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Ceylon, Saskatchewan

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Ceylon
Village of Ceylon
Ceylon is located in Saskatchewan
Ceylon
Ceylon
Ceylon is located in Canada
Ceylon
Ceylon
Coordinates: 49°16′21″N 104°21′44″W / 49.272418°N 104.362268°W / 49.272418; -104.362268
Country Canada
Province Saskatchewan
RegionSouthwest
Census division2
Rural MunicipalityThe Gap No. 39
Government
 • TypeMunicipal
 • Governing bodyCeylon Village Council
 • MayorLandon Lillihgard
 • AdministratorLaura delaney
Area
 • Total0.75 km2 (0.29 sq mi)
Population
 (2016)
 • Total111
 • Density148.5/km2 (385/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CST)
Postal code
S0C 0T0
Area code306
Highways Hwy 6
Hwy 377
RailwaysDefunct (pulled)
[1][2][3][4]

Ceylon /sˈlɑːn/ (2016 population: 111) is a village in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan within the Rural Municipality of The Gap No. 39 and Census Division No. 2. It is located alongside Gibson Creek,[5] which is a tributary of Long Creek. No shops or businesses other than the bar remain.

Discover more about Ceylon, Saskatchewan related topics

Village

Village

A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet but smaller than a town, with a population typically ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand. Though villages are often located in rural areas, the term urban village is also applied to certain urban neighborhoods. Villages are normally permanent, with fixed dwellings; however, transient villages can occur. Further, the dwellings of a village are fairly close to one another, not scattered broadly over the landscape, as a dispersed settlement.

Provinces and territories of Canada

Provinces and territories of Canada

Within the geographical areas of Canada, the ten provinces and three territories are sub-national administrative divisions under the jurisdiction of the Canadian Constitution. In the 1867 Canadian Confederation, three provinces of British North America—New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and the Province of Canada —united to form a federation, becoming a fully independent country over the next century. Over its history, Canada's international borders have changed several times as it has added territories and provinces, making it the world's second-largest country by area.

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is a province in western Canada, bordered on the west by Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, to the northeast by Nunavut, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. Saskatchewan and Alberta are the only landlocked provinces of Canada. In 2022, Saskatchewan's population was estimated at 1,194,803. Nearly 10% of Saskatchewan’s total area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi) is fresh water, mostly rivers, reservoirs and lakes.

Rural Municipality of The Gap No. 39

Rural Municipality of The Gap No. 39

The Rural Municipality of The Gap No. 39 is a rural municipality (RM) in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan within Census Division No. 2 and SARM Division No. 2.

Division No. 2, Saskatchewan

Division No. 2, Saskatchewan

Division No. 2 is one of eighteen census divisions in the province of Saskatchewan, Canada, as defined by Statistics Canada. It is located in the south-southeastern part of the province, on the United States border. The most populous community in this division is Weyburn.

Long Creek (Saskatchewan)

Long Creek (Saskatchewan)

Long Creek is a river in central North America that begins in Saskatchewan, flows south-east into North Dakota, and then flows back north into Saskatchewan. It is a tributary of the Souris River. The Souris River drains into the Assiniboine River, which is part of the Red River drainage basin in a region called the Prairie Pothole Region of North America, which extends throughout three Canadian provinces and five U.S. states. It is also within Palliser's Triangle and the Great Plains ecoregion. In 1957, a dam was built on Long Creek near where it meets the Souris River to create Boundary Dam Reservoir.

History

Ceylon incorporated as a village on September 26, 1911.[6]

Taken from Radville & Deep South Star[7]

Ceylon and Hardy really started when the railroad arrived. The Canadian National Railway line came through in 1910, opening for service in July, 1911. The section between Ceylon and Hardy was completed on November 21, 1911. Ceylon had actually started up in 1910 north of where the tracks were eventually laid. When the town site was surveyed in 1911, it had to be moved to the south side of the tracks. With a great effort of manpower and horsepower (of the animal variety), the fledgling town was moved to its present location. The origin of the name Ceylon is still a mystery. It was given its name by the first postmaster in the area, John Aldred, who did not want the new town to be named after him. He may have chosen the name Ceylon in recognition of a CPR station of the name in Ontario, or it may have been named for a yacht that was owned by Scottish merchant Sir Thomas Lipton (whose name still graces tea bags to this day). Hardy was named for the great 19th century English novelist and poet Thomas Hardy.

