded to a selected list of other teams, which included the Broncos.[23] Prior to Elway, the Broncos had over 24 different starting quarterbacks in its 23 seasons to that point.[24]

A ticket for the 1987–88 AFC Championship Game between the Browns and the Broncos.
A ticket for the 1987–88 AFC Championship Game between the Browns and the Broncos.
John Elway (right) hands the ball for a rushing play against the Packers in 1984.
John Elway (right) hands the ball for a rushing play against the Packers in 1984.

Reeves and Elway guided the Broncos to six post-season appearances, five AFC West divisional titles, three AFC championships and three Super Bowl appearances (Super Bowl XXI, XXII and XXIV) during their 12-year span together. The Broncos lost Super Bowl XXI to the New York Giants, 39–20; Super Bowl XXII to the Washington Redskins, 42–10; and Super Bowl XXIV to the San Francisco 49ers, 55–10; the latter score remains the most lopsided scoring differential in Super Bowl history. The last year of the Reeves-Elway era were marked by feuding, due to Reeves taking on play-calling duties after ousting Elway's favorite offensive coordinator Mike Shanahan after the 1991 season, as well as Reeves drafting quarterback Tommy Maddox out of UCLA instead of going with a wide receiver to help Elway. Reeves was fired after the 1992 season and replaced by his protégé and friend Wade Phillips, who had been serving as the Broncos' defensive coordinator.[25][26][27] Phillips was fired after a mediocre 1994 season, in which management felt he lost control of the team.

Mike Shanahan years (1995–2008)

In 1995, Mike Shanahan, who had formerly served under Reeves as the Broncos' offensive coordinator, returned as head coach. Shanahan drafted rookie running back Terrell Davis. In 1996, the Broncos were the top seed in the AFC with a 13–3 record, dominating most of the teams that year. The fifth-seeded Jacksonville Jaguars, however, upset the Broncos 30–27 in the divisional round of the playoffs, ending the Broncos' 1996 run.[17]

Super Bowl XXXII champions (1997)

During the 1997 season, Elway and Davis helped guide the Broncos to their first Super Bowl victory, a 31–24 win over the defending champion Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII. Though Elway completed only 13 of 22 passes, throwing one interception and no touchdowns (he did, however, have a rushing touchdown), Davis rushed for 157 yards and a Super Bowl-record three touchdowns to earn the Super Bowl Most Valuable Player Award—this while overcoming a severe migraine headache that caused him blurred vision.[28]

Super Bowl XXXIII champions (1998)

The Broncos repeated as Super Bowl champions the following season, defeating the Atlanta Falcons (led by Elway's longtime head coach Dan Reeves) in Super Bowl XXXIII, 34–19. Elway was named Super Bowl MVP, completing 18 of 29 passes for 336 yards, with an 80-yard touchdown to wide receiver Rod Smith and one interception.[27]

Broncos' quarterback Jay Cutler in 2007.
Broncos' quarterback Jay Cutler in 2007.

John Elway retired following the 1998 season, and Brian Griese started at quarterback for the next four seasons. After a 6–10 record in 1999, mostly due to a season-ending injury to Terrell Davis, the Broncos recovered in 2000, earning a Wild Card playoff berth, but losing to the eventual Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens. After missing the playoffs the following two seasons, former Arizona Cardinals' quarterback Jake Plummer replaced Griese in 2003, and led the Broncos to two straight 10–6 seasons, earning Wild Card playoff berths both years. However, the Broncos went on the road to face the Indianapolis Colts in back-to-back seasons and were blown out by more than 20 points in each game, allowing a combined 90 points.[17]

Plummer led the Broncos to a 13–3 record in 2005 and their first AFC West division title since 1998. After a first-round bye, the Broncos defeated the defending Super Bowl champion New England Patriots, 27–13, denying New England from becoming the first NFL team ever to win three consecutive Super Bowl championships. They were the first team to beat the Patriots in the playoffs during the Tom Brady era. The Broncos' playoff run came to an end the next week, after losing at home to the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC Championship game, 34–17. The Steelers went on to win Super Bowl XL.

The Broncos' defense began the first five games of the 2006 season allowing only one touchdown - an NFL record that still stands. ESPN commentator and Super Bowl-winning QB Joe Theismann gave the 2006 defense the name “Bad Blue” on Monday Night Football as they played the Ravens. However, the team struggled down the season stretch. Plummer led the team to a 7–2 record, only to struggle and be replaced by rookie quarterback Jay Cutler. Cutler went 2–3 as a starter, and the Broncos finished with a 9–7 record, losing the tiebreaker to the Kansas City Chiefs for the final playoff spot. Cutler's first full season as a starter in 2007 became the Broncos' first losing season since 1999, with a 7–9 record.

The 2008 season ended in a 52–21 loss at the San Diego Chargers, giving the Broncos an 8–8 record and their third straight season out of the playoffs. Mike Shanahan, the longest-tenured and most successful head coach in Broncos' franchise history, was fired after 14 seasons.[29]

Josh McDaniels years (2009–2010)

On January 11, 2009, two weeks after Shanahan was fired, the Broncos hired former New England Patriots' offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels as the team's new head coach.[30] Three months later, the team acquired quarterback Kyle Orton as part of a trade that sent Jay Cutler to the Chicago Bears.

Under McDaniels and Orton, the Broncos jumped out to a surprising 6–0 start in 2009. However, the team lost eight of their next ten games, finishing 8–8 for a second consecutive season and missing the playoffs. The next season (2010), the Broncos set a new franchise record for losses in a single season, with a 4–12 record.[31] McDaniels was fired before the end of the 2010 season following a combination of the team's poor record and the fallout from a highly publicized videotaping scandal. Running backs coach Eric Studesville was named interim coach for the final four games of the 2010 season.[32] He chose to start rookie first-round draft choice Tim Tebow at quarterback for the final three games.

John Fox years (2011–2014)

Following the 2010 season, Joe Ellis was promoted from Chief Operating Officer to team president, while John Elway returned to the organization as the team's Executive Vice President of Football Operations.[33] In addition, the Broncos hired John Fox as the team's 14th head coach. Fox previously served as the Carolina Panthers' head coach from 2002 to 2010.[34]

Following a 1–4 start to the 2011 season, Tim Tebow replaced Kyle Orton as the Broncos' starting quarterback, and “Tebow Time” was born. Tebow led the Broncos with toughness, determination and miraculous come-from-behind victories which gave the Broncos hope and were the catalyst for better things to come. Tebow led the Broncos to an 8–8 record and garnered the team's first playoff berth and division title since 2005. The Broncos defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Wild Card round on a memorable 80-yard touchdown pass from Tebow to wide receiver Demaryius Thomas on the first play of overtime, setting a record for the fastest overtime in NFL history.[35] However, the Broncos lost to the New England Patriots in the Divisional round.[36]

In March 2012, the Broncos reached an agreement on a five-year, $96 million contract with former longtime Indianapolis Colts' quarterback Peyton Manning, who had recently missed the entire 2011 season following multiple neck surgeries.[37][38] This resulted in the Broncos subsequently trading incumbent quarterback Tim Tebow to the New York Jets.[39] The Broncos finished with a 13–3 record and the AFC's No. 1 seed in the 2012 playoffs, but were defeated by the Baltimore Ravens in the Divisional round.[40]

Like in 2012, the 2013 Broncos finished with a 13–3 record and the AFC's No. 1 seed. The Broncos broke all offensive records and QB Peyton Manning shattered many QB records that season as well. In the 2013 playoffs, they defeated the San Diego Chargers in the Divisional round and the New England Patriots in the AFC Championship. However, the Broncos lost to the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XLVIII by a score of 43–8, the Broncos' first Super Bowl berth since winning back-to-back Super Bowls in 1997 and 1998.[41]

Prior to the start of the 2014 season, the Broncos announced that Pat Bowlen, the team's owner since 1984, relinquished control of the team due to his battle with Alzheimer's disease, resulting in team president Joe Ellis and general manager John Elway assuming control of the team.[22] The Broncos finished the 2014 season with a 12–4 record and the AFC's No. 2 seed. However, the Broncos were defeated by the Indianapolis Colts in the Divisional round of the 2014 playoffs, marking the third time in four seasons that the Broncos lost in the Divisional round of the playoffs. Quarterback Peyton Manning had been playing with strained quadriceps for the final month of the 2014 season.[42]

Gary Kubiak won Super Bowl 50 in his first season as the Broncos head coach.
Gary Kubiak won Super Bowl 50 in his first season as the Broncos head coach.

Gary Kubiak years (2015–2016)

On January 12, 2015, one day after the divisional playoff loss to the Colts, the Broncos and head coach John Fox mutually agreed to part ways.[43] Fox left the Broncos with a .719 winning percentage in his four seasons as the Broncos' head coach—the highest in franchise history.[44] One week later, the Broncos hired Gary Kubiak as the team's 15th head coach. Kubiak served as a backup quarterback to executive vice president/general manager John Elway from 1983 to 1991, as well as the Broncos' offensive coordinator from 1995 to 2005.[45]

Super Bowl 50 champions (2015)

Shortly after Kubiak became head coach, the Broncos underwent numerous changes to their coaching staff and players, including the hiring of defensive coordinator, defensive mastermind Wade Phillips, under whom the Broncos' defense went from middle of the road to being ranked No. 1 in the NFL. By the 2015 season, it would go on to be considered one of the greatest NFL defenses of all time - along with the 1985 Bears, 2000 Ravens and 2002 Buccaneers.[46] The Broncos finished with a 12–4 record and the AFC's No. 1 seed, despite Peyton Manning having his worst statistical season since his rookie year with the Indianapolis Colts in 1998.[47] Backup quarterback Brock Osweiler started the last six games of the regular season due to Manning suffering from a foot injury. Manning led the Broncos throughout the playoffs. The Broncos defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers 23–16 in the Divisional Round and the New England Patriots 20–18 in the AFC Championship. They were victorious against the Carolina Panthers 24–10 in Super Bowl 50 for their third Super Bowl title.[48]

On March 7, 2016, quarterback Peyton Manning retired after 18 NFL seasons during a press conference at the team's Dove Valley headquarters.[49][50]

Following Manning's retirement, the Broncos scrambled to find the team's next starting quarterback after backup quarterback Brock Osweiler departed on a four-year contract to the Houston Texans. The Broncos acquired Mark Sanchez from the Philadelphia Eagles and selected Paxton Lynch during the 2016 draft. Sanchez, Lynch and second-year quarterback Trevor Siemian competed for the starting quarterback spot during the off-season and preseason. Prior to the regular season, Sanchez was released and Siemian was named the starter. The Broncos finished the season 9–7 and missed the playoffs for the first time since 2010.

