Get Our Extension

C-segment

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
2020 best-selling C-segment cars
2020 best-selling C-segment carsVolkswagen Golf 8th generation (2019–present)Škoda Octavia 4th generation (2020–present)Ford Focus 4th generation (2018–present)Mercedes-Benz A-Class 4th generation (2018–present)
Volkswagen Golf 8th generation (2019–present)
2020 best-selling C-segment carsVolkswagen Golf 8th generation (2019–present)Škoda Octavia 4th generation (2020–present)Ford Focus 4th generation (2018–present)Mercedes-Benz A-Class 4th generation (2018–present)
Škoda Octavia 4th generation (2020–present)
2020 best-selling C-segment carsVolkswagen Golf 8th generation (2019–present)Škoda Octavia 4th generation (2020–present)Ford Focus 4th generation (2018–present)Mercedes-Benz A-Class 4th generation (2018–present)
Ford Focus 4th generation (2018–present)
2020 best-selling C-segment carsVolkswagen Golf 8th generation (2019–present)Škoda Octavia 4th generation (2020–present)Ford Focus 4th generation (2018–present)Mercedes-Benz A-Class 4th generation (2018–present)
Mercedes-Benz A-Class 4th generation (2018–present)

The C-segment is the 3rd category of the European segments for passenger cars and is described as "medium cars".[1][2] It is equivalent to the Euro NCAP "small family car" size class,[3] and the compact car category in the United States.[4]

In 2011, the C-segment had a European market share of 23%.[5]

Discover more about C-segment related topics

Euro Car Segment

Euro Car Segment

Excepting those of the Europe-wide safety assessment programme Euro NCAP, vehicle segments in Europe do not have formal characterization or regulations. Although the definition is vague, there is little overlap between segments A–F based on weight and size parameters.

Euro NCAP

Euro NCAP

The European New Car Assessment Programme is a European voluntary car safety performance assessment programme based in Leuven (Belgium) formed in 1996, with the first results released in February 1997. It was originally started by the Transport Research Laboratory for the UK Department for Transport, but later backed by several European governments, as well as by the European Union. Their slogan is "For Safer Cars".

Compact car

Compact car

Compact car is a vehicle size class — predominantly used in North America — that sits between subcompact cars and mid-size cars. "Small family car" is a British term and a part of the C-segment in the European car classification. However, prior to the downsizing of the United States car industry in the 1970s and 1980s, larger vehicles with wheelbases up to 110 in (2.79 m) were considered "compact cars" in the United States.

Market share

Market share

Market share is the percentage of the total revenue or sales in a market that a company's business makes up. For example, if there are 50,000 units sold per year in a given industry, a company whose sales were 5,000 of those units would have a 10 percent share in that market.

Definition

The European segments are not based on size or weight criteria.[1][6] In practice, C-segment cars have been described as having a length of approximately 4.5 metres (15 ft).[7][8]

As of 2021 C-segment category size span from approx. 4.2m to 4.6m (photo comparison of new compact cars of all brands sorted by length):

  • New compact cars comparison with dimensions and boot capacity[9]
  • New family cars comparison with dimensions and boot capacity[10]

(some cars from this site include cars in family category which belongs to compact size, like: Mercedes-Benz A-Class, Mazda3, Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla etc.)

As a best reference to C-segment category cars look to this source. [11]

C-segment category cars are good balance between the interior space and compact exterior dimensions.

Characteristics

The most common body styles for C-segment cars in Europe are hatchbacks, and much less sedans and wagons/estates.

Current models

In 2020 the highest selling C-segment cars in Europe were the Volkswagen Golf, Škoda Octavia, Ford Focus, Mercedes A-Class, Toyota Corolla, SEAT León, BMW 1-Series, Audi A3, Peugeot 308, Renault Mégane, Kia Ceed, Opel Astra, Mercedes-Benz CLA and Volkswagen ID.3. [12]

200,000 - 300,000 sales (Best-Selling)

100,000 - 200,000 sales

50,000 - 100,000 sales

Discover more about Current models related topics

Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen Golf

The Volkswagen Golf is a compact car/small family car (C-segment) produced by the German automotive manufacturer Volkswagen since 1974, marketed worldwide across eight generations, in various body configurations and under various nameplates – including as the Volkswagen Rabbit in the United States and Canada, and as the Volkswagen Caribe in Mexico (Mk1).

Ford Focus (fourth generation)

Ford Focus (fourth generation)

The fourth generation Ford Focus, also known as the Focus Mk IV, is a compact car (C-segment) which was produced by Ford from 2018. It was revealed in April 2018 to replace the third-generation Focus. As in the previous generation, the model is available with saloon, hatchback and estate body styles. This generation marked the demise of the Focus line-up in many regions, including North America, South America, and Southeast Asia, effectively limiting its market reach to just Europe, China, Taiwan, Australasia, and other minor markets.

