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Croatia national football team records and statistics

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This article lists various football records in relation to the Croatia national football team.

Individual records

Player records

Most capped players

Rank Player First appearance Last appearance Caps
1 Luka Modrić 1 March 2006 27 November 2022 157
2 Darijo Srna 20 November 2002 25 June 2016 134
3 Ivan Perišić 26 March 2011 27 November 2022 118
4 Stipe Pletikosa 10 February 1999 23 June 2014 114
5 Ivan Rakitić 8 September 2007 13 October 2019 106
6 Josip Šimunić 10 November 2001 19 November 2013 105
7 Ivica Olić 13 February 2002 13 October 2015 104
8 Vedran Ćorluka 16 August 2006 11 July 2018 103
9 Dario Šimić 13 March 1996 20 August 2008 100
Domagoj Vida 23 May 2010 16 November 2022
11 Mario Mandžukić 17 November 2007 15 July 2018 89
12 Mateo Kovačić 22 March 2013 27 November 2022 86
13 Robert Kovač 28 April 1999 14 October 2009 84
14 Niko Kovač 11 December 1996 11 October 2008 83
15 Robert Jarni 22 December 1990 13 June 2002 81
Niko Kranjčar 18 August 2004 15 October 2013
17 Marcelo Brozović 7 June 2014 27 November 2022 79
18 Andrej Kramarić 4 September 2014 27 November 2022 76
19 Dejan Lovren 8 October 2009 27 November 2022 74
20 Davor Šuker 22 December 1990 3 June 2002 69
21 Eduardo da Silva 16 November 2004 18 June 2014 64
22 Aljoša Asanović 17 October 1990 28 May 2000 62
23 Zvonimir Soldo 20 April 1994 8 June 2002 61
24 Dražen Ladić 17 October 1990 28 May 2000 59
Jerko Leko 8 May 2002 8 October 2009
26 Danijel Pranjić 16 November 2004 3 September 2015 58
27 Igor Tudor 15 November 1997 2 June 2006 55
Ognjen Vukojević 16 October 2007 31 May 2014
Milan Badelj 2 September 2011 1 June 2021
30 Igor Štimac 22 December 1990 13 February 2002 53
31 Goran Vlaović 5 July 1992 21 August 2002 52
Šime Vrsaljko 9 February 2011 10 June 2022
33 Zvonimir Boban 22 December 1990 13 November 1999 51
Updated on 27 November 2022, after match against  Canada.
First player to reach 100 appearances

Dario Šimić, 20 August 2008, Slovenia 2–3 Croatia[1]

Fastest player to reach 100 appearances

Ivan Perišić, 10 years 2 months 6 days, 26 March 2011 – 1 June 2021[2]

Top goalscorers

Rank Player Croatia career Goals Caps
1 Davor Šuker 1990–2002 45 69
2 Mario Mandžukić 2007–2018 33 89
3 Ivan Perišić 2011– 32 118
4 Eduardo da Silva 2004–2014 29 64
5 Luka Modrić 2006– 23 157
6 Andrej Kramarić 2014– 22 76
Darijo Srna 2002–2016 134
8 Ivica Olić 2002–2015 20 104
9 Niko Kranjčar 2004–2013 16 81
10 Nikola Kalinić 2008–2018 15 42
Goran Vlaović 1992–2002 52
Ivan Rakitić 2007–2019 106
Updated on 27 November 2022, after match against  Canada.
First goal

Florijan Matekalo, 2 April 1940, Croatia 4–0 Switzerland

Manager records

Managers results

The following table provides a summary of the complete record of each Croatia manager including their results regarding World Cups and European Championships.