On January 2, 2017, coach Gary Kubiak announced his retirement, citing health as the main reason for retiring.[51] The Broncos hired Miami Dolphins defensive coordinator Vance Joseph as head coach on January 11, 2017.[52] The Broncos finished 5–11 in 2017 as a result of an unimpressive offense led by a quarterback committee of Trevor Siemian, Brock Osweiler, and Paxton Lynch.

In an effort to address poor production from the offense, the Broncos signed quarterback Case Keenum on March 14, 2018, and traded away Trevor Siemian to the Minnesota Vikings on March 19, 2018.

On May 1, 2018, the Broncos signed local undrafted free agent running back Phillip Lindsay, who became a fan favorite due to his underdog mentality, explosive play style and local roots. Lindsay became the first undrafted player in NFL history with 100+ scrimmage yards in each of their first two games[53] and on December 18, 2018, Lindsay was voted to the 2019 Pro Bowl, making him the first undrafted offensive rookie in NFL history to be voted to a Pro Bowl.[54]

After getting off to a strong start, their 2018 season was up and down, eventually finishing with a 6–10 record and placing third in the AFC West. Coupled with the 5–11 season in 2017, the Broncos had back-to-back losing seasons for the first time since 19711972.[55] Shortly after the conclusion of the regular season, head coach Vance Joseph was fired after recording a poor 11–21 record in two seasons.[56]

Vic Fangio years (2019–2021)

On January 10, 2019, the Broncos hired Chicago Bears defensive coordinator Vic Fangio to become the 17th head coach in franchise history.[57] Fangio was chosen over Mike Munchak, the Broncos' offensive line coach. Fangio received a four-year contract with a team option for an additional season.[58]

On February 13, 2019, Joe Flacco was announced as the new starting quarterback. On October 6, 2019, the Broncos defeated the Los Angeles Chargers for their 500th win, bringing their win–loss record to 500–432.[59]

On December 1, 2019, the Broncos started Mizzou rookie quarterback Drew Lock for the first time. He led the Broncos to a 4–1 record to end the 2019 season. The Broncos finished 2nd place in the AFC West Division at 7–9, missing the playoffs for a fourth consecutive year. In five games, Lock finished with 1,020 passing yards, seven touchdowns, and three interceptions.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2020 NFL season did not have a preseason or full training camps,[60] which likely contributed to an abnormally large amount of injuries that plagued the Broncos and other NFL teams. Star linebacker Von Miller suffered a season-ending ankle tendon injury before the regular season started, and starting wide receiver Courtland Sutton suffered a season-ending torn ACL during a week two game.

On November 29, 2020, after all three of the Broncos' quarterbacks were placed in COVID-19 protocol, the Broncos were forced to turn to undrafted wide receiver and former college quarterback Kendall Hinton as the emergency quarterback. Hinton completed only one pass for 13 yards in 9 attempts—the fewest pass completions in a single game in franchise history—and was intercepted twice. The Broncos' only scoring play was a 58-yard field goal by placekicker Brandon McManus in a 31–3 loss to the New Orleans Saints. In July 2021, the Pro Football Hall of Fame announced that Hinton's quarterback wristband would be added to the Hall of Fame as part of a display.[61]

The Broncos finished the 2020 season with a record of 5–11, last in the AFC West, and missed the playoffs for the fifth consecutive year.

Following another season of uninspiring quarterback performances, the Broncos were the subject of multiple quarterback trade rumors during the 2021 offseason. Aaron Rodgers and Deshaun Watson were two names rumored to be of interest for the Broncos, but ultimately the Broncos traded for quarterback Teddy Bridgewater on April 28, 2021. Bridgewater won the subsequent quarterback competition between himself and Drew Lock during the preseason, and he was named the Broncos' starting quarterback on August 25, 2021.

The Broncos also made notable improvements in the defensive secondary, signing former All-Pro cornerback Kyle Fuller and cornerback Ronald Darby, as well as drafting Alabama cornerback Patrick Surtain II with the ninth overall pick in the 2021 NFL Draft. Running back Phillip Lindsay was replaced by UNC rookie running back Javonte Williams, who was drafted in the second round of the 2021 NFL Draft by the Broncos.

On October 31, 2021, Peyton Manning (who won two AFC Championships, Super Bowl 50, and an NFL MVP during his four seasons as a Bronco) was inducted to the Broncos' Ring of Fame during a game against Washington.[62]

On November 1, 2021, the Broncos traded franchise legend Von Miller to the Los Angeles Rams in exchange for a 2nd and 3rd round pick in the 2022 NFL Draft.[63] At the time of the trade, Miller was the longest-tenured Bronco on the team, and the only remaining non-special teams player from Denver's Super Bowl 50 roster.

After another mediocre performance in the 2021 season with the Broncos going 7–10, head coach Vic Fangio was dismissed on January 8, 2022, after losing to the Kansas City Chiefs.[64] The Broncos announced the hiring of Green Bay Packers offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett as head coach on January 27, 2022.[65]

The Broncos then announced on February 1, 2022, that they were now up for sale and that they would be parting ways with the Bowlen family, the former owners of the franchise.[66]

Hackett's first hire as head coach was Justin Outten as offensive coordinator. He was hired on February 2, 2022.

On March 16, 2022, the Broncos traded Drew Lock, Noah Fant, Shelby Harris, Denver's 2022 first-round pick (No. 9), its 2022 second-round pick (No. 40), its 2023 first- and second-round picks, and its 2022 fifth-round round pick for Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks' 2022 fourth-round pick.[67]

Walton-Penner Era (2022–present)

On June 7, 2022, the Broncos announced that the Walton-Penner family, led by Rob Walton, had entered in an agreement to acquire the Denver Broncos for $4.65 billion (a North American record) subject to approval by the NFL Finance Committee and 3/4 of the league's team owners.[68][69] The Broncos announced that Condoleezza Rice would join the ownership group on July 11, 2022.[70]

On August 10, 2022, the Broncos formally introduced the new ownership group to the media and Denver community. The full group comprises Rob Walton, Carrie Walton Penner, Greg Penner, Mellody Hobson, Condoleezza Rice and Lewis Hamilton.[71]

On December 26, with the Broncos sitting at 4–11 following a 51–14 Christmas Day loss to the Los Angeles Rams, Hackett was fired and replaced by interim head coach Jerry Rosburg. He became the fifth head coach to not finish his first season after Lou Holtz in 1976, Pete McCulley in 1978, Bobby Petrino in 2007, and Urban Meyer in 2021. Jerry Rosburg was released from the staff on January 25.

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History of the Denver Broncos

History of the Denver Broncos

The history of the Denver Broncos American football club began when the team was chartered a member of the American Football League in 1960. The Broncos have played in the city of Denver, Colorado throughout their entire history. The Broncos did not win any titles as members of the AFL. Since the 1970 AFL–NFL merger, the Broncos have won 15 division titles, and played in eight Super Bowls, following the 1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, 2013, and 2015 seasons. They won Super Bowl XXXII, Super Bowl XXXIII and Super Bowl 50. Their most famous player is former quarterback John Elway, starting quarterback in five Super Bowls and holder of many NFL records. The Broncos currently play in the National Football League's AFC West division.

Bob Howsam

Bob Howsam

Robert Lee Howsam was an American professional sports executive and entrepreneur. In 1959, he played a key role in establishing two leagues—the American Football League, which succeeded and merged with the National Football League, and baseball's Continental League, which never played a game but forced expansion of Major League Baseball (MLB) from 16 to 20 teams in 1961–62. Howsam then became a prominent MLB executive as the highly successful general manager (GM) and club president of the Cincinnati Reds during the Big Red Machine dynasty between 1967 and 1977, when his team won four National League pennants and two World Series titles. He also served as GM of the St. Louis Cardinals from August 17, 1964, until January 1967, where he inherited a team that would win the 1964 World Series, but made material contributions to the Redbirds' 1967 world champions and 1968 pennant-winners.

American Football League

American Football League

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1970, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

1960 Boston Patriots season

1960 Boston Patriots season

The 1960 Boston Patriots season was the franchise's first season in the new American Football League. Led by head coach Lou Saban, the Patriots finished with five wins and nine losses, last in the AFL's Eastern Division. The team played their home games at Boston University Field, later named "Nickerson Field."

1960 Denver Broncos season

1960 Denver Broncos season

The 1960 Denver Broncos season was the team's inaugural year in the American Football League. Led by head coach Frank Filchock, the Broncos recorded four wins, nine losses, and one tie, finishing last in the AFL's Western Division.

1967 Detroit Lions season

1967 Detroit Lions season

The 1967 Detroit Lions season was the 38th season in franchise history. On August 5, the Lions met the Denver Broncos in the first inter-league exhibition game. The Broncos beat the Lions 13–7 to become the first AFL team to beat an NFL team.

1962 Denver Broncos season

1962 Denver Broncos season

The 1962 Denver Broncos season was the third season for the team in the American Football League (AFL). They finished with their best record of the decade with seven wins and seven losses, finishing second in the AFL's Western Division. The Broncos started the season strong with a record of 6–1, but went in reverse in the second half of the season with a 1–6 record. Despite this, head coach Jack Faulkner was named AFL Coach of the Year.

1965 Denver Broncos season

1965 Denver Broncos season

The 1965 Denver Broncos season was the sixth season for the team in the American Football League (AFL). The team improved slightly from the previous two seasons with a record of four wins, and ten losses. They finished last in the AFL's Western Division.

