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Brian Cox (physicist)

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Brian Cox

Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS.jpg
Brian Cox at the Royal Society admissions day in London, July 2016
Born
Brian Edward Cox

(1968-03-03) 3 March 1968 (age 54)
Oldham, England
EducationHulme Grammar School
Alma materUniversity of Manchester (BSc, PhD)
Known for
Spouse
(m. 2003)
Children1
Awards
Scientific career
FieldsParticle physics
Institutions
ThesisDouble diffraction dissociation at large momentum transfer (1998)
Doctoral advisorRobin Marshall
Doctoral studentsTamsin Edwards[1]
Influences
Websiteapolloschildren.com

Brian Edward Cox CBE FRS (born 3 March 1968) is an English physicist and former musician who is a professor of particle physics in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester[2][3] and The Royal Society Professor for Public Engagement in Science.[4] He is best known to the public as the presenter of science programmes, especially the Wonders of... series[5][6] and for popular science books, such as Why Does E=mc²? and The Quantum Universe.

Cox has been described as the natural successor for the BBC's scientific programming by both David Attenborough[7] and Patrick Moore. Before his academic career, Cox was a keyboard player for the British bands D:Ream and Dare.

Discover more about Brian Cox (physicist) related topics

Fellow of the Royal Society

Fellow of the Royal Society

Fellowship of the Royal Society is an award granted by the judges of the Royal Society of London to individuals who have made a "substantial contribution to the improvement of natural knowledge, including mathematics, engineering science, and medical science".

English people

English people

The English people are an ethnic group and nation native to England, who speak the English language, a West Germanic language, and share a common history and culture. The English identity is of Anglo-Saxon origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD.

Physicist

Physicist

A physicist is a scientist who specializes in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe. Physicists generally are interested in the root or ultimate causes of phenomena, and usually frame their understanding in mathematical terms. Physicists work across a wide range of research fields, spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic and particle physics, through biological physics, to cosmological length scales encompassing the universe as a whole. The field generally includes two types of physicists: experimental physicists who specialize in the observation of natural phenomena and the development and analysis of experiments, and theoretical physicists who specialize in mathematical modeling of physical systems to rationalize, explain and predict natural phenomena. Physicists can apply their knowledge towards solving practical problems or to developing new technologies.

Musician

Musician

A musician is a person who composes, conducts, or performs music. According to the United States Employment Service, "musician" is a general term used to designate one who follows music as a profession. Musicians include songwriters who write both music and lyrics for songs, conductors who direct a musical performance, or performers who perform for an audience. A music performer is generally either a singer who provides vocals or an instrumentalist who plays a musical instrument. Musicians may perform on their own or as part of a group, band or orchestra. Musicians specialize in a musical style, and some musicians play in a variety of different styles depending on cultures and background. A musician who records and releases music can be known as a recording artist.

Professor

Professor

Professor is an academic rank at universities and other post-secondary education and research institutions in most countries. Literally, professor derives from Latin as a "person who professes". Professors are usually experts in their field and teachers of the highest rank.

Particle physics

Particle physics

Particle physics or high energy physics is the study of fundamental particles and forces that constitute matter and radiation. The fundamental particles in the universe are classified in the Standard Model as fermions and bosons. There are three generations of fermions, but ordinary matter is made only from the first fermion generation. The first generation consists of up and down quarks which form protons and neutrons, and electrons and electron neutrinos. The three fundamental interactions known to be mediated by bosons are electromagnetism, the weak interaction, and the strong interaction.

Popular science

Popular science

Popular science is an interpretation of science intended for a general audience. While science journalism focuses on recent scientific developments, popular science is more broad-ranging. It may be written by professional science journalists or by scientists themselves. It is presented in many forms, including books, film and television documentaries, magazine articles, and web pages.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London, England. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

David Attenborough

David Attenborough

Sir David Frederick Attenborough is an English broadcaster, biologist, natural historian and author. He is best known for writing and presenting, in conjunction with the BBC Natural History Unit, the nine natural history documentary series forming the Life collection, a comprehensive survey of animal and plant life on Earth.

Patrick Moore

Patrick Moore

Sir Patrick Alfred Caldwell-Moore was an English amateur astronomer who attained prominence in that field as a writer, researcher, radio commentator and television presenter.