Manager Period Pld W D L Win % Major competitions
Kingdom of Yugoslavia Jozo Jakopić 1939–1941 4 2 1 1 050.00
Independent State of Croatia Rudolf Hitrec 1941 1 0 0 1 000.00
Independent State of Croatia Bogdan Cuvaj 1941–1943 13 6 3 4 046.15
Independent State of Croatia Bernard Hügl 1943–1945 1 1 0 0 100.00
Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Bogdan Cuvaj 1956 1 1 0 0 100.00
Croatia Dražan Jerković 1990–1991 3 3 0 0 100.00
Croatia Stanko Poklepović 1992 4 1 1 2 025.00
Croatia Vlatko Marković 1993–1994 1 1 0 0 100.00
Croatia Miroslav Blažević 1994–2000 72 33 24 15 045.83 Symbol confirmed.svg 1996 European Championship – Quarter-final
Symbol confirmed.svg 1998 World Cup – Third place
Symbol delete vote.svg 2000 European Championship – Failed to qualify
Croatia Tomislav Ivić (c)[a] 1994 1 1 0 0 100.00
Croatia Mirko Jozić 2000–2002 18 9 6 3 050.00 Symbol confirmed.svg 2002 World Cup – Group stage
Croatia Otto Barić 2002–2004 24 11 8 5 045.83 Symbol confirmed.svg 2004 European Championship – Group stage
Croatia Zlatko Kranjčar 2004–2006 25 11 8 6 044.00 Symbol confirmed.svg 2006 World Cup – Group stage
Croatia Slaven Bilić 2006–2012 65 42 15 8 064.62 Symbol confirmed.svg 2008 European Championship – Quarter-final
Symbol delete vote.svg 2010 World Cup – Failed to qualify
Symbol confirmed.svg 2012 European Championship – Group stage
Croatia Igor Štimac 2012–2013 15 8 2 5 053.33
Croatia Niko Kovač 2013–2015 19 10 5 4 052.63 Symbol confirmed.svg 2014 World Cup – Group stage
Croatia Ante Čačić 2015–2017 25 15 6 4 060.00 Symbol confirmed.svg 2016 European Championship – Round of 16
Croatia Zlatko Dalić 2017– 65 33 15 17 050.77 Symbol confirmed.svg 2018 World Cup – Runners-up
Symbol confirmed.svg 2020 European Championship – Round of 16
Symbol confirmed.svg 2022 World Cup – To be determined
Totals 357 188 94 75 52.66% 12 out of 14

Last updated: Croatia vs. Canada, 27 November 2022.

Source: Croatian Football Federation

  1. ^ In September 1994, national team manager Miroslav Blažević, who was also coaching Croatia Zagreb at the time, was dismissed in a 1994–95 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup match against Auxerre. Blažević was suspended by UEFA for one game and Ivić was appointed as his replacement for the UEFA Euro 1996 qualifying match against Italy in November 1994.

Discover more about Individual records related topics

Luka Modrić

Luka Modrić

Luka Modrić is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder for La Liga club Real Madrid and captains the Croatia national team. He plays mainly as a central midfielder, but can also play as an attacking midfielder or as a defensive midfielder. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest midfielders of his generation, and as the greatest Croatian footballer ever.

Darijo Srna

Darijo Srna

Darijo Srna is a Croatian former professional footballer and current director of football of Ukrainian Premier League club Shakhtar Donetsk. During most of his career he played as a right wing-back.

Ivan Perišić

Ivan Perišić

Ivan Perišić is a Croatian professional footballer who plays for Premier League club Tottenham Hotspur and the Croatia national team. Usually deployed as a winger, he has also featured as an attacking midfielder, second striker, or wing-back.

Ivan Rakitić

Ivan Rakitić

Ivan Rakitić is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a central or attacking midfielder for La Liga club Sevilla.

Josip Šimunić

Josip Šimunić

Josip "Joe" Šimunić is a Croatian retired footballer and current manager of the Croatia national under-19 team.

Ivica Olić

Ivica Olić

Ivica Olić is a Croatian professional football manager and former player who is an assistant coach of the Croatia national team.

Dario Šimić

Dario Šimić

Dario Šimić is a Croatian former footballer. Šimić was a versatile defender who played as full-back, sweeper or centre back; a physical and hard-tackling defender, he was known in particular for his strength and ability in the air. A product of Dinamo Zagreb Academy, he later played for Serie A sides Inter Milan and A.C. Milan and Ligue 1 side Monaco, before returning to Dinamo Zagreb in 2010, where he retired from the game during the same year.

Domagoj Vida

Domagoj Vida

Domagoj Vida is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a defender for Super League Greece club AEK Athens and the Croatia national team. He is capable of playing in any defensive position but is mostly deployed as a centre-back or a right-back.

2018 FIFA World Cup Final

2018 FIFA World Cup Final

The 2018 FIFA World Cup Final was the final match of the 2018 World Cup, the 21st edition of FIFA's competition for national football teams. The match was played at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, on 15 July 2018, and was contested by France and Croatia. The tournament comprised hosts Russia and 31 other teams who emerged from the qualification phase, organised by the six FIFA confederations. The 32 teams competed in a group stage, from which 16 teams qualified for the knockout stage. En route to the final, France finished first in Group C, with two wins and a draw, after which they defeated Argentina in the round of 16, Uruguay in the quarter-final and Belgium in the semi-final. Croatia finished top of Group D with three wins, before defeating Denmark in the round of 16 and Russia in the quarter-final – both through a penalty shoot-out – and then England in the semi-final. The final took place in front of 78,011 supporters, with more than a billion watching on television, and was refereed by Néstor Pitana from Argentina.