Floyd Little

Floyd Little

Floyd Douglas Little was an American professional football player who was a halfback for the Denver Broncos, initially in the American Football League (AFL) and later the National Football League (NFL). He was a three-time All-American at Syracuse University, and in 1967 was the sixth selection of the 1967 NFL/AFL draft, the first common draft. He was the first first-round draft pick to sign with the AFL's Broncos, where he was known as "the Franchise". Little was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2010.

1967 Denver Broncos season

1967 Denver Broncos season

The 1967 Denver Broncos season was the eighth season for the team in the American Football League (AFL). Led by first-year head coach and general manager Lou Saban, the Broncos posted a record of three wins and eleven losses, last in the AFL's Western division. Running back Floyd Little, a first round draft choice, was team captain in his rookie season. After an opening win at home, the Broncos lost nine straight games, then split the last four.

1973 Denver Broncos season

1973 Denver Broncos season

The 1973 Denver Broncos season was the team's 14th year in professional football and its fourth with the National Football League (NFL). Led by second-year head coach and general manager John Ralston, the Broncos posted a winning record for the first time in franchise history, with seven wins, five losses, and two ties, which tied for sixth-best in the conference. Denver tied for second in the AFC West, 1½ games behind the Oakland Raiders.

American Football Conference

American Football Conference

The American Football Conference (AFC) is one of the two conferences of the National Football League (NFL), the highest professional level of American football in the United States. The AFC and its counterpart, the National Football Conference (NFC), each contain 16 teams with 4 divisions. Both conferences were created as part of the 1970 merger between the National Football League, and the American Football League (AFL). All ten of the AFL teams, and three NFL teams, became members of the new AFC, with the remaining thirteen NFL teams forming the NFC. A series of league expansions and division realignments have occurred since the merger, thus making the current total of 16 teams in each conference. The current AFC champions are the Kansas City Chiefs, who defeated the Cincinnati Bengals in the 2022 season's AFC Championship Game for their third conference championship.

Rivalries

Divisional

The Denver Broncos have three AFC West rivals—the Kansas City Chiefs, Las Vegas Raiders and Los Angeles Chargers. All teams, along with the Broncos, were charter members of the American Football League (AFL), with each team placed in the AFL Western Division. The Broncos were barely competitive during the AFL years (1960–69), going a combined 10–49–1 against the Chiefs, Chargers and Raiders.

Kansas City Chiefs

The Broncos have had several memorable matchups with the Chiefs, particularly during the years in which John Elway was the Broncos' starting quarterback (1983–98). The Broncos defeated the Chiefs at Arrowhead Stadium in the divisional round of the 1997 NFL playoffs, en route to their first Super Bowl victory. The Chiefs currently hold a 69–55 series lead over the Broncos, including the aforementioned 1997 divisional playoff game.

Las Vegas Raiders

The rivalry with the Raiders was ignited in 1977, when the Broncos advanced to their first Super Bowl by defeating the defending champion Raiders in the 1977 AFC Championship. The rivalry intensified in the mid-1990s, when Mike Shanahan was hired as the Broncos' head coach in 1995. Shanahan coached the Raiders in 1988 before being fired four games into the 1989 season. The Raiders currently hold a 70–54–2 series lead over the Broncos, including 1–1 in the playoffs.

Los Angeles Chargers

Unlike their records against the Chiefs and Raiders, the Broncos currently have a winning record against the Chargers, with a 70–54–1 series lead, including 1–0 in the playoffs. The Broncos pulled off one of the largest comebacks in Monday Night Football history, when Peyton Manning led the Broncos from a 24–0 halftime deficit to a 35–24 win at San Diego's Qualcomm Stadium during the 2012 season. The two teams met in the playoffs for the first time on January 12, 2014, at Denver's Sports Authority Field at Mile High, with the Broncos winning 24–17.

Historical

Aside from the aforementioned AFC West teams, the Broncos have had intra-conference rivalries over the years with the Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers and New England Patriots. The Broncos and Seattle Seahawks were also former AFC West rivals from 1977–2001, after which Seattle was realigned to the NFC West.

Cleveland Browns

The Broncos had a brief rivalry with the Browns that arose from three AFC championship matches in 1986, 1987 and 1989. In the 1986 AFC Championship, quarterback John Elway led The Drive to secure a tie in the waning moments at Cleveland Municipal Stadium; the Broncos went on to win in 23–20 in overtime.[72] One year later, the two teams met again in the 1987 AFC Championship at Mile High Stadium. Denver took a 21–3 lead, but Browns' quarterback Bernie Kosar threw four touchdown passes to tie the game at 31–31 halfway through the 4th quarter. After a long drive, John Elway threw a 20-yard touchdown pass to running back Sammy Winder to give Denver a 38–31 lead. Cleveland advanced to Denver's 8-yard line with 1:12 left, but Broncos' safety Jeremiah Castille stripped Browns' running back Earnest Byner of the football at the 2-yard line—a play that has been called The Fumble by Browns' fans. The Broncos recovered it, gave Cleveland an intentional safety, and went on to win 38–33.[73] The two teams met yet again in the 1989 AFC Championship at Mile High Stadium, which the Broncos easily won by a score of 37–21.[74] The Broncos did not win the Super Bowl after any of the championship games where they defeated the Browns, losing by an aggregate of 136–40.

Pittsburgh Steelers

As of the end of the 2015 season, the Broncos and Steelers have met in postseason play eight times, tied with five other pairings for the second–most frequent playoff matchups in NFL playoff history. The Broncos currently own a 5–3 playoff record vs. the Steelers.[75] Perhaps the most memorable postseason matchup occurred in the 1997 AFC Championship, in which the Broncos defeated the Steelers 24–21 at Three Rivers Stadium, en route to their first Super Bowl victory. Eight years later, the Steelers returned the favor at INVESCO Field at Mile High, defeating the Broncos 34–17 in the 2005 AFC Championship, and subsequently won Super Bowl XL.[76] In the Wild Card round of the 2011 playoffs, in a game dubbed The 3:16 game, the Broncos stunned the Steelers 29–23 on the first play of overtime, when quarterback Tim Tebow connected with wide receiver Demaryius Thomas on an 80-yard game-winning touchdown pass.[77] The teams met again in the Divisional round of the 2015 playoffs at Denver, where the Broncos defeated the Steelers 23–16 on their way to a victory in Super Bowl 50.[78]

New England Patriots

The Broncos and Patriots met twice annually during the American Football League (AFL) years from 1960 to 1969, and played in the first-ever AFL game on September 9, 1960.[79] Since 1995, the two teams have met frequently during the regular season, including nine consecutive seasons from 1995 to 2003.[80] As of the end of the 2015 season, the two teams have met in the playoffs five times, with the Broncos owning a 4–1 record.[81] The teams' first playoff match on January 4, 1987, was John Elway's first career playoff win,[82] while the teams' second playoff match on January 14, 2006, game was the Broncos' first playoff win since Elway's retirement after the 1998 season.[83] The game was also notable for Champ Bailey's 100-yard interception that resulted in a touchdown-saving tackle by Benjamin Watson at the 1-yard line.[84] On October 11, 2009, the two teams met with former Patriots' offensive coordinator, Josh McDaniels as the Broncos' head coach. Both teams wore their AFL 50th anniversary jerseys.[85] The game featured a 98-yard drive in the fourth quarter, with a game-tying touchdown pass from Kyle Orton to Brandon Marshall, followed by an overtime drive led by Orton that resulted in a 41-yard game-winning field goal by Matt Prater.[86] The two teams met in the Divisional round of the 2011 playoffs, with the Patriots blowing out Tim Tebow and the Broncos by a score of 45–10.[36] The Broncos' rivalry with the Patriots later intensified when longtime Indianapolis Colts' quarterback Peyton Manning became the Broncos' starting quarterback from 2012 to 2015. Manning and Patriots' quarterback Tom Brady maintained a legendary rivalry from 2001[87] until Manning's retirement after the 2015 season.[88] Though Brady dominated Manning in regular season play, winning nine of twelve meetings, Manning won three of five playoff meetings, including the Broncos' 26–16 win in the 2013 AFC Championship and the Broncos' 20–18 win in the 2015 AFC Championship.[89]

Seattle Seahawks

The Broncos had an old rivalry with the Seattle Seahawks, who were members of the AFC West from 1977 to 2001, prior to the Seahawks' move to the NFC West as part of the NFL's 2002 re-alignment.[90] During the 25 years in which the Seahawks resided in the AFC West, the Broncos went 32–18 against the Seahawks, including a loss at Seattle in the 1983 NFL playoffs. Since 2002, the Broncos have won three of five interconference meetings,[91] and the two teams met in Super Bowl XLVIII on February 2, 2014, with the Seahawks winning by a score of 43–8.[92]

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American Football League

American Football League

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1970, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

AFC West

AFC West

The American Football Conference – Western Division or AFC West is one of the four divisions of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The division comprises the Denver Broncos, Kansas City Chiefs, Las Vegas Raiders, and Los Angeles Chargers.

Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas City Chiefs

The Kansas City Chiefs are a professional American football team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Chiefs compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) West division.

Broncos–Chiefs rivalry

Broncos–Chiefs rivalry

The Broncos–Chiefs rivalry is a rivalry between the Denver Broncos and Kansas City Chiefs in the National Football League's AFC West division. Since the American Football League was established in 1960, the Broncos and the Chiefs have shared the same division, first being the AFL Western Conference, and since the AFL–NFL merger, the AFC West. For years, the rivalry has featured two of the best home-field advantages in the league. CBS ranked this rivalry as the No. 4 NFL rivalry of the 1990s in 2020.

John Elway

John Elway

John Albert Elway Jr. is an American professional football executive and former quarterback who is the president of football operations for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL).

Arrowhead Stadium

Arrowhead Stadium

Arrowhead Stadium is an American football stadium in Kansas City, Missouri. It primarily serves as the home venue of the Kansas City Chiefs of the National Football League (NFL). The stadium has been officially named GEHA Field at Arrowhead Stadium since March 2021, following a naming rights deal between GEHA and the Chiefs. The agreement began at the start of the 2021 season and ends in January 2031 with the expiration of the leases for the Chiefs and Royals with the stadium's owner, the Jackson County Sports Complex Authority.

