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Charles J. Hanley

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Charles J. Hanley
Charles J. Hanley.jpg
Hanley in 2007
Born (1947-07-06) July 6, 1947 (age 75)
Brooklyn, New York
Alma materSt. Bonaventure University
OccupationJournalist
EmployerAssociated Press
Notable work • The Bridge at No Gun Ri
 • Ghost Flames
TitleSpecial Correspondent
SpousePamela Hanlon

Charles J. Hanley is an American journalist and author who reported for the Associated Press (AP) for over 40 years, chiefly as a roving international correspondent. In 2000, he and two AP colleagues won the Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for their work confirming the U.S. military’s massacre of South Korean refugees at No Gun Ri during the Korean War.

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Associated Press

Associated Press

The Associated Press (AP) is an American non-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association, and produces news reports that are distributed to its members, U.S. newspapers and broadcasters. Since the award was established in 1917, the AP has earned 56 Pulitzer Prizes, including 34 for photography. It is also known for publishing the widely used AP Stylebook.

Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting

Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting

The Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting has been awarded since 1953, under one name or another, for a distinguished example of investigative reporting by an individual or team, presented as a single article or series in a U.S. news publication. It is administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City.

United States Armed Forces

United States Armed Forces

The United States Armed Forces are the military forces of the United States. The armed forces consists of six service branches: the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, Space Force, and Coast Guard. The president of the United States is the commander-in-chief of the armed forces and forms military policy with the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS), both federal executive departments, acting as the principal organs by which military policy is carried out. All six armed services are among the eight uniformed services of the United States.

No Gun Ri massacre

No Gun Ri massacre

The No Gun Ri massacre occurred on July 26–29, 1950, early in the Korean War, when an undetermined number of South Korean refugees were killed in a U.S. air attack and by small- and heavy-weapons fire of the American 7th Cavalry Regiment at a railroad bridge near the village of Nogeun-ri, 100 miles (160 km) southeast of Seoul. In 2005, a South Korean government inquest certified the names of 163 dead or missing and 55 wounded, and added that many other victims' names were not reported. The No Gun Ri Peace Foundation estimated in 2011 that 250–300 were killed, mostly women and children.

Korean War

Korean War

The Korean War was fought between North Korea and South Korea from 1950 to 1953. The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following clashes along the border and rebellions in South Korea. North Korea was supported by China and the Soviet Union while South Korea was supported by the United States and allied countries. The fighting ended with an armistice on 27 July 1953.

Early life

Hanley graduated from St. Bonaventure University in 1968 with a journalism degree. In 1969–1970, he served as a U.S. Army journalist, including in wartime Vietnam.[1][2]

Journalism career

Hanley joined the AP's Albany, New York bureau in 1968, returning there in 1971 after military service.[3][4] In 1976, he transferred to the AP's international news desk in New York,[5] where he eventually became a roving international correspondent, reporting on subjects ranging from wars[6] and summit conferences[7] to climate change in the Arctic[8] In 1987–1992 he served as AP assistant and deputy managing editor.[9][10][11]

No Gun Ri

In 1998, Hanley and reporters Choe Sang-hun and Martha Mendoza, assisted by researcher Randy Herschaft, confirmed that the U.S. military massacred South Korean refugees – an estimated 250–300, the South Korean government later concluded – near No Gun Ri, South Korea, in late July 1950. The AP team had located a dozen U.S. Army veterans, witnesses, who corroborated the account of Korean survivors. The reporters also uncovered declassified archival U.S. military documents ordering the shooting of civilians, out of fear of enemy infiltrators.[12]

The story was not published until September 1999, after a year-long struggle with an AP leadership reluctant to run such an explosive report.[13] The AP team subsequently won 11 major journalism awards, including the Pulitzer[14] and a Polk Award.[15]

Iraq reporting

In the years after the 9/11 terror attacks, Hanley reported extensively on the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. Before the 2003 U.S. invasion, he reported from Iraq on the lack of evidence of weapons of mass destruction in that country, discrediting official U.S. claims.[16][17] He was the first journalist to report on the prisoner abuses at Abu Ghraib and other U.S. prisons in Iraq, months before photos emerging from Abu Ghraib drew international attention to the story.[18][19][20][21]

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Albany, New York

Albany, New York

Albany is the capital of the U.S. state of New York, also the seat and largest city of Albany County. Albany is on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and about 135 miles (220 km) north of New York City.

Choe Sang-hun

Choe Sang-hun

Choe Sang-Hun is a Pulitzer Prize-winning South Korean journalist and Seoul Bureau Chief for The New York Times.

Martha Mendoza

Martha Mendoza

Martha Mendoza is an Associated Press journalist whose reporting has helped free over 2,000 enslaved fishermen and prompted action by the U.S. Congress and the White House. 

