Get Our Extension

Borommakot

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Borommakot
บรมโกศ
King of Ayutthaya
King of Ayutthaya
Reign13 January 1733 – 26 April 1758[1]
PredecessorSanphet IX
SuccessorUthumphon
Viceroy of Ayutthaya
Tenure1708 – 1732
AppointedSanphet IX
Deputy Viceroy of Ayutthaya
Tenurecirca 1703 – 1708
AppointedSanpet VIII
Bornc. 1681[2]
Ayutthaya Kingdom
Died26 April 1758 (aged 77–78)
Ayutthaya, Ayutthaya Kingdom
SpouseAphainuchit
Phiphit Montri
Issue108 sons and daughters, including:
Thammathibet
King Uthumphon
King Ekkathat
Thepphiphit
HouseBan Phlu Luang dynasty
FatherSanpet VIII

Borommakot[3] (Thai: บรมโกศ, pronounced [bɔ̄ː.rōm.mā.kòːt]) or Maha Thammarachathirat II (Thai: สมเด็จพระมหาธรรมราชาธิราชที่ ๒) was the king of Ayutthaya from 1733 to 1758. His reign was the last blooming period of