1997–98 NFL playoffs

1997–98 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 1997 season began on December 27, 1997. The postseason tournament concluded with the Denver Broncos defeating the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII, 31–24, on January 25, 1998, at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California.

Broncos–Raiders rivalry

Broncos–Raiders rivalry

The Broncos–Raiders rivalry is a National Football League (NFL) rivalry between the Denver Broncos and Las Vegas Raiders. Both teams compete in the American Football Conference (AFC) West division. Since the American Football League was established in 1960, the Broncos and Raiders are the most frequent Monday Night Football matchup in league history. The Broncos and the Raiders have shared the same division, first being the AFL Western Conference, and since the AFL–NFL merger, the AFC West.

1977 NFL season

1977 NFL season

The 1977 NFL season was the 58th regular season of the National Football League. The two second-year expansion teams switched conferences, with the Seattle Seahawks moving from the NFC West to the AFC West, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers transferring from the AFC West to the NFC Central.

1977–78 NFL playoffs

1977–78 NFL playoffs

The National Football League playoffs for the 1977 season began on December 24, 1977. The postseason tournament concluded with the Dallas Cowboys defeating the Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XII, 27–10, on January 15, 1978, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

1995 Denver Broncos season

1995 Denver Broncos season

The 1995 Denver Broncos season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League, and the 36th overall. The season would be a turning point for the franchise, as being the first year that Mike Shanahan would be head coach, and that would include the drafting of future 2,000 yard rusher and Super Bowl MVP Terrell Davis. As of 2022, this was the last season in which the Broncos lost to the Dallas Cowboys in the regular season.

1988 NFL season

1988 NFL season

The 1988 NFL season was the 69th regular season of the National Football League. The Cardinals relocated from St. Louis, Missouri to the Phoenix, Arizona area becoming the Phoenix Cardinals but remained in the NFC East division. The playoff races came down to the regular season's final week, with the Seattle Seahawks winning the AFC West by one game, and the Philadelphia Eagles and San Francisco 49ers winning their respective divisions in a five-way tie, with the New Orleans Saints and New York Giants losing the NFC Wild Card berth to the Los Angeles Rams on tiebreakers.

Facilities

Mile High Stadium was the home of the Broncos from 1960 to 2000
Mile High Stadium was the home of the Broncos from 1960 to 2000

For most of their history, the Denver Broncos played in Mile High Stadium. The AFL Broncos played at the University of Denver's Hilltop Stadium from time to time, including the first victory of an AFL team over an NFL team: The Broncos beat the Detroit Lions on August 5, 1967, in a preseason game. The team has sold out every home game (including post-season games) since the AFL–NFL merger in 1970, with the exception of two replacement games during the 1987 strike (but both were sold out before the strike).

During home games, the attendance is announced to the crowd, along with the number of no-shows (the fans subsequently boo the no-shows). The fans are also known to chant "IN-COM-PLETE!" every time the visiting team throws an incomplete pass.[93] The stadium's legendary home-field advantage is regarded as one of the best in the NFL, especially during the playoffs. The Broncos had the best home record in pro football over a 32-year span from 1974 to 2006 (191–65–1). Mile High Stadium was one of the NFL's loudest stadiums, with steel flooring instead of concrete, which may have given the Broncos an advantage over opponents, plus the advantage of altitude conditioning for the Broncos. In 2001, the team moved into then-named Invesco Field at Mile High, built next to the former site of the since-demolished Mile High Stadium. Sportswriter Woody Paige, along with many of Denver's fans, however, often refused to call the stadium by its full name, preferring to use "Mile High Stadium" because of its storied history and sentimental import. Additionally, The Denver Post had an official policy of referring to the stadium as simply "Mile High Stadium" in protest, but dropped this policy in 2004.[94]

Empower Field at Mile High has been the Broncos' home since 2001
Empower Field at Mile High has been the Broncos' home since 2001

Prior to the 2011 season, Englewood-based sporting goods retailer Sports Authority claimed the naming rights of Invesco Field, which became known as Sports Authority Field at Mile High.[95][96] However, in the summer of 2016, Sports Authority went bankrupt, the stadium was renamed Broncos Stadium at Mile High, and the Broncos sought out a naming rights sponsor until September 2019 when they agreed to rename the stadium Empower Field at Mile High.[97]

The altitude has also been attributed as part of the team's home success. The stadium displays multiple references to the stadium's location of 5,280 feet (1.000 mi) above sea level, including a prominent mural just outside the visiting team's locker room. The team training facility, the UCHealth Training Center (formerly known as the Paul D. Bowlen Memorial Broncos Centre), is a state-of-the-art facility located in Dove Valley. With 13.5 acres (5.5 ha) of property, the facility hosts three full-size fields, a complete weight and training facility, and a cafeteria.[98][99]

In their more than half-century of existence, the Broncos have never been shut out at home, a streak of over 400 games as of the 2016 season.[100]

In late 2012, the Broncos announced that the stadium would receive $30 million upgrades including a new video board in the south end zone three times larger than the previous display. The renovations were finished before kickoff of the 2013 season.[101]

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American Football League

American Football League

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1970, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

DU Stadium

DU Stadium

DU Stadium, sometimes referred to as Hilltop Stadium, was a stadium in the western United States, located on the campus of the University of Denver in Denver, Colorado. Built 96 years ago in 1926, the crescent-shaped main grandstand design on the west sideline was based on other similar-sized stadiums from the same time period, Brown Stadium and Cornell's Schoellkopf Field, both in the Ivy League.

Detroit Lions

Detroit Lions

The Detroit Lions are a professional American football team based in Detroit. The Lions compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) North Division. The team play their home games at Ford Field in Downtown Detroit.

AFL–NFL merger

AFL–NFL merger

The AFL–NFL merger was the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States at the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). It paved the way for the combined league, which retained the "National Football League" name and logo, to become the most popular sports league in the United States. The merger was announced on the evening of June 8, 1966. Under the merger agreement, the leagues maintained separate regular-season schedules for the next four seasons—from 1966 through 1969—and then officially merged before the 1970 season to form one league with two conferences.

1970 NFL season

1970 NFL season

The 1970 NFL season was the 51st regular season of the National Football League, and the first one after the consummation of the AFL–NFL merger. The merged league realigned into two conferences: all 10 of the former AFL teams joined the Baltimore Colts, Cleveland Browns, and Pittsburgh Steelers to form the American Football Conference; while the other 13 NFL clubs formed the National Football Conference. The season concluded with Super Bowl V when the Baltimore Colts beat the Dallas Cowboys 16–13 at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida. The Pro Bowl took place on January 24, 1971, where the NFC beat the AFC 27–6 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

1987 NFL season

1987 NFL season

The 1987 NFL season was the 68th regular season of the National Football League. This season featured games predominantly played by replacement players, as the National Football League Players Association (NFLPA) players were on strike from weeks four to six with week three being cancelled in its entirety. This remains the last NFL season in which regular-season games were impacted by a labor conflict.

Forward pass

Forward pass

In several forms of football, a forward pass is the throwing of the ball in the direction in which the offensive team is trying to move, towards the defensive team's goal line. The forward pass is one of the main distinguishers between gridiron football in which the play is legal and widespread, and rugby football from which the North American games evolved, in which the play is illegal.

Concrete

Concrete

Concrete is a composite material composed of fine and coarse aggregate bonded together with a fluid cement that hardens (cures) over time. Concrete is the second-most-used substance in the world after water, and is the most widely used building material. Its usage worldwide, ton for ton, is twice that of steel, wood, plastics, and aluminum combined. Globally, the ready-mix concrete industry, the largest segment of the concrete market, is projected to exceed $600 billion in revenue by 2025. This widespread use results in a number of environmental impacts. Most notably, the production process for cement produces large volumes of greenhouse gas emissions, leading to net 8% of global emissions. Other environmental concerns include widespread illegal sand mining, impacts on the surrounding environment such as increased surface runoff or urban heat island effect, and potential public health implications from toxic ingredients. Significant research and development is being done to try to reduce the emissions or make concrete a source of carbon sequestration, and increase recycled and secondary raw materials content into the mix to achieve a circular economy. Concrete is expected to be a key material for structures resilient to climate disasters, as well as a solution to mitigate the pollution of other industries, capturing wastes such as coal fly ash or bauxite tailings and residue.

2001 NFL season

2001 NFL season

The 2001 NFL season was the 82nd regular season of the National Football League (NFL), and the second season of the 21st century. The league permanently moved the first week of the regular season to the weekend following Labor Day. In the wake of the September 11 attacks, the NFL's week 2 games were postponed and rescheduled to the weekend of January 6 and 7, 2002. To retain the full playoff format, all playoff games, including Super Bowl XXXVI, were rescheduled one week later. The New England Patriots won the Super Bowl, defeating the St. Louis Rams 20–17 at the Louisiana Superdome.

Empower Field at Mile High

Empower Field at Mile High

Empower Field at Mile High is an American football stadium in Denver, Colorado, United States. The primary tenant is the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). It opened in 2001 to replace the Broncos' original home, the old Mile High Stadium. The venue was previously home of the Denver Outlaws lacrosse team and the Colorado Rapids soccer team. It has also played host to countless concerts and served as the venue for Barack Obama's acceptance of the Democratic presidential nomination.

2011 Denver Broncos season

2011 Denver Broncos season

The 2011 season was the Denver Broncos' 42nd in the National Football League (NFL) and their 52nd overall. It also marked their first season under head coach John Fox, as well as the first with John Elway as the team's Executive Vice President of Football Operations.

Englewood, Colorado

Englewood, Colorado

The City of Englewood is a home rule municipality located in Arapahoe County, Colorado, United States. The town population was 33,659 at the 2020 United States Census. Englewood is a part of the Denver–Aurora–Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Front Range Urban Corridor. Englewood is located immediately south of Denver in the South Platte River Valley.