Some decades were better than the others. After the first years of backbreaking work cultivating the land, the first crops were harvested and prosperity came to the region.

The area suffered a setback from 1914 to 1918 when many young men left to fight in the Great War. A disproportionately high number of young men from the Ceylon area never returned home.

Their names are remembered in perpetuity on the war memorial at the bottom of Main Street.

The twenties were particularly prosperous, only to be followed by the Dirty Thirties and the dust, poverty and hunger that came with it. Many families left during that time, some sought work elsewhere and returned once things had improved, and others stuck it out. The 1940s were dominated by the war in Europe. Many young men left to fight overseas. When they returned, things had changed a great deal. Farm work had become mostly mechanized, rendering horses and oxen obsolete. The threshing machines and their work gangs became a memory as combines took over the harvesting. Since many trains were diverted to the war effort, civilians had to use alternative forms of transportation. They became used to travelling in their own private vehicles, and roads were eventually improved accordingly. The trains were used less and less until the Ceylon train station was torn down in 1976, and all five grain elevators are now a distant memory. The last elevator to go, the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool, was torn down in 2000, ending the need for rail service in Ceylon. Hardy also had a train station and elevators; it lost its train station in 1959, and the last elevator was torn down in 1989.

Today, Ceylon is a peaceful village, but its history is full of exciting stories. One of the most famous is the still unsolved bank robbery of 1922. In the wee hours of September 27, 1922, the Bank of Montreal was robbed. That same night, a bank was robbed in Moosomin. The robbery attracted a great deal of attention, and was the front-page story of the Regina Leader-Post for three days in a row. The story was even mentioned in two novels, though it was represented very inaccurately in both. A very good (and exciting) account of the bank robbery by A. O. Smith is included in Ceylon's first history book, Builders of a Great Land. During the Prohibition of the 1920s, there was also allegedly some rum running that went on in the area.

A great many things have changed throughout the past century, but some things have come almost full circle. The earliest farmers in the R.M. of the Gap had to haul their grain to Weyburn. Eventually elevators were built in Ceylon and Hardy, but these did not last and now, a full century later, the closest grain gathering point is once again Weyburn. But while the earliest settlers faced a grueling two- or three-day journey with a horse-pulled wagon, farmers now haul their grain in semis. In those first few years, there were few families in the area, and farms were far away from each other. A steady stream of settlers meant that within a decade or so, there were farms everywhere, and the isolation of the earliest days ended. Over the years, as farming changed and cities became more attractive to young people, the countryside has thinned out again. Small clumps of trees, former access roads that are being reclaimed by the land, and tumbledown shacks are all that remain of these former farms and homes. Reliable roads, vehicles, telephones and the Internet mean that farm families are not exactly isolated, but they certainly have fewer neighbours than they would have in decades past.

Hardy School, and the country schools of the R.M. of the Gap, were centers of social activity in the first decades of the R.M. of the Gap.

Ceylon and Hardy were the centres of business in the municipality, but in the earliest decades of its history, most farm families' centre of identity would be their local school district. In the Gap, there were twenty school districts, ten of which encompassed area in other municipalities as well. These school districts were: Trail, Egypt Valley, Lyons, Gibson Creek, Buffalo Valley, East Ceylon, Troy, Lacadia, Freda, Round Up, Naomi, Green Lake, Meadow View, Carnbrogie, Big Four, Good Time, Gordon, Oakville, Hardy, and Ceylon. Schools were more than just educational institutions; they were also centres of social activity. Dances, meetings and church services were held in the local schools. It was much more convenient to travel the relatively short distance (though it was probably always several miles, uphill, in a blizzard) to the local schoolhouse rather than travel all the way to Ceylon or Hardy, especially in the winter. Most of the schools were closed down in the 1950s, and the children were bused to the nearest town. The schools may be long gone, but many farms still bear the name of these school districts.

