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Chris Hipkins

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Chris Hipkins
Chris Hipkins NZ Labour (2).jpg
Hipkins in 2022
41st Prime Minister of New Zealand
Assumed office
25 January 2023
MonarchCharles III
Governor-GeneralCindy Kiro
DeputyCarmel Sepuloni
Preceded byJacinda Ardern
18th Leader of the Labour Party
Assumed office
22 January 2023
DeputyKelvin Davis
Preceded byJacinda Ardern
Ministerial offices 2017–⁠2023
41st Minister of Police
In office
14 June 2022 – 25 January 2023
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded byPoto Williams
Succeeded byStuart Nash
1st Minister for COVID-19 Response
In office
6 November 2020 – 14 June 2022
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byAyesha Verrall
41st Minister of Health
In office
2 July 2020 – 6 November 2020
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded byDavid Clark
Succeeded byAndrew Little
47th Minister of Education
In office
26 October 2017 – 25 January 2023
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded byNikki Kaye
Succeeded byJan Tinetti
19th Minister for the Public Service
In office
26 October 2017 – 25 January 2023
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded byPaula Bennett
Succeeded byGrant Robertson
11th Leader of the House
In office
26 October 2017 – 25 January 2023
Prime MinisterJacinda Ardern
Preceded bySimon Bridges
Succeeded byGrant Robertson
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Remutaka
Rimutaka (2008–2020)
Assumed office
8 November 2008
Preceded byPaul Swain
Majority20,497
Personal details
Born
Christopher John Hipkins

(1978-09-05) 5 September 1978 (age 44)
Hutt Valley, Wellington, New Zealand
Political partyLabour
Spouse
Jade Hipkins
(m. 2020; sep. 2022)
Children2
Residence(s)Upper Hutt, New Zealand
Alma materVictoria University of Wellington (BA)
Signature
WebsiteHipkins' Facebook page
NicknameChippy[1]

Christopher John Hipkins (born 5 September 1978) is a New Zealand politician serving as the 41st prime minister of New Zealand and leader of the New Zealand Labour Party since 2023.[2][3] He has been the member of Parliament (MP) for Remutaka since the 2008 election.

Hipkins served in opposition as Labour's education spokesperson. In the Sixth Labour Government, he previously served as minister of education, police, the public service, and leader of the House. He became a prominent figure as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand, taking on the roles of minister of health from July to November 2020 and minister for COVID-19 response from November 2020 to June 2022.

On 21 January 2023, Hipkins became the sole candidate to succeed Jacinda Ardern as leader of the Labour Party after she announced her resignation. He became party leader after being elected unopposed on 22 January 2023, and was consequently appointed prime minister by the governor-general on 25 January 2023.[4] He is expected to lead the Labour Party into the 2023 general election. His premiership was faced almost immediately with the devastating 2023 Auckland floods.[5]

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2008 New Zealand general election

2008 New Zealand general election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand Parliament. The liberal-conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked the beginning of the Fifth National Government which governed for the next nine years, until the 2017 general election, when a government was formed between the Labour and New Zealand First parties, with support on confidence and supply by the Green Party.

Ministers in the New Zealand Government

Ministers in the New Zealand Government

Ministers, in the New Zealand Government, are members of Parliament (MPs) who hold ministerial warrants from the Crown to perform certain functions of government. This includes formulating and implementing policies and advising the governor-general. Ministers collectively make up the executive branch of the New Zealand state. The governor-general is obliged to follow the advice of the prime minister on the appointment and dismissal of ministers.

Minister of Education (New Zealand)

Minister of Education (New Zealand)

The Minister of Education is a minister in the government of New Zealand with responsibility for the country's schools, and is in charge of the Ministry of Education.

Minister of Police (New Zealand)

Minister of Police (New Zealand)

The Minister of Police is a minister in the government of New Zealand with responsibility for the New Zealand Police.

Leader of the House (New Zealand)

Leader of the House (New Zealand)

In the New Zealand Parliament, the Leader of the House is the government minister appointed by the Prime Minister of New Zealand to be responsible for the management of government business in the House of Representatives. The Leader of the House is also an ex officio member of the Parliamentary Service Commission.

COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand

COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand

The COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand is part of the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. The first case of the disease in New Zealand was reported on 28 February 2020. As of 23 January 2023, the country has had a total of 2,171,788 cases. 2,468 people have died as a result of the virus, with cases recorded in all twenty district health board (DHB) areas. The pandemic first peaked in early April 2020, with 89 new cases recorded per day and 929 active cases. Cases peaked again in October 2021 with 134 new cases reported on 22 October. A total of 7,274,347 COVID tests have been carried out as of 28 June 2022.

Minister of Health (New Zealand)

Minister of Health (New Zealand)

The Minister of Health, formerly styled Minister of Public Health, is a minister in the government of New Zealand with responsibility for the New Zealand Ministry of Health and Te Whatu Ora—Health New Zealand.

Jacinda Ardern

Jacinda Ardern

Jacinda Kate Laurell Ardern is a New Zealand politician who served as the 40th prime minister of New Zealand and leader of the Labour Party from 2017 to 2023. A member of the Labour Party, she has been the member of Parliament (MP) for Mount Albert since 2017.

Leader of the New Zealand Labour Party

Leader of the New Zealand Labour Party

The leader of the Labour Party is the highest-ranked political position within the New Zealand Labour Party, who serves as the parliamentary leader and leading spokesperson of the party. The current leader is Chris Hipkins, after Jacinda Ardern resigned.

2023 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election

2023 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election

The 2023 New Zealand Labour Party leadership election was held on 22 January 2023 to choose the next leader of the New Zealand Labour Party. The election was triggered by the resignation of Prime Minister and Labour Party Leader Jacinda Ardern, which was announced on 19 January 2023.

Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-General of New Zealand

The governor-general of New Zealand is the viceregal representative of the monarch of New Zealand, currently King Charles III. As the King is concurrently the monarch of 14 other Commonwealth realms and lives in the United Kingdom, he, on the advice of his New Zealand prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out his constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand.

2023 New Zealand general election

2023 New Zealand general election

The 2023 New Zealand general election to determine the composition of the 54th Parliament of New Zealand is planned to be held on 14 October 2023, after the currently elected 53rd Parliament is dissolved or expires. Voters will elect 120 members to the unicameral New Zealand House of Representatives under the mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting system, a proportional representation system in which 72 members will be elected from single-member electorates and 48 members from closed party lists.

Early life

Christopher John Hipkins was born in the Hutt Valley[6] on 5 September 1978,[7][8] the son of Doug and Rosemary Hipkins.[9] His mother is the chief researcher for the New Zealand Council for Educational Research.[10] He attended Waterloo Primary School and Hutt Intermediate School. He was head boy at Hutt Valley Memorial College (later known as Petone College) in 1996.[7] He later studied at the Victoria University of Wellington,[7] where he was student president in 2000 and 2001.[11]

In September 1997, as a first-year student at the Victoria University of Wellington, Hipkins was one of dozens arrested while protesting the Tertiary Review Green Bill at Parliament. The matter went through the courts, and 10 years later an apology and award of over $200,000 was shared among the 41 protesters. The judge ruled that despite claims by police that the protestors were violent, the protest was peaceful and there were no grounds for arrest.[11] Hipkins received a Bachelor of Arts with a major in politics and criminology from the Victoria University of Wellington.[12] He then held a number of jobs, including working as a policy advisor for the Industry Training Federation, and as a training manager for Todd Energy in Taranaki. Hipkins also worked in Parliament as an advisor to Trevor Mallard and Helen Clark.[13]

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Hutt Valley

Hutt Valley

The Hutt Valley is the large area of fairly flat land in the Hutt River valley in the Wellington region of New Zealand. Like the river that flows through it, it takes its name from Sir William Hutt, a director of the New Zealand Company in early colonial New Zealand.

New Zealand Council for Educational Research

New Zealand Council for Educational Research

The New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) is an independent, educational research organisation that provides educators, students, parents, policy makers, and the public with innovative and independent research, analysis, and advice. Established in 1934 through grants from the Carnegie Corporation, it became a statutory body in 1945 and now operates under the NZCER Act 1972. It is not formally attached to any government department, university, or other educational organisation.

Hutt Intermediate School

Hutt Intermediate School

Hutt Intermediate School (HIS) is a state intermediate school located in Lower Hutt, New Zealand. The school was founded in 1948, and currently has a total number of 685 students and a teaching staff of 45.

