Get Our Extension

Bright Futures Scholarship Program

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Florida Bright Futures
Scholarship Program
Formation1997; 26 years ago (1997)
TypeMerit-based scholarship
Parent organization
Florida Department of Education
Budget
$226 million (2016)
WebsiteOfficial website

Bright Futures is a scholarship program in the state of Florida. It is funded by the Florida Lottery and was first started in 1997.

History

The Bright Futures Scholarship Program was meant to emulate neighboring state Georgia's HOPE Scholarship. Originally the Program disbursed just above 42,000 scholarships for about $70 million.[1] At the program's peak in 2008, it provided scholarships to 39% of Florida high school graduates,[2] including 94 percent of incoming freshmen and 70 percent of all undergraduates at the University of Florida.[3]

The program was solely based on academic merit and not on financial need, and had an "A level" and a "B level", plus a vocational scholarship program that could be used at trade schools. The A level covered 100% of tuition and fees while the B level covered 75%. At its height in 2008, the program was criticized for subsidizing the education of students from wealthy families using lottery proceeds collected largely from lower-income individuals.[4] UF Chief Financial Officer Matt Fajack criticized the program for keeping state university tuition artificially low, since any tuition raise would mean that the state would have to spend more money to cover scholarships under the program.[3]

The Florida Legislature enacted cuts to Bright Futures funding in 2011 by increasing the minimum SAT score required to qualify for the program. The changes took full effect for the graduating class of 2014, increasing the minimum score for the "A level", from 1280 to 1290, and increasing the minimum score for the "B level" from 980 to 1170; as well as decreasing the award amount for the "A level" to only cover 50% of tuition and fees and the "B level" to cover 33%, down from 100% and 75% respectively. The cuts disproportionately impacted black and Latino students as well as students from predominantly poor schools.[5] By the 2015–16 school year, the program covered only 20% of Florida high school graduates and paid an average of $2,000 per year.[2]

In 2014, the United States Department of Education launched an investigation of the Bright Futures program due to allegations of racial bias against black and Latino students, focusing particularly on its effects on students from Miami–Dade County and at Florida International University.[6] The department ultimately found evidence of disparate impacts on minorities but no evidence of discriminatory intent.[7]

2018 saw a massive overhaul with the scholarship, with the "A level" being renamed to "Florida Academic Scholar" (FAS), the "B level" renamed to "Florida Medallion Scholar" (FMS), the vocational program being renamed to "Gold Seal Vocational", and a new fourth level (also intended for vocational schools) called "Gold Seal CAPE". Another new award was also added called the Academic Top Scholar (ATS) award, which would be given to the student with the highest academic rank in each Florida county. The FAS and FMS levels returned to their previous values, with the FAS increasing to cover 100% of tuition and fees plus a new $300 per semester book stipend and the FMS increasing to cover 75% of tuition and fees.[8]

In 2021, the book stipend was removed as part of the budgetary process.[9] This change came among many controversies surrounding Florida Senate Bill 86, a piece of legislation that would have made massive structural changes to Bright Future's implementation and administration. While SB 86 did not pass, other similar legislation raised the SAT score requirements from 1290 to 1330 for FAS and 1170 to 1210 for FMS, but the ACT score requirement remained the same for both levels. In 2022, the SAT requirement for the FAS level was raised to 1340 (taking affect for 2023–24 graduates), but SAT requirement at the FMS level and the ACT requirement at both levels remained the same.

Discover more about History related topics

HOPE Scholarship

HOPE Scholarship

The HOPE Program created in 1993 under the supervision of Georgia Governor Zell Miller, is Georgia's scholarship and grant program that rewards students with financial assistance in degree, diploma, and certificate programs at eligible Georgia public and private colleges and universities, and public technical colleges. HOPE is funded entirely by revenue from the Georgia Lottery and is administered by the Georgia Student Finance Commission (GSFC).

University of Florida

University of Florida

The University of Florida is a public land-grant research university in Gainesville, Florida. It is a senior member of the State University System of Florida, traces its origins to 1853, and has operated continuously on its Gainesville campus since September 1906.