Marcelo Brozović

Marcelo Brozović

Marcelo Brozović is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a defensive midfielder for Serie A club Inter Milan and the Croatia national team. He represented his nation at the 2014, 2018 and 2022 editions of the FIFA World Cup, as well as the UEFA European Championship in 2016 and 2020. Brozović is often recognised as one of the world's best defensive midfielders.

Andrej Kramarić

Andrej Kramarić

Andrej Kramarić is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a forward or attacking midfielder for Bundesliga club 1899 Hoffenheim and the Croatia national team.

Dejan Lovren

Dejan Lovren

Dejan Lovren is a Croatian professional footballer who plays as a centre-back for Russian Premier League club Zenit Saint Petersburg and the Croatia national team.

Team records

Home matches

Key: Pld–games played, W–games won, D–games drawn; L–games lost, %–win percentage

Stadium City / town Pld W D L Win % Last match hosted
Stadion Maksimir Zagreb 68 47 15 6 069.1 2022
Stadion Poljud Split 17 4 8 5 023.5 2022
Stadion Gradski vrt Osijek 14 10 3 1 071.4 2022
Stadion Kantrida Rijeka 11 10 1 0 090.9 2011
Stadion Varteks Varaždin 8 5 2 1 062.5 2019
Stadion Rujevica Rijeka 7 5 2 0 071.4 2021
Stadion A. Drosina Pula 5 4 0 1 080.0 2019
Stadion Cibalia Vinkovci 1 1 0 0 100.0 2009
Stadion Koprivnica Koprivnica 1 1 0 0 100.0 2016
Stadion Kranjčevićeva Zagreb 1 1 0 0 100.0 1996
Stadion Šubićevac Šibenik 1 0 1 0 000.0 2003
Stadion Radnik Velika Gorica 1 0 1 0 000.0 2021
Totals 135 88 33 14 65.2% 2022

Last updated: Croatia vs. Denmark, 22 September 2022. Statistics include official FIFA-recognised matches only.

Discover more about Team records related topics

Stadion Maksimir

Stadion Maksimir

Maksimir Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Zagreb, Croatia. It takes its name from the surrounding neighbourhood of Maksimir. The venue is primarily the home of Dinamo Zagreb, the top club of the country with 23 league titles, but it is also the home venue of the Croatia national football team. First opened in 1912, it has undergone many revamps, and its current layout dates from a 1997 rebuilding. The stadium also sometimes hosts other events such as rock concerts.

Stadion Poljud

Stadion Poljud

Gradski stadion u Poljudu, better known as Stadion Poljud or simply Poljud, is a multi-use stadium in Split, Croatia, which has been the home ground of Hajduk Split football club since 1979. The stadium is located in the neighbourhood of Poljud, which belongs to city district of Spinut. It was opened in September 1979, and has a seating capacity of 33.987

Split, Croatia

Split, Croatia

Split is the second-largest city of Croatia, the largest city in Dalmatia and the largest city on the Croatian coast. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings. An intraregional transport hub and popular tourist destination, the city is linked to the Adriatic islands and the Apennine Peninsula.

Osijek

Osijek

Osijek is the fourth-largest city in Croatia, with a population of 96,848 in 2021. It is the largest city and the economic and cultural centre of the eastern Croatian region of Slavonia, as well as the administrative centre of Osijek-Baranja County. Osijek is located on the right bank of the Drava River, 25 km (16 mi) upstream of its confluence with the Danube, at an elevation of 94 m (308 ft).

Stadion Kantrida

Stadion Kantrida

Kantrida Stadium is a football stadium in the Croatian city of Rijeka. It is named after the Kantrida neighbourhood in which it is located, in the western part of the city. It has served as the home of the HNK Rijeka football club for most years since 1946. The stadium has a distinctive appearance as it is situated between steep cliffs, a remnant of an old quarry, just north of the stadium and the shore of the Adriatic on its south side.

Rijeka

Rijeka

Rijeka is the principal seaport and the third-largest city in Croatia. It is located in Primorje-Gorski Kotar County on Kvarner Bay, an inlet of the Adriatic Sea and in 2021 had a population of 108,622 inhabitants. Historically, because of its strategic position and its excellent deep-water port, the city was fiercely contested, especially between the Holy Roman Empire, Italy and Croatia, changing rulers and demographics many times over centuries. According to the 2011 census data, the majority of its citizens are Croats, along with small numbers of Serbs, Bosniaks and Italians.

Stadion Aldo Drosina

Stadion Aldo Drosina

Stadion Aldo Drosina is a multi-use stadium in Pula, Croatia. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of NK Istra 1961 and formerly NK Istra. The stadium has a capacity of 9,800. From March 2009 to January 2011 the stadium has undergone a major reconstruction. The west stand was completely demolished and redesigned, a roof over the west stand was added. New seats replaced bench seating all around the stadium, and the three existing stands were cleaned up. On 9 February 2011, Croatia hosted the Czech Republic in an international football friendly for the inaugural match to open the stadium. The match finished with a 4–2 win for Croatia.

