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Charlotte Clymer

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Charlotte Clymer
Portrait of Charlotte Clymer from the shoulders up, wearing a black and white striped blazer with a Human Rights Campaign lapel pin
Born (1986-10-11) October 11, 1986 (age 36)[1]
NationalityAmerican
EducationGeorgetown University (BA)
Occupation(s)Activist, writer
Military career
AllegianceFlag of the United States.svg United States of America
BranchEmblem of the United States Department of the Army.svg United States Army
Years of service2005–2012
RankArmy-USA-OR-04a-2015.svg Corporal
Unit3rd Infantry Regiment COA.svg 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard)

Charlotte Anora Elizabeth Clymer[1] (born October 11, 1986)[1] is an American activist, press secretary, and writer. She was previously the press secretary for rapid response at the Human Rights Campaign and the director of communications and strategy at Catholics for Choice.[2][3][4]

Career

Clymer joined the United States Army in 2005,[5] and later enrolled in the United States Military Academy.[3] Clymer was assigned to the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard), based at Arlington National Cemetery, until 2012.[5] After leaving the Army, she moved to Washington, D.C. and took a job as a visitor services representative at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. After working there for a year, Clymer enrolled at Georgetown University and finished her bachelor's degree.[3]

In 2017, Clymer began working at the Human Rights Campaign,[3] the largest LGBTQ advocacy group and political lobbying organization in the United States.[4] In 2020, Clymer was included in Fortune magazine's 40 Under 40 list in the "Government and Politics" category.[6] From January through May 2021, Clymer was the director of communications and strategy for Catholics for Choice,[2] an abortion rights dissenting Catholic advocacy group based in Washington, D.C.[7]

Clymer is an outspoken activist on issues including LGBTQ rights, feminism, and veterans' affairs.[8][9][10][11]

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United States Army

United States Army

The United States Army (USA) is the land service branch of the United States Armed Forces. It is one of the eight U.S. uniformed services, and is designated as the Army of the United States in the U.S. Constitution. The oldest and most senior branch of the U.S. military in order of precedence, the modern U.S. Army has its roots in the Continental Army, which was formed on 14 June 1775 to fight the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783)—before the United States was established as a country. After the Revolutionary War, the Congress of the Confederation created the United States Army on 3 June 1784 to replace the disbanded Continental Army. The United States Army considers itself to be a continuation of the Continental Army, and thus considers its institutional inception to be the origin of that armed force in 1775.

United States Military Academy

United States Military Academy

The United States Military Academy (USMA), also known metonymically as West Point or simply as Army, is a United States service academy in West Point, New York. It was originally established as a fort, since it sits on strategic high ground overlooking the Hudson River with a scenic view, 50 miles (80 km) north of New York City. It is the oldest of the five American service academies and educates cadets for commissioning into the United States Army.

3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard)

3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment (The Old Guard)

The 3rd United States Infantry Regiment is a regiment of the United States Army. It currently has three active battalions, and is readily identified by its nickname, The Old Guard, as well as Escort to the President. The regimental motto is Noli Me Tangere. The regiment is a major unit of the Military District of Washington (MDW).

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery is one of two national cemeteries run by the United States Army. Nearly 400,000 people are buried in its 639 acres in Arlington, Virginia. There are about 30 funerals conducted on weekdays and 7 held on Saturday. The other Army cemetery is in Washington, D.C. and is called the U.S. Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery. All other national cemeteries are run by the National Cemetery System of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (USHMM) is the United States' official memorial to the Holocaust. Adjacent to the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the USHMM provides for the documentation, study, and interpretation of Holocaust history. It is dedicated to helping leaders and citizens of the world confront hatred, prevent genocide, promote human dignity, and strengthen democracy.

Georgetown University

Georgetown University

Georgetown University is a private research university in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Founded by Bishop John Carroll in 1789 as Georgetown College, the university has grown to comprise eleven undergraduate and graduate schools, including the Walsh School of Foreign Service, McDonough School of Business, Medical School, Law School, and a campus in Qatar. The school's main campus, on a hill above the Potomac River, is identifiable by its flagship Healy Hall, a National Historic Landmark. The school was founded by and is affiliated with the Society of Jesus, and is the oldest Catholic institution of higher education in the United States, though the majority of students presently are not Catholic.