Florida Legislature

Florida Legislature

The Florida Legislature is the legislature of the U.S. State of Florida. It is organized as a bicameral body composed of an upper chamber, the Senate, and a lower chamber, the House of Representatives. Article III, Section 1 of the Florida Constitution, adopted in 1968, defines the role of the legislature and how it is to be constituted. The legislature is composed of 160 state legislators. The primary purpose of the legislature is to enact new laws and amend or repeal existing laws. It meets in the Florida State Capitol building in Tallahassee.

United States Department of Education

United States Department of Education

The United States Department of Education is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government. It began operating on May 4, 1980, having been created after the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was split into the Department of Education and the Department of Health and Human Services by the Department of Education Organization Act, which President Jimmy Carter signed into law on October 17, 1979.

Florida International University

Florida International University

Florida International University (FIU) is a public research university with its main campus in Miami-Dade County. Founded in 1965, the school opened its doors to students in 1972. FIU has grown to become the third-largest university in Florida and the fifth-largest public university in the United States by enrollment. FIU is a constituent part of the State University System of Florida. In 2021, it was ranked #1 in the Florida Board of Governors performance funding, and had over $246 million in research expenditures.

Florida Senate Bill 86 (2021)

Florida Senate Bill 86 (2021)

Senate Bill 86, also titled SB 86: Student Financial Aid or An act relating to student financial aid was a proposed 2021 Florida educational funding bill that would have made major changes to the implementation and administration of the Bright Futures Scholarship Program. The bill drew considerable controversy due to its proposals.

Scholarships

Basic requirements

As of August 2022, the program funds four scholarship levels, available to students who:

  • Are U.S. citizens or legal residents;[10]
  • Graduate from a Florida high school, OR earn a GED as a Florida resident, OR homeschooled students who are registered with their local district for at least two school years, OR out-of-state students who earn a diploma from a non-Florida high school while living with a parent or legal guardian who is a Florida resident on military/public service assignment outside of Florida for the student's last year of high school;[10]
  • Have not been found guilty of, or plead no contest to, a felony charge, unless granted clemency;[10]
  • Submit a Florida Financial Aid Application (FFAA);[10]
  • Be accepted to and enroll in a degree/certificate program at an eligible Florida post-secondary institution;
  • Meet the requirements of the specified scholarship (listed below).[10]

All above requirements must be met by the January 31 (if the student is a mid-year graduate) or the June 30 (if the student is a regular graduate) following student's high school graduation other than the FFAA submission, which must be completed by the December 31 (if the student is a mid-year graduate and seeking funding for the following spring term) or the August 31 (if the student is a regular graduate or if they are a mid-year graduate who is not seeking funding for the following spring term) following the student's high school graduation.[10][11]

Scholarship-specific requirements

This section does not list every possible scenario that can be used to qualify for a Bright Futures scholarship, but it does list the most common ways. For the full list of ways to qualify as of August 2022, see here.