Religion was also very important to many early settlers. Before churches were built, travelling priests and ministers held services in people's homes. St. Joseph's was built between 1913 and 1917, being dedicated in that year by the Archbishop of Regina. It burned down in 1951 and a new church was built to replace it. The United Church was built in 1918. There was also a church established at the eastern edge of the Gap, called St. Collette's. A congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses was established in the 1940s.

Water shortages were a problem early on for the village of Ceylon, and as early as 1919 plans were made to develop a dam. It was completed east of town in 1934 under supervision of the R.M. The work to build it provided employment for many men during the early years of the Depression. The dam ended up being picturesque as well as practical, and in the 1950s the Ceylon Beach was started by the Homemakers Club. In 1967, a Centennial Grant allowed the development of a regional park, complete with swimming pool, picnic area, campground, ball diamond and a small golf course.

Throughout the years, there were a variety of clubs and sports teams in Ceylon. Women were active in the community, and they worked through organizations like the Catholic Women's League, the United Church Women, the Ceylon Ladies Aid, Easter Lily Rebekah Lodge, the Ladies Auxiliary of the Ceylon Legion Branch No. 46, and the Ceylon Women's Institute (also known as the Ceylon Homemakers), among others. There were clubs for men as well, including the Ceylon Lions Club, Connaught Odd Fellows Lodge, Ceylon Masonic Lodge, Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 46 and the Knights of Columbus. The Gap Agricultural Society was active in the earlier decades of the area, holding fairs each year. There were a variety of sports in the Ceylon area as well, including: football, baseball/softball, tennis, basketball, curling, figure skating, and hockey.

Ceylon grew quickly, and by 1926 had made a name for itself in southern Saskatchewan. The Regina Leader-Post published an article on June 26, 1926, which put Ceylon "In the Front Rank of the 'Best' Saskatchewan Villages."

In the earliest decades there were many businesses, including: general stores, hardware stores, cafes, livery barns, a newspaper, several banks, blacksmiths, butchers, laundries, drug store, dress shops, boarding houses, and later, garages and implement dealers. The original hotel built in 1911 burnt down that same year, but the North West Hotel was soon erected on the same site, and it is still in use today. Today Ceylon has lost most of its business to larger centres, however, businesses like Ceylon Pulses Plus and Border Line Feeders have rejuvenated the local economy in recent years. The oil and gas industry has also had positive effects on the economy. And of course, there are still farmers and ranchers, making a living the same way the original homesteaders in this area did, albeit with much more advanced technology.

Ceylon and Hardy may have shrunk to a fraction of their former populations, but many families remain. Some of them have been here for more than a century, out dating even the municipality itself. Others are newcomers. Though the population of Ceylon and Hardy is smaller than it used to be (it has grown in recent years), the fact remains that for those who do live here in the "Gap", it is unquestioningly home.

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Hardy, Saskatchewan

Hardy, Saskatchewan

Hardy is a hamlet in The Gap Rural Municipality No. 39, Saskatchewan, Canada. The community had a population of 5 in 2001. It previously held the status of village until January 1, 2000. The hamlet is located 82 km south west of the City of Weyburn 10 km west of highway 6 and 5 km north of highway 705. Hardy was named for the great 19th-century English novelist and poet Thomas Hardy.

Canadian National Railway

Canadian National Railway

The Canadian National Railway Company is a Canadian Class I freight railway headquartered in Montreal, Quebec, which serves Canada and the Midwestern and Southern United States.

Postmaster

Postmaster

A postmaster is the head of an individual post office, responsible for all postal activities in a specific post office. When a postmaster is responsible for an entire mail distribution organization, the title of Postmaster General is commonly used. Responsibilities of a postmaster typically include management of a centralized mail distribution facility, establishment of letter carrier routes, supervision of letter carriers and clerks, and enforcement of the organization's rules and procedures. The postmaster is the representative of the Postmaster General in that post office.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Canadian Pacific Railway

The Canadian Pacific Railway, also known simply as CPR or Canadian Pacific and formerly as CP Rail (1968–1996), is a Canadian Class I railway incorporated in 1881. The railway is owned by Canadian Pacific Railway Limited, which began operations as legal owner in a corporate restructuring in 2001.