Bachelor's degree

Bachelor's degree

A bachelor's degree or baccalaureate is an undergraduate academic degree awarded by colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study lasting three to six years. The two most common bachelor's degrees are the Bachelor of Arts (BA) and the Bachelor of Science. In some institutions and educational systems, certain bachelor's degrees can only be taken as graduate or postgraduate educations after a first degree has been completed, although more commonly the successful completion of a bachelor's degree is a prerequisite for further courses such as a master's or a doctorate.

Advocacy group

Advocacy group

Advocacy groups, also known as interest groups, special interest groups, lobbying groups or pressure groups use various forms of advocacy in order to influence public opinion and ultimately policy. They play an important role in the development of political and social systems.

Lobbying

Lobbying

In politics, lobbying, persuasion or interest representation is the act of lawfully attempting to influence the actions, policies, or decisions of government officials, most often legislators or members of regulatory agencies. Lobbying, which usually involves direct, face-to-face contact, is done by many types of people, associations and organized groups, including individuals in the private sector, corporations, fellow legislators or government officials, or advocacy groups. Lobbyists may be among a legislator's constituencies, meaning a voter or bloc of voters within their electoral district; they may engage in lobbying as a business. Professional lobbyists are people whose business is trying to influence legislation, regulation, or other government decisions, actions, or policies on behalf of a group or individual who hires them. Individuals and nonprofit organizations can also lobby as an act of volunteering or as a small part of their normal job. Governments often define "lobbying" for legal purposes, and regulate organized group lobbying that has become influential.

40 Under 40

40 Under 40

Fortune magazine's 40 Under 40 is a list of individuals the publication considers to be the most influential young leaders for the year. The list has existed in two phases: First, from 1999 to 2003, the list was presented purely as a numeric ranking of wealth, capturing the first dot com boom. The current iteration started in 2009 and is a subjective ranking of power and influence. The list includes business executives, political figures, sportsmen, fashion designers, and others who are under the age of forty years old. The majority of the list members are business executives from the tech industry.

Catholics for Choice

Catholics for Choice

Catholics for Choice (CFC) is a dissenting Catholic abortion rights advocacy group based in Washington, D.C. Formed in 1973 as Catholics for a Free Choice, the group gained notice after its 1984 advertisement in The New York Times challenging Church teaching on abortion led to Church disciplinary pressure against some of the priests and nuns who signed it. It has lobbied nationally and internationally for abortion rights goals and led an unsuccessful effort to downgrade the Holy See's status in the United Nations. CFC was led for 25 years by Frances Kissling and is currently led by its President Jamie L. Manson.

Feminism

Feminism

Feminism is a range of socio-political movements and ideologies that aim to define and establish the political, economic, personal, and social equality of the sexes. Feminism holds the position that societies prioritize the male point of view and that women are treated unjustly in these societies. Efforts to change this include fighting against gender stereotypes and improving educational, professional, and interpersonal opportunities and outcomes for women.

Personal life

Clymer was raised in central Texas, after moving with her mother from Utah at a young age.[3] In November 2017, she came out as a transgender woman.[3] Clymer is an Episcopalian.[12]

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Texas

Texas

Texas is a state in the South Central region of the United States. At 268,596 square miles (695,662 km2), and with more than 30 million residents in 2022, it is the second-largest U.S. state by both area and population. Texas shares borders with the states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the south and southwest; and has a coastline with the Gulf of Mexico to the southeast.

Utah

Utah

Utah is a landlocked state in the Mountain West subregion of the Western United States. It is bordered to its east by Colorado, to its northeast by Wyoming, to its north by Idaho, to its south by Arizona, and to its west by Nevada. Utah also touches a corner of New Mexico in the southeast. Of the fifty U.S. states, Utah is the 13th-largest by area; with a population over three million, it is the 30th-most-populous and 11th-least-densely populated. Urban development is mostly concentrated in two areas: the Wasatch Front in the north-central part of the state, which is home to roughly two-thirds of the population and includes the capital city, Salt Lake City; and Washington County in the southwest, with more than 180,000 residents. Most of the western half of Utah lies in the Great Basin.

Coming out

Coming out

Coming out of the closet, often shortened to coming out, is a metaphor used to describe LGBT people's self-disclosure of their sexual orientation, romantic orientation or gender identity.

Transgender

Transgender

A transgender person is someone whose gender identity or gender expression does not correspond with their sex assigned at birth. Many transgender people experience dysphoria, which they seek to alleviate through transitioning, often adopting a different name and set of pronouns in the process. Additionally, they may undergo sex reassignment therapies such as hormone therapy and sex reassignment surgery to more closely align their primary and secondary sex characteristics with their gender identity. Not all transgender people desire these treatments, however, and others may be unable to access them for financial or medical reasons. Those who do desire to medically transition to another sex may identify as transsexual.