Victoria University of Wellington

Victoria University of Wellington

The Victoria University of Wellington is a public university in Wellington, New Zealand. It was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament, and was a constituent college of the University of New Zealand.

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate program in the arts, or, in some cases, other disciplines. A Bachelor of Arts degree course is generally completed in three or four years, depending on the country and institution.Degree attainment typically takes four years in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Brunei, China, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, Georgia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, the United States and Zambia. Degree attainment typically takes three years in Albania, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Caribbean, Iceland, India, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, the Canadian province of Quebec, the United Kingdom and most of the European Union. In Bangladesh, three-year BA (associates) courses are also available.

Politics

Politics

Politics is the set of activities that are associated with making decisions in groups, or other forms of power relations among individuals, such as the distribution of resources or status. The branch of social science that studies politics and government is referred to as political science.

Criminology

Criminology

Criminology is the study of crime and deviant behaviour. Criminology is an interdisciplinary field in both the behavioural and social sciences, which draws primarily upon the research of sociologists, political scientists, economists, psychologists, philosophers, psychiatrists, social workers, biologists, social anthropologists, as well as scholars of law.

Todd Corporation

Todd Corporation

The Todd Corporation is a large private New Zealand company with a value of $4.3 billion, owned and controlled by the Todd family and headquartered in Wellington, New Zealand. The corporation is currently led by chairman of the board, Henry Tait, and Group Chief Executive Officer, Jon Young. The corporation employs 800 individuals, at 20 locations in New Zealand, Australia and the United States, including eight on the senior management team. The board of directors has nine members.

Trevor Mallard

Trevor Mallard

Trevor Colin Mallard is a New Zealand politician and member of the Labour Party. First elected to Parliament in 1984, he was Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives from 2017 until 2022.

Helen Clark

Helen Clark

Helen Elizabeth Clark is a New Zealand politician who served as the 37th prime minister of New Zealand from 1999 to 2008, and was the administrator of the United Nations Development Programme from 2009 to 2017. She was New Zealand's fifth-longest-serving prime minister, and the second woman to hold that office.

Political career

New Zealand Parliament
Years Term Electorate List Party
2008–2011 49th Rimutaka 47 Labour
2011–2014 50th Rimutaka 30 Labour
2014–2017 51st Rimutaka 9 Labour
2017–2020 52nd Rimutaka 7 Labour
2020–present 53rd Remutaka 6 Labour
Hipkins in 2011
Hipkins in 2011

Hipkins was selected to stand in the Labour-held seat of Rimutaka (renamed Remutaka in 2020) in the 2008 general election, following the retirement of the sitting MP Paul Swain. He contested the Labour selection over trade unionist Paul Chalmers, who had Swain's support. His selection was part of Prime Minister Helen Clark's intention to rejuvenate the party with 29-year-old Hipkins winning against the 54-year-old Chalmers.[14] In his first election, Hipkins won the seat with a majority of 753 and comfortably retained the electorate on each subsequent attempt.[15][16][17][18] In the 2020 general election, he had the highest majority of any successful candidate other than Ardern.[19]

In Opposition, 2008–2017

For the first nine years of Hipkins' parliamentary career, Labour formed the Official Opposition. In his first term, Hipkins was the Labour spokesperson for internal affairs and a member of parliamentary committees for government administration, local government and environment, and transport and infrastructure.[20] In May 2010, his Electricity (Renewable Preference) Amendment Bill was drawn from the member's ballot.[21] The bill would have reinstated an ban on the thermal generation of electricity which had been imposed by the previous Labour Government in September 2008 before being repealed by the incoming National Government in December 2008,[22] but was defeated at its first reading in June.[21]

In Hipkins' second term, he was promoted into Labour's shadow Cabinet as spokesperson for state services and education under new leader, David Shearer. He also became the Labour Party's chief whip for the first time.[20] As education spokesperson, Hipkins was outspoken in his opposition to the National Government's implementation of charter schools in New Zealand[23] and closure of schools in Christchurch following the destructive 2011 earthquake.[24] He continued as education spokesperson under subsequent leaders David Cunliffe, Andrew Little and Ardern.[20] Under Little and Ardern, Hipkins was additionally shadow leader of the House.[20]

In April 2013, Hipkins voted in favour of the Marriage (Definition of Marriage) Amendment Bill, which legalised same-sex marriage in New Zealand.[25] In late 2015, Hipkins received veiled threats, including a death threat, for voicing his concerns about a billboard advertising "cut-price" guns.[26]