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

The Mercedes-Benz A-Class is a compact car produced by the German automobile manufacturer Mercedes-Benz as the brand's entry-level vehicle. The first generation was introduced in 1997, the second generation (W169) in late 2004 and the third generation (W176) in 2012. The fourth generation model (W177), which was launched in 2018, marked the first time the A-Class was offered in the United States and Canada. This fourth generation A-Class is also the first to be offered both as a hatchback (W177) and sedan (V177).

Toyota Corolla

Toyota Corolla

The Toyota Corolla is a series of compact cars manufactured and marketed globally by the Japanese automaker Toyota Motor Corporation. Introduced in 1966, the Corolla was the best-selling car worldwide by 1974 and has been one of the best-selling cars in the world since then. In 1997, the Corolla became the best-selling nameplate in the world, surpassing the Volkswagen Beetle. Toyota reached the milestone of 50 million Corollas sold over twelve generations in 2021.

SEAT León

SEAT León

The SEAT León, also spelled Leon in some other languages, is a hatchback compact car built by the Spanish car manufacturer SEAT since October 1999.

BMW 1 Series

BMW 1 Series

The BMW 1 Series is a range of subcompact executive cars (C-segment) manufactured by BMW since 2004. It is the successor to the BMW 3 Series Compact and is currently in its third generation. Positioned as the entry level model in BMW range of products, the first generation was produced in hatchback, coupé and convertible body styles.

Audi A3

Audi A3

The Audi A3 is a subcompact executive/small family car (C-segment) manufactured and marketed by the German automaker Audi AG since September 1996, currently in its fourth generation.

Peugeot 308

Peugeot 308

The Peugeot 308 is a small family car produced by French automaker Peugeot. It was unveiled in June 2007, and launched in September 2007. The 308 replaced the 307, and positioned below the 508 and above the smallest 208.

Renault Mégane

Renault Mégane

The Renault Mégane, also spelled without the acute accent as Megane, especially in languages other than French, is a small family car produced by the French car manufacturer Renault for model year 1996, and was the successor to the Renault 19. The Mégane has been offered in three- and five-door hatchback, saloon, coupé, convertible and estate bodystyles at various points in its lifetime, and having been through four generations is now in its fifth incarnation.

Kia Ceed

Kia Ceed

The Kia Ceed is a compact car produced by the South Korean manufacturer Kia since 2006 exclusively for the European market. The Ceed was first unveiled on 28 September 2006 at the Paris Motor Show. In mid-2007, the station wagon version called the cee'd_sw was launched followed by the three-door pro_cee'd in early 2008. The second generation of the cee'd was presented at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show. At the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, Kia presented the third generation Ceed. In September 2019, Kia also unveiled the XCeed, a crossover SUV based on the third generation Ceed.

Opel Astra

Opel Astra

The Opel Astra is a compact car/small family car (C-segment) developed and produced by the German automaker Opel since 1991, currently at its sixth generation. It was first launched in September 1991 as a direct replacement to the Opel Kadett. As of 2022, the car slots between the smaller Corsa supermini and the larger Insignia large family car.

Volkswagen ID.3

Volkswagen ID.3

The Volkswagen ID.3 is a battery electric small family car (C-segment) produced by Volkswagen since 2019. It is the first production car to utilize the MEB platform, and the first model of the ID. series. It was unveiled on 9 September 2019 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, after being first shown as the I.D. concept car at the 2016 Paris Motor Show. Deliveries to retail customers began in Germany in September 2020.

Sales figures in Europe

2021
rank
Brand Model 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 % change
(2020–2021)
1 Volkswagen Golf 462,527 523,729 534,535 491,681 482,177 445,303 410,779 285,013 214,069 Decrease -25%
2 Škoda Octavia 165,027 205,071 215,797 226,737 227,313 216,676 218,439 180,902 151,442 Decrease -16%
3 Toyota Corolla 4,714 12,432 12,713 14,030 14,382 15,041 133,597 137,209 142,720 Increase +4%
4 Mercedes A-Class 131,258 121,231 119,475 141,800 143,550 153,882 198,926 158,955 118,439 Decrease -25%
5 Ford Focus 225,102 222,297 232,160 212,083 212,353 199,197 224,401 173,853 101,066 Decrease -42%
6 SEAT León 85,954 136,896 141,777 143,938 144,951 139,470 136,622 111,045 96,748 Decrease -13%
7 BMW 1 Series 152,808 131,847 130,494 132,287 137,959 127,681 112,068 107,870 96,410 Decrease -11%
8 Audi A3 167,804 199,815 198,663 189,956 163,928 142,414 124,422 97,492 95,788 Decrease -2%
9 Kia Ceed 86,743 75,692 73,412 76,530 68,443 71,848 100,676 72,017 80,057 Increase +11%
10 Volkswagen ID.3 - - - - - - - 54,495 72,723 Increase +32%
11 Renault Mégane 149,435 135,206 123,114 148,213 167,836 138,077 129,222 74,536 68,692 Decrease -8%
12 Citroën C4 79,476 61,533 50,202 46,939 32,673 14,926 129 3,441 64,982 Increase +1.788%
13 Opel/Vauxhall Astra 198,449 179,547 192,973 250,410 216,515 158,674 136,638 70,550 58,063 Decrease -18%
14 Mercedes-Benz CLA 27,598 38,374 62,100 65,810 64,086 58,522 61,958 67,319 55,956 Decrease -17%
Mainstream 2,068,504 2,274,368 2,317,728 2,380,154 2,335,894 2,132,583 - - -
Premium 721,936 746,176 865,724 938,349 873,774 798,398 - - -
Segment total 2,650,578 2,026,503 1,774,634 Decrease -12%
Source [13][14] [15][16] [17][18] [19][20] [21][22] [23][24] [25] [26] [27]