Pula

Pula

Pula is the largest city in Istria County, Croatia, and the seventh-largest city in the country, situated at the southern tip of the Istrian peninsula, with a population of 52,411 in 2021. It is known for its multitude of ancient Roman buildings, the most famous of which is the Pula Arena, one of the best preserved Roman amphitheaters. The city has a long tradition of wine making, fishing, shipbuilding, and tourism. It was the administrative centre of Istria from ancient Roman times until superseded by Pazin in 1991.

Stadion HNK Cibalia

Stadion HNK Cibalia

Stadion Cibalia is a multi-purpose stadium in Vinkovci, Croatia. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of HNK Cibalia. It has a grass court, surrounded with a clay running surface, and stands, a part of which is covered. The stadium can hold 10,000 people, with 6,000 seats, of which 2,175 seats are under a roof and another 120 are in the luxury suite.

Gradski stadion (Koprivnica)

Gradski stadion (Koprivnica)

Ivan Kušek-Apaš City Stadium is a football stadium in Koprivnica, Croatia. It serves as home ground for NK Slaven Belupo football club. The stadium has a capacity of 3,134 seats. In May 2007, city of Koprivnica had finished putting up floodlights, so that domestic league and UEFA Europa League games could be played at night.

Koprivnica

Koprivnica

Koprivnica is a city in Northern Croatia, located 70 kilometers northeast of Zagreb. It is the capital and the largest city of the Koprivnica-Križevci county. In 2011, the city's administrative area of 90.94 km2 had a total population of 30,854, with 23,955 in the city proper.

Stadion Kranjčevićeva

Stadion Kranjčevićeva

Stadion u Kranjčevićevoj ulici, also known as Stadion Concordije between 1921 and 1945, is a multi-purpose stadium located in Trešnjevka neighbourhood, in the Croatian capital of Zagreb. It is mainly used for football matches and was historically the home ground of NK Zagreb until their eviction from the ground in 2018. More recently the stadium has been the home ground for Croatian First League side NK Lokomotiva. In addition, NK Rudeš use the stadium for selected matches, particularly Croatian First League games. First opened in 1921, it has undergone many renovations and facelifts, with its current layout dating back to the 1987 Summer Universiade renovation. The Croatia national football team played only once at the stadium in a 3–0 friendly game win against South Korea on 13 March 1996. With its reduced capacity from 2008, the stadium can hold 8,850 people, which makes it the second biggest stadium in Zagreb, behind Stadion Maksimir. In 2018, the stadium was refurbished with chairs installed in the eastern grandstand and a new hybrid lawn installed, leaving it with a seating capacity of 5,350 seats.

Competition records

FIFA World Cup

Croatia qualified for and competed in three consecutive World Cup tournaments between 1998 and 2006, but failed to qualify for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa after finishing 3rd in Group 6 behind England and Ukraine. Although they had joined both FIFA and UEFA by 1992, they were unable to enter the 1994 World Cup as qualification had started before the side was officially recognised as a state.[3] In the following three World Cup groups they were eliminated after finishing third in all of them, before finally advancing further than the group stage at the 2018 World Cup.[4] On 11 July 2018, Croatia won their semi-final match against England, advancing the national team to their first FIFA World Cup final wherein they secured second place as runners-up against winners France.[5] Supplanting their third place positioning in 1998, this is the nation's best performance to date.[6]

The national squad, lining up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final.
The national squad, lining up for the 2018 FIFA World Cup Final.
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks; correct as of 27 November 2022 after the match against Canada.
FIFA World Cup record FIFA World Cup qualification record
Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pos Pld W D L GF GA
1930 to 1990 Part of  Yugoslavia
United States 1994 Did not enter
France 1998 Third place 3rd 7 5 0 2 11 5 Squad 2nd 10 5 4 1 20 13
South Korea Japan 2002 Group stage 23rd 3 1 0 2 2 3 Squad 1st 8 5 3 0 15 2
Germany 2006 22nd 3 0 2 1 2 3 Squad 1st 10 7 3 0 21 5
South Africa 2010 Did not qualify 3rd 10 6 2 2 19 13
Brazil 2014 Group stage 19th 3 1 0 2 6 6 Squad 2nd 12 6 3 3 14 9
Russia 2018 Runners-up 2nd 7 4 2 1 14 9 Squad 2nd 12 7 3 2 19 5
Qatar 2022 TBD 3 1 2 0 4 1 Squad 1st 10 7 2 1 21 4
CanadaMexicoUnited States 2026 To be determined To be determined
Total Runners-up 6/7 26 12 6 8 39 27 72 43 20 9 129 51