In April 2016, his Education (Charter Schools Abolition) Amendment Bill was drawn from the members' ballot. It was defeated at its first reading in November.[27]

In Government, 2017–present

As a senior Labour MP, Hipkins was a key figure in the Sixth Labour Government. Between 2017 and 2023, he was the sixth-ranked Government minister from the Labour Party and he was assigned responsibilities as minister of education, minister for the public service and leader of the House. He was later looked upon as a "fixer,"[28] and was given additional responsibility as minister of health and minister for COVID-19 response during the COVID-19 pandemic in New Zealand, and later as minister of police during a spate of ram-raids.[29][30][31] He emerged as the Labour Party's "consensus candidate" in a January 2023 leadership election triggered by the retirement of Ardern.[32]

First term (2017–2020)

Hipkins was elected as a Cabinet minister by the Labour Party caucus following the formation of a Labour–New Zealand First coalition government supported by the Greens.[33] It was later announced that he would serve as minister for education.[34]

Hipkins at the NZEI strike rally outside Parliament House, 15 August 2018
Hipkins at the NZEI strike rally outside Parliament House, 15 August 2018

As education minister, Hipkins has supported the abolition of National Standards and charter schools in New Zealand, which were supported by the previous National Government. He has also signaled a review of the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) high school certificate system. However, Hipkins has clarified that the Ministry of Education would continue to fund the University of Otago's National Monitoring Study of Student Achievement and the Progress and Consistency Tool (PaCT). The Government's announcement that it would close charter schools drew criticism from the opposition National and ACT parties.[35][36] In early 2018, Hipkins introduced legislation preventing the creation of new charter schools, while enabling existing charter schools to be converted into special character schools.[37] By September 2018, all twelve charter schools had successfully transitioned to become state-integrated and special character schools.[38][39]

In December 2018, Hipkins rejected a recommendation by the Council of Victoria University of Wellington to rename the university "University of Wellington", citing the strong opposition to the name change from staff, students, and alumni. Hipkins said that "he was not convinced the university had sufficiently engaged with stakeholders, who should have their views considered."[40][41]

In February 2019, Hipkins proposed merging the country's 16 polytechnics into a New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology to counter deficits and declining domestic enrolments. This proposed Institute of Skills and Technology will also take over the country's vocational and apprenticeship programmes. While the Tertiary Education Union, Employers and Manufacturers Union, and the Canterbury Employers' Chamber of Commerce have expressed support for the Government's proposal, this has been criticised by the opposition National Party, Southern Institute of Technology CEO Penny Simmonds, and Mayor of Invercargill Tim Shadbolt.[42][43][44][45] In response to the Christchurch mosque shootings, Hipkins extended the polytechnic submission timeframe to 5 April 2019.[46]

In early May 2019, Hipkins announced that the Government would be investing NZ$95 million to train 2,400 new teacher trainees through increased scholarships and placements, new employment-based teacher education programmes, and iwi-based scholarships over the next four years to address the teaching shortage. These measures were criticised as inadequate by the Post Primary Teachers' Association and National Party education spokesperson Nikki Kaye.[47][48][49]

On 1 August 2019, Hipkins reaffirmed the Government's plan to merge all polytechnics into a single entity in April 2020.[50] In addition, he announced that the Government would replace all 11 industrial training organisations (ITOs) with between four and seven workforce development councils that would be set up by 2022 to influence vocational education and training. While polytechnics have been cautiously optimistic about the changes despite concerns about losing their autonomy, ITOs and National's tertiary education spokesperson Shane Reti have opposed these changes, claiming they would damage the vocational training system and cause job losses.[51][52][53] By 2022, the merger began to strike difficulties including low enrolments, large deficits and resignations of senior staff.[54]

Following the resignation of David Clark as minister of health on 2 July 2020, Prime Minister Ardern appointed Hipkins as interim health minister, serving until the October 2020 general election.[29][55]

Second term (2020–2023)

In early November 2020, Hipkins retained his education portfolio. He was also designated as minister for COVID-19 response and minister for the Public Service.[30]