Notes:

Jump in segment total sales after 2019. year is because premium cars are included.

From 2013-2018 premium cars had separate count, and are not included in mainstream total sales.

Premium brands and models are marked italic.

Electric cars are included in C-segment from 2020. year.

Discover more about Sales figures in Europe related topics

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz, commonly referred to as Mercedes and sometimes as Benz, is a German luxury and commercial vehicle automotive brand established in 1926. Mercedes-Benz AG is headquartered in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Mercedes-Benz AG produces consumer luxury vehicles and commercial vehicles badged as Mercedes-Benz. From November 2019 onwards, Mercedes-Benz-badged heavy commercial vehicles are managed by Daimler Truck, a former part of the Mercedes-Benz Group turned into an independent company in late 2021. In 2018, Mercedes-Benz was the largest brand of premium vehicles in the world, having sold 2.31 million passenger cars.

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

Mercedes-Benz A-Class

The Mercedes-Benz A-Class is a compact car produced by the German automobile manufacturer Mercedes-Benz as the brand's entry-level vehicle. The first generation was introduced in 1997, the second generation (W169) in late 2004 and the third generation (W176) in 2012. The fourth generation model (W177), which was launched in 2018, marked the first time the A-Class was offered in the United States and Canada. This fourth generation A-Class is also the first to be offered both as a hatchback (W177) and sedan (V177).

Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company is an American multinational automobile manufacturer headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, United States. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand, and luxury cars under its Lincoln luxury brand. Ford also owns Brazilian SUV manufacturer Troller, an 8% stake in Aston Martin of the United Kingdom and a 32% stake in China's Jiangling Motors. It also has joint ventures in China, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. The company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family; they have minority ownership but the majority of the voting power.

Ford Focus

Ford Focus

The Ford Focus is a compact car manufactured by Ford Motor Company since 1998. It was created under Alexander Trotman's Ford 2000 plan, which aimed to globalize model development and sell one compact vehicle worldwide. The original Focus was primarily designed by Ford of Europe's German and British teams. Production of the fourth generation Focus began in 2018 in Germany and China.

SEAT

SEAT

SEAT S.A. is a Spanish car manufacturer, which sells its vehicles under the SEAT and Cupra brands. It was founded on 9 May 1950 as a partnership between the Spanish state-owned Instituto Nacional de Industria (INI), which held a majority stake, Spanish private banks, and FIAT. It quickly became the largest supplier of cars in Spain. In 1986, after 36 years of being publicly listed as an independent automaker, the Spanish government sold SEAT to the Volkswagen Group, of which it remains a wholly owned subsidiary.

SEAT León

SEAT León

The SEAT León, also spelled Leon in some other languages, is a hatchback compact car built by the Spanish car manufacturer SEAT since October 1999.

BMW

BMW

Bayerische Motoren Werke AG, abbreviated as BMW, is a German multinational manufacturer of luxury vehicles and motorcycles headquartered in Munich, Bavaria. The corporation was founded in 1916 as a manufacturer of aircraft engines, which it produced from 1917 until 1918 and again from 1933 to 1945.

BMW 1 Series

BMW 1 Series

The BMW 1 Series is a range of subcompact executive cars (C-segment) manufactured by BMW since 2004. It is the successor to the BMW 3 Series Compact and is currently in its third generation. Positioned as the entry level model in BMW range of products, the first generation was produced in hatchback, coupé and convertible body styles.

Audi

Audi

Audi AG is a German automotive manufacturer of luxury vehicles headquartered in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, Germany. As a subsidiary of its parent company, the Volkswagen Group, Audi produces vehicles in nine production facilities worldwide.

Audi A3

Audi A3

The Audi A3 is a subcompact executive/small family car (C-segment) manufactured and marketed by the German automaker Audi AG since September 1996, currently in its fourth generation.