Logos and uniforms

1968–1996

Wordmark previously used by the Broncos (1968 - 1996)
Wordmark previously used by the Broncos (1968 - 1996)
Denver Broncos uniform set from 1968 to 1996. The logo was designed by Edwin Guy Taylor of Denver. A contest was held through Public Service of Denver to come up with a new logo for the team. Taylor's submission was selected late in 1967 and adopted soon after. The team briefly wore orange pants with the away jerseys between 1969–1971 and 1978–1979.
Denver Broncos uniform set from 1968 to 1996. The logo was designed by Edwin Guy Taylor of Denver. A contest was held through Public Service of Denver to come up with a new logo for the team. Taylor's submission was selected late in 1967 and adopted soon after. The team briefly wore orange pants with the away jerseys between 1969–1971 and 1978–1979.

When the Broncos debuted in 1960, their original uniforms drew as much attention as their play on the field. They featured white and mustard yellow jerseys, with contrasting brown helmets, brown pants and vertically striped socks. Two years later, the team unveiled a new logo featuring a bucking horse, and changed their team colors to orange, royal blue and white. The 1962 uniform consisted of white pants, orange helmets, and either orange or white jerseys.[3]

In 1968, the Broncos debuted a design that became known as the "Orange Crush". Their logo was redesigned so that the horse was coming out of a "D." Additionally, the helmets were changed to royal blue, with thin stripes placed onto the sleeves, and other minor modifications were added. From 1969 to 1971, and again from 1978 to 1979, the team wore orange pants with their white jerseys.[102] The facemasks became white (from grey) in 1975.

The Broncos wore their white jerseys at home throughout the 1971 season, as well as for 1980 home games vs. the San Diego Chargers and Dallas Cowboys, the latter in hopes to bring out the "blue jersey jinx" which has followed the Cowboys for decades (it worked, the Broncos won 41–20). The Broncos wore their white jerseys for 1983 home games vs. the Philadelphia Eagles, Los Angeles Raiders and Cincinnati Bengals, but did not wear white at home again for two decades — see next section.[102][103]

In 1994, in honor of the 75th anniversary season of the NFL, the Broncos wore their 1965 throwback uniforms for two games—a Week 3 home game against the Raiders, as well a road game at the Buffalo Bills the following week.[102]

1997–2011

Thunder (mascot)
Thunder (mascot)

The Broncos radically changed their logo and uniforms in 1997, a design that the team continues to use to this day. The new logos and uniforms were unveiled on February 4, 1997.[104] Navy blue replaced royal blue on the team's color scheme. The current logo is a profile of a horse's head, with an orange mane and navy blue outlines.[105] The Broncos' popular live animal mascot Thunder was the inspiration to incorporate a horse-head profile as part of the logo on the team's helmets.[106] During a February 4, 1997, press conference introducing the new logo, the team president and the art director for Nike, who were the creators of the new design, described it as "a powerful horse with a fiery eye and mane."[107]

The Broncos began wearing navy blue jerseys, replacing their longtime orange jerseys that had been the team's predominant home jersey color since 1962. This new uniform design features a new word mark, numbering font and a streak that runs up and down the sides of both the jerseys and the pants. On the navy blue jerseys, the streak is orange, with an orange collar and white numerals trimmed in orange, while on the road white jerseys, the streak is navy blue, with a thin orange accent strip on both sides, a navy collar and navy numerals trimmed in orange; the helmet facemasks became navy blue. When they debuted, these uniforms were vilified by the press and fans, until the Broncos won their first-ever Super Bowl in the new design that same season. The navy blue jerseys served as the team's primary home jersey until the end of the 2011 season — see next section.[105]

In 2002, the Broncos introduced an alternate orange jersey that is a mirror image of the aforementioned navy blue jerseys, but with orange and navy trading places. Like the road white jerseys, the white pants with the navy blue streaks running down the sides are worn with this uniform. This jersey was used only once in the 2002 and 2004 seasons, and were used twice per season from 2008 to 2011. Mike Shanahan, the team's head coach from 1995 to 2008, was not a big fan of the alternate orange jerseys.[108] The Broncos previously wore orange jerseys as a throwback uniform in a Thanksgiving Day game at the Dallas Cowboys in 2001.[109]

The team also introduced navy blue pants in 2003, with orange side streaks to match with the navy blue jerseys. Though they were part of the uniform change in 1997 (in fact, they were worn for a couple of 1997 preseason games) and most players wanted to wear them, the only player who vetoed wearing them was John Elway, thereby delaying their eventual introduction.[110] From 2003 to 2011, these pants were primarily used for select prime-time and late-season home games (excluding the 2008 season), and since 2012, are used exclusively with the now-alternate navy blue jerseys — see next section.

On November 16, 2003, the Broncos wore their white jerseys at home for the first time since 1983, in a game vs. the San Diego Chargers. This was compensation for a uniform mix-up, after the teams' first meeting at San Diego's Qualcomm Stadium in Week 2 earlier that season, when the Chargers were the team that was supposed to declare their uniform color. The Chargers were planning to wear their white jerseys, but the visiting Broncos came to the stadium in white, and were fined $25,000 by the NFL as a result. When the two teams met at INVESCO Field at Mile High later that season (Week 11), the NFL allowed the visiting Chargers to choose their uniform color in advance, and they chose navy blue, forcing the Broncos to wear their white jerseys at home.[110]

In 2009, in honor of their 50th anniversary season as one of the eight original American Football League teams, the Broncos wore their 1960 throwback uniforms (brown helmets, mustard yellow and brown jerseys) for games against two fellow AFL rivals—a Week 5 home game vs. the New England Patriots, as well as the following week at the San Diego Chargers.[111][112]

2012–present

Beginning in 2012, the orange jerseys that served as the alternate colored jerseys from 2002 to 2011 became the primary home jersey, while the navy blue jerseys that served as the primary home jersey from 1997 to 2011 switched to alternate designation. The change was made due to overwhelming popularity with the fans, who pressured the Broncos to return to orange as the team's primary home jersey color.[105] Since the 2012 uniform change, the team has worn the alternate navy blue jerseys for at least one home game per season, with the exception of 2013, in which the Broncos wore their alternate navy blue uniforms for an October 6, 2013, road game at the Dallas Cowboys, which the Broncos won in a shootout, 51–48.[113] The team will either wear the navy blue or the white pants — with the orange side stripes — to match with the alternate navy blue jerseys. The team initially did not wear the white pants with the orange side stripes, until a November 1, 2015, game vs. the Green Bay Packers, in which the Broncos wore said design in order to match the uniform ensemble that was used during the team's Super Bowl XXXII win over the Packers.[114] On October 30, 2022, the Broncos debuted a new combination of white jerseys and alternate navy blue pants in an NFL London Game at the Jacksonville Jaguars, with mismatched side stripes of navy blue (white jersey) and orange (navy blue pants).[115]

As the designated home team in Super Bowl 50, the Broncos — who have a 0–4 Super Bowl record when using their standard orange jerseys — chose to wear their white jerseys as the designated "home" team.[116][117]

In 2016, the Broncos' unveiled a new Color Rush uniform, which the team wore for a Thursday Night game at the San Diego Chargers on October 13, 2016. The uniform kit contained the following features: orange pants, which the team wore for the first time since 1979, orange socks and shoes, along with block-style numerals trimmed in navy blue that mirrored the team's 1968–1996 uniform style. Due to the NFL's one-helmet rule implemented in 2013, the helmets remained the same, with the team temporarily replacing the modern primary logo with the throwback "D-horse" logo.[118] The same uniform was used for a Thursday night game against the Indianapolis Colts during the 2017 season and again during a 2018 game against the Pittsburgh Steelers.[119]

Super Bowl jersey colors

Super Bowl Date Opponent Favorite Jersey Color Result
XII (12) January 15, 1978 Dallas Cowboys Cowboys by 6 Orange L 27–10
XXI (21) January 25, 1987 New York Giants Giants by 9.5 White L 39–20
XXII (22) January 31, 1988 Washington Redskins Broncos by 3 Orange L 42–10
XXIV (24) January 28, 1990 San Francisco 49ers 49ers by 12 Orange L 55–10
XXXII (32) January 25, 1998 Green Bay Packers Packers by 11 Navy blue W 31–24
XXXIII (33) January 31, 1999 Atlanta Falcons Broncos by 7.5 White W 34–19
XLVIII (48) February 2, 2014 Seattle Seahawks Broncos by 2 Orange L 43–8
50 (L) February 7, 2016 Carolina Panthers Panthers by 5.5 White W 24–10

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1960 NFL season

1960 NFL season

The 1960 NFL season was the 41st regular season of the National Football League.

1962 NFL season

1962 NFL season

The 1962 NFL season was the 43rd regular season of the National Football League (NFL). Before the season, CBS signed a contract with the league to televise all regular-season games for a $4.65 million annual fee.

1968 NFL season

1968 NFL season

The 1968 NFL season was the 49th regular season of the National Football League. Per the agreement made during the 1967 realignment, the New Orleans Saints and the New York Giants switched divisions; the Saints joined the Century Division while the Giants became part of the Capitol Division.

1971 NFL season

1971 NFL season

The 1971 NFL season was the 52nd regular season of the National Football League. The Boston Patriots changed their name to New England Patriots to widen their appeal to the entire New England region after moving to their new stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, located between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island.

1980 NFL season

1980 NFL season

The 1980 NFL season was the 61st regular season of the National Football League.

Dallas Cowboys

Dallas Cowboys

The Dallas Cowboys, also known as America's Team, are a professional American football team based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Cowboys compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team is headquartered in Frisco, Texas, and has been playing its home games at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, since its opening in 2009. The stadium took its current name prior to the 2013 season. In January 2020 it was announced that Mike McCarthy had been hired as head coach of the Cowboys. He is the ninth in the team’s history. McCarthy follows Jason Garrett, who coached the team from 2010–2019.

1983 NFL season

1983 NFL season

The 1983 NFL season was the 64th regular season of the National Football League. The Colts played their final season in Baltimore before the team's relocation to Indianapolis the following season. The season ended with Super Bowl XVIII when the Los Angeles Raiders defeated the Washington Redskins 38–9 at Tampa Stadium in Florida.