  • Florida Academic Scholars (FAS):
    • Minimum weighted[a] GPA of 3.50 in the 16 "college preparatory" required courses[b], OR be a National Merit Finalist or Scholar, OR National Hispanic Scholar, OR receive an Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) diploma prior to high school graduation, OR receive an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma prior to high school graduation;[12]
    • Completion of the 16 "college preparatory" required courses;[b][12]
    • Minimum ACT composite score of 29 OR minimum SAT combined reading/math score of 1330 (increasing to 1340 for students graduating high school during the 2023–24 school year). Score must be sent to at least one of Florida's 12 state universities;[12]
    • Completion (with signed documentation) of 100 volunteer service hours OR 100 paid work hours. Volunteer hours or paid work must fall under the list of "approved activities" set by the student's district school board (or school administration if the student attends a nonpublic school).[13]
    • IF the student earned a GED instead of a high school diploma OR is applying as an out-of-state student, they must also submit high school transcripts to the Florida Office of Student Financial Aid.[14]
  • Florida Medallion Scholars (FMS):
    • Minimum weighted[a] GPA of 3.00 in the 16 "college preparatory" required courses[b], OR be a National Merit Finalist or Scholar, OR National Hispanic Scholar, OR receive an Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) diploma prior to high school graduation, OR receive an International Baccalaureate (IB) diploma prior to high school graduation;[12]
    • Completion of the 16 "college preparatory" required courses;[b][12]
    • Minimum ACT composite score of 25 OR minimum SAT combined reading/math score of 1210. Score must be sent to at least one of Florida's 12 state universities;[12]
    • Completion (with signed documentation) of 75 volunteer service hours OR 100 paid work hours. Volunteer hours or paid work must fall under the "approved activities" set by the student's district school board (or school administration if the student attends a nonpublic school).[13]
    • IF the student earned a GED instead of a high school diploma OR is applying as an out-of-state student, they must also submit high school transcripts to the Florida Office of Student Financial Aid.[14]
  • Florida Gold Seal Vocational Scholars (GSV):
    • Minimum weighted GPA[a] of 3.00 in non-elective courses;[15]
    • Minimum weighted GPA[a] of 3.50 in career education courses (must take at least 3 career education courses);[15]
    • Minimum ACT Reading, English, and Math scores of 19, 17, and 19 respectively, OR minimum SAT Reading, Writing, and Math scores of 24, 25, and 24, respectively, OR Florida Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (P.E.R.T.) Reading, Writing, and Math scores of 106, 103, and 114, respectively. Score must be sent to at least one of Florida's 12 state universities;[15]
    • Completion (with signed documentation) of 30 volunteer service hours OR 100 paid work hours. Volunteer hours or paid work must fall under the "approved activities" set by the student's district school board (or school administration if the student attends a nonpublic school).[13]
    • IF the student earned a GED instead of a high school diploma OR is applying as an out-of-state student, they must also submit high school transcripts to the Florida Office of Student Financial Aid.[14]
    • May only be used at postsecondary institutions that offer an applied technology diploma, technical degree education program or a career certificate program.[15]
  • Florida Gold Seal CAPE Scholars (GSC):
    • Earn a minimum of five post-secondary credit hours through Career and Professional Education (CAPE) industry certifications that count for college credit;[16]
    • Completion (with signed documentation) of 30 volunteer service hours OR 100 paid work hours. Volunteer hours or paid work must fall under the "approved activities" set by the student's district school board (or school administration if the student attends a nonpublic school).[13]
    • May only be used at institutions that offer an applied technology diploma, technical degree education program (associate in applied science or associate in science), or a career certificate program. Upon completion of an eligible associate degree program, a GSC Scholar may also apply to receive an additional award for a maximum of 60 credit hours toward an eligible baccalaureate degree.[16]

Additionally, the Bright Futures program gives an Academic Top Scholar (ATS) award to the student with the highest academic rank in each of Florida's 67 counties, based on multiplying the student's weighted GPA and ACT/SAT score.[17]

Requirements for all levels must be met no later than January 31 of a mid-year graduating senior's graduation year (i.e. students who graduate after one semester of their senior year) or June 30 of a regular graduating senior's graduation year. Each district school board (or school administration for nonpublic schools) has the right to set an earlier deadline for volunteer/paid work hour completion requirements if they choose to do so.[13]

Renewal requirements

At each level, the scholarship is valid for one year and is renewable for up to five years or a specified number of semester hours depending on scholarship level[c] (whichever comes sooner), but certain requirements must be met regarding GPA and courses completed, depending on the level.[18]

  • All levels:
    • Be enrolled for at least six non-remedial semester credit hours (or equivalent) per term, unless the student needs fewer than six semester hours to complete their degree program;[10][18]
    • Complete a minimum 24 semester hours (or equivalent) per year.[19]
  • FAS and ATS:
    • 3.00 GPA, must earn credits in all classes taken, unless withdrawn from (i.e. the student must pass all courses taken, except for courses from which the student withdraws).[19]
  • FMS, GSV, and GSC:
    • 2.75 GPA, must earn credits in all classes taken, unless withdrawn from.[19]

If a FAS awardee drops below the 3.00 GPA requirement, they are allowed to renew at the FMS level (provided their GPA is still above 2.75). If the student dropped below the threshold during their first year of study they may also be reinstated at the FAS level if they bring their GPA back above 3.00; FMS awardees can also be reinstated if they drop below the 2.75 requirement and then bring their GPA back up during their first year of study, but they cannot earn FAS even if their GPA meets the FAS requirement of 3.00.