Nogeun-ri

Nogeun-ri

Nogeun-ri, also No Gun Ri, is a village in Hwanggan-myeon, Yeongdong County, North Chungcheong Province in central South Korea. The village was the closest named place to the site of the No Gun Ri Massacre during the Korean War, in which the U.S. military killed South Korean civilians fleeing their nearby villages. A South Korean government committee in 2005 certified the names of 163 dead and missing and 55 wounded, and said many other victims' names were never reported.

September 11 attacks

September 11 attacks

The September 11 attacks, commonly known as 9/11, were four coordinated suicide terrorist attacks carried out by the militant Islamist extremist network al-Qaeda against the United States on September 11, 2001. That morning, nineteen terrorists hijacked four commercial airliners scheduled to travel from the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States to California. The hijackers crashed the first two planes into the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, and the third plane into the Pentagon in Arlington County, Virginia. The fourth plane was intended to hit a federal government building in Washington, D.C., but crashed in a field following a passenger revolt. The attacks killed nearly 3,000 people and instigated the global war on terror.

Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse

Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse

During the early stages of the Iraq War, members of the United States Army and the CIA committed a series of human rights violations and war crimes against detainees in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, including physical and sexual abuse, torture, rape and the killing of Manadel al-Jamadi. The abuses came to public attention with the publication of photographs of the abuse by CBS News in April 2004. The incidents caused shock and outrage, receiving widespread condemnation within the United States and internationally.

Awards

In addition to the honors for the No Gun Ri reporting, Hanley’s other journalism won awards from the Overseas Press Club, the Associated Press Managing Editors association, Brown University’s Feinstein media awards program, the Korn Ferry awards for reporting on the United Nations, and the Society of Environmental Journalists.[22][23]

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Overseas Press Club

Overseas Press Club

The Overseas Press Club of America (OPC) was founded in 1939 in New York City by a group of foreign correspondents. The wire service reporter Carol Weld was a founding member, as was the war correspondent Peggy Hull. The club seeks to maintain an international association of journalists working in the United States and abroad, to encourage the highest standards of professional integrity and skill in the reporting of news, to help educate a new generation of journalists, to contribute to the freedom and independence of journalists and the press throughout the world, and to work toward better communication and understanding among people. The organization has approximately 500 members who are media industry leaders.

Brown University

Brown University

Brown University is a private Ivy League research university in Providence, Rhode Island. Brown is the seventh-oldest institution of higher education in the United States, founded in 1764 as the College in the English Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. Brown is one of nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution. Brown is ranked among the top universities in the United States.

Korn Ferry

Korn Ferry

Korn Ferry is a management consulting firm headquartered in Los Angeles, California. It was founded in 1969 and as of 2019, operates in 111 offices in 53 countries and employs 8,198 people worldwide. Korn Ferry operates through four business segments: Consulting, Digital, Executive Search, Recruitment Process Outsourcing and Professional Search.

Society of Environmental Journalists

Society of Environmental Journalists

The Society of Environmental Journalists is a non-profit national journalism organization created by and for journalists who report environmental topics in the news media. On its website, the organization says that "SEJ’s mission is to strengthen the quality, reach and viability of journalism across all media to advance public understanding of environmental issues."

Books

In 2001, Henry Holt and Company published The Bridge at No Gun Ri, a narrative recounting of the 1950 massacre and events before and after, written by Hanley with the reporting assistance of his AP partners.[24]

In August 2020, PublicAffairs, an imprint of Perseus Books Group, published Hanley's Ghost Flames: Life and Death in a Hidden War, Korea 1950–1953, a narrative history of the entire Korean War, told through the experiences of 20 individuals who lived through it, civilians and soldiers of several nationalities involved. An underlying theme is the little-known "dark underside" of wartime atrocities.[25][26][27]

Earlier in his career, Hanley co-authored World War II: A 50th Anniversary History (Henry Holt); 20th Century America (Grolier Educational), and FLASH! The Associated Press Covers the World (Abrams).[22]

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Henry Holt and Company

Henry Holt and Company

Henry Holt and Company is an American book-publishing company based in New York City. One of the oldest publishers in the United States, it was founded in 1866 by Henry Holt and Frederick Leypoldt. Currently, the company publishes in the fields of American and international fiction, biography, history and politics, science, psychology, and health, as well as books for children's literature. In the US, it operates under Macmillan Publishers.

The Bridge at No Gun Ri

The Bridge at No Gun Ri

The Bridge at No Gun Ri is a non-fiction book about the killing of South Korean civilians by the U.S. military in July 1950, early in the Korean War. Published in 2001, it was written by Charles J. Hanley, Sang-hun Choe and Martha Mendoza, with researcher Randy Herschaft, the Associated Press (AP) journalists who wrote about the mass refugee killing in news reports that won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for investigative journalism and 10 other major national and international journalism awards. The book looks in depth at the lives of both the villager victims and the young American soldiers who killed them, and analyzes various U.S. military policies including use of deadly force in dealing with the refugee crisis during the early days of the war.