On 31 January 2022, Hipkins, in his capacity as minister for COVID-19 response, issued a statement that the Government had offered stranded New Zealand journalist Charlotte Bellis a place under the emergency allocation criteria to travel to New Zealand within a period of 14 days. However, he also claimed that Bellis had indicated that she did not intend to travel until late February and that MIQ had advised her to consider moving her travel plans forward. He also confirmed that New Zealand consular assistance had earlier twice offered to help her return from Afghanistan in December 2021. Bellis was an Al Jazeera journalist who had left Qatar after becoming pregnant due to the Gulf State's law criminalising unmarried pregnancies. Bellis had travelled to Afghanistan where she and her partner had visas allowing them to live there. Due to New Zealand's strict pandemic border policies, Bellis had struggled to secure a place in the Managed Isolation and Quarantine (MIQ) system.[56]

Hipkins was criticised by Bellis' lawyer Tudor Clee for allegedly breaching her client's privacy by sharing personal details about her circumstances and indicated that she was considering "legal options." In response, Bellis stated that she did not give Hipkins consent to share her information and disputed the facts in his statement. MPs Chris Bishop and David Seymour, from National and ACT respectively, also criticised Hipkins' actions, stating that they were "unbecoming" of a minister of the Crown.[57] On 22 June 2022, Hipkins publicly apologised for releasing personal information without Bellis' consent and making inaccurate comments about Bellis travelling to Afghanistan and being offered consular assistance. As a result, Bellis and her partner Jim Huylebroek received online abuse. Hipkins had earlier privately apologised to Bellis in mid-March 2022.[58]

In a June 2022 reshuffle, Hipkins was shifted from his COVID-19 response portfolio and replaced Poto Williams as minister of police.[31]

In September 2022, Hipkins apologised to former Finance Minister Bill English for suggesting that he had granted his brothers favourable government contracts. Hipkins had made those remarks during an exchange over the awarding of government contracts to Foreign Minister Nanaia Mahuta's husband Gannin Ormsby.[59]

Prime minister (2023–present)

Hipkins (right) and Carmel Sepuloni (left), after being sworn in as prime minister and deputy prime minister, respectively, by the governor-general, Dame Cindy Kiro, at Government House, Wellington, on 25 January 2023
Hipkins (right) and Carmel Sepuloni (left), after being sworn in as prime minister and deputy prime minister, respectively, by the governor-general, Dame Cindy Kiro, at Government House, Wellington, on 25 January 2023

Jacinda Ardern announced her resignation as leader of the Labour Party in a media conference on 19 January 2023, stating that she no longer had sufficient energy for the demands of the role. She indicated that she will formally step down no later than 7 February 2023.[60][61]

Hipkins was confirmed as the only nominee shortly after nominations closed at 9:00 a.m. on 21 January.[32][62] Stuff reported that Kiritapu Allan, the East Coast MP and minister of justice who had been speculated by media as an alternative candidate, was one of the seven MPs who nominated him.[63] Hipkins had previously demurred when asked about his leadership aspirations, stating that he would support whichever candidate the Labour Party could "reach a consensus" on.[64] In a media standup outside Parliament at 1:00 p.m. on 21 January, Hipkins commented that he discovered he had emerged as that consensus candidate as "the door to the plane [that he had boarded for a flight to Wellington] was closing", leaving him unable to respond to his messages for 40 minutes.[65] The formal meeting to confirm Hipkins as leader was scheduled for 1:00 p.m. on 22 January 2023.[61]

Hipkins was sworn in as prime minister by Governor-General Dame Cindy Kiro on 25 January 2023.[66] His deputy prime minister is Carmel Sepuloni, the first Pasifika to hold the position.[4] Upon taking office, Hipkins addressed the cost of living, saying that New Zealanders will “absolutely see in the coming weeks and months the cost of living is right at the heart of our work program”, and declared it his “absolute priority”. He indicated that Labour would postpone some of its new projects until after the election to focus on the economy.[67] In response, several small business owners including Kiwi Kai business owner Reni Gargiulo, Air Milford CEO Hank Sproull, Christchurch pharmacy owner Annabel Turley, Saint Andrews Dairy Dhaval Amin, and Grownup Donuts owner Daniel Black called on Hipkins' Government to address various issues including staffing shortages, immigration work visa policies, youth crime, and inflation. In addition, Ashburton dairy farmer Nick Gier called on the Government to scrap the Three Waters reform programme and carbon emissions taxes on the agricultural sector.[68]

Hipkins was faced almost immediately with the 2023 Auckland floods. The flash flooding began on 27 January 2023, and saw an entire summer's worth of rain fall within just a day.[69]

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Electoral history of Chris Hipkins

Electoral history of Chris Hipkins

This is a summary of the electoral history of Chris Hipkins, Prime Minister of New Zealand, Leader of the Labour Party (2023–present), and Member of Parliament for Remutaka (2008–present).

