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Calais border barrier

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Calais border barrier
Characteristics
Entities France  United Kingdom
History
EstablishedSeptember 2016
To prevent illegal migrants from gaining access to the Channel Tunnel and from the port of Calais as a means of illegal entry to Britain

The Calais border barrier is an international border barrier under construction jointly by France and the United Kingdom designed to prevent illegal migrants from gaining access to the Channel Tunnel and from the port of Calais as a means of illegal entry to Britain. Construction, funded by Britain, began in September 2016.[1]

It aims, in particular, to prevent migrants from entering Britain by stowing away on trucks and ferry boats. The wall will cut the large migrant encampment known as the Calais Jungle off from access to the port and tunnel entrance.[2] The government of Calais opposes construction of the wall, preferring that the central government instead dismantle the Jungle because the illegal migrants living there place a strain on local resources.[2]

The $23 million cost will be shared by Britain and France.[3]

Discover more about Calais border barrier related topics

Border barrier

Border barrier

A border barrier, border fence or border wall is a separation barrier that runs along or near an international border. Such barriers are typically constructed for border control purposes such as curbing illegal immigration, human trafficking, and smuggling. Some such barriers are constructed for defence or security reasons. In cases of a disputed or unclear border, erecting a barrier can serve as a de facto unilateral consolidation of a territorial claim that can supersede formal delimitation. A border barrier does not usually indicate the location of the actual border, and is usually constructed unilaterally by a country, without the agreement or cooperation of the other country.

Channel Tunnel

Channel Tunnel

The Channel Tunnel, also known as the Chunnel, is a 50.46-kilometre (31.35 mi) underwater railway tunnel that connects Folkestone with Coquelles beneath the English Channel at the Strait of Dover. It is the only fixed link between the island of Great Britain and the European mainland. At its lowest point, it is 75 metres (246 ft) deep below the sea bed and 115 metres (377 ft) below sea level. At 37.9 kilometres (23.5 mi), it has the longest underwater section of any tunnel in the world, and is the third longest railway tunnel in the world. The speed limit for trains through the tunnel is 160 kilometres per hour (99 mph). The tunnel is owned and operated by the company Getlink, formerly "Groupe Eurotunnel".

Calais

Calais

Calais is a port city in the Pas-de-Calais department, of which it is a subprefecture. Although Calais is by far the largest city in Pas-de-Calais, the department's prefecture is its third-largest city of Arras. The population of the city proper is 72,929; that of the urban area is 149,673 (2018). Calais overlooks the Strait of Dover, the narrowest point in the English Channel, which is only 34 km (21 mi) wide here, and is the closest French town to England. The White Cliffs of Dover can easily be seen on a clear day from Calais. Calais is a major port for ferries between France and England, and since 1994, the Channel Tunnel has linked nearby Coquelles to Folkestone by rail.

Calais Jungle

Calais Jungle

The Calais Jungle was a refugee and immigrant encampment in the vicinity of Calais, France that existed from January 2015 to October 2016. There had been other camps known as "jungles" in previous years, but this particular shanty town drew global media attention during the peak of the European migrant crisis in 2015, when its population grew rapidly. Migrants stayed at the camp while they attempted to enter the United Kingdom, or while they waited for their French asylum claims to be processed.

Source: "Calais border barrier", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calais_border_barrier.

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References
  1. ^ "Calais migrants: Work begins on UK-funded border wall". BBC. 20 September 2016. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  2. ^ a b McAuley, James (29 September 2016). "France and Britain just beat Donald Trump to building a border wall". Washington Post. Retrieved 29 September 2016.
  3. ^ Iaconangelo, David (14 January 2017). "From the wall to the burqa: why the politics of immigration is all about big symbols". Christian Science Monitor. Retrieved 25 January 2017.

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