Kia

Kia

Kia Corporation, commonly known as Kia, is a South Korean multinational automobile manufacturer headquartered in Seoul, South Korea. It is South Korea's second largest automobile manufacturer, after its parent company, Hyundai Motor Company, with sales of over 2.8 million vehicles in 2019. As of 2015, the Kia Corporation is minority owned by Hyundai, which holds a 33.88% stake valued at just over US$6 billion. Kia in turn is a minority owner of more than twenty Hyundai subsidiaries ranging from 4.9% up to 45.37%, totaling more than US$8.3 billion.

Kia Ceed

Kia Ceed

The Kia Ceed is a compact car produced by the South Korean manufacturer Kia since 2006 exclusively for the European market. The Ceed was first unveiled on 28 September 2006 at the Paris Motor Show. In mid-2007, the station wagon version called the cee'd_sw was launched followed by the three-door pro_cee'd in early 2008. The second generation of the cee'd was presented at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show. At the 2018 Geneva Motor Show, Kia presented the third generation Ceed. In September 2019, Kia also unveiled the XCeed, a crossover SUV based on the third generation Ceed.

Market share in Europe

2019 - The compact car segment in Europe sees 5% fewer deliveries in 2019, as Europe’s #2 segment is down to 2.65 million sales, or 16.9% of the total European car market, down from 18% in 2018. [28]

2020 - Sales of compact cars in Europe are down 24% to 2.03 million in 2020, perfectly in line with the overall market. And while Europeans bought more small crossovers than compact cars in the first three quarters of the year, in the full-year score the pecking order is returned to “normal”, with an advantage of 17,000 sales for the compact class. This result is mostly due to a wave of VW ID.3 (self)registrations, especially in December. We expect small crossovers to become Europe’s #2 segment in 2021 by a large margin. [29]

Europe

According to 2011 sales,[30] compact cars are currently the second segment in Europe after the subcompact one (which in Europe corresponds to A-segment + B-segment), with approximately 3 million units sold.

Because of the Volkswagen Golf's definition and long standing dominance of this class it is often referred to as the "Golf segment" in much of Europe.[31][32][33]

Mainstream compact sedans began falling in popularity since 1990s, when Peugeot stopped production of 306 in 4-door saloon form, and also sharply declining since 2010s, as well as the reduced sales of 4-door Ford Focus.

Compact MPVs

During the late 1990s, compact MPVs increased in popularity as a competitor to the compact car, with models such as the Renault Scenic and the Citroën C4 Picasso becoming popular in Europe.[34] By the early 2010s, demand for compact MPVs was declining, due to the rise of the compact SUV.[35]

Discover more about Europe related topics

Volkswagen Golf

Volkswagen Golf

The Volkswagen Golf is a compact car/small family car (C-segment) produced by the German automotive manufacturer Volkswagen since 1974, marketed worldwide across eight generations, in various body configurations and under various nameplates – including as the Volkswagen Rabbit in the United States and Canada, and as the Volkswagen Caribe in Mexico (Mk1).

A-segment

A-segment

The A-segment is the 1st category in the passenger car classification system defined by the European Commission. It is used for city cars, the smallest category of passenger cars defined.

B-segment

B-segment

The B-segment is the second smallest of the European segments for passenger cars between the A-segment and C-segment, and commonly described as "small cars". The B-segment is the largest segment in Europe by volume, accounting for 20 percent of total car sales in 2020 according to JATO Dynamics.

Peugeot 306

Peugeot 306

The Peugeot 306 is a small family car built by the French car manufacturer Peugeot from 1993 to 2002. It replaced the 309. Peugeot gave the 306 many updates and aesthetic changes to keep up with the competition, and it was replaced by the 307 in 2001. Cabriolet and estate versions continued until 2002. Versions were built in Argentina by Sevel from 1996 to 2002.

Ford Focus

Ford Focus

The Ford Focus is a compact car manufactured by Ford Motor Company since 1998. It was created under Alexander Trotman's Ford 2000 plan, which aimed to globalize model development and sell one compact vehicle worldwide. The original Focus was primarily designed by Ford of Europe's German and British teams. Production of the fourth generation Focus began in 2018 in Germany and China.

Compact MPV

Compact MPV

Compact MPV is a vehicle size class for the middle size of MPVs. The Compact MPV size class sits between the mini MPV and large MPV (minivan) size classes.

International history

After the Second World War, European manufacturers usually featured two vehicle types: small economy cars that were usually saloons and large saloons. By the 1960s, the post war economic boom had produced customers who wanted something of intermediate size. These were usually saloons during the 1950s and 1960s.

The world's first hatchback,[36][37] the 1958 FR layout Austin A40 Farina Countryman model that was a co-development of BMC and the Italian design house Pininfarina at a time when this was unusual. It had a lift up rear window and drop down boot lid. It was also sold as a two-door saloon. It was built in Italy by Innocenti as well as in the UK. For 1965 Innocenti designed a new single-piece rear door for their Combinata version of the Countryman. This top-hinged door used struts to hold it up over a wide cargo opening and was a true hatchback – a model never developed in the home (United Kingdom) market. The Countryman name has 'estate' type associations, and BMC successor company Rover used the name on estate cars / Station Wagons so it is largely forgotten. This hatchback layout was further pioneered along with the European switch to front wheel drive FF layout with the smaller 1964 (Fiat) Autobianchi Primula.