UEFA European Championship

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks; correct as of 28 June 2021 after the match against Spain.
UEFA European Championship record/UEFA European Championship qualifying
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA Squad Pos Pld W D L GF GA
1960 to 1992 Part of  Yugoslavia
England 1996 Quarter-final 7th 4 2 0 2 5 5 Squad 1st 10 7 2 1 22 5
Belgium Netherlands 2000 Did not qualify 3rd 8 4 3 1 13 9
Portugal 2004 Group stage 13th 3 0 2 1 4 6 Squad 2nd 10 6 2 2 14 5
Austria Switzerland 2008 Quarter-final 5th 4 3 1 0 5 2 Squad 1st 12 9 2 1 28 8
Poland Ukraine 2012 Group stage 10th 3 1 1 1 4 3 Squad 2nd 12 8 2 2 21 7
France 2016 Round of 16 9th 4 2 1 1 5 4 Squad 2nd 10 6 3 1 20 5
Europe 2020 Round of 16 14th 4 1 1 2 7 8 Squad 1st 8 5 2 1 17 7
Germany 2024 To be determined To be determined
Total Quarter-final 6/7 22 9 6 7 30 28 70 45 16 9 135 46

UEFA Nations League

*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks; correct as of 25 September 2022 after the match against Austria.
UEFA Nations League
Year Division Group Pld W D L GF GA P/R Rank
Portugal 2018–19 A 4 4 1 1 2 4 10 Same position 9th
Italy 2020–21 A 3 6 1 0 5 9 16 Same position 12th
Netherlands 2022–23 A 1 6 4 1 1 8 6 Same position 1st–4th
2024–25 A To be played
Total 16 6 2 8 21 32 1st–4th

Discover more about Competition records related topics

Croatia at the FIFA World Cup

Croatia at the FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, sometimes called the Football World Cup, but usually referred to simply as the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the men's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946, due to World War II.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

2010 FIFA World Cup

2010 FIFA World Cup

The 2010 FIFA World Cup, also branded as South Africa 2010, was the 19th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in South Africa from 11 June to 11 July 2010. The bidding process for hosting the tournament finals was open only to African nations. In 2004, the international football federation, FIFA, selected South Africa over Egypt and Morocco to become the first African nation to host the finals.

England national football team

England national football team

The England national football team has represented England in international football since the first international match in 1872. It is controlled by The Football Association (FA), the governing body for football in England, which is affiliated with UEFA and comes under the global jurisdiction of world football's governing body FIFA. England competes in the three major international tournaments contested by European nations: the FIFA World Cup, the UEFA European Championship, and the UEFA Nations League.

1994 FIFA World Cup

1994 FIFA World Cup

The 1994 FIFA World Cup was the 15th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national soccer teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from June 17 to July 17, 1994, at nine venues across the country. The United States was chosen as the host by FIFA on July 4, 1988. Despite soccer's relative lack of popularity in the host nation, the tournament was the most financially successful in World Cup history. It broke tournament records with overall attendance of 3,587,538 and an average of 68,991 per game, marks that stood unsurpassed as of 2018 despite the expansion of the competition from 24 to 32 teams starting with the 1998 World Cup.

1994 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)

1994 FIFA World Cup qualification (UEFA)

A total of 39 UEFA teams entered qualification for the 1994 FIFA World Cup. However, Liechtenstein withdrew before the draw was made. The CIS, then Russia took the Soviet Union's spot after the Soviet Union dissolved while FIFA suspended Yugoslavia due to United Nations sanctions stemming from the Yugoslav wars. The European zone was allocated 13 from 24 places in the final tournament. Germany, the defending champions, qualified automatically, leaving 12 spots open for competition between 37 teams.

2018 FIFA World Cup

2018 FIFA World Cup

The 2018 FIFA World Cup was the 21st FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial world championship for men's national football teams organized by FIFA. It took place in Russia from 14 June to 15 July 2018, after the country was awarded the hosting rights in 2010. It was the eleventh time the championships had been held in Europe, and the first time they were held in Eastern Europe. At an estimated cost of over $14.2 billion, it was the most expensive World Cup ever held until it was surpassed by Qatar in 2022. The tournament phase involved 32 teams, of which 31 came through qualifying competitions, while as the host nation Russia qualified automatically. Of the 32, 20 had also appeared in the 2014 event, while Iceland and Panama each made their first appearance at the World Cup. 64 matches were played in 12 venues across 11 cities. Germany, the defending champions, were eliminated in the group stage for the first time since 1938. Host nation Russia was eliminated in the quarter-finals. In the final, France played Croatia on 15 July at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow. France won the match 4–2, claiming their second World Cup.