Cincinnati Bengals

Cincinnati Bengals

The Cincinnati Bengals are a professional American football team based in Cincinnati. The Bengals compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) North division. The club's home games are held in downtown Cincinnati at Paycor Stadium.

1994 NFL season

1994 NFL season

The 1994 NFL season was the 75th regular season of the National Football League. To honor the NFL's 75th season, a special anniversary logo was designed and each player wore a patch on their jerseys with this logo throughout the season. Also, a selection committee of media and league personnel named a special NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team, honoring the best NFL players from the first 75 seasons.

1965 NFL season

1965 NFL season

The 1965 NFL season was the 46th regular season of the National Football League. The Green Bay Packers won the NFL title after defeating the Cleveland Browns in the championship game, the last before the Super Bowl era.

Buffalo Bills

Buffalo Bills

The Buffalo Bills are a professional American football team based in the Buffalo metropolitan area. The Bills compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) East division. The team plays its home games at Highmark Stadium in Orchard Park, New York. Founded in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), they joined the NFL in 1970 following the AFL–NFL merger. The Bills' name is derived from an All-America Football Conference (AAFC) franchise from Buffalo that was in turn named after western frontiersman Buffalo Bill. Drawing much of its fanbase from Western New York, the Bills are the only NFL team that plays home games in that state. The franchise is owned by Terry and Kim Pegula, who purchased the Bills after the death of original owner Ralph Wilson in 2014.

1997 NFL season

1997 NFL season

The 1997 NFL season was the 78th regular season of the National Football League. The Oilers relocated from Houston, Texas to Nashville, Tennessee. The newly renamed Tennessee Oilers played their home games during this season at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tennessee while construction of a new stadium in Nashville started. Houston would rejoin the NFL with the expansion Texans in 2002.

Statistics and records

Season-by-season records

Players of note

Current roster

Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists

Unrestricted FAs

Restricted FAs

Exclusive-Rights FAs

Rookies in italics

Roster updated January 15, 2023

49 active, 10 inactive, 26 free agent(s)

AFC rostersNFC rosters

50th Anniversary Team (2009)

The Denver Broncos announced the club's 50th anniversary team on September 15, 2009. The anniversary team was voted on by users at DenverBroncos.com from June 6 – September 4, 2009.[120]

Retired numbers

Denver Broncos retired numbers
No. Player Position Career Retired
7 John Elway QB 1983–1998 September 13, 1999
18 Frank Tripucka QB 1960–1963 1963–2012
Peyton Manning QB 2012–2015 2016
44 Floyd Little RB 1967–1975 1984

† Note: No. 18 was re-issued for Peyton Manning after Tripucka gave his approval; it was used by Manning from the 2012 season until his retirement after the 2015 season.[121] Manning's name was added to the retired number's banner as an honorable mention.[122][123][124]

Pro Football Hall of Famers

Hall of Fame CB Champ Bailey
Hall of Fame CB Champ Bailey
Hall of Fame RB Terrell Davis
Hall of Fame RB Terrell Davis
Hall of Fame QB John Elway
Hall of Fame QB John Elway
Hall of Fame RB Floyd Little
Hall of Fame RB Floyd Little
Hall of Fame TE Shannon Sharpe
Hall of Fame TE Shannon Sharpe
Denver Broncos Hall of Famers
Players
No. Name Position(s) Season(s) Inducted
24 Brown, WillieWillie Brown CB 1963–1966 1984
33 Tony Dorsett RB 1988 1994
7 John Elway QB 1983–1998 2004
65 Gary Zimmerman OT 1993–1997 2008
44 Floyd Little RB 1967–1975 2010
19 Jerry Rice WR 2005 2010
84 Shannon Sharpe TE 1990–1999
2002–2003
2011
30 Terrell Davis RB 1995–2001 2017
20 Brian Dawkins SS 2009–2011 2018
24 Champ Bailey CB 2004–2013 2019
26 Ty Law CB 2009 2019
27 Steve Atwater FS 1989–1998 2020
47 John Lynch SS 2004–2007 2021
18 Peyton Manning QB 2012–2015 2021
Coaches and Contributors
Name Position(s) Season(s) Inducted
Pat Bowlen Owner/CEO 1984–2019 2019

Ring of Fame

The Broncos have a Ring of Fame on the Level 5 facade of Empower Field at Mile High, which honors the following:

Denver Broncos Ring of Fame
No. Name Position(s) Seasons Inducted
23 Goose Gonsoulin S 1960–1966 1984
87 Rich Jackson DE 1967–1972 1984
44 Floyd Little RB 1967–1975 1984
87 Lionel Taylor WR 1960–1966 1984
Gerald Phipps Owner 1961–1981 1985
12 Charley Johnson QB 1972–1975 1986
70 Paul Smith DE 1968–1978 1986
18 Frank Tripucka QB 1960–1963 1986
36 Billy Thompson CB/S 1969–1981 1987
7 Craig Morton QB 1977–1982 1988
25 Haven Moses WR 1972–1981 1988
15 Jim Turner PK 1971–1979 1988
53 Randy Gradishar LB 1974–1983 1989
57 Tom Jackson LB 1973–1986 1992
20 Louis Wright CB 1975–1986 1993
7 John Elway QB
General manager
1983–1998
2011–2020
1999
77 Karl Mecklenburg LB 1983–1995 2001
49 Dennis Smith SS 1981–1994 2001
65 Gary Zimmerman OT 1993–1997 2003
27 Steve Atwater SS 1989–1998 2005
30 Terrell Davis RB 1995–2001 2007
84 Shannon Sharpe TE 1990–1999, 2002–2003 2009
80 Rod Smith WR 1994–2006 2012
66 Tom Nalen C 1994–2007 2013
21 Gene Mingo RB, K, RS 1960–1964 2014
Dan Reeves Head coach 1981–1992 2014
80 Rick Upchurch WR, RS 1975–1983 2014
Pat Bowlen Owner 1984–2013 2015
1 Jason Elam PK 1993–2007 2016
73 Simon Fletcher LB/DE 1985–1995 2016
47 John Lynch SS 2004–2007 2016
Red Miller Head coach 1977–1980 2017
24 Champ Bailey CB 2004–2013 2019
Mike Shanahan Head coach 1984-1987 (WR Coach / QB Coach / Offensive Coordinator)
1989–1991 (QB Coach / Offensive Coordinator)
1995–2008 (Head Coach)
2020
18 Peyton Manning QB 2012–2015 2021

Super Bowl MVPs

Super Bowl MVP Winners
Super Bowl Player Position
XXXII Terrell Davis RB
XXXIII John Elway QB
50 Von Miller LB

Colorado Sports Hall of Fame

Discover more about Players of note related topics

Jarrett Guarantano

Jarrett Guarantano

Jarrett James Guarantano is an American football quarterback for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Tennessee and Washington State.

Damarea Crockett

Damarea Crockett

Damarea Crockett is an American football running back for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Missouri, and was originally signed by the Houston Texans as an undrafted free agent in 2019. He has also been a member of the Oakland Raiders and Green Bay Packers.

Chase Edmonds

Chase Edmonds

Chase Edmonds is an American football running back for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Fordham and was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in the fourth round of the 2018 NFL Draft.

Javonte Williams

Javonte Williams

Javonte Williams is an American football running back for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at North Carolina and was drafted by the Broncos in the second round of the 2021 NFL Draft.

Brandon Johnson (wide receiver)

Brandon Johnson (wide receiver)

Brandon Johnson is an American football wide receiver for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at UCF.

Courtland Sutton

Courtland Sutton

Courtland Sutton is an American football wide receiver for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at SMU, and was selected by the Broncos in the second round of the 2018 NFL Draft.

Freddie Swain

Freddie Swain

Freddie Swain is an American football wide receiver for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida.

Jalen Virgil

Jalen Virgil

Jalen Lorenzo Virgil is an American football wide receiver and return specialist for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Appalachian State.

Greg Dulcich

Greg Dulcich

Gregory Paul Dulcich is an American football tight end for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at UCLA and was a twice all-conference selection in the Pac-12, including first-team honors in 2021. He was selected in the third round of the 2022 NFL Draft.

Albert Okwuegbunam

Albert Okwuegbunam

Albert Chukwuemeka Okwuegbunam is an American football tight end for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Missouri.

Garett Bolles

Garett Bolles

Garett Bolles is an American football offensive tackle for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Utah, and was drafted by the Broncos in the first round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Christian DiLauro

Christian DiLauro

Christian Joseph DiLauro is an American football offensive tackle for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Illinois. DiLauro signed with the Cleveland Browns as an undrafted free agent in 2018 and has also been a member of several other NFL teams.

Staff and head coaches

Head coaches

The most recent head coach of the Broncos was Nathaniel Hackett.[125] On December 26, 2022, ownership announced that Hackett had been fired after he led the team to a disappointing 4-11 record despite entering the season with high expectations.[126]

Current staff

Front office
  • Owners – Walton-Penner Family Ownership Group
  • CEO – Greg Penner
  • President – Damani Leech
  • General manager – George Paton
  • Assistant general manager – Darren Mougey
  • Director of player personnel – Reed Burckhardt
  • Director of pro personnel – A. J. Durso
  • Executive director of football operations – Kelly Kleine
  • Vice president of football administration – Rich Hurtado
  • Vice president of football operation and compliance – Mark Thewes
  • Vice president of player development – Ray Jackson
  • Director of college scouting – Brian Stark
  • Senior personnel executive – Roman Phifer
  • Assistant director of college scouting – Nick Schiralli
Head coach
  • Head coach – Vacant
Offensive coaches
  • Offensive coordinator – Justin Outten
  • Passing game coordinator/quarterbacks – Klint Kubiak
  • Running backs – Vacant
  • Wide receivers – Zach Azzanni
  • Tight ends – Jake Moreland
  • Offensive line – Vacant
  • Assistant offensive line – Ben Steele
  • Offensive quality control – Ramon Chinyoung
  • Offensive quality control – Zach Grossi
  • Marlin Briscoe coaching fellowship – Mateo Kambui
 
Defensive coaches
  • Defensive coordinator – Ejiro Evero
  • Defensive line – Marcus Dixon
  • Linebackers – Peter Hansen
  • Outside linebackers – Bert Watts
  • Defensive backs – Christian Parker
  • Assistant defensive backs – Ola Adams
  • Senior defensive assistant – Dom Capers
  • Defensive quality control – Andrew Carter
  • Defense - special projects – Mayur Chaudhari
  • Billy Thompson coaching fellowship – DeAndre Thompson
Special teams coaches
  • Special teams coordinator – Vacant
  • Assistant special teams - Mike Mallory
Support staff
  • Assistant to head coach – Derek Haithcock
  • Football strategy analyst – Brad Miller
  • Instructional designer – John Vieira
Strength and Conditioning
  • Head strength and conditioning – Loren Landow
  • Assistant strength and conditioning – Richard Guarascio
  • Assistant strength and conditioning – Korey Jones

Coaching staff
Management
More NFL staffs

Discover more about Staff and head coaches related topics

List of Denver Broncos head coaches

List of Denver Broncos head coaches

The Denver Broncos are a professional American football franchise based in Denver, Colorado. They are members of the West Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team began playing in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League (AFL), and joined the NFL as part of the AFL-NFL merger. The team has played their home games at Empower Field at Mile High since 2001.