D Ream

D Ream

D:Ream is a Northern Irish/English pop rock and dance group. They had a UK No. 1 hit with "Things Can Only Get Better" in 1994. Eight more top 40 hits followed, including "U R the Best Thing" and "Shoot Me with Your Love". They released three albums, two of which reached the UK top five. The group had an all-male line-up which varied in number, but mainly centred on lead singer Peter Cunnah. The live band included keyboard player Brian Cox, who is now a renowned physicist and television presenter; although Cunnah, as the only official member, normally played keyboards on studio recordings.

Dare (band)

Dare (band)

Dare is an English rock band from Oldham, England, fronted by former Thin Lizzy keyboard player Darren Wharton. They formed in 1985 and have released ten albums to date, nine studio and one live. An eleventh album was stated as planned to be released in 2019, although this did not happen, the release of Road to Eden announced by the band in January 2022.

Early life and education

Cox was born on 3 March 1968 in the Royal Oldham Hospital, later living in nearby Chadderton from 1971.[8][9][10] He has a younger sister. His parents worked for Yorkshire Bank, his mother as a cashier and his father as a middle-manager in the same branch.[11] He recalls a happy childhood in Oldham that included pursuits such as dance, gymnastics, and plane and bus spotting. He attended the private Hulme Grammar School[8][12] in Oldham from 1979 to 1986.[13][14][15]

He has stated in many interviews and in an episode of Wonders of the Universe[16] that when he was 12, the book Cosmos by Carl Sagan was a key factor in inspiring him to become a physicist.[9] He said on The Jonathan Ross Show that he performed poorly on his maths A-level exam: "I got a D ... I was really not very good ... I found out you need to practise."[17]

Music

In the 1980s and early 1990s, Cox was a keyboard player with the rock band Dare.[18] Dare released two albums with Cox – Out of the Silence in 1988 and Blood from Stone in 1991. He subsequently joined dance act D:Ream,[19] a group that had several hits in the UK charts, including the number one "Things Can Only Get Better",[20] later used as a New Labour election anthem, although he did not play on the track. In 2015, he appeared as a guest keyboardist during a live performance of the song "Your Silent Face" by New Order.[21] Cox wrote the foreword of the official Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (OMD) biography, Pretending to See the Future (2018), having been an "obsessive" fan of the band in his youth. He said of their songs, "They shaped my character and inspired me to make music."[22]

Higher education

Cox studied physics at the University of Manchester during his music career. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree with first-class honours. After D:Ream disbanded in 1997, he completed his Doctor of Philosophy degree in high-energy particle physics at the University of Manchester.[23] His thesis, Double Diffraction Dissociation at Large Momentum Transfer,[23] was supervised by Robin Marshall[23][24] and based on research he did on the H1 experiment at the Hadron Elektron Ring Anlage (HERA)[23][25] particle accelerator at the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany.[26]

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Royal Oldham Hospital

Royal Oldham Hospital

The Royal Oldham Hospital is a NHS hospital in the Coldhurst area of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England. It is managed by the Northern Care Alliance NHS Foundation Trust. The hospital has its own volunteer-run radio station, Radio Cavell, which broadcasts at 1350 AM.

Chadderton

Chadderton

Chadderton is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, Greater Manchester, England, on the River Irk and Rochdale Canal. It is located in the foothills of the Pennines, 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Oldham, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south of Rochdale and 6 miles (9.7 km) north-east of Manchester.

Oldham

Oldham

Oldham is a large town in Greater Manchester, England, amid the Pennines and between the rivers Irk and Medlock, 5.3 miles (8.5 km) southeast of Rochdale and 6.9 miles (11.1 km) northeast of Manchester. It is the administrative centre of the Metropolitan Borough of Oldham, which had a population of 237,110 in 2019.

Dance

Dance

{{Other uses}

Gymnastics

Gymnastics

Gymnastics is a type of sport that includes physical exercises requiring balance, strength, flexibility, agility, coordination, dedication and endurance. The movements involved in gymnastics contribute to the development of the arms, legs, shoulders, back, chest, and abdominal muscle groups. Gymnastics evolved from exercises used by the ancient Greeks that included skills for mounting and dismounting a horse, and from circus performance skills.

Aircraft spotting

Aircraft spotting

Aircraft spotting, or plane spotting is a hobby of tracking the movement of aircraft, which is often accomplished by photography. Besides monitoring aircraft, plane spotting enthusiasts also record information regarding airports, air traffic control communications and airline routes.

Bus spotting

Bus spotting

Bus spotting is the interest and activity of watching, photographing and tracking buses throughout their working service lives within bus companies. A person who engages in these activities is known as a bus spotter, bus fan, bus nut or bus enthusiast.

Carl Sagan

Carl Sagan

Carl Edward Sagan was an American astronomer, planetary scientist, cosmologist, astrophysicist, astrobiologist, author, and science communicator. His best known scientific contribution is research on extraterrestrial life, including experimental demonstration of the production of amino acids from basic chemicals by radiation. Sagan assembled the first physical messages sent into space, the Pioneer plaque and the Voyager Golden Record, universal messages that could potentially be understood by any extraterrestrial intelligence that might find them. Sagan argued the hypothesis, accepted since, that the high surface temperatures of Venus can be attributed to, and calculated using, the greenhouse effect.

The Jonathan Ross Show

The Jonathan Ross Show

The Jonathan Ross Show is a British comedy chat show presented by Jonathan Ross. It was first broadcast on ITV on 3 September 2011 and airs on Saturday evenings following the conclusion of Ross' BBC One chat show, Friday Night with Jonathan Ross, in July 2010.

Dare (band)

Dare (band)

Dare is an English rock band from Oldham, England, fronted by former Thin Lizzy keyboard player Darren Wharton. They formed in 1985 and have released ten albums to date, nine studio and one live. An eleventh album was stated as planned to be released in 2019, although this did not happen, the release of Road to Eden announced by the band in January 2022.

Things Can Only Get Better (D:Ream song)

Things Can Only Get Better (D:Ream song)

"Things Can Only Get Better" is a song by Northern Irish musical group D:Ream, released as the second single from their debut album, D:Ream On Volume 1 (1993). It took several months to reach the top of the UK Singles Chart. Originally a club hit, pop success took much longer for the song—initially, it reached only number 24 on the chart in January 1993. Band member Al Mackenzie left later that year, and remaining member Peter Cunnah took the band in a more pop-friendly direction.

New Labour

New Labour

New Labour was a period in the history of the British Labour Party from the mid to late 1990s until 2010 under the leadership of Tony Blair and Gordon Brown. The name dates from a conference slogan first used by the party in 1994, later seen in a draft manifesto which was published in 1996 and titled New Labour, New Life for Britain. It was presented as the brand of a newly reformed party that had altered Clause IV and endorsed market economics. The branding was extensively used while the party was in government between 1997 and 2010. New Labour was influenced by the political thinking of Anthony Crosland and the leadership of Blair and Brown as well as Peter Mandelson and Alastair Campbell's media campaigning. The political philosophy of New Labour was influenced by the party's development of Anthony Giddens' Third Way which attempted to provide a synthesis between capitalism and socialism. Mark Bevir argues that another motivation for the creation of New Labour was as a response to the emergence of the New Right in the preceding decades. The party emphasised the importance of social justice, rather than equality, emphasising the need for equality of opportunity and believed in the use of markets to deliver economic efficiency and social justice.

Career and research

Cox is a particle physicist at the University of Manchester.[27] He worked on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)[28][29] at CERN,[30][31][32][33] near Geneva, Switzerland.[34][35][36][37][38] He previously held a Royal Society University Research Fellowship and a Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) advanced research fellowship.

Cox has co-written several books on physics including Why does E=mc2?[39] and The Quantum Universe, both with Jeff Forshaw.[40] He has supervised or co-supervised several PhD students to completion including Tamsin Edwards.[1][41][42][43][44][45]

Broadcasting

Brian Cox at Science Foo Camp in 2008
Brian Cox at Science Foo Camp in 2008

Cox has appeared in many science programmes for BBC radio and television,[5][46] including In Einstein's Shadow,[47] the BBC Horizon series,[48] ("The Six Billion Dollar Experiment", "What on Earth is Wrong with Gravity?", "Do You Know What Time It Is?", and "Can we Make a Star on Earth?") and as a voice-over for the BBC's Bitesize revision programmes. He presented the five-part BBC Two television series Wonders of the Solar System in early 2010 and a follow up four-part series, Wonders of the Universe, which began on 6 March 2011.[49] Wonders of Life, which he describes as "a physicist's take on life/natural history", was broadcast in 2013.[50] He co-presents Space Hoppers and has also featured in Dani's House on CBBC.[51]

Cox also presented a three-part BBC series called Science Britannica which sees him explore the contribution of British scientists over the last 350 years, as well as the relationship between British science and the public perception thereof.[52]

BBC Two commissioned Cox to copresent Stargazing Live, a three-day live astronomy series in January 2011 – co-presented with physicist-turned-comedian Dara Ó Briain and featuring chat show host Jonathan Ross[53] – linked to events across the United Kingdom. A second and a third series featuring a variety of guests ran in January 2012 and January 2013.[54]

Since November 2009 Cox has co-presented a BBC Radio 4 "comedy science magazine programme", The Infinite Monkey Cage with comedian Robin Ince.[55] Guests have included comedians Tim Minchin, Alexei Sayle, Dara Ó Briain, and scientists including Alice Roberts of the BBC show The Incredible Human Journey, and astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson.[56] Cox also appeared in Ince's Nine Lessons and Carols for Godless People. He was a regular contributor to the BBC 6 Music Breakfast Show (and the Afternoon Show since 2019) with Shaun Keaveny, with a weekly feature, and an annual Christmas special[57] with Keaveny and Brian Eno. He appeared on 24 July 2009 episode of Robert Llewellyn's CarPool podcast series.[58]

Cox has also appeared numerous times at TED, giving talks on the LHC and particle physics.[59][60] In 2009 he appeared in People magazine's Sexiest Men Alive.[61] In 2010 he was featured in The Case for Mars by Symphony of Science. In November 2010 he made a promotional appearance in the Covent Garden Apple Store, talking about his new e-book set to accompany his new television series as well as answering audience questions.[62]

Cox gave the Royal Television Society's 2010 Huw Wheldon Memorial Lecture on "Science, a Challenge to TV Orthodoxy", in which he examined problems in media coverage of science and news about science. It was subsequently broadcast on BBC Two. On 4 March, a talk entitled "Frankenstein's Science" at the National Theatre featured Cox in discussion with biographer Richard Holmes on Mary Shelley's exploration of humanity's desire to bring life to an inanimate object and whether the notion is possible, in both the 19th century and today.[63]

On 6 March 2011, Cox appeared as a guest at Patrick Moore's 700th episode anniversary of The Sky at Night. He has said that he is a lifelong fan of the programme, and that it helped inspire him to become a physicist. On 10 March 2011, he gave the Ninth Douglas Adams Memorial Lecture.

Cox was the science advisor for the science fiction film Sunshine. On the DVD release, he provides an audio commentary where he discusses scientific accuracies (and inaccuracies) depicted in the film. He also was featured on the Discovery Channel special Megaworld: Switzerland. In 2013, he presented another series of Wonders of Life.

On 14 November 2013, BBC Two broadcast The Science of Doctor Who in celebration of Doctor Who's 50th anniversary, in which Cox tackles the mysteries of time travel. The lecture was recorded at the Royal Institution Faraday Lecture Theatre. The BBC subsequently broadcast Human Universe and Forces of Nature also presented by Cox.

A longtime fan of the Monty Python comedy troupe, in July 2014 Cox appeared on stage on the final night of their 10-date live show, Monty Python Live (Mostly). He also appears on the documentary telefilm Monty Python: The Meaning of Live.[64]

In 2017, Cox appeared in the children's television programme Postman Pat, voicing space expert Professor Ryan Farrow.[65]

Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
2005–2009 Horizon Himself/presenter Episodes:
  • Einstein's Equation of Life and Death (2005)
  • Einstein's Unfinished Symphony (2005)
  • The Six Billion Dollar Experiment (2007)
  • What on Earth is Wrong with Gravity? (2008)
  • Do You Know What Time It Is? (2008)
  • Can we Make a Star on Earth? (2009)
2008 The Big Bang Machine Presenter
2010 Wonders of the Solar System Presenter
Dani's House Himself
Would I Lie to You? Panellist
2011–2012 QI Panellist Episodes:
2011–2017, 2019 Stargazing Live Co-presenter All 6 episodes
2011 Wonders of the Universe Presenter
A Night with the Stars Presenter
The One Show Guest
The Sky at Night Guest 700th episode
The Graham Norton Show Guest Series 8, Episode 16
The Horizon Guide: Moon Presenter
2012 The Jonathan Ross Show Guest
Doctor Who Himself (cameo) "The Power of Three"
2013 Wonders of Life Presenter
Science Britannica Presenter September 2013, BBC Two
Conan Guest Episode 437
The Science of Doctor Who Presenter BBC Two
In Search of Science Presenter Episodes:
  • Method and Madness
  • Frankenstein's Monster
  • Money
2014 CBeebies Bedtime Stories Himself Episode: "The Way Back Home"
Monty Python Live Himself
Human Universe Presenter BBC Two
Space, Time & Videotape[66] Presenter BBC Four
2015 Absolutely Anything Himself (cameo)
2016 Forces of Nature Presenter BBC One
The Entire Universe Presenter BBC Two
2017 Life of a Universe[67] Presenter ABC
John Bishop: In Conversation With... Himself (Series 3 Episode 10) W
Postman Pat Professor Ryan Farrow (voice) Episode: "Postman Pat and the Space Suit" (CBeebies)
The 21st Century Race for Space Presenter BBC Two
2019 The Planets Presenter BBC Two
2021 Brian Cox's Adventures in Space and Time Presenter BBC Two
Universe Presenter BBC Two
2022 Mandy Himself Series 2, Episode 6 "The Curse of Mandy Carter" (BBC Two)
Brian Cox: Seven Days on Mars[68] Presenter BBC Two

Discography

Session discography[69]

Bibliography

Awards and honours

Cox has received many awards for his efforts to publicise science. In 2002 he was elected an International Fellow of The Explorers Club and in 2006 he received the British Association's Lord Kelvin Award for this work. He held a prestigious Royal Society University Research Fellowship (an early-career Research Fellowship scheme) from 2006 to 2013.[71] A frequent lecturer, he was keynote speaker at the Australian Science Festival in 2006, and in 2010 won the Institute of Physics Kelvin Medal and Prize for his work in communicating the appeal and excitement of physics to the general public.[72]

He was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2010 Birthday Honours for services to science[73] and Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2020 Birthday Honours for services to the promotion of science.[74]

On 15 March 2011, he won Best Presenter and Best Science/Natural History programme by the Royal Television Society for Wonders of the Universe. On 25 March 2011, he won twice at the Broadcasting Press Guild Awards for 'Best Performer' in a non-acting role, while Wonders of the Solar System was named best documentary series of 2010.[75][76]

In July 2012, Cox was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Huddersfield, presented by Sir Patrick Stewart.[77] Later that year, he was awarded the Institute of Physics President's medal by Sir Peter Knight, following which he gave a speech on the value of education in science and the need to invest more in future generations of scientists.[78] On 5 October 2012 Cox was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Open University for his "Exceptional contribution to Education and Culture".[79] In 2012 he also was awarded the Michael Faraday Prize of the Royal Society "for his excellent work in science communication."[80] He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) in 2016.[71]

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University of Manchester

University of Manchester

The University of Manchester is a public research university in Manchester, England. The main campus is south of Manchester City Centre on Oxford Road. The university owns and operates major cultural assets such as the Manchester Museum, The Whitworth art gallery, the John Rylands Library, the Tabley House Collection and the Jodrell Bank Observatory—a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

ATLAS experiment

ATLAS experiment

ATLAS is the largest general-purpose particle detector experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a particle accelerator at CERN in Switzerland. The experiment is designed to take advantage of the unprecedented energy available at the LHC and observe phenomena that involve highly massive particles which were not observable using earlier lower-energy accelerators. ATLAS was one of the two LHC experiments involved in the discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012. It was also designed to search for evidence of theories of particle physics beyond the Standard Model.

CERN

CERN

The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN, is an intergovernmental organization that operates the largest particle physics laboratory in the world. Established in 1954, it is based in a northwestern suburb of Geneva, on the France–Switzerland border. It comprises 23 member states, and Israel is currently the only non-European country holding full membership. CERN is an official United Nations General Assembly observer.

Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council

The Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) was one of a number of research councils in the United Kingdom. It directed, coordinated and funded research in particle physics and astronomy for the people of the UK. Its head office was at Polaris House in Swindon, Wiltshire, but it also operated three scientific sites: the UK Astronomy Technology Centre in Edinburgh, the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING) in La Palma and the Joint Astronomy Centre (JAC) in Hawaii. It published the Frontiers magazine three times a year, containing news and highlights of the research and outreach programmes it supports.

Research fellow

Research fellow

A research fellow is an academic research position at a university or a similar research institution, usually for academic staff or faculty members. A research fellow may act either as an independent investigator or under the supervision of a principal investigator.

The Quantum Universe

The Quantum Universe

The Quantum Universe: Everything That Can Happen Does Happen is a 2011 book by the theoretical physicists Brian Cox and Jeff Forshaw.

Jeff Forshaw

Jeff Forshaw

Jeffrey Robert Forshaw is a British particle physicist with a special interest in quantum chromodynamics (QCD): the study of the behaviour of subatomic particles, using data from the HERA particle accelerator, Tevatron particle accelerator and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Since 2004 he has been professor of particle physics in the School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Manchester.

Tamsin Edwards

Tamsin Edwards

Tamsin Edwards is a British climate scientist and lecturer at King's College London. She is a popular science communicator and writes for the Public Library of Science (PLOS).

Science Foo Camp

Science Foo Camp

Science Foo Camp (scifoo) is an annual of interdisciplinary scientific unconferences organized by O'Reilly Media, Digital Science, Alphabet Inc., based on an idea from Linda Stone. The event is based on the spirit and format of Foo Camp, an event focused on emerging technology, and is designed to encourage collaboration between scientists who would not typically work together. As such, it is unusual among conferences in three ways:attendance is by invitation-only the delegates come from many different areas of science rather than one subject, such as physics, chemistry or biology the meeting has no fixed agenda; the invited scientists, technologists and policy makers set the conference program during the conference itself, based on their shared professional interests and enthusiasms, aka unconference

BBC Two

BBC Two

BBC Two is a British free-to-air public broadcast television network owned and operated by the BBC. It covers a wide range of subject matter, with a remit "to broadcast programmes of depth and substance" in contrast to the more mainstream and popular BBC One.

Dani's House

Dani's House

Dani's House is a British children's comedy series broadcast on CBBC and starring Dani Harmer. The first series premiered on 26 September 2008, and its fifth series concluded on 19 July 2012. It has received several awards and nominations from BAFTA Kids. A spin-off called Dani's Castle aired from 2013 to 2015. Currently, all 5 series are available to stream on BBC iPlayer.

Stargazing Live

Stargazing Live

Stargazing Live is a British live television programme on astronomy that was broadcast yearly on BBC Two over three nights every winter from 2011 to 2017. The series was primarily presented by scientist Brian Cox and comedian and amateur astronomer Dara Ó Briain with support from TV presenter and biochemist Liz Bonnin and astronomer Mark Thompson. For the first six series, the show was broadcast from Jodrell Bank Observatory in Cheshire, and featured live links from scientific facilities in locations such as Hawaii, South Africa, and Norway. The seventh series in 2017 was broadcast from Siding Spring Observatory in Australia, and a special episode filmed at Kennedy Space Center was broadcast in July 2019 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission.

Political views

Cox has voiced his concerns about Brexit saying he feels it is a "weakening of our interaction with our neighbouring countries" and that "it cannot be the right trajectory."[81] On 23 June 2018, the People's Vote march was held in London to mark the second anniversary of the referendum to leave the European Union. Cox tweeted that, "if [a people's vote were] held on known exit terms and leave commanded majority, I'd back it as settled, informed decision. That's my argument for having one."[82] Cox has called for the term "the British people" to be banned from political discourse, calling it "inflammatory and divisive".[83][84]

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Brexit

Brexit

Brexit was the withdrawal of the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) at 23:00 GMT on 31 January 2020. The UK is the only sovereign country to have left the EU or the EC. The UK had been a member state of the EU or its predecessor the European Communities (EC), sometimes of both at the same time, since 1 January 1973. Following Brexit, EU law and the Court of Justice of the European Union no longer have primacy over British laws, except in select areas in relation to Northern Ireland. The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 retains relevant EU law as domestic law, which the UK can now amend or repeal. Under the terms of the Brexit withdrawal agreement, Northern Ireland continues to participate in the European Single Market in relation to goods, and to be a de facto member of the EU Customs Union.

People's Vote

People's Vote

People's Vote was a United Kingdom campaign group that unsuccessfully campaigned for a second referendum following the UK's Brexit vote to leave the European Union (EU) in 2016. The group was launched in April 2018 at which four Members of Parliament spoke, along with the actor Patrick Stewart and other public figures.

2016 United Kingdom European Union membership referendum

2016 United Kingdom European Union membership referendum

The United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, commonly referred to as the EU referendum or the Brexit referendum, took place on 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom (UK) and Gibraltar to ask the electorate whether the country should remain a member of, or leave, the European Union (EU). It was organised and facilitated through the European Union Referendum Act 2015 and the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000. The referendum resulted in 51.9% of the votes cast being in favour of leaving the EU. Although the referendum was legally non-binding, the government of the time promised to implement the result.

Personal life

In 2003, Cox married U.S. science presenter Gia Milinovich in Duluth, Minnesota. They have a son born in 2009, and Milinovich has a son from a previous relationship. The family currently lives in Battersea.[85]

Cox has rejected the label atheist and has stated he has "no personal faith".[86] In 2009, he contributed to the charity book The Atheist's Guide to Christmas.[87] He is a humanist, and is a Distinguished Supporter of Humanists UK.[88] In June 2019, Cox explained that he cannot be sure there is no God and that science cannot answer every question.[89]

Cox is a supporter of the Football club Oldham Athletic and has held a season ticket at the club.[9]

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Gia Milinovich

Gia Milinovich

Gia Michele Milinovich is an American-British television presenter and writer.

Minnesota

Minnesota

Minnesota is a state in the upper midwestern region of the United States. It is the 12th largest U.S. state in area and the 22nd most populous, with over 5.75 million residents. Minnesota is home to western prairies, now given over to intensive agriculture; deciduous forests in the southeast, now partially cleared, farmed, and settled; and the less populated North Woods, used for mining, forestry, and recreation. Roughly a third of the state is covered in forests, and it is known as the "Land of 10,000 Lakes" for having over 14,000 bodies of fresh water of at least ten acres. More than 60% of Minnesotans live in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metropolitan area, known as the "Twin Cities", the state's main political, economic, and cultural hub. With a population of about 3.7 million, the Twin Cities is the 16th largest metropolitan area in the U.S. Other minor metropolitan and micropolitan statistical areas in the state include Duluth, Mankato, Moorhead, Rochester, and St. Cloud.

Battersea

Battersea

Battersea is a large district in south London, part of the London Borough of Wandsworth, England. It is centred 3.5 miles (5.6 km) southwest of Charing Cross and extends along the south bank of the River Thames. It includes the 200-acre (0.81 km2) Battersea Park.

The Atheist's Guide to Christmas

The Atheist's Guide to Christmas

The Atheist's Guide to Christmas is a 2009 book written by 42 atheist celebrities, comedians, scientists and writers who give their humorous and serious tips for enjoying the Christmas season as an atheist. It made the Amazon best-seller list on its launch. It is the first atheist charity book campaign with the full book advance and half of the royalties being donated to the UK HIV charity Terrence Higgins Trust.

Humanism

Humanism

Humanism is a philosophical stance that emphasizes the individual and social potential and agency of human beings. It considers human beings the starting point for serious moral and philosophical inquiry.

Humanists UK

Humanists UK

Humanists UK, known from 1967 until May 2017 as the British Humanist Association (BHA), is a charitable organisation which promotes secular humanism and aims to represent "people who seek to live good lives without religious or superstitious beliefs" in the United Kingdom by campaigning on issues relating to humanism, secularism, and human rights. It seeks to act as a representative body for non-religious people in the UK.

Oldham Athletic A.F.C.

Oldham Athletic A.F.C.

Oldham Athletic Association Football Club is a professional football club in Oldham, Greater Manchester, England, which competes in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system.

Source: "Brian Cox (physicist)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Cox_(physicist).

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References
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  25. ^ Cox, B. (2005). "A review of forward proton tagging at 420m at the LHC, and relevant results from the Tevatron and HERA". AIP Conference Proceedings. Vol. 753. pp. 103–111. arXiv:hep-ph/0409144. doi:10.1063/1.1896693. S2CID 16324151.
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  56. ^ "The Infinite Monkey Cage Christmas Special, The Infinite Monkey Cage – BBC Radio 4". BBC. Retrieved 2 November 2017.
  57. ^ "Ep 253 - The Two Brians Christmas Special - Brian Eno and Prof Brian Cox join Shaun". BBC. Archived from the original on 1 January 2021. Retrieved 4 November 2021.
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  62. ^ Landmark Apple Store Event for Professor Cox Archived 31 March 2013 at the Wayback Machine, press release from HarperCollins, 24 November 2010. Retrieved 6 December 2010.
  63. ^ "Brian Cox To Reveal Frankenstein Science". westendtheatre.com. 23 November 2010. Retrieved 27 January 2018.
  64. ^ Harvey, Dennis. Film Review: 'Monty Python: The Meaning of Live'. Variety 2 May 2015
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  66. ^ "Brian Cox: Space, Time & Videotape". BBC Four. 9 November 2014.
  67. ^ "Life of a Universe". Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
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  70. ^ Cox, Brian; Forshaw, J R. (2016). Universal : a guide to the cosmos. London. ISBN 9781846144363. OCLC 965118761.
  71. ^ a b Anon (2016). "Professor Brian Cox OBE FRS". London: Royal Society. Archived from the original on 29 April 2016. One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from the royalsociety.org website where:

    "All text published under the heading 'Biography' on Fellow profile pages is available under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License." --"Royal Society Terms, conditions and policies". Archived from the original on 25 September 2015. Retrieved 9 March 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)

  72. ^ "2010 Kelvin medal and prize". Institute of Physics. 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2014.
  73. ^ "Rock star scientist Professor Brian Cox is made an OBE for services to science". Manchester.ac.uk. 12 June 2010. Retrieved 22 May 2020.
  74. ^ "No. 63135". The London Gazette (Supplement). 10 October 2020. p. B9.
  75. ^ Cox, Brian; Cohen, Andrew (2010). Wonders of the Solar System. London: Collins. ISBN 978-0-00-738690-1.
  76. ^ Cox, Brian; Cohen, Andrew (2011). Wonders of the Universe. New York: Harper Design. ISBN 978-0-06-211054-1.
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  78. ^ "IOP Awards 2012: Professor Brian Cox delivers a key note speech".
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  80. ^ "The Royal Society Michael Faraday Prize". Royal Society. Retrieved 17 October 2012.
  81. ^ "UK needs a visionary leader, says Professor Brian Cox". The Irish News. 4 May 2017. Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  82. ^ "'At least 100,000' march for vote on final Brexit deal". Sky News. 23 June 2018. Retrieved 25 June 2018.
  83. ^ "Silly season comes to the Blue Tick brigade". unherd.com. 12 August 2020.
  84. ^ "Why is Brian Cox getting flak for pointing out that our fascist government uses fascist language?". voxpoliticalonline.com.
  85. ^ Falk, Ben (2012). The Wonder of Brian Cox – The Unauthorised Biography of the Man Who Brought Science to the Nation. John Blake Publishing Ltd. ISBN 978-1-84358-953-2.
  86. ^ Woods, Mark (9 September 2016). "Professor Brian Cox condemns 'toxic' rows between science and religion". Christian Today. Retrieved 12 September 2016.
  87. ^ "Authors read their contributions to Ariane Sherine's book". The Guardian. London. 2 December 2009. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017.
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  89. ^ "BBC Radio 5 live – In Short, Professor Brian Cox: 'I can't be sure there is no God'". BBC. Retrieved 12 June 2019.
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