If a student withdraws from a course, they must repay Bright Futures for the cost of that course.

If a student is unable to meet annual renewal requirements due to a verifiable illness or other documented emergency (as reported by the post-secondary institution), an exception of one academic year to the renewal timeframe may be granted.

Award amounts

(All numbers as of 2022–23 school year)

  • FAS: 100% of tuition and fees at all public institutions (Florida College System or State University System of Florida) or comparable amount at private institutions.[18]
  • FMS: 100% of tuition and fees if enrolled in an associate degree program at a Florida College System member; otherwise 75% of tuition and fees at public institutions or comparable amount at private institutions.[18]
  • GSV: For institutions with semester systems: $39/credit hour for Career Certificate Program (CCP) or Applied Technology Diploma Program (ATDP), $48/credit hour for Technical Degree Education Program (TDEP, meaning associate degree program) or Bachelors of Science (BS)/Bachelors of Applied Science (BAS) program. For institutions with quarter systems: $26/credit hour for CCP or ATDP, $32/credit hour for TDEP or BS/BAS program. Cannot be used for summer courses.[18]
  • GSC: For institutions with semester systems: $39/credit hour for CCP or ATDP, $49/credit hour for TDEP or BS/BAS program. For institutions with quarter systems: $26/credit hour for CCP or ATDP, $32/credit hour for TDEP or BS/BAS program. Cannot be used for summer courses.[18]
  • ATS: For institutions with semester systems: extra $44/credit hour on top of FAS scholarship. For institutions with quarter systems: extra $29/credit hour on top of FAS scholarship.[18]

Additional information

  • Students may defer their scholarship by up to 5 years. If a student enlists in the military, they can defer their scholarship for their entire time enlisted plus an additional 5 years.
  • If a FAS or FMS student completes their Bachelor's Degree in 7 semesters or fewer, they may receive funding for up to one semester of study in a Graduate School program (not exceeding 15 semester credit hours or equivalent).[18]

Discover more about Scholarships related topics

General Educational Development

General Educational Development

The General Educational Development (GED) tests are a group of four subject tests which, when passed, provide certification that the test taker has United States or Canadian high school-level academic skills. It is an alternative to the US high school diploma, as is HiSET. The GED Testing Service website currently does not refer to the test as anything but "GED".

National Merit Scholarship Program

National Merit Scholarship Program

The National Merit Scholarship Program is a United States academic scholarship competition for recognition and university scholarships administered by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), a privately funded, not-for-profit organization based in Evanston, Illinois. The program began in 1955.

National Hispanic Recognition Program

National Hispanic Recognition Program

National Hispanic Recognition Program (NHRP) was initiated in 1983, by the College Board, to identify outstanding Hispanic high school students and to share information about these academically well-prepared students with subscribing colleges and universities.

Advanced International Certificate of Education

Advanced International Certificate of Education

The Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE) is an internationally used English language curriculum offered to students in the higher levels of secondary school intended to prepare them for an honours programme during tertiary education. The curriculum is overseen by Cambridge International Examinations which is a branch of Cambridge Assessment and operates globally. It includes classes in the subject areas of mathematics and science; languages; and arts and humanities with two levels of difficulty Advanced Subsidiary level and Advanced level with Advanced level being more challenging. It is mandatory for a student to have taken and passed a subject on the Advanced Level. Students need to select subject from 4 different groups.

International Baccalaureate

International Baccalaureate

The International Baccalaureate (IB), formerly known as the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is a nonprofit foundation headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, and founded in 1968. It offers four educational programmes: the IB Diploma Programme and the IB Career-related Programme for students aged 15 to 19, the IB Middle Years Programme for students aged 11 to 16, and the IB Primary Years Programme for children aged 3 to 12. To teach these programmes, schools must be authorized by the International Baccalaureate.

ACT (test)

ACT (test)

The ACT is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name. The ACT test covers four academic skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and scientific reasoning. It also offers an optional direct writing test. It is accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States as well as more than 225 universities outside of the U.S.