The modern C-segment market in Europe can be traced back to the 1968 launch of the Renault 6, the first successful hatchback of this size. The hatchback bodystyle was first introduced by Renault with the 1964 Renault 16, which was elected the 1965 Car of the year in Europe. A review in the English Motoring Illustrated in May 1965 stated: "The Renault Sixteen can thus be described as a large family car but one that is neither a four door saloon and nor is it quite an estate. But, importantly, it is a little different."[38] Even the later similar-sized cars like the Ford Escort, Vauxhall Viva, Austin Allegro and Hillman Avenger were still only available as saloons or estates, although some cars of this size, like the BMC/BL 1100 and 1300 saloons and Italy's Fiat 128 featured front-wheel drive from their launch during the 1960s.

The C-segment was revolutionized in 1974 with the launch of the Volkswagen Golf, a front-wheel drive hatchback, which was hugely successful all over Europe. Within a decade, most cars of this size in Europe were front-wheel drive hatchbacks. These included the Fiat Ritmo (Strada in the UK), Ford Escort (from the MK3 model launched in 1980), Opel Kadett (Vauxhall Astra in the UK), Renault 11, and the Talbot Horizon (originally a Chrysler/Simca until Peugeot took over Chrysler's European division in 1979). Most manufacturers still offered a traditional saloon of this size though, with Volkswagen using the Golf as the base for its Jetta saloon, and Ford launching the Escort-based Orion in 1983. Also in the 1980s saloons became popular again in certain Western European markets, often with a different model name than the hatchback, for example the Renault 9 (Renault 11-based), Fiat Regata (Ritmo-based) and SEAT Málaga.

Some carmakers later created the liftback bodystyle like the Peugeot 309, which replaced the Talbot Horizon in this sector at the end of 1985.

Since the mid-1990s, premium brands usually associated with larger and more expensive cars have entered the C-segment with more affordable hatchbacks and saloons. The first such example was the Audi A3 in 1996. Subsequent cars of this type include the BMW 1 Series and Mercedes-Benz A-Class.

In the 1st decade of 21st century, coupé convertibles (cabriolets) with components from these vehicles were being also built. Examples of this are the Peugeot 307 CC and later 308 CC in the first generation, third-generation Opel Astra TwinTop, second generation Ford Focus Coupe-Convertible, and Volkswagen Eos.

France

Early successful compact family cars by French manufacturers are Citroën GSA hatch version of the 1970 GS, Peugeot 304 and Renault 14. During 1980s, Citroën replaced the GSA with the 1983 BX that was between the sizes of the small family car and large family car, in an attempt to cover both markets with single model. The Citroën ZX was the model which celebrated the entry of PSA Group (now Stellantis) in China during early 1990s.

Former USSR/Russia

Cars of the Soviet/Russian brand Lada: VAZ-2101, VAZ-2103, VAZ-2106, Lada Riva (based on the Fiat 124 and Fiat 125) and Lada Samara (since 1984) were very popular in Central and Eastern Europe in the 1970s and 1980s. The modern-day Lada's compact cars are Lada Priora and Lada Vesta. There was also the lineup of the AZLK-factory, Moskvitch (from 1947 to 2003): 400, 402, 408, 412, Izh 2125 (the first Soviet hatchback), 2140 and Aleko.

Discover more about International history related topics

Austin A40

Austin A40

A number of different automobiles were marketed under the Austin A40 name by Austin between 1947 and 1967.

British Motor Corporation

British Motor Corporation

The British Motor Corporation Limited (BMC) was a UK-based vehicle manufacturer, formed in early 1952 to give effect to an agreed merger of the Morris and Austin businesses.

Pininfarina

Pininfarina

Pininfarina S.p.A. is an Italian car design firm and coachbuilder, with headquarters in Cambiano, Turin, Italy. The company was founded by Battista "Pinin" Farina in 1930.

Innocenti

Innocenti

Innocenti was an Italian machinery works, originally established by Ferdinando Innocenti in 1920. Over the years, they produced Lambretta scooters as well as a range of automobiles, mainly of British Leyland origins. The brand was retired in 1996, six years after being acquired by Fiat.

MG Rover Group

MG Rover Group

MG Rover Group was the last domestically owned mass-production car manufacturer in the British motor industry. The company was formed when BMW sold the car-making and engine manufacturing assets of the original Rover Group to the Phoenix Consortium in 2000.

Autobianchi Primula

Autobianchi Primula

The Autobianchi Primula is a supermini economy car manufactured between 1964 and 1970 by the Italian automaker Autobianchi, partly owned by and later a subsidiary of the Fiat Group. The Primula was a prototype for Fiat's rack and pinion steering and is widely known for its innovative Dante Giacosa-designed front-wheel drive, transverse engine layout — that would be later popularized by the Fiat 128 to ultimately become an industry-standard front drive layout.