2018 FIFA World Cup Final

2018 FIFA World Cup Final

The 2018 FIFA World Cup Final was the final match of the 2018 World Cup, the 21st edition of FIFA's competition for national football teams. The match was played at the Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Russia, on 15 July 2018, and was contested by France and Croatia. The tournament comprised hosts Russia and 31 other teams who emerged from the qualification phase, organised by the six FIFA confederations. The 32 teams competed in a group stage, from which 16 teams qualified for the knockout stage. En route to the final, France finished first in Group C, with two wins and a draw, after which they defeated Argentina in the round of 16, Uruguay in the quarter-final and Belgium in the semi-final. Croatia finished top of Group D with three wins, before defeating Denmark in the round of 16 and Russia in the quarter-final – both through a penalty shoot-out – and then England in the semi-final. The final took place in front of 78,011 supporters, with more than a billion watching on television, and was refereed by Néstor Pitana from Argentina.

FIFA World Cup qualification

FIFA World Cup qualification

The FIFA World Cup qualification is a competitive match that a national association football team takes in order to qualify for one of the available berths at the final tournament of the (men's) FIFA World Cup.

1930 FIFA World Cup

1930 FIFA World Cup

The 1930 FIFA World Cup was the inaugural FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national football teams. It took place in Uruguay from 13 to 30 July 1930. FIFA, football's international governing body, selected Uruguay as host nation, as the country would be celebrating the centenary of its first constitution and the Uruguay national football team had successfully retained their football title at the 1928 Summer Olympics. All matches were played in the Uruguayan capital, Montevideo, the majority at the Estadio Centenario, which was built for the tournament.

1990 FIFA World Cup

1990 FIFA World Cup

The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event for a second time. Teams representing 116 national football associations entered and qualification began in April 1988. 22 teams qualified from this process, along with host nation Italy and defending champions Argentina.

1998 FIFA World Cup

1998 FIFA World Cup

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the football world championship for men's national teams. The finals tournament was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. The country was chosen as the host nation by FIFA for the second time in the history of the tournament, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. It was the second time that France staged the competition and the ninth time that it was held in Europe. Spanning 32 days, it is the longest World Cup tournament ever held.

Head-to-head records

The following table show the Croatia national football team's all-time international record.

Only FIFA matches are counted. Correct as of 27 November 2022, after the 2022 FIFA World Cup fixture against Canada.