SAT

SAT

The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Since its debut in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times. For much of its history, it was called the Scholastic Aptitude Test and had two components, Verbal and Mathematical, each of which was scored on a range from 200 to 800. Later it was called the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, then simply the SAT.

State University System of Florida

State University System of Florida

The State University System of Florida is a system of twelve public universities in the U.S. state of Florida. As of 2018, over 341,000 students were enrolled in Florida's state universities. Together with the Florida College System, which includes Florida's 28 community colleges and state colleges, it is part of Florida's system of public higher education. The system, headquartered in Tallahassee, is overseen by a chancellor and governed by the Florida Board of Governors.

Associate degree

Associate degree

An associate degree is an undergraduate degree awarded after a course of post-secondary study lasting two to three years. It is a level of qualification above a high school diploma, GED, or matriculation, and below a bachelor's degree.

Florida College System

Florida College System

The Florida College System, previously the Florida Community College System, is a system of 28 public community colleges and state colleges in the U.S. state of Florida. In 2013-14, enrollment consisted of more than 813,000 students. Together with the State University System of Florida, which consists of Florida's twelve public universities, the two systems control all public higher education in the state of Florida.

Source: "Bright Futures Scholarship Program", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bright_Futures_Scholarship_Program.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

Notes
  1. ^ a b c d Weighting system adds an extra 0.25 to GPA per semester taken of Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), Pre-International Baccalaureate (Pre-IB), International Baccalaureate (IB), Pre-Advanced International Certificate of Education (Pre-AICE), Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE), and Dual Enrollment courses
  2. ^ a b c d 4 years of English (3 of which must include substantial writing)
    4 years of Mathematics (all at or above Algebra I)
    3 years of Natural Sciences (2 of which must include substantial laboratory work)
    3 years of Social Sciences
    2 years of World Languages (must be sequential classes in the same language)
  3. ^ ATS, FAS, and FMS: 120 hours
    GSV: 72 hours for a Technical Degree Education Program or Career Certificate Program OR 60 credit hours for an Applied Technology Degree Program
    GSC: 60 hours, can apply for an additional 60 hours toward an eligible bachelor's degree program after completion of associate degree
References
  1. ^ "Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Disbursement History" (PDF). Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program.
  2. ^ a b Carter, Cathy. "Negron Eyes Bright Futures As Key To Senate's Ed Plan". WLRN. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  3. ^ a b Stewart, Thomas. "UF official says Bright Futures may be adding to budget woes". The Independent Florida Alligator. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  4. ^ "Popular Bright Futures Penalizes Needy Florida Students, Critics Say". Associated Press. September 21, 2008. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  5. ^ McGlade, Caitlin; Travis, Scott. "Minorities, poor hit hardest by stricter Bright Futures requirements". Sun-Sentinel. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  6. ^ Smiley, David (March 22, 2014). "Feds investigate Florida's Bright Futures scholarships". The Miami Herald. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  7. ^ McGrory, Kathleen (January 22, 2015). "Gov. Scott proposes Bright Futures expansion but doesn't address criticisms". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved January 4, 2017.
  8. ^ "Florida students get boost from Bright Futures changes". www.bizjournals.com. Retrieved March 11, 2022.
  9. ^ Staff, Crow's Nest. "Legislature eliminates $600 book stipend for Bright Futures recipients – The Crow's Nest at USF St. Petersburg". Retrieved July 31, 2021.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g "Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 2.
  11. ^ "Bright Futures Student Handbook" (PDF). p. 11.
  12. ^ a b c d e f "Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 3.
  13. ^ a b c d e "2022-23 Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 4.
  14. ^ a b c "Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 9.
  15. ^ a b c d "Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 6.
  16. ^ a b "Bright Futures Student Handbook 2022-23" (PDF). p. 7.
  17. ^ "Bright Futures". fmh.leeschools.net. Retrieved March 11, 2022.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h "Bright Futures Handbook ch2 2022-23" (PDF).
  19. ^ a b c "Bright Futures Student Handbook ch 3 2021-23" (PDF).
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.