Renault

Renault

Groupe Renault is a French multinational automobile manufacturer established in 1899. The company produces a range of cars and vans, and in the past has manufactured trucks, tractors, tanks, buses/coaches, aircraft and aircraft engines, and autorail vehicles.

Renault 16

Renault 16

The Renault 16 (R16) is a D-segment family hatchback produced by French automaker Renault between 1965 and 1980 in Le Havre, France. The Renault 16 was the first French winner of the European Car of the Year award.

European Car of the Year

European Car of the Year

The European Car of the Year ("ECOTY") award is an international Car of the Year award established in 1964, by a collective of automobile magazines from different countries in Europe. The current organising companies of the award are Auto (Italy), Autocar, Autopista (Spain), Autovisie (Netherlands), L'Automobile Magazine (France), Stern (Germany) and Vi Bilägare (Sweden).

Ford Escort (Europe)

Ford Escort (Europe)

The Ford Escort is a small family car that was manufactured by Ford of Europe from 1968 until 2000. In total there were six generations, spread across three basic platforms beginning with the original rear-wheel drive Mk.1/Mk.2 (1968–1980), the "Erika" front wheel drive Mk.3/Mk.4 (1980–1990), and the final CE-14 Mk.5/Mk.6 (1990–2002) version. Its successor - the Ford Focus - was released in 1998, but the final generation of Escort was gradually phased out, with the panel van version ending production in 2002 in favour of the Ford Transit Connect.

Austin Allegro

Austin Allegro

The Austin Allegro is a small family car that was manufactured by the Austin-Morris division of British Leyland from 1973 until 1982. The same vehicle was built in Italy by Innocenti between 1974 and 1975 and sold as the Innocenti Regent. The Allegro was designed as a replacement for the Austin 1100 and 1300 models. In total, 642,350 Austin Allegros were produced during its ten-year production life, most of which were sold on the home market, less than a third of 2.1 million 1100s and 1300s sold in the previous 11 years.

Hillman Avenger

Hillman Avenger

The Hillman Avenger is a rear-wheel drive small family car originally manufactured by the former Rootes division of Chrysler Europe from 1970–1978, badged from 1976 onward as the Chrysler Avenger. Between 1979 and 1981 it was manufactured by PSA Peugeot Citroën and badged as the Talbot Avenger. The Avenger was marketed in North America as the Plymouth Cricket and was the first Plymouth to have a four-cylinder engine since the 1932 Plymouth Model PB was discontinued.

History in the United Kingdom

1970s

Morris 1300 (1971-1974)
Morris 1300 (1971-1974)

At the start of the 1970s, the two most popular sectors of the UK market were small family cars and large family cars. Since its launch in 1962, the BMC 1100/1300 had often been Britain's best selling car,[39][40] and other locally produced compact cars included the Ford Escort, Vauxhall Viva and Hillman Avenger. Imported small family cars that were popular in the UK included the Citroën GS and Datsun Sunny 120Y.

British Leyland replaced the BMC 1100/1300 with a variety of models; the 1969 Austin Maxi, the 1971 Morris Marina, and the 1973 Austin Allegro.

A second-generation Ford Escort (jointly designed in Britain and Germany) was released in 1974. The same year, the German Volkswagen Golf front-wheel drive hatchback was released, becoming one of the first significantly-imported small family cars in the UK market. The sporty "GTI" version of the Golf sparked a huge demand for "hot hatches" in the UK and many other countries.

The third-generation Vauxhall Viva was produced until late 1979, when it was replaced by the Vauxhall Astra (a rebadged Opel Kadett D which was initially produced in West Germany and Belgium).

The Astra was part of a late-1970s transition in small family cars from being predominantly rear-wheel drive saloons, to becoming front-wheel drive hatchbacks (by then increasingly popular in mainland Europe). The Austin Allegro - introduced five years earlier - was front-wheel drive but was built in only saloon and estate body styles. Only the related Austin Maxi was a hatchback.

The Hillman Avenger (marketed as a Chrysler Avenger 1976-1979 and as a Talbot Avenger 1979-1981) continued to sell well, in spite of the 1978 launch of the Talbot Horizon front-wheel drive hatchback.

1980s

Ford Escort Mk3 (1980-1986)
Ford Escort Mk3 (1980-1986)

The Ford Escort Mk3 went on sale in the autumn of 1980, replacing the rear-wheel-drive saloon format of the Mk2 with a hatchback and front-wheel drive. (A saloon version called the Ford Orion was added in 1983.) Only in 1983 was the Austin Allegro replaced by the Austin Maestro hatchback. In 1984, the Vauxhall Astra Mk2 hatchback/estate/cabriolet was released, alongside a saloon version called the Vauxhall Belmont.