2008 New Zealand general election

2008 New Zealand general election

The 2008 New Zealand general election was held on 8 November 2008 to determine the composition of the 49th New Zealand Parliament. The liberal-conservative National Party, headed by its parliamentary leader John Key, won the largest share of votes and seats, ending nine years of government by the social-democratic Labour Party, led by Helen Clark. Key announced a week later that he would lead a National minority government with confidence-and-supply support from the ACT, United Future and Māori parties. The Governor-General swore Key in as New Zealand's 38th Prime Minister on 19 November 2008. This marked the beginning of the Fifth National Government which governed for the next nine years, until the 2017 general election, when a government was formed between the Labour and New Zealand First parties, with support on confidence and supply by the Green Party.

49th New Zealand Parliament

49th New Zealand Parliament

The 49th New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2008 election. It comprised 122 members, including an overhang of two seats caused by the Māori Party having won two more electorate seats than its share of the party vote would otherwise have given it. The Parliament served from 2008 until the November 2011 election.

New Zealand Labour Party

New Zealand Labour Party

The New Zealand Labour Party, or simply Labour, is a centre-left political party in New Zealand. The party's platform programme describes its founding principle as democratic socialism, while observers describe Labour as social-democratic and pragmatic in practice. The party participates in the international Progressive Alliance. It is one of two major political parties in New Zealand, alongside its traditional rival, the National Party.

2011 New Zealand general election

2011 New Zealand general election

The 2011 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 26 November 2011 to determine the membership of the 50th New Zealand Parliament.

50th New Zealand Parliament

50th New Zealand Parliament

The 50th New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2011 general election. It had 121 members, and was in place from December 2011 until September 2014, followed by the 2014 general election. The first sitting of the 50th Parliament was held on 20 December 2011, where members were sworn in and Lockwood Smith was elected Speaker of the House. This was followed by the speech from the throne on 21 December. John Key continued to lead the Fifth National Government. Following the resignation of Smith, David Carter was elected Speaker.

2014 New Zealand general election

2014 New Zealand general election

The 2014 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 20 September 2014 to determine the membership of the 51st New Zealand Parliament.

51st New Zealand Parliament

51st New Zealand Parliament

The 51st New Zealand Parliament was elected at the 2014 general election. This Parliament consists of 121 members and was in place from September 2014 until August 2017, followed by the 2017 New Zealand general election. Following the final vote count John Key was able to continue to lead the Fifth National Government.

2017 New Zealand general election

2017 New Zealand general election

The 2017 New Zealand general election took place on Saturday 23 September 2017 to determine the membership of the 52nd New Zealand Parliament. The previous parliament was elected on 20 September 2014 and was officially dissolved on 22 August 2017. Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives under New Zealand's mixed-member proportional (MMP) voting system, a proportional representation system in which 71 members were elected from single-member electorates and 49 members were elected from closed party lists. Around 3.57 million people were registered to vote in the election, with 2.63 million (79.8%) turning out. Advance voting proved popular, with 1.24 million votes cast before election day, more than the previous two elections combined.

52nd New Zealand Parliament

52nd New Zealand Parliament

The 52nd New Zealand Parliament was a session of legislature in New Zealand, which opened on 7 November 2017 following the 2017 general election and dissolved on 6 September 2020. The New Zealand Parliament comprises the Sovereign and the House of Representatives, which consists of 120 members.

2020 New Zealand general election

2020 New Zealand general election

The 2020 New Zealand general election was held on Saturday 17 October 2020 to determine the composition of the 53rd parliament. Voters elected 120 members to the House of Representatives, 72 from single-member electorates and 48 from closed party lists. Two referendums, one on the personal use of cannabis and one on euthanasia, were also held on the same day. Official results of the election and referendums were released on 6 November.