Greg Penner

Greg Penner

Gregory Boyd Penner is an American businessman and venture capitalist. Penner was named the chairman of Walmart in June 2015. He is the son-in-law of S. Robson Walton and the grandson-in-law of Sam Walton, the founder of Walmart. He is part-owner and CEO of the Denver Broncos.

George Paton (American football executive)

George Paton (American football executive)

George Paton is an American football executive who is the general manager of the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). Paton previously served as the assistant general manager and vice president of player personnel for the Minnesota Vikings and served with the Vikings in various executive roles for 14 seasons. Paton began his NFL career as a scout for the Chicago Bears before serving as the director of pro personnel for the Miami Dolphins from 2001 to 2006 and joining the Vikings in 2007.

Darren Mougey

Darren Mougey

Darren Mougey is an American football executive who is the assistant general manager for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). Mougey also was a former American football wide receiver. He was signed by the Atlanta Falcons as an undrafted free agent in 2009. He played college football at San Diego State.

Justin Outten

Justin Outten

Justin Outten is an American football coach who is the offensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He previously served as the tight ends coach for the Green Bay Packers and also served as an assistant coach for the Atlanta Falcons.

Klint Kubiak

Klint Kubiak

Klint Alexander Kubiak is an American football coach who is the passing game coordinator and quarterbacks coach for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He previously served as the offensive coordinator for the Minnesota Vikings in 2021.

Jake Moreland

Jake Moreland

Jake Moreland is a former player in the National Football League for the New York Jets and Cleveland Browns in 2000 and 2001. Moreland currently serves as the tight ends coach for the Denver Broncos. He has coached previously at Syracuse Air Force and Western Michigan

Ben Steele

Ben Steele

Benjamin Joseph Steele is a former tight end and coach in the National Football League (NFL). He is the offensive line coach for the Denver Broncos. He coached the tight ends for the Atlanta Falcons and he formerly played for the Green Bay Packers. Steele played collegiate ball at Fort Lewis College and Mesa State College.

Ejiro Evero

Ejiro Evero

Ejiro Evero is an American football coach who is the defensive coordinator for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He previously served as an assistant coach for the Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and San Francisco 49ers.

Christian Parker (American football)

Christian Parker (American football)

Christian Parker is an American football coach who is currently the defensive backs coach for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He was previously a defensive quality control for the Green Bay Packers, and also spent time as an analyst at Texas A&M and Notre Dame.

Dom Capers

Dom Capers

Ernest Dominic Capers is an American football coach who is a senior defensive assistant for the Denver Broncos of the National Football League (NFL). He was previously the inaugural head coach of the Carolina Panthers and the Houston Texans for four seasons each. Capers is the only head coach to lead two different NFL expansion teams during their first seasons.

List of current National Football League staffs

List of current National Football League staffs

This article is a list of current National Football League (NFL) team staffs.

In the media and popular culture

Discover more about In the media and popular culture related topics

Barrel Man (Denver Broncos)

Barrel Man (Denver Broncos)

Barrel Man, real name Tim McKernan, was a superfan of the Denver Broncos. In all types of weather for 30 years, he attended every home game at both Mile High Stadium and INVESCO Field at Mile High wearing nothing but an orange barrel that covered his torso and a cowboy hat and boots. His costume was reminiscent of rodeo clowns who serve as a distraction to animals in the rodeo arena in order to protect riders who have been thrown and of the stereotype of the miner who lost his stake and had nothing left to wear but a barrel. He was the first Broncos fan inducted into the VISA Hall of Fans at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

South Park

South Park

South Park is an American adult animated sitcom created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone and developed by Brian Graden for Comedy Central. The series revolves around four boys—Stan Marsh, Kyle Broflovski, Eric Cartman, and Kenny McCormick—and their exploits in and around the titular Colorado town. South Park became infamous for its profanity and dark, surreal humor that satirizes a substantial amount of subject matter.

Park County, Colorado

Park County, Colorado

Park County is a county located in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2020 census, the population was 17,390. The county seat is Fairplay. The county was named after the large geographic region known as South Park, which was named by early fur traders and trappers in the area.

Matt Stone

Matt Stone

Matthew Richard Stone is an American actor, animator, filmmaker, and composer. He is known for co-creating South Park and The Book of Mormon (2011) with his creative partner Trey Parker. Stone was interested in film and music as a child and at high school, and attended the University of Colorado Boulder, where he met Parker. The two collaborated on various short films, and starred in the feature-length musical Cannibal! The Musical (1993).

Cape Feare

Cape Feare

"Cape Feare" is the second episode of the fifth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on October 7, 1993. The episode features guest star Kelsey Grammer in his third major appearance as Sideshow Bob, who attempts to kill Bart Simpson again after getting out of jail, spoofing the 1962 film Cape Fear and its 1991 remake. Both films are based on John D. MacDonald's 1957 novel The Executioners and allude to other horror films such as Psycho.

Dallas Cowboys

Dallas Cowboys

The Dallas Cowboys, also known as America's Team, are a professional American football team based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Cowboys compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team is headquartered in Frisco, Texas, and has been playing its home games at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, since its opening in 2009. The stadium took its current name prior to the 2013 season. In January 2020 it was announced that Mike McCarthy had been hired as head coach of the Cowboys. He is the ninth in the team’s history. McCarthy follows Jason Garrett, who coached the team from 2010–2019.

Sunday, Cruddy Sunday

Sunday, Cruddy Sunday

"Sunday, Cruddy Sunday" is the twelfth episode of the tenth season of the American animated television series The Simpsons. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on January 31, 1999, just after Super Bowl XXXIII and the premiere of Family Guy. In the episode, while buying new tires for his car, Homer meets a travel agent called Wally Kogen. After becoming friends, Kogen offers Homer a free bus ride to the Super Bowl, as long as he can find enough people to fill Kogen's bus. Several people, including Bart, tag along on what soon becomes a problematic trip. Meanwhile, Marge and Lisa set out to find the missing parts of "Vincent Price's Egg Magic", a celebrity-endorsed craft kit.

Atlanta Falcons

Atlanta Falcons

The Atlanta Falcons are a professional American football team based in Atlanta. The Falcons compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) South division. The Falcons joined the NFL in 1965 as an expansion team, after the NFL offered then-owner Rankin Smith a franchise to keep him from joining the rival American Football League (AFL).

Seattle Seahawks

Seattle Seahawks

The Seattle Seahawks are a professional American football team based in Seattle. The Seahawks compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) West, which they rejoined in 2002 as part of a conference realignment. The club entered the NFL as an expansion team in 1976 in the NFC. From 1977 to 2001, Seattle was assigned to the American Football Conference (AFC) West. They have played their home games at Lumen Field in Seattle's SoDo neighborhood since 2002, having previously played home games in the Kingdome (1976–1999) and Husky Stadium. The Seahawks are currently coached by Pete Carroll.

Fox Broadcasting Company

Fox Broadcasting Company

The Fox Broadcasting Company, commonly known simply as Fox and stylized in all caps as FOX, is an American commercial broadcast television network owned by Fox Corporation and headquartered in New York City, with master control operations and additional offices at the Fox Network Center in Los Angeles and the Fox Media Center in Tempe. Launched as a competitor to the Big Three television networks on October 9, 1986, Fox went on to become the most successful attempt at a fourth television network. It was the highest-rated free-to-air network in the 18–49 demographic from 2004 to 2012 and again in 2020, and was the most-watched American television network in total viewership during the 2007–08 season.

Mork & Mindy

Mork & Mindy

Mork & Mindy is an American television sitcom that aired on ABC from September 14, 1978, to May 27, 1982. A spin-off after a highly successful episode of Happy Days, "My Favorite Orkan", it starred Robin Williams as Mork, an extraterrestrial who comes to Earth from the planet Ork, and Pam Dawber as Mindy McConnell, his human friend, roommate, and eventual love interest.

Robin Williams

Robin Williams

Robin McLaurin Williams was an American actor and comedian. Known for his improvisational skills and the wide variety of characters he created on the spur of the moment and portrayed on film, in dramas and comedies alike, he is regarded as one of the greatest comedians of all time. He received numerous accolades including an Academy Award, two Primetime Emmy Awards, six Golden Globe Awards, two Screen Actors Guild Awards, and five Grammy Awards.