The first significant Japanese-designed compact car in the UK was the 1981 Triumph Acclaim, a licensed version of the four-door Honda Ballade with a Honda-designed engine. The Acclaim was replaced in 1984 by the Rover 200. In late 1985 the Peugeot 309 became the first Peugeot to be built in the UK at the Ryton plant.

1990s

Rover 200 Mk2 (1989-1995)
Rover 200 Mk2 (1989-1995)

Ford began the 1990s by replacing its 10-year-old Escort (and the Orion saloon version) with the Ford Escort MkV. In 1998, the European version of the Escort was replaced by the global Ford Focus MkI model.

General Motors released the Vauxhall Astra Mk3 update in 1991 and the all-new Astra Mk4 in 1998.

Rover Group introduced the Rover 200 Mk2 in 1989. The Rover 200 Mk3 was introduced in 1995, replacing the Honda Concerto-based Mk2 with a UK-designed car.

Discover more about History in the United Kingdom related topics

D-segment

D-segment

The D-segment is the 4th category of the European segments for passenger cars, and is described as "large cars".

BMC ADO16

BMC ADO16

The BMC ADO16 is a range of small family cars built by the British Motor Corporation (BMC) and, later, British Leyland. Launched in 1962, it was Britain's best-selling car from 1963 to 1966 and from 1968 to 1971. The ADO16 was marketed under various make and model names; however, the Austin 1100 and Morris 1100 were the most prolific of all the ADO16 variants. The car's ubiquity at the height of its popularity led to it simply being known as the 1100 (eleven-hundred) in its home market.

Hillman Avenger

Hillman Avenger

The Hillman Avenger is a rear-wheel drive small family car originally manufactured by the former Rootes division of Chrysler Europe from 1970–1978, badged from 1976 onward as the Chrysler Avenger. Between 1979 and 1981 it was manufactured by PSA Peugeot Citroën and badged as the Talbot Avenger. The Avenger was marketed in North America as the Plymouth Cricket and was the first Plymouth to have a four-cylinder engine since the 1932 Plymouth Model PB was discontinued.

Citroën GS

Citroën GS

The GS is a front-engine, front-drive, four or five door, five passenger family car manufactured and marketed by Citroën in two series: for model years 1970-1979 in fastback saloon and estate bodystyles and subsequently as the GSA for model years 1980-1989 in hatchback and estate body styles — the latter after a facelift. Combined production reached approximately 2.5 million.

Nissan Sunny

Nissan Sunny

The Nissan Sunny is an automobile built by the Japanese automaker Nissan from 1966 to 2006. In the early 1980s, the brand changed from Datsun to Nissan in line with other models by the company. Although production of the Sunny in Japan ended in 2006, the name remains in use in China and GCC countries for a rebadged version of the Nissan Almera.

British Leyland

British Leyland

British Leyland was an automotive engineering and manufacturing conglomerate formed in the United Kingdom in 1968 as British Leyland Motor Corporation Ltd (BLMC), following the merger of Leyland Motors and British Motor Holdings. It was partly nationalised in 1975, when the UK government created a holding company called British Leyland, later renamed BL in 1978. It incorporated much of the British-owned motor vehicle industry, which in 1968 had a 40 percent share of the UK car market, with its history going back to 1895.

Austin Maxi

Austin Maxi

The Austin Maxi is a medium-sized, 5-door hatchback family car that was produced by Austin and later British Leyland between 1969 and 1981. It was the first British five-door hatchback.

Morris Marina

Morris Marina

The Morris Marina is a front-engined, rear-wheel-drive small family car that was manufactured by the Austin-Morris division of British Leyland from 1971 until 1980. It served to replace the Morris Minor in the Morris product line, which had first been built in 1948. The Marina was also sold in some markets as the Austin Marina, the Leyland Marina and the Morris 1700.

Austin Allegro

Austin Allegro

The Austin Allegro is a small family car that was manufactured by the Austin-Morris division of British Leyland from 1973 until 1982. The same vehicle was built in Italy by Innocenti between 1974 and 1975 and sold as the Innocenti Regent. The Allegro was designed as a replacement for the Austin 1100 and 1300 models. In total, 642,350 Austin Allegros were produced during its ten-year production life, most of which were sold on the home market, less than a third of 2.1 million 1100s and 1300s sold in the previous 11 years.

Rear-wheel drive

Rear-wheel drive

Rear-wheel drive (RWD) is a form of engine and transmission layout used in motor vehicles, in which the engine drives the rear wheels only. Until the late 20th century, rear-wheel drive was the most common configuration for cars. Most rear-wheel drive vehicles feature a longitudinally-mounted engine at the front of the car.

Front-wheel drive

Front-wheel drive

Front-wheel drive (FWD) is a form of engine and transmission layout used in motor vehicles, where the engine drives the front wheels only. Most modern front-wheel drive vehicles feature a transverse engine, rather than the conventional longitudinal engine arrangement generally found in rear-wheel drive and four-wheel drive vehicles.