Opponent Pld W D L GF GA GD Win % Points/game[a] Competitive matches[b]
 Andorra 6 6 0 0 24 0 +24 100.00% 3.00 2004 EQ
2008 EQ
2010 WQ
 Argentina 5 2 1 2 7 5 +2 40.00% 1.40 1998 W
2018 W
 Armenia 1 0 1 0 1 1 +0 00.00% 1.00 2024 EQ
 Australia 6 2 2 2 11 6 +5 33.33% 1.33 2006 W
 Austria 7 6 0 1 12 6 +6 85.71% 2.57 2008 E
2022–23 NQ
 Azerbaijan 4 2 2 0 9 2 +7 50.00% 2.00 2016 EQ
2020 EQ
 Belarus 2 2 0 0 4 1 +3 100.00% 3.00 2010 WQ
 Belgium 8 3 2 4 9 6 +3 37.50% 1.38 2002 WQ
2004 EQ
2014 WQ
2022 W
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 4 4 0 0 14 6 +8 100.00% 3.00 1998 WQ
 Brazil 4 0 1 3 2 7 −5 00.00% 0.25 2006 W
2014 W
 Bulgaria 8 5 2 1 12 6 +6 62.50% 2.16 2004 EQ
2006 WQ
2016 EQ
 Cameroon 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100.00% 3.00 2014 W
 Canada 1 1 0 0 4 1 +3 100.00% 3.00 2022 W
 Chile 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 00.00% 1.00
 China 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 00.00% 1.00
 Cyprus 3 3 0 0 6 0 +6 100.00% 3.00 2022 WQ
 Czech Republic 4 1 3 0 8 6 +2 25.00% 1.50 2016 E
2020 E
 Denmark 8 4 2 2 11 8 +3 50.00% 1.75 1996 E
1998 WQ
2018 W
2022–23 NQ
 Ecuador 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 00.00% 0.00 2002 W
 Egypt 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 00.00% 1.00
 England 11 3 2 6 13 22 −9 27.27% 1.00 2004 E
2008 EQ
2010 WQ
2018 W
2018–19 NQ
2020 E
 Estonia 9 6 2 1 16 5 +11 66.67% 2.22 1996 EQ
2004 EQ
2008 EQ
 Finland 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 50.00% 2.00 2018 WQ
 FR Yugoslavia[c] 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 00.00% 1.00 2000 EQ
 France 10 1 3 6 10 20 −10 10.00% 0.60 1998 W
2004 E
2018 W
2020–21 NQ
2022–23 NQ
 Georgia 3 2 0 1 4 3 +1 66.67% 2.00 2012 EQ
 Germany 5 2 1 2 8 6 +2 40.00% 1.40 1996 E
1998 W
2008 E
 Gibraltar 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100.00% 3.00
 Greece 8 2 4 2 10 9 +1 25.00% 1.25 1998 WQ
2012 EQ
2018 WQ
 Hong Kong 1 1 0 0 4 0 +4 100.00% 3.00
 Hungary 9 4 4 1 17 7 +10 44.44% 1.78 2006 WQ
2020 EQ
 Iceland 7 5 1 1 13 3 +10 71.43% 2.26 2006 WQ
2014 WQ
2018 WQ
2018 W
 Iran 2 1 1 0 4 2 +2 50.00% 2.00
 Israel 9 8 1 0 22 8 +14 88.89% 2.78 2008 EQ
2012 EQ
 Italy 8 3 5 0 10 6 +4 37.50% 1.75 1996 EQ
2002 W
2012 E
2016 EQ
 Jamaica 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 100.00% 3.00 1998 W
 Japan 3 1 1 1 4 4 0 33.33% 1.33 1998 W
2006 W
 Jordan 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00% 3.00
 Kazakhstan 2 2 0 0 5 1 +4 100.00% 3.00 2010 WQ
 Kosovo 2 2 0 0 7 0 +7 100.00% 3.00 2018 WQ
 Latvia 4 4 0 0 10 1 +9 100.00% 3.00 2002 WQ
2012 EQ
2024 EQ
 Liechtenstein 2 2 0 0 8 2 +6 100.00% 3.00
 Lithuania 2 1 1 0 2 0 +2 50.00% 2.00 1996 EQ
 Mali 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00% 3.00
 Malta 10 9 1 0 29 5 +24 90.00% 2.80 2000 EQ
2006 WQ
2012 EQ
2016 EQ
2022 WQ
 Mexico 6 4 0 2 9 6 +3 66.67% 2.00 2002 W
2014 W
 Moldova 2 2 0 0 2 0 +2 100.00% 3.00
 Morocco 2 0 2 0 2 2 0 00.00% 1.00 2022 W
 Netherlands 2 1 0 1 2 4 −2 50.00% 1.50 1998 W
 Nigeria 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 100.00% 3.00 2018 W
 North Macedonia 8 5 2 1 11 9 +2 62.50% 2.13 2000 EQ
2008 EQ
2014 WQ
 Northern Ireland 1 1 0 0 3 0 +3 100.00% 3.00
 Norway 5 3 1 1 10 6 +4 60.00% 2.00 2016 EQ
 Peru 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 00.00% 0.00
 Poland 5 3 1 1 7 3 +4 60.00% 2.00 2008 E
 Portugal 7 0 1 6 4 15 −11 00.00% 0.14 1996 E
2016 E
2020–21 NQ
 Qatar 1 1 0 0 3 2 +1 100.00% 3.00
 Republic of Ireland 7 2 3 2 8 8 0 28.57% 1.29 2000 EQ
2012 E
 Romania 3 3 0 0 4 1 +3 100.00% 3.00 1998 W
 Russia 6 2 4 0 6 3 +3 33.33% 1.67 2008 EQ
2018 W
2022 WQ
 San Marino 3 3 0 0 18 0 +18 100.00% 3.00 2002 WQ
 Saudi Arabia 1 1 0 0 1 0 +1 100.00% 3.00
 Scotland 6 1 3 2 5 6 −1 16.67% 1.00 2002 WQ
2014 WQ
2020 E
 Senegal 1 1 0 0 2 1 +1 100.00% 3.00
 Serbia 2 1 1 0 3 1 +2 50.00% 2.00 2014 WQ
 Slovakia 10 5 3 2 18 11 +7 50.00% 1.80 2020 EQ
2022 WQ
 Slovenia 11 6 4 1 19 10 +9 54.55% 2.00 1996 EQ
1998 WQ
2004 EQ
2022 WQ
 South Korea 7 3 2 2 11 7 +4 42.86% 1.57
 Spain 9 3 1 5 12 20 −8 33.33% 1.11 2012 E
2016 E
2018–19 NQ
2020 E
 Sweden 6 4 0 2 8 7 +1 66.67% 2.00 2006 WQ
2020–21 NQ
 Switzerland 4 1 2 1 6 7 –1 25.00% 1.25 2004 E
 Tunisia 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 00.00% 0.00
 Turkey 10 3 6 1 13 9 +4 30.00% 1.50 1996 E
2008 E
2012 EQ
2016 E
2018 WQ
2024 EQ
 Ukraine 9 5 3 1 15 5 +10 55.56% 2.00 1996 EQ
1998 WQ
2010 WQ
2018 WQ
 Wales 6 4 2 0 10 4 +6 66.67% 2.33 2014 WQ
2020 EQ
2024 EQ
Total: 75 teams played 329 173 89 67 558 319 +239 52.58% 1.85
Notes
  1. ^ According to the "three points for a win" standard
  2. ^ Legend: In each final tournament of the World Cup, the European Championship and the Nations League (shown in bold), Croatia has played one match against the respective opponent, while in each qualifying tournament and each Nations League group stage, it has played two matches against the respective opponent. Friendly matches and minor tournaments are counted in the table but are not shown in this column.
  3. ^ No longer active