Episcopal Church (United States)

Episcopal Church (United States)

The Episcopal Church, based in the United States with additional dioceses elsewhere, is a member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It is a mainline Protestant denomination and is divided into nine provinces. The presiding bishop of the Episcopal Church is Michael Bruce Curry, the first African American bishop to serve in that position.

Source: "Charlotte Clymer", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlotte_Clymer.

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References
  1. ^ a b c Charlotte Clymer [@cmclymer] (October 11, 2018). "Well, it's past midnight, and this is my first official birthday as Charlotte Anora Elizabeth Clymer..." (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  2. ^ a b Lizza, Ryan; Palmeri, Tara; Daniels, Eugene; Bade, Rachael. "POLITICO Playbook: McConnell retreats as Trump dominates the GOP civil war". POLITICO. Retrieved March 29, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Riley, John (July 12, 2018). "Fighting Back: Transgender Activist Charlotte Clymer". Metro Weekly. Archived from the original on September 24, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  4. ^ a b Crowley, Candy (August 10, 2007). "Democratic hopefuls pressed on gay issues at forum". CNN. Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  5. ^ a b Clymer, Charlotte (April 12, 2019). "The Trans Ban Is in Effect, And Service Members Are Now in Jeopardy". Vice. Archived from the original on May 7, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  6. ^ "Charlotte Clymer | 2020 40 under 40 in Government and Politics". Fortune. Retrieved September 13, 2020.
  7. ^ Kretschmer, Kelsy (Winter 2009). "Contested Loyalties: Dissident Identity Organizations, Institutions, and Social Movements". Sociological Perspectives. 52 (4): 433–454. doi:10.1525/sop.2009.52.4.433. JSTOR 10.1525/sop.2009.52.4.433. S2CID 143359410.Dillon, Michele (1999). Catholic identity: balancing reason, faith, and power. Cambridge University Press.Davies, Margaret (April 27, 2011). "The future of secularism: a critique". Law and Religion in Public Life. Taylor & Francis. p. 66. ISBN 9781136725845.Byrnes, Timothy A.; Segers, Mary C. (1992). The Catholic Church and the politics of abortion: a view from the states. Westview Press. p. 171.McBrien, Richard P. (1987). Caesar's coin: religion and politics in America. Macmillan. p. 155.Paludi, Michele Antoinette (2010). Feminism and Women's Rights Worldwide. Women's Psychology. Vol. 1. ABC-CLIO. p. 136. ISBN 978-0313375965."Catholics for choice protest in Rome". The Washington Times. Reuters. July 12, 1994. Retrieved June 6, 2012.(subscription required)"Stupak Like a Fox". Newsweek. November 18, 2009."Catholic group urges Harper to include abortion in G8 plan". Macleans. April 7, 2010."Hands off health care, US Catholic group tells bishops". TurkishPress.com. Agence France-Presse. March 5, 2010. Archived from the original on December 5, 2014."Events planned for World AIDS Day". USA Today. Associated Press. November 30, 2003.Tumulty, Karen; Vickers, Robert J. (November 13, 1989). "Pro-Choice Advocates Rally Coast-to-Coast". Los Angeles Times."U.S. nuns get Vatican ultimatum". The Montreal Gazette. UPI. December 19, 1984."Bishops' role in debate on abortion questioned". The Washington Times. October 26, 1990.(subscription required)Sharpe, Jerry (June 9, 1984). "Abortion up to women, Catholic group contends". The Pittsburgh Press.
  8. ^ Schmidt, Samantha (June 27, 2019). "At first debate, transgender issues were raised like never before — and the community noticed". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 24, 2019.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ "On CBS, trans veteran Charlotte Clymer delivered a powerful monologue denouncing Trump's trans ban". Media Matters for America. April 8, 2019. Archived from the original on September 24, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  10. ^ Bollinger, Alex (July 22, 2019). "The alt-right used a trans woman's picture to tear her down. Twitter lifted her up". LGBTQ Nation. Archived from the original on July 23, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  11. ^ Ioanes, Ellen (August 30, 2019). "Veterans say the Trump administration's confusing new rule may be 'targeting' immigrants who serve in war zones". Business Insider. Archived from the original on September 1, 2019. Retrieved September 24, 2019.
  12. ^ "Twitter Post". Twitter. Retrieved April 20, 2022.
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