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Celtic kingship

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Celtic kingships refer to a series of studies focused on examining monarchial hierarchies of Celtic people from the antiquity to flight of the Earls. The social role of Celtic can be compared to the more examined topics of Germanic kings and the main focuses of Irish people, Welsh, and Scottish lineages, albeit Gallic are a topic of interest.[1]

Discover more about Celtic kingship related topics

Monarchy

Monarchy

A monarchy is a form of government in which a person, the monarch, is head of state for life or until abdication. The political legitimacy and authority of the monarch may vary from restricted and largely symbolic, to fully autocratic, and can expand across the domains of the executive, legislative, and judicial.

Antiquity

Antiquity

Antiquity or Antiquities may refer to:

Flight of the Earls

Flight of the Earls

The Flight of the Earls took place in September 1607, when Hugh O'Neill, 2nd Earl of Tyrone, and Rory O'Donnell, 1st Earl of Tyrconnell, and about ninety followers, left Ulster in Ireland for mainland Europe. Their permanent exile was a watershed event in Irish history, symbolising the end of the old Gaelic order.

Germanic kingship

Germanic kingship

Germanic kingship is a thesis regarding the role of kings among the pre-Christianized Germanic tribes of the Migration period and Early Middle Ages. The thesis holds that the institution of feudal monarchy developed, through contact with the Roman Empire and the Christian Church, from an earlier custom of sacral and military kingship based on both birth status and consent from subjects.

Irish people

Irish people

The Irish are an ethnic group and nation native to the island of Ireland, who share a common history and culture. There have been humans in Ireland for about 33,000 years, and it has been continually inhabited for more than 10,000 years. For most of Ireland's recorded history, the Irish have been primarily a Gaelic people. From the 9th century, small numbers of Vikings settled in Ireland, becoming the Norse-Gaels. Anglo-Normans also conquered parts of Ireland in the 12th century, while England's 16th/17th century conquest and colonisation of Ireland brought many English and Lowland Scots to parts of the island, especially the north. Today, Ireland is made up of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. The people of Northern Ireland hold various national identities including British, Irish, Northern Irish or some combination thereof.

Gauls

Gauls

The Gauls were a group of Celtic peoples of mainland Europe in the Iron Age and the Roman period. Their homeland was known as Gaul (Gallia). They spoke Gaulish, a continental Celtic language.

Ireland

Ireland was home to thousands of petty kingdoms with different levels of regalia. Many Irish petty kingdoms were not larger than a few acres, and most powerful being the high king of Ireland. Following the Norman invasion of Ireland, traditional Celtic kingship disappeared.

Wales

Wales was traditionally subdivided into four petty kingdoms, and only briefly united against western Anglo-Saxons by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn, ultimately resulting in England balkanizing the area.

Scotland

The Kingdom of Scotland began as petty kingdoms cooperating against foreign enemies, the Scottish Kingdom was gradually unified over the course of the 11th century. However, while Scotland would survive as an independent kingdom the Act of Union, the traditional Celtic kingship disappears during the medieval period as the Scottish kings adapted more traditions inspired by French colonists.

Dumnonia and Brittany

The Kingdom of Dumnonia briefly existed following the Roman withdrawal from the region. While the Dumnonia itself was quickly overrun by the Anglo-Saxons migrated to Duchy of Brittany, where traditional Celtic kingship survived until the 11th century, when French traditions were adopted.

Source: "Celtic kingship", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celtic_kingship.

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References
  1. ^ Duggan, Anne; Studies, King's College (University of London) Centre for Late Antique and Medieval (1993). Kings and Kingship in Medieval Europe. King's College London Centre for Late Antique and Medieval Studies. pp. 102–104. ISBN 978-0-9513085-9-2. Retrieved 25 January 2023.

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