Discover more about Head-to-head records related topics

2022 FIFA World Cup Group F

2022 FIFA World Cup Group F

Group F of the 2022 FIFA World Cup took place from 23 November to 1 December 2022. The group consisted of Belgium, Canada, Morocco and Croatia. The top two teams, Morocco and Croatia, advanced to the round of 16. Morocco advanced to the knockout stage for the first time since 1986. By winning the group, they became the first African team to do so since Nigeria in 1998. Belgium failed to advance out of the group for the second time since 1998.

Andorra national football team

Andorra national football team

The Andorra national football team represents Andorra in association football and is controlled by the Andorran Football Federation, the governing body for football in Andorra. The team has enjoyed very little success due to the Principality's tiny population, the fifth smallest of any UEFA country.

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

Armenia national football team

Armenia national football team

The Armenia national football team represents Armenia in association football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Armenia, the governing body for football in Armenia.

Australia men's national soccer team

Australia men's national soccer team

The Australia men's national soccer team represents Australia in international men's soccer. Officially nicknamed the Socceroos, the team is controlled by the governing body for soccer in Australia, Football Australia, which is affiliated with the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF).

Austria national football team

Austria national football team

The Austria national football team represents Austria in men's international football competition and it is controlled by the Austrian Football Association.

Azerbaijan national football team

Azerbaijan national football team

The Azerbaijan national football team is the national football team of Azerbaijan and is controlled by Association of Football Federations of Azerbaijan. It represents Azerbaijan in international football competitions. The majority of Azerbaijan's home matches are held at the national stadium, Baku Olympic Stadium, with friendly matches sometimes hosted at club stadiums.

Belarus national football team

Belarus national football team

The Belarus national football team represents Belarus in international football and is controlled by the Football Federation of Belarus, the governing body for football in Belarus. Belarus' home ground is Dinamo Stadium in Minsk. Since independence in 1991, Belarus has not yet qualified for a FIFA World Cup or UEFA European Championship.

Belgium national football team

Belgium national football team

The Belgium national football team officially represents Belgium in men's international football since their maiden match in 1904. The squad is under the global jurisdiction of FIFA and is governed in Europe by UEFA—both of which were co-founded by the Belgian team's supervising body, the Royal Belgian Football Association. Periods of regular Belgian representation at the highest international level, from 1920 to 1938, from 1982 to 2002 and again from 2014 onwards, have alternated with mostly unsuccessful qualification rounds. Most of Belgium's home matches are played at the King Baudouin Stadium in Brussels.

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team

The Bosnia and Herzegovina national football team represents Bosnia and Herzegovina in international football competitions, and is governed by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Until 1992, Bosnian footballers played for Yugoslavia.

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Bulgaria national football team

Bulgaria national football team

The Bulgaria national football team represents Bulgaria in men's international football and is administered by the Bulgarian Football Union, a member association of UEFA. The team's home venue is the Vasil Levski Stadium in Sofia.

Source: "Croatia national football team records and statistics", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, December 2nd), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croatia_national_football_team_records_and_statistics.

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References
  1. ^ "Dario Šimić stats". eu-football.info. Retrieved 2020-04-03.
  2. ^ "Ivan Perišić stats". eu-football.info. Retrieved 2021-06-03.
  3. ^ "World Cup 1994 qualifications". Rec. Sport Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 11 May 2011. Retrieved 20 August 2008.
  4. ^ "World Cup 2018: Argentina 0–3 Croatia". BBC Sport. 21 June 2018. Retrieved 1 July 2018.
  5. ^ Taylor, Daniel (11 July 2018). "England's World Cup dream dashed as Croatia win semi-final in extra time". The Guardian. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 16 July 2018.
  6. ^ FIFA.com. "1998 FIFA World Cup France ™ - FIFA". FIFA. Archived from the original on 6 June 2018. Retrieved 1 July 2018.

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