Hatchback

Hatchback

A hatchback is a car body configuration with a rear door that swings upward to provide access to the main interior of the car as a cargo area rather than just to a separated trunk. Hatchbacks may feature fold-down second-row seating, where the interior can be reconfigured to prioritize passenger or cargo volume. Hatchbacks may feature two- or three-box design.

Source: "C-segment", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 18th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-segment.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b "Regulation (EEC) No 4064/89 - Merger Procedure" (PDF). www.europa.eu. exact market definition was left open .. boundaries between segments are blurred by factors other than the size or length of cars
  2. ^ "Impact on the Competitiveness of the European Automotive Industry of Potential FTA with India and ASEAN" (PDF). www.europa.eu. p. 8. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 April 2013.
  3. ^ "Latest Safety Ratings". www.euroncap.com. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  4. ^ Brooke, Lindsay (7 September 2012). "Taking the 'Cheap' Out of the Small Car". The New York Times.
  5. ^ Christian Thiel; Johannes Schmidt; Arnold Van Zyl; Erwin Schmid (16 February 2014). "Cost and well-to-wheel implications of the vehicle fleet CO2 emission regulation in the European Union". ResearchGate. Transportation Research Part A 63 (2014) 25–42. 63: 27+28. doi:10.1016/j.tra.2014.02.018. Retrieved 25 August 2016. There is no or very little overlap between the traditional segments A to F PDF EU headliner
  6. ^ "EU: Vehicle Definitions". Retrieved 25 August 2016.
  7. ^ Meadows, Jordan (2017). Vehicle Design: aesthetic principles in transportation design. Routledge. pp. 39–40. ISBN 9781138685604. Retrieved 29 September 2018. The [C] segment is around 4.5 metres long.
  8. ^ Jacobs, Andrew James (2016). The new domestic automakers in the United States and Canada: history, impacts, and prospects. Lexington Books. p. 33. ISBN 9780739188262. Retrieved 19 July 2017. 4) Compact— vehicles between 165 and 179.99 inches in length or equivalent to Europe's C-segment for cars.
  9. ^ "New compact cars comparison with dimensions and boot capacity". www.automobiledimension.com. March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  10. ^ "New family cars comparison with dimensions and boot capacity". www.automobiledimension.com. March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  11. ^ "European sales 2020 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  12. ^ "European sales 2020 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  13. ^ "European sales 2013 compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  14. ^ "European sales 2013 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  15. ^ "European sales 2014 compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  16. ^ "European sales 2014 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  17. ^ "European sales 2015 compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  18. ^ "European sales 2015 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  19. ^ "European sales 2016 compact car segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  20. ^ "European sales 2016 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  21. ^ "European sales 2017 compact car segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  22. ^ "European sales 2017 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  23. ^ "European sales 2018 compact car segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  24. ^ "European sales 2018 Premium Compact segment". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  25. ^ "European sales 2019 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  26. ^ "European sales 2020 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 22 March 2021.
  27. ^ "European sales 2021 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. 2022. Retrieved 14 May 2022.
  28. ^ "European sales 2019 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  29. ^ "European sales 2020 Compact cars". www.carsalesbase.com. March 2021. Retrieved 29 March 2021.
  30. ^ "Europe Full Year 2011: Top 318 All models ranking now available!". Automotive News. Retrieved 7 February 2016.
  31. ^ "Kompaktklasse" [Compact Class] (in German). Auto Motor und Sport. Retrieved 2016-08-19.
  32. ^ Jakobsson, David; Berggren, Jan-Erik (2013-04-16). "Stort test: De 10 bästa bilarna i Golf-klassen" [Big test: The 10 best cars in the Golf class]. Allt om Bilar (in Swedish). Expressen.
  33. ^ Copping, Richard (2006). VW Golf: Five Generations of Fun: The Full Story of the Volkswagen Golf. Veloce Publishing. p. 17.
  34. ^ Speer, Lawrence J. (20 March 2009). "Renault wants to be minivan leader again". Automotive News Europe. Retrieved 7 February 2016.
  35. ^ "2018's most popular cars in Europe by market segment". www.autocar.co.uk. Retrieved 8 January 2019.
  36. ^ Lewin, Tony; Borroff, Ryan; Callum, Ian (2010). How to Design Cars Like a Pro. Motorbooks. p. 185.
  37. ^ Copping, Richard (2006). VW Golf: Five Generations of Fun: The Full Story of the Volkswagen Golf. Veloce Publishing. p. 17.
  38. ^ Motoring Illustrated, May 1965
  39. ^ "BMC 1100/1300 development story – the car that shaped 1960s Britain". www.aronline.co.uk. 17 June 2018. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  40. ^ "Buyer's Guide BMC 1100 & 1300 / ADO16 Britain's best-selling". www.drive-my.com. 9 February 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2019.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.