PublicAffairs

PublicAffairs

PublicAffairs is a book publishing company located in New York City and has been a part of the Hachette Book Group since 2016.

Perseus Books Group

Perseus Books Group

Perseus Books Group was an American publishing company founded in 1996 by investor Frank Pearl. Perseus acquired the trade publishing division of Addison-Wesley in 1997.

Ghost Flames

Ghost Flames

Ghost Flames: Life and Death in a Hidden War, Korea 1950-1953 is a non-fiction narrative history of the Korean War written by Charles J. Hanley and published in August 2020 by PublicAffairs, an imprint of Perseus Books Group, part of the Hachette Book Group. The book tells the story of the war through the experiences of 20 individuals who lived through it, of several nationalities and walks of life.

Source: "Charles J. Hanley", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_J._Hanley.

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References
  1. ^ Kellogg, Kathy; Webster, Terry (April 13, 2000). "St. Bonaventure Boasts Fifth Pulitzer Prize Winner". Buffalo News.
  2. ^ "Army Reporter Articles 2". 25th Aviation Battalion. August 3, 1970. Editorial Staff ... Spec. 4 Charles Hanley
  3. ^ "New AP Employes". AP World. XXIV (4): 38. 1968.
  4. ^ "New AP Employes". AP World: 61. Spring 1971.
  5. ^ "New Posts". AP World. 33 (2): 29. 1976.
  6. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (April 30, 2003). "U.S. Troops, Religion a Fiery Mix in Iraq". Midland (Michigan) Daily News. Retrieved May 25, 2020.
  7. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (December 19, 2009). "Analysis: Obama climate 'accord' is thin, toothless, but may prove small step on long road". CTV News.
  8. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (August 31, 2009). "Climate trouble may be bubbling up in far north". ABC News.
  9. ^ "Charles J. Hanley Named AP's Assistant Managing Editor". The Associated Press. New York. October 20, 1987.
  10. ^ "New Posts: Charles J. Hanley to deputy managing editor". The AP World: 12–13. 1988.
  11. ^ "New Posts". AP World: 14. 1992.
  12. ^ Choe, Sang-hun; Hanley, Charles J.; Mendoza, Martha (September 29, 1999). "War's hidden chapter: Ex-GIs tell of killing Korean refugees". The Associated Press. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  13. ^ Port, J. Robert (2002). "The Story No One Wanted to Hear". In Kristina Borjesson (ed.). Into the Buzzsaw: Leading Journalists Expose the Myth of a Free Press. Amherst, New York: Prometheus Books. pp. 201–13. ISBN 978-1-57392-972-1.
  14. ^ "The Pulitzer Prizes". 2000.
  15. ^ "Past Polk Winners/Long Island University". Retrieved May 24, 2020.
  16. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (January 19, 2003). "No vioations at Iraqi sites of concern". The Associated Press. Baghdad, Iraq.
  17. ^ Rendall, Steve (April 1, 2006). "Wrong on Iraq? Not Everyone". Extra!. Fairness & Accuracy in Reporting.
  18. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (November 1, 2003). "AP Enterprise: Former Iraqi detainees tell of riots, punishment in the sun, good Americans and pitiless ones". utsandiego.com. San Diego Union Tribune. Archived from the original on May 3, 2014. Retrieved April 22, 2014.
  19. ^ Hanley, Charles J. (May 9, 2004). "Early accounts of extensive Iraq abuse met U.S. silence". The Southeast Missourian. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  20. ^ "AP's Hanley Reported on Iraqi Prisoner Abuse Last Fall". Editor & Publisher. May 10, 2004.
  21. ^ Mitchell, Greg (2008). So Wrong for So Long: How the Press, the Pundits – and the President – Failed on Iraq. New York City: Union Square Press. pp. 74–77. ISBN 978-1402774508. Charley Hanley at The Associated Press had actually `broken' the Abu Ghraib story months before it came out via The New Yorker and other outlets.
  22. ^ a b "SBU grad and Pulitzer winner to speak on 9/11 about AP coverage of war". Inside Bona's. St. Bonaventure University. August 23, 2007.
  23. ^ "Winners: SEJ 9th Annual Awards for Reporting on the Environment". Society of Environmental Journalists. August 5, 2010. Retrieved May 14, 2020.
  24. ^ "The Bridge at No Gun Ri: A Hidden Nightmare from the Korean War". The New Yorker. October 29, 2001. Retrieved September 12, 2012.
  25. ^ "A top-notch addition to the literature on the Korean War". Kirkus Reviews. March 15, 2020.
  26. ^ "Ghost Flames". Publishers Weekly. May 15, 2020. An essential account of America's 'forgotten war'.
  27. ^ "Ghost Flames". Library Journal. May 2020. An extraordinary kaleidoscope of human experiences in a catastrophic forgotten war.

Further reading

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