Radio and television

The Broncos' flagship radio station is currently KOA, 850AM, a 50,000-watt station owned by iHeartMedia. Dave Logan is the play-by-play announcer, with former Broncos' wide receiver Ed McCaffrey serving as the color commentator beginning in 2012, replacing Brian Griese.[139] Ed McCaffrey was replaced by Rick Lewis. Until 2010, preseason games not selected for airing on national television were shown on KCNC, channel 4, which is a CBS owned-and-operated station, as well as other CBS affiliates around the Rocky Mountain region. On May 26, 2011, the Broncos announced that KUSA channel 9, an NBC affiliate also known as 9NEWS in the Rocky Mountain region, will be the team's new television partner for preseason games.[140]

In 2011, the Broncos began a partnership with KJMN, 92.1 FM, a leading Spanish language radio station owned by Entravision Communications (EVC). The partnership also includes broadcasting rights for a half-hour weekly TV show on KCEC, the local Univision affiliate operated by Entravision Communications.[140]

Discover more about Radio and television related topics

KOA (AM)

KOA (AM)

KOA is a commercial AM radio station licensed to Denver, Colorado. Owned by iHeartMedia, it serves the Denver-Boulder media market. KOA broadcasts a news/talk radio format, and is also the flagship station of the Denver Broncos, Colorado Rockies and Colorado Buffaloes. KOA has its radio studios in Southeast Denver, while the transmitter site is off South Parker Road in Parker.

IHeartMedia

IHeartMedia

iHeartMedia, Inc., formerly CC Media Holdings, Inc., is an American mass media corporation headquartered in San Antonio, Texas. It is the holding company of iHeartCommunications, Inc., a company founded by Lowry Mays and B. J. "Red" McCombs in 1972, and later taken private by Bain Capital and Thomas H. Lee Partners through a leveraged buyout in 2008. As a result of this buyout, Clear Channel Communications, Inc., began to operate as a wholly owned subsidiary of CC Media Holdings, Inc. On September 16, 2014, CC Media Holdings, Inc. was rebranded iHeartMedia, Inc., and Clear Channel Communications, Inc., became iHeartCommunications, Inc.

Dave Logan (American football)

Dave Logan (American football)

David Russell Logan is a former American football player, radio personality, and high school coach. Logan played in nine National Football League seasons from 1976 to 1984, primarily for the Cleveland Browns. He has been the Voice of Denver Broncos football for 23 years, serving as the team's color analyst for six seasons prior to sliding into the play-by-play role. He has been a major voice on 850 KOA radio in Denver for nearly 30 years, and in 2016 was the key on-air figure when iHeartMedia launched the radio station "Denver Sports 760".

Ed McCaffrey

Ed McCaffrey

Edward Thomas McCaffrey, Jr. is an American football coach and former wide receiver who played in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. McCaffrey played college football for Stanford University and earned first-team All-American honors. The New York Giants chose him in the third round of the 1991 NFL Draft. He also played for the San Francisco 49ers and Denver Broncos. He served as the head coach of the Northern Colorado Bears football team from 2020–2022.

Brian Griese

Brian Griese

Brian David Griese is an American football coach and former quarterback who is the quarterbacks coach for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the third round of the 1998 NFL Draft. He played high school football at Christopher Columbus High School and later college football at Michigan.

KCNC-TV

KCNC-TV

KCNC-TV is a television station in Denver, Colorado, United States, airing programming from the CBS network. It is owned and operated by the network's CBS News and Stations division, and maintains studios on Lincoln Street in downtown Denver; its transmitter is based on Lookout Mountain, near Golden.

CBS

CBS

CBS Broadcasting Inc., commonly shortened to CBS, the abbreviation of its former legal name Columbia Broadcasting System, is an American commercial broadcast television and radio network serving as the flagship property of the CBS Entertainment Group division of Paramount Global.

Owned-and-operated station

Owned-and-operated station

In the broadcasting industry, an owned-and-operated station usually refers to a television or radio station owned by the network with which it is associated. This distinguishes such a station from an affiliate, which is independently owned and carries network programming by contract.

NBC

NBC

The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American English-language commercial broadcast television and radio network. The flagship property of the NBC Entertainment division of NBCUniversal, a division of Comcast, its headquarters are located at Comcast Building in New York City. The company also has offices in Los Angeles at 10 Universal City Plaza and Chicago at the NBC Tower. NBC is the oldest of the traditional "Big Three" American television networks, having been formed in 1926 by the Radio Corporation of America. NBC is sometimes referred to as the "Peacock Network," in reference to its stylized peacock logo, introduced in 1956 to promote the company's innovations in early color broadcasting.

KJMN

KJMN

KJMN is a radio station broadcasting a Spanish adult hits format licensed to Castle Rock, Colorado, United States, serving the Denver-Boulder area. The station is currently owned by Entravision Holdings, LLC. Its studios are located in Denver near Sports Authority Field at Mile High, and the transmitter is west of Castle Rock.

Spanish language

Spanish language

Spanish is a Romance language of the Indo-European language family that evolved from colloquial Latin spoken on the Iberian Peninsula. Today, it is a global language with more than 500 million native speakers, mainly in the Americas and Spain. Spanish is the official language of 20 countries. It is the world's second-most spoken native language after Mandarin Chinese; the world's fourth-most spoken language overall after English, Mandarin Chinese, and Hindustani (Hindi-Urdu); and the world's most widely spoken Romance language. The largest population of native speakers is in Mexico.

KCEC (TV)

KCEC (TV)

KCEC is a television station licensed to Boulder, Colorado, United States, broadcasting the Spanish-language Univision network to the Denver area. Owned by TelevisaUnivision, it is operated under a local marketing agreement (LMA) by Entravision Communications as a sister station to UniMás affiliate KTFD-TV. Both stations share studios on Mile High Stadium West Circle in Jefferson Park, Denver, while KCEC's transmitter is located atop Mount Morrison in western Jefferson County.

Source: "Denver Broncos", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denver_Broncos.

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References

Notes

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  2. ^ The postal designation of Englewood, a city eight miles west, is used in the headquarters' mailing address."Contact Info". DenverBroncos.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on June 27, 2018. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  3. ^ a b Saccomano, Jim (February 20, 2015). "Legend and Legacy: Orange's origin". DenverBroncos.com. NFL Enterprises. Archived from the original on July 30, 2020. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  4. ^ "Broncos Directory" (PDF). 2015 Denver Broncos Media Guide (PDF). NFL Enterprises, LLC. September 26, 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 29, 2020. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  5. ^ "Denver Broncos Team Capsule" (PDF). 2021 Official National Football League Record and Fact Book (PDF). NFL Enterprises, LLC. August 11, 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 11, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  6. ^ Around the NFL staff (August 9, 2022). "NFL owners approve Walton-Penner group's purchase the new owners of Denver Broncos franchise". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved August 10, 2022.
  7. ^ DiLalla, Aric (August 9, 2022). "'Putting a winning team on the field is our No. 1 priority': Walton-Penner Family Ownership Group unanimously approved, introduced as new Broncos owners as of August 10th 2022". DenverBroncos.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Retrieved August 10, 2022.
  8. ^ Gordon, Grant (January 12, 2021). "George Paton agrees to six-year deal as new Broncos general manager". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on January 13, 2021. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  9. ^ "Denver Broncos Team Encyclopedia – Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 2, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  10. ^ "Denver Broncos Hall of Famers". ProFootballHOF.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on July 20, 2009. Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  11. ^ a b "Denver Broncos Team Facts". ProFootballHOF.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on September 21, 2020. Retrieved February 10, 2020.
  12. ^ "Denver Broncos: American Football League Charter Members". Conigliofamily.com. Archived from the original on November 28, 2020. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  13. ^ "Brothers buy Broncos; won't shift team". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. February 16, 1965. p. 11. Archived from the original on February 9, 2021. Retrieved February 4, 2021.
  14. ^ "Broncos sold, stay at home". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). UPI. February 16, 1965. p. B6. Archived from the original on February 8, 2021. Retrieved February 4, 2021.
  15. ^ "Denver Broncos Team History". NFLteamhistory.com. Archived from the original on October 3, 2008. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
  16. ^ "Denver Broncos Team Encyclopedia – Pro Football Reference". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on January 2, 2021. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  17. ^ a b c "Sports E-Cyclopedia – Denver Broncos". Archived from the original on October 21, 2020. Retrieved July 20, 2010.
  18. ^ "1977 Denver Broncos Statistics". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on May 9, 2018. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  19. ^ Paton, James. "Clock runs out for ex-Broncos owner". Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on October 4, 2008. Retrieved October 2, 2008.
  20. ^ Wesseling, Chris (July 23, 2014). "Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen stepping back". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. Archived from the original on April 5, 2020. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  21. ^ "Statements on Owner Pat Bowlen". DenverBroncos.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. July 23, 2014. Archived from the original on December 17, 2019. Retrieved December 17, 2019.
  22. ^ a b Klis, Mike (July 23, 2014). "Pat Bowlen resigns control of Denver Broncos, acknowledges he is dealing with Alzheimer's disease". The Denver Post. Archived from the original on July 23, 2014. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  23. ^ "John Elway Timeline". The Sporting News. Archived from the original on September 20, 2008. Retrieved November 28, 2008.
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Further reading

  • Dater, Adrian (2007) The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Denver Broncos: Heart-Pounding, Jaw-Dropping, and Gut-Wrenching Moments from Denver Broncos History. Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-975-0
  • Frei, Terry (2009) '77: Denver, The Broncos, and A Coming of Age . Taylor Trade Publishing. ISBN 1-58979-213-0
  • Morton, Craig and Dater, Adrian (2008) Then Morton Said to Elway...: The Best Denver Broncos Stories Ever Told, Triumph Books. ISBN 1-60078-121-7
  • Saccomano, Jim (2007) Game of My Life: Denver Broncos: Memorable Stories of Broncos Football. Sports Publishing LLC. ISBN 1-59670-091-2
  • Saccomano, Jim and Elway, John (2009) Denver Broncos: The Complete Illustrated History. MBI Publishing Company, ISBN 0-7603-3476-5
  • Sandler, Michael (2007) John Elway and the Denver Broncos: Super Bowl XXXIII. Bearport Publishing Company. ISBN 1-59716-536-0
  • Stewart, Mark (2006)The Denver Broncos. Norwood House Press. ISBN 1-59953-066-X
  • Zimmer, Larry (2004) Denver Broncos: Colorful Tales of the Orange and Blue. Globe Pequot Press. ISBN 0-7627-2766-7
External links

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