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Cranksgiving

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Cranksgiving
Santa Cruz Cranksgiving Cyclists Planning Routes.jpg
Two cyclists plan their routes before the 2013 event in Santa Cruz, California
Race details
DisciplineAlleycat
TypeCharity
Web sitecranksgiving.org
History
First edition1999

Cranksgiving is an annual charity event where cyclists compete in an alleycat style race while purchasing food items at stops along the way. The event is scheduled near the American Thanksgiving holiday and the food is donated to local food pantries. The event was started in New York City in 1999 and has since spread to other cities in the United States as well as in other countries.

History

The first Cranksgiving event was November 20, 1999. New York City bicycle messenger Antonio Rodrigues came up with the idea of using an alleycat race as a charity event.[1] A traditional alleycat is an unsanctioned race in which bicycle messengers compete against each other.[2] In contrast, Cranksgiving has been described as "part bike ride, part food drive, part scavenger hunt".[3]

By 2009, the event drew 118 participants in New York, with similar events happening in over a dozen other cities.[4] That year, the New York event collected over $1000 worth of food which was donated to local food pantries.[5] In 2015, New York had 300 participants who collected 3,000 pounds (1,400 kg) of food, including a dozen turkeys and 600 jars of baby food.[6]

In 2019, there were 112 events held in 42 states as well as in the United Kingdom and Canada. Over 20,000 pounds (9,100 kg) of food was collected in Kansas City.[7] In New York City, there were three distinct events held; Brooklyn, Manhattan, and the Bronx, with Citibike making free bikes available for the event.[8] The Seattle event that year collected 2,223 pounds (1,008 kg) of food, while a separate event in West Seattle collected another 1,195 pounds (542 kg).[9]

A 2020 event in State College, Pennsylvania, drew 89 participants who collected over 1,400 pounds (640 kg) of food worth nearly $2500.[10]

Discover more about History related topics

Alleycat race

Alleycat race

An alley cat race is an unsanctioned bicycle race. Alley cats almost always take place in cities, and are often organized by bicycle messengers. The informality of the organization is matched by the emphasis on taking part, rather than simple competition. For instance, many alleycats present prizes for the last competitor to finish . The first race to be called an 'alley cat' was held in Toronto on 30 October 1989 and continued, in its original form, around Halloween and Valentine's Day for the following five years. In 1993, when Toronto messengers shared Alleycat stories at the first international messenger race, the name and the concept spread far and wide. Regularly organized Alleycats can be found in cities across North America, Europe and Asia. Many smaller cities with no cycle messenger population are also home to alleycats run by the burgeoning urban cyclist subculture.

Bicycle messenger

Bicycle messenger

Bicycle messengers are people who work for courier companies carrying and delivering items by bicycle. Bicycle messengers are most often found in the central business districts of metropolitan areas. Courier companies use bike messengers because bicycle travel is less subject to unexpected holdups in city traffic jams, and is not deterred by parking limitations, fees or fines in high-density development that can hinder or prevent delivery by motor vehicle, thereby offering a predictable delivery time.

Baby food

Baby food

Baby food is any soft easily consumed food other than breastmilk or infant formula that is made specifically for human babies between four and six months and two years old. The food comes in many varieties and flavors that are purchased ready-made from producers, or it may be table food eaten by the family that has been mashed or otherwise broken down.

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City is the largest city in Missouri by population and area. As of the 2020 census, the city had a population of 508,090 in 2020, making it the 36th most-populous city in the United States. It is the central city of the Kansas City metropolitan area, which straddles the Missouri–Kansas state line and has a population of 2,392,035. Most of the city lies within Jackson County, with portions spilling into Clay, Cass, and Platte counties. Kansas City was founded in the 1830s as a port on the Missouri River at its confluence with the Kansas River coming in from the west. On June 1, 1850, the town of Kansas was incorporated; shortly after came the establishment of the Kansas Territory. Confusion between the two ensued, and the name Kansas City was assigned to distinguish them soon after.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City's most populous borough, with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.

Manhattan

Manhattan

Manhattan, known regionally as the City, is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City. The borough is also coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Located near the southern tip of New York State, Manhattan is based in the Eastern Time Zone and constitutes both the geographical and demographic center of the Northeast megalopolis and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. Over 58 million people live within 250 miles of Manhattan, which serves as New York City’s economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and the city’s historical birthplace. Manhattan has been described as the cultural, financial, media, and entertainment capital of the world, is considered a safe haven for global real estate investors, and hosts the United Nations headquarters. New York City is the headquarters of the global art market, centered in Manhattan.

The Bronx

The Bronx

The Bronx is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Bronx County, in the state of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of the New York City borough of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of the New York City borough of Queens, across the East River. The Bronx has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,472,654 in the 2020 census. If each borough were ranked as a city, the Bronx would rank as the ninth-most-populous in the U.S. Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density. It is the only borough of New York City not primarily on an island. With a population that is 54.8% Hispanic as of 2020, it is the only majority-Hispanic county in the Northeastern United States and the fourth-most-populous nationwide.

Citi Bike

Citi Bike

Citi Bike is a privately owned public bicycle sharing system serving the New York City boroughs of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens, as well as Jersey City, New Jersey, and Hoboken, New Jersey. Named after lead sponsor Citigroup, it was operated by Motivate, with former Metropolitan Transportation Authority CEO Jay Walder as chief executive until September 30, 2018, when the company was acquired by Lyft. The system's bikes and stations use technology from Lyft.

Seattle

Seattle

Seattle is a seaport city on the West Coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With a 2020 population of 737,015, it is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest region of North America. The Seattle metropolitan area's population is 4.02 million, making it the 15th-largest in the United States. Its growth rate of 21.1% between 2010 and 2020 makes it one of the nation's fastest-growing large cities.

West Seattle

West Seattle

West Seattle is a conglomeration of neighborhoods in Seattle, Washington, United States. It comprises two of the thirteen districts, Delridge and Southwest, and encompasses all of Seattle west of the Duwamish River. It was incorporated as an independent town in 1902 before being annexed by Seattle five years later. Among the area's attractions are its saltwater beach parks along Elliott Bay and Puget Sound, including Alki Beach Park and Lincoln Park. The area is also known for its views of the Olympic Mountains to the west and the Cascade Range to the east. One-third of Seattle's green space and urban forest is located in West Seattle, much of it in the West Duwamish Greenbelt.

State College, Pennsylvania

State College, Pennsylvania

State College is a home rule municipality in Centre County in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is a college town, dominated economically and demographically by the presence of the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University.

Event format

Cranksgiving shopping list
Cranksgiving shopping list
Cargo trailer loaded with Cranksgiving food
Cargo trailer loaded with Cranksgiving food

Event sponsors are provided a basic set of requirements they must use, but there is no strict format. In general, cyclists are given a list of grocery stores they must visit, with specific routes to be determined by the riders. Riders are also given a shopping list from which they make purchases at each of the stores, and the goods donated to a local charity at the end of the event.[1][4] While there is no entry fee, riders spend $15 to $20 to complete their purchases.[11]

Source: "Cranksgiving", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cranksgiving.

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References
  1. ^ a b "Cranksgiving – History". Archived from the original on October 12, 2022. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  2. ^ Moynihan, Colin (October 10, 2016). "In Race of Bike Messengers, Potholes and Bad Manners Can Be Costly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 12, 2022. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  3. ^ "Above & Beyond: Cranksgiving". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on October 12, 2022. Retrieved October 12, 2022.
  4. ^ a b Goodman, David J. (November 24, 2009). "City Room: An Outlaw Street Race, for a Good Cause". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 12, 2022. Retrieved October 11, 2022.
  5. ^ "Cranksgiving: How To Illegally Street Race And Give Back At The Same Time". HuffPost. March 18, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  6. ^ Zaslow, Alexandra (November 24, 2016). "Bikers race to collect over 3,000 pounds of food for 'Cranksgiving'". TODAY.com. Archived from the original on October 13, 2022. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  7. ^ "Cranksgiving holds record 112 events this year". Bicycle Retailer and Industry News. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  8. ^ "Cranksgiving – Brooklyn, NY". August 30, 2019. Archived from the original on October 13, 2022. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  9. ^ Fucoloro, Tom (November 28, 2019). "Watch: Cranksgiving riders biked a literal metric tonne of food to Rainier Valley Food Bank". Seattle Bike Blog. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  10. ^ Collegian, Jeremiah Hassel. "State College's CentreBike to host 3rd annual Cranksgiving". The Daily Collegian. Retrieved October 6, 2022.
  11. ^ Mancuso, Anne (November 15, 2012). "Spare Times: Recreation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 13, 2022. Retrieved October 12, 2022.

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