53rd New Zealand Parliament

53rd New Zealand Parliament

The 53rd New Zealand Parliament is the current session of Parliament in New Zealand. It opened on 25 November 2020 following the 17 October 2020 general election, and will expire on or before 20 November 2023 to trigger the next election. It consists of 120 members of Parliament (MPs) with five parties represented: the Labour and Green parties, in government, and the National, Māori and ACT parties, in opposition. The Sixth Labour Government has a majority in this Parliament. Jacinda Ardern continued as prime minister until her resignation on 25 January 2022; she was succeeded by Chris Hipkins.

Personal life

Hipkins and his wife Jade were married in 2020 in a ceremony held at Premier House, Wellington, with Grant Robertson serving as best man.[70] He has two children. He and his wife have since separated.[71] When he took extended paternity leave for the birth of his second child in 2018 he was one of the first senior male cabinet ministers to do so.[72]

He is known for his enjoyment of sausage rolls and Coke Zero.[73][74]

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Source: "Chris Hipkins", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Hipkins.

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References
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  2. ^ Whyte, Anna (25 January 2023). "Chris Hipkins formally sworn in as new prime minister". Stuff. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  3. ^ "Hipkins Named to Succeed Ardern as New Zealand Prime Minister". Bloomberg.com. 20 January 2023. Archived from the original on 21 January 2023. Retrieved 20 January 2023.
  4. ^ a b McClure, Tess (22 January 2023). "New Zealand: Chris Hipkins taking over from Jacinda Ardern on Wednesday". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 22 January 2023. Retrieved 22 January 2023.
  5. ^ Frost, Natasha (27 January 2023). "Rain Batters New Zealand's Largest City, Causing Major Flooding". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 28 January 2023.
  6. ^ "Chris Hipkins: From Head Boy to Prime Minister". Radio New Zealand. 21 January 2023. Archived from the original on 20 January 2023. Retrieved 21 January 2023.
  7. ^ a b c "Hon Chris Hipkins". New Zealand Government. Archived from the original on 22 November 2021. Retrieved 22 November 2021.
  8. ^ Young, Audrey (1 September 2018). "Education Minister Chris Hipkins plans to take parental leave from Beehive for baby No. 2". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 23 November 2021. Retrieved 23 November 2021.
  9. ^ "Hipkins, Chris: maiden statements". Hansard. 651: 74. 16 December 2008. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  10. ^ Alves, Vera (30 December 2021). "Covid 19 Omicron: Minister Chris Hipkins' mum warns media he will be late". New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 2 January 2022. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  11. ^ a b Bhonsule, Priyanka (4 August 2009). "Parliament to say sorry to protestors". Stuff. Archived from the original on 10 February 2022. Retrieved 10 February 2022.
  12. ^ "Hon Chris Hipkins". The Beehive. Archived from the original on 22 November 2021. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  13. ^ "Chris Hipkins – Profile". 12 December 2007. Archived from the original on 21 May 2010. Retrieved 6 May 2010.
  14. ^ Young, Audrey (10 December 2007). "Youth beats experience to safe Labour seat". The New Zealand Herald. Archived from the original on 22 January 2023. Retrieved 23 January 2023.
  15. ^ "Official Count Results – Rimutaka". ElectionsNZ. 22 November 2008. Archived from the original on 12 August 2020. Retrieved 6 May 2010.
  16. ^ Commission, New Zealand Electoral. "Official Count Results – Rimutaka". www.electionresults.govt.nz. Archived from the original on 19 October 2017. Retrieved 26 September 2017.
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External links
Order of precedence
Preceded byas Governor-General Order of Precedence of New Zealand
as Prime Minister

2023–present
Succeeded byas Speaker of the House of Representatives
New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by Member of Parliament for Remutaka
2008–present
Incumbent
Preceded by Leader of the House
2017–2023
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Minister of Education
2017–2023
Succeeded by
Jan Tinetti (acting)
Preceded by Minister for the Public Service
2017–2023
Vacant
Preceded by Minister of Police
2022–2023
Succeeded by
Stuart Nash (acting)
New ministerial post Minister for COVID-19 Response
2020–2022
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Health
2020
Succeeded by
Preceded by Prime Minister of New Zealand
2023–present
Incumbent
Party political offices
Preceded by Senior Whip of the Labour Party
2011–2013
2014–2016
Succeeded by
Preceded by Succeeded by
Preceded by Leader of the Labour Party
2023–present
Incumbent

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