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Culiseta

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Culiseta is a genus of mosquitoes. Most Culiseta species are cold-adapted, and only occur in warmer climates during the colder parts of the year or at higher elevations where temperatures are lower. Species found in Southern California are larger than most mosquitoes species, specifically Cs. inornata, Cs. particeps, and Cs. incidens. These species are found throughout the year in Southern California and feed on several vertebrate species, such as birds, livestock, rodents, reptiles, and humans.[2][3] The larvae of most species are found bogs, marshes, ponds, streams, ditches, and rock pools, but an African species occurs in tree holes ("phytotelmata"), a common eastern Palaearctic species occurs in water wells and rock pools, and several Australian species occur under ground. Little is known about the blood-feeding habits of females. Most species feed on birds and mammals, but a few feed on reptiles. Several species attack domestic animals and occasionally humans,[4] and some species are pollinators.[5]

Culiseta species are found throughout the world, except in South America.[4] Two extinct species are known from the Eocene Kishenehn Formation in Montana[6]

Discover more about Culiseta related topics

Mosquito

Mosquito

Mosquitoes are members of a group of almost 3,600 species of small flies within the family Culicidae. The word "mosquito" is Spanish for "little fly". Mosquitoes have a slender segmented body, one pair of wings, one pair of halteres, three pairs of long hair-like legs, and elongated mouthparts.

Culiseta inornata

Culiseta inornata

Culiseta inornata, the winter marsh mosquito, or the Unadorned American Cool Weather Mosquito is a species of mosquito in the family Culicidae. This species is found in southern California.

Culiseta particeps

Culiseta particeps

Culiseta particeps is a species of mosquito in the family Culicidae. It is found along the West coast of the United States including Southern California, Arizona as well as Mexico and Guatemala. Cs. particeps is not a known vector of human pathogens.

Culiseta incidens

Culiseta incidens

Culiseta incidens, the cool weather mosquito, is a species of mosquito in the family Culicidae. Specimens have been collected in Southern California.

Larva

Larva

A larva is a distinct juvenile form many animals undergo before metamorphosis into adults. Animals with indirect development such as insects, amphibians, or cnidarians typically have a larval phase of their life cycle.

Hematophagy

Hematophagy

Hematophagy is the practice by certain animals of feeding on blood. Since blood is a fluid tissue rich in nutritious proteins and lipids that can be taken without great effort, hematophagy is a preferred form of feeding for many small animals, such as worms and arthropods. Some intestinal nematodes, such as Ancylostomatids, feed on blood extracted from the capillaries of the gut, and about 75 percent of all species of leeches, a free-living worm, are hematophagous. Some fish, such as lampreys and candirus, and mammals, especially the vampire bats, and birds, such as the vampire finches, hood mockingbirds, the Tristan thrush, and oxpeckers also practise hematophagy.

Mammal

Mammal

Mammals are a group of vertebrate animals constituting the class Mammalia, characterized by the presence of mammary glands which in females produce milk for feeding (nursing) their young, a neocortex, fur or hair, and three middle ear bones. These characteristics distinguish them from reptiles from which they diverged in the Carboniferous, over 300 million years ago. Around 6,400 extant species of mammals have been described divided into 29 orders. The largest orders, in terms of number of species, are the rodents, bats, and Eulipotyphla. The next three are the Primates, the Artiodactyla, and the Carnivora.

List of domesticated animals

List of domesticated animals

This page gives a list of domesticated animals, also including a list of animals which are or may be currently undergoing the process of domestication and animals that have an extensive relationship with humans beyond simple predation. This includes species which are semi-domesticated, undomesticated but captive-bred on a commercial scale, or commonly wild-caught, at least occasionally captive-bred, and tameable. In order to be considered fully domesticated, most species have undergone significant genetic, behavioural and morphological changes from their wild ancestors, while others have changed very little from their wild ancestors despite hundreds or thousands of years of potential selective breeding. A number of factors determine how quickly any changes may occur in a species, but there is not always a desire to improve a species from its wild form. Domestication is a gradual process, so there is no precise moment in the history of a given species when it can be considered to have become fully domesticated.

Human

Human

Humans are the most abundant and widespread species of primate, characterized by bipedalism and exceptional cognitive skills due to a large and complex brain. This has enabled the development of advanced tools, culture, and language. Humans are highly social and tend to live in complex social structures composed of many cooperating and competing groups, from families and kinship networks to political states. Social interactions between humans have established a wide variety of values, social norms, and rituals, which bolster human society. Its intelligence and its desire to understand and influence the environment and to explain and manipulate phenomena have motivated humanity's development of science, philosophy, mythology, religion, and other fields of study.

Eocene

Eocene

The Eocene Epoch is a geological epoch that lasted from about 56 to 33.9 million years ago (mya). It is the second epoch of the Paleogene Period in the modern Cenozoic Era. The name Eocene comes from the Ancient Greek ἠώς and καινός and refers to the "dawn" of modern ('new') fauna that appeared during the epoch.

Kishenehn Formation

Kishenehn Formation

The Kishenehn Formation is a Paleogene stratigraphic unit in Montana. Fossil amiiforme and teleost fish have been found in outcrops of the formation's Coal Creek Member in Glacier National Park. Mosquitos have also been found in the Coal Creek Member, and have been found to be hematophagous. It is considered a Middle Eocene Lagerstätte.

Montana

Montana

Montana is a state in the Mountain West division of the Western United States. It is bordered by Idaho to the west, North Dakota and South Dakota to the east, Wyoming to the south, and the Canadian provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and Saskatchewan to the north. It is the fourth-largest state by area, the eighth-least populous state, and the third-least densely populated state. Its state capital is Helena. The western half of Montana contains numerous mountain ranges, while the eastern half is characterized by western prairie terrain and badlands, with smaller mountain ranges found throughout the state.

Source: "Culiseta", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culiseta.

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References
  1. ^ "Nematocera by Markku Savela". Lepidoptera and some other life forms. Retrieved 2007-12-13.
  2. ^ Identification of the Mosquitoes of California. Richard Meyer and Stephen Durso, Mosquito and Vector Control Association of California. 1998.
  3. ^ Sandhu TS, Williams GW, Haynes BW, Dhillon MS. Population dynamics of blood-fed female mosquitoes and comparative efficacy of resting boxes in collecting them from the northwestern part of Riverside County, California. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2013 [cited 2013 Oct 22];5:15-8.
  4. ^ a b "GENUS Culiseta". The Walter Reed Biosystematics Unit. Archived from the original on 2007-06-22. Retrieved 2007-12-13.
  5. ^ Peach, Daniel A. H.; Gries, Gerhard (2019). "Mosquito phytophagy – sources exploited, ecological function, and evolutionary transition to haematophagy". Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 168 (2): 120–136. doi:10.1111/eea.12852. ISSN 1570-7458.
  6. ^ Harbach, Ralph E.; Greenwalt, Dale (2012-10-30). "Two Eocene species of Culiseta (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Kishenehn Formation in Montana". Zootaxa. 3530 (1): 25. doi:10.11646/zootaxa.3530.1.2. ISSN 1175-5334.
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