Ontario

Ontario

Ontario is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. Located in Central Canada, it is Canada's most populous province, with 38.3 percent of the country's population, and is the second-largest province by total area. Ontario is Canada's fourth-largest jurisdiction in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto, which is Ontario's provincial capital.

Europe

Europe

Europe is a large peninsula conventionally considered a continent in its own right because of its great physical size and the weight of its history and traditions. Europe is also considered a subcontinent of Eurasia and it is located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. Comprising the westernmost peninsulas of Eurasia, it shares the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with both Africa and Asia. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, the Mediterranean Sea to the south and Asia to the east. Europe is commonly considered to be separated from Asia by the watershed of the Ural Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian Sea, the Greater Caucasus, the Black Sea and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.

Grain elevator

Grain elevator

A grain elevator is a facility designed to stockpile or store grain. In the grain trade, the term "grain elevator" also describes a tower containing a bucket elevator or a pneumatic conveyor, which scoops up grain from a lower level and deposits it in a silo or other storage facility.

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

Saskatchewan Wheat Pool

The Saskatchewan Wheat Pool was a grain handling, agri-food processing and marketing company based in Regina, Saskatchewan. The Pool created a network of marketing alliances in North America and internationally which made it the largest agricultural grain handling operation in the province of Saskatchewan. Before becoming Viterra, SWP had operated 276 retail outlets and more than 100 grain handling and marketing centres. The Saskatchewan Wheat Pool operated under the name of AgPro in the prairie provinces of Manitoba and Alberta. Begun as a co-operative in the 1920s, the company became a publicly traded corporation in the 1990s. After the 2007 takeover of its competitor, Winnipeg-based Agricore United, the Pool name was retired. The merged company operated under the name Viterra until 2013, when it was acquired by Glencore International.

Moosomin, Saskatchewan

Moosomin, Saskatchewan

Moosomin is a town in southern Saskatchewan founded in 1882. It is 20 kilometres west of the provincial boundary between Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Regina Leader-Post

Regina Leader-Post

The Regina Leader-Post is the daily newspaper of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada, and a member of the Postmedia Network.

Prohibition

Prohibition

Prohibition is the act or practice of forbidding something by law; more particularly the term refers to the banning of the manufacture, storage, transportation, sale, possession, and consumption of alcoholic beverages. The word is also used to refer to a period of time during which such bans are enforced.

Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses is a millenarian restorationist Christian denomination with nontrinitarian beliefs distinct from mainstream Christianity. The group reports a worldwide membership of approximately 8.7 million adherents involved in evangelism and an annual Memorial attendance of over 21 million. Jehovah's Witnesses are directed by the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses, a group of elders in Warwick, New York, United States, which establishes all doctrines based on its interpretations of the Bible. They believe that the destruction of the present world system at Armageddon is imminent, and that the establishment of God's kingdom over the earth is the only solution for all problems faced by humanity.

Ceylon Regional Park

Ceylon Regional Park (49°29′00″N 104°19′02″W / 49.4834°N 104.3172°W / 49.4834; -104.3172)[8] is a regional park 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) east of village of Ceylon at the small reservoir and dam along the course of Gibson Creek. The 20-acre park has a campground, ball diamonds, fishing dock, boat launch, and swimming pool. Access to the park is from Highway 377.[9]

The dam along the river was originally built in 1934 and rebuilt in 1984. Prior to the park being designated a regional park in 1965, it was known as Ceylon Beach in the 1950s. The campground has 34 sites, showers, washrooms, and potable water. The reservoir is stocked with jackfish and perch.[10]

Demographics

Population history
(1981–2016)
YearPop.±%
1981184—    
1986184+0.0%
1991163−11.4%
1996148−9.2%
2001105−29.1%
200690−14.3%
201199+10.0%
2016111+12.1%
Source: Statistics Canada via Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics[11][12]

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, Ceylon had a population of 97 living in 50 of its 57 total private dwellings, a change of -12.6% from its 2016 population of 111. With a land area of 0.76 km2 (0.29 sq mi), it had a population density of 127.6/km2 (330.6/sq mi) in 2021.[13]

In the 2016 Census of Population, the Village of Ceylon recorded a population of 111 living in 53 of its 53 total private dwellings, a 10.8% change from its 2011 population of 99. With a land area of 0.75 km2 (0.29 sq mi), it had a population density of 148.0/km2 (383.3/sq mi) in 2016.[14]

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Climate

Climate data for Ceylon
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 11
(52)
16
(61)
21
(70)
32
(90)
37
(99)
40
(104)
38.5
(101.3)
40
(104)
36
(97)
32.5
(90.5)
23
(73)
11.5
(52.7)
40
(104)
Average high °C (°F) −7.6
(18.3)
−5.6
(21.9)
1.4
(34.5)
11.1
(52.0)
18
(64)
22.6
(72.7)
25.2
(77.4)
25.2
(77.4)
18.4
(65.1)
11
(52)
0
(32)
−6.9
(19.6)
9.4
(48.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) −12.5
(9.5)
−10.4
(13.3)
−3.5
(25.7)
4.7
(40.5)
11.3
(52.3)
16
(61)
18.6
(65.5)
18.2
(64.8)
11.8
(53.2)
5
(41)
−4.6
(23.7)
−11.8
(10.8)
3.6
(38.5)
Average low °C (°F) −17.4
(0.7)
−15.2
(4.6)
−8.3
(17.1)
−1.7
(28.9)
4.6
(40.3)
9.4
(48.9)
11.8
(53.2)
11.1
(52.0)
5.2
(41.4)
−1
(30)
−9.2
(15.4)
−16.5
(2.3)
−2.3
(27.9)
Record low °C (°F) −38.5
(−37.3)
−41
(−42)
−32
(−26)
−22
(−8)
−7
(19)
−1
(30)
3
(37)
−1.5
(29.3)
−9.5
(14.9)
−19
(−2)
−32.5
(−26.5)
−41
(−42)
−41
(−42)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 16
(0.6)
10.9
(0.43)
21.1
(0.83)
23
(0.9)
49.4
(1.94)
65.8
(2.59)
70.5
(2.78)
39.6
(1.56)
37.1
(1.46)
22.1
(0.87)
14.1
(0.56)
16.7
(0.66)
386.3
(15.21)
Source: Environment Canada[15]

Source: "Ceylon, Saskatchewan", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ceylon,_Saskatchewan.

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References
  1. ^ National Archives, Archivia Net, Post Offices and Postmasters, archived from the original on October 6, 2006
  2. ^ Government of Saskatchewan, MRD Home, Municipal Directory System, archived from the original on November 21, 2008
  3. ^ Canadian Textiles Institute. (2005), CTI Determine your provincial constituency, archived from the original on September 11, 2007
  4. ^ Commissioner of Canada Elections, Chief Electoral Officer of Canada (2005), Elections Canada On-line, archived from the original on April 21, 2007
  5. ^ "Gibson Creek". Canadian Geographical Names Database. Government of Canada. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  6. ^ "Urban Municipality Incorporations". Saskatchewan Ministry of Government Relations. Archived from the original on October 15, 2014. Retrieved June 1, 2020.
  7. ^ Radville & Deep South Star
  8. ^ "Ceylon Regional Park". Canadian Geographical Names Database. Government of Canada. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  9. ^ "Ceylon Regional Park". Tourism Saskatchewan. Government of Saskatchewan. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  10. ^ "Ceylon". Regional Parks of Saskatchewan. Saskatchewan Regional Parks. Retrieved November 25, 2022.
  11. ^ "Saskatchewan Census Population" (PDF). Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 24, 2015. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  12. ^ "Saskatchewan Census Population". Saskatchewan Bureau of Statistics. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  13. ^ "Population and dwelling counts: Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions and census subdivisions (municipalities), Saskatchewan". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved April 1, 2022.
  14. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Saskatchewan)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved May 30, 2020.
  15. ^ Environment Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1971–2000 Archived 2013-11-30 at archive.today, accessed 23 July 2010

Coordinates: 49°27′24″N 104°36′22″W / 49.45667°N 104.60611°W / 49.45667; -104.60611

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