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Cashbox (magazine)

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Cashbox
CategoriesMusic industry, trade magazine
First issueJuly 1942; 80 years ago (1942-07) (original version)
2006 (2006) (revival)
Final issueNovember 16, 1996; 26 years ago (1996-11-16) (original version)
CountryUnited States
ISSN0008-7289

Cashbox, also known as Cash Box, was an American music industry trade magazine, originally published weekly from July 1942 to November 1996. Ten years after its dissolution, it was revived and continues as Cashbox Magazine, an online magazine with weekly charts and occasional special print issues.[1] In addition to the music industry, the magazine covered the amusement arcade industry, including jukebox machines and arcade games.

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Music industry

Music industry

The music industry consists of the individuals and organizations that earn money by writing songs and musical compositions, creating and selling recorded music and sheet music, presenting concerts, as well as the organizations that aid, train, represent and supply music creators. Among the many individuals and organizations that operate in the industry are: the songwriters and composers who write songs and musical compositions; the singers, musicians, conductors, and bandleaders who perform the music; the record labels, music publishers, recording studios, music producers, audio engineers, retail and digital music stores, and performance rights organizations who create and sell recorded music and sheet music; and the booking agents, promoters, music venues, road crew, and audio engineers who help organize and sell concerts.

Trade magazine

Trade magazine

A trade magazine, also called a trade journal or trade paper, is a magazine or newspaper whose target audience is people who work in a particular trade or industry. The collective term for this area of publishing is the trade press.

Online magazine

Online magazine

An online magazine is a magazine published on the Internet, through bulletin board systems and other forms of public computer networks. One of the first magazines to convert from a print magazine format to being online only was the computer magazine Datamation. Some online magazines distributed through the World Wide Web call themselves webzines. An ezine is a more specialized term appropriately used for small magazines and newsletters distributed by any electronic method, for example, by email. Some social groups may use the terms cyberzine and hyperzine when referring to electronically distributed resources. Similarly, some online magazines may refer to themselves as "electronic magazines", "digital magazines", or "e-magazines" to reflect their readership demographics or to capture alternative terms and spellings in online searches.

Amusement arcade

Amusement arcade

An amusement arcade, also known as a video arcade, amusements, arcade, or penny arcade, is a venue where people play arcade games, including arcade video games, pinball machines, electro-mechanical games, redemption games, merchandisers, or coin-operated billiards or air hockey tables. In some countries, some types of arcades are also legally permitted to provide gambling machines such as slot machines or pachinko machines. Games are usually housed in cabinets.

Jukebox

Jukebox

A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons, with letters and numbers on them, which are used to select a specific record. Some may use compact discs instead. Disc changers are similar devices that are intended for home use, are small enough to fit in a shelf, may hold up to hundreds of discs, and allow discs to be easily removed, replaced, and inserted by the user.

History

Print edition charts (1952–1996)

Cashbox was one of several magazines that published record charts in the United States. Its most prominent competitors were Billboard and Record World (known as Music Vendor prior to April 1964). Unlike Billboard, Cashbox combined all currently available recordings of a song into one chart position with artist and label information shown for each version, alphabetized by label. Originally, no indication of which version was the biggest seller was given, but from October 25, 1952, a star was placed next to the names of the most important artists. Cashbox also printed shorter jukebox charts that included specific artist data beginning in spring 1950. Separate charts were presented for jukebox popularity, record sales and radio airplay. This was similar to Billboard's methodology prior to August 1958, when Billboard debuted its "Hot 100", which attempted to combine all measures of popularity into one all-encompassing chart. In addition, Cashbox published chart data for specific genres, such as country music and R&B music. In 1960, Cashbox discontinued its R&B chart after the March 5 issue; it was reinstated in the December 17 issue due to popular demand. The chart was originally dropped because it became dominated by pop records.[2]

Cashbox was a competitor to Billboard through the 1950s and 1960s, but two factors spelled its decline in 1970. Archivist and record historian Joel Whitburn published his first research book based on the Billboard Hot 100, which made that data the "Bible" for official historic chart positions. In addition, the syndicated radio series American Top 40 with Casey Kasem used Billboard chart statistics, cementing Billboard as the dominant chart data for current and historic reference. Magazine publisher George Albert compiled Cashbox chart data for a reference book more than a decade later, and Dick Clark used Cashbox information for a time on his National Music Survey, beginning in 1981. However, by that time, the trend was set.

Perhaps the final straw for Cashbox came on December 12, 1992, when the Top 100 chart reported the number one song as "The Letter" by Wayne Newton. The song did not even make the bottom of any Billboard chart, nor was it reported to be in the top ten by local radio charts or sales reports. This called the magazine's integrity into question. Cashbox lost considerable credibility within the industry after this, with accusations of chart fixing. No official findings of the Newton incident were ever revealed. Cashbox would subsequently print its final consecutive chart of this era in November 1996.

In 2003, the former Cashbox Magazine became involved in a murder trial after police in Nashville, Tennessee, made an arrest in a 1989 cold case. Kevin Hughes was a small-town boy from southeastern Illinois who spent his childhood focused on music and creating his own country music charts. As a young man of 22, Hughes thought he had landed his dream job in Nashville as the chart director for Cashbox's country music chart for up-and-coming artists. He compiled data from jukebox plays, record sales, and radio play to determine the Cashbox chart positions of various country music records. He reportedly was looking to introduce more scientific and transparent methods of determining chart positions, when a year into his job, he was gunned down in the street late one night on Nashville's famous Music Row. After years of investigation, police arrested his former Cashbox coworker, Richard D'Antonio, for the murder. Prosecutors maintained the killing was in connection with a payola scheme where record promoter Chuck Dixon paid Cashbox employees for favorable chart positions and other publicity. A Dixon client was once named Cashbox's "Male Vocalist of the Year" without having sold a single record. Hughes was reportedly killed for not going along with the chart-fixing scheme. D'Antonio, a Cashbox employee associated with Dixon, was convicted of first degree murder in 2003 and died in prison in 2014. Dixon had already died a few years prior to D'Antonio's arrest.[3][4][5][6]

Online magazine (2006–present)

Cash Box was reinvented as the online-only Cashbox Magazine in 2006, with the consent and cooperation of the family of Albert, the late president and publisher of the original edition. Cashbox has occasionally issued special print editions.

As of April 2015, Cashbox Magazine has added the following music charts: Roots Music, Bluegrass Singles, Bluegrass Gospel Singles, Beach Music Top 40, Roadhouse Blues and Boogie Top 40, Country Christian Top 100 Singles and Southern Gospel Singles. The online magazine also relaunched the Looking Ahead Charts on March 1, 2015, covering all genres of music. The Cashbox Top 100 has been expanded to the Top 200. All chart data for the main Cashbox charts is provided by Digital Radio Tracker.

Sandy Graham is the owner, editor in chief and CEO of Cashbox Canada, an independent music trade in Toronto, Canada. Shane and Robert Bartosh control the Roots data. Bruce Elrod is the owner and remains the registered agent for Cashbox, which is now operated from Ridgeway, South Carolina.[7]

The current owners of Cashbox met with Wilds & Associates co-founder and CEO Randall Wilds in 2018 to discuss business relations. Wilds acquired interest in Cashbox Magazine and a partnership was formed. As a result, Wilds & Associates became the publisher for Cashbox. While the digital/online edition remains intact, Cashbox returned to a printed edition as a bi-monthly publication beginning with their November/December 2018 issue, featuring country music artist Blake Shelton on the cover. In addition to being the publisher for Cashbox, Wilds & Associates also serves as the distributor of the publication. Since returning to a print edition, a new website was unveiled in late 2021. The new site[1] offers readers a preview of each issue, music news, and subscription information.

Archives

In 2014, Whitburn's Record Research Inc. published a history of the Cash Box singles chart data covering October 1952 through the 1996 demise of the original magazine.[8] Randy Price maintains the original Cash Box data for the online archives.[9]

The Swem Library at The College of William and Mary[10] maintains the archive of the original print editions of Cash Box magazine.

Trivia

The Chicago blues band the Cash Box Kings credit the magazine for their name.

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Billboard (magazine)

Billboard (magazine)

Billboard is an American music and entertainment magazine published weekly by Penske Media Corporation. The magazine provides music charts, news, video, opinion, reviews, events, and style related to the music industry. Its music charts include the Hot 100, the 200, and the Global 200, tracking the most popular albums and songs in different genres of music. It also hosts events, owns a publishing firm, and operates several TV shows.

Jukebox

Jukebox

A jukebox is a partially automated music-playing device, usually a coin-operated machine, that will play a patron's selection from self-contained media. The classic jukebox has buttons, with letters and numbers on them, which are used to select a specific record. Some may use compact discs instead. Disc changers are similar devices that are intended for home use, are small enough to fit in a shelf, may hold up to hundreds of discs, and allow discs to be easily removed, replaced, and inserted by the user.

Airplay

Airplay

Airplay is how frequently a song is being played through broadcasting on radio stations. A song which is being played several times every day (spins) would have a significant amount of airplay. Music which became very popular on jukeboxes, in nightclubs and at discotheques between the 1940s and 1960s would also have airplay.

Billboard Hot 100

Billboard Hot 100

The Billboard Hot 100 is the music industry standard record chart in the United States for songs, published weekly by Billboard magazine. Chart rankings are based on sales, radio play, and online streaming in the United States.

Country music

Country music

Country is a music genre originating in the Southern and Southwestern United States. First produced in the 1920s, country primarily focuses on working class Americans and blue-collar American life.

Joel Whitburn

Joel Whitburn

Joel Carver Whitburn was an American author and music historian, responsible for setting up the Record Research, Inc. series of books on record chart placings.

American Top 40

American Top 40

American Top 40 is an internationally syndicated, independent song countdown radio program created by Casey Kasem, Don Bustany, Tom Rounds, and Ron Jacobs. The program is currently hosted by Ryan Seacrest and presented as an adjunct to his weekday radio program, On Air with Ryan Seacrest.

Casey Kasem

Casey Kasem

Kemal Amin "Casey" Kasem was an American disc jockey, actor, and radio personality, who created and hosted several radio countdown programs, notably American Top 40. He was the first actor to voice Norville "Shaggy" Rogers in the Scooby-Doo franchise and as Dick Grayson/Robin in Super Friends (1973–1985).

Dick Clark

Dick Clark

Richard Wagstaff Clark was an American television and radio personality, television producer and film actor, as well as a cultural icon who remains best known for hosting American Bandstand from 1956 to 1989. He also hosted five incarnations of the Pyramid game show from 1973 to 1988 and Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve, which transmitted New Year's Eve celebrations in New York City's Times Square.

Cold case

Cold case

A cold case is a crime, or a suspected crime, that has not yet been fully resolved and is not the subject of a current criminal investigation, but for which new information could emerge from new witness testimony, re-examined archives, new or retained material evidence, or fresh activities of a suspect. New technological methods developed after the crime was committed can be used on the surviving evidence to analyse causes, often with conclusive results.

Music Row

Music Row

Music Row is a historic district located southwest of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, United States. Widely considered the heart of Nashville's entertainment industry, Music Row has also become a metonymous nickname for the music industry as a whole, particularly in country music, gospel music, and contemporary Christian music.

Payola

Payola

Payola, in the music industry, is the illegal practice of paying a commercial radio station to play a song without the station disclosing the payment. Under US law, a radio station must disclose songs they were paid to play on the air as sponsored airtime. The number of times the songs are played can influence the perceived popularity of a song, and payola may be used to influence these meters. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) treats payola as a violation of the Sponsorship Identification Rules, which requires any broadcast of paid material to include a disclosure.

Source: "Cashbox (magazine)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 17th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cashbox_(magazine).

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References
  1. ^ a b "Cashbox Magazine". cashboxmagazine.com. Archived from the original on March 20, 2014. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
  2. ^ "R&B Chart Returns" (PDF). Cash Box: 38. December 17, 1960.
  3. ^ Patterson, Jim (September 23, 2003). "Ex-Record Promoter's Murder Trial Starts". Associated Press. Retrieved 2 September 2022.
  4. ^ "The Dark Side of Nashville's Music Business". ABC News. Nov 10, 2003. Retrieved 2 September 2022.
  5. ^ Nicholson, Jessica (September 18, 2014). "Man Convicted in 1989 Music Row Murder Dies". MusicRow. Retrieved 2 September 2022.
  6. ^ "Guilty Verdict Returned in Music Row Murder". CMT. September 26, 2003. Retrieved 2 September 2022.
  7. ^ "Business Profile for Cashbox Magazine, Inc". Better Business Bureau. Archived from the original on Jun 27, 2018.
  8. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2014). Cash Box Pop Hits 1952–1996. Record Research Inc. ISBN 978-0898202090.
  9. ^ Price, Randy (ed.). "Archives". Cashbox Magazine. Archived from the original on Aug 18, 2021. Retrieved 5 August 2021.
  10. ^ "Cash Box". The W&M Digital Archive. Retrieved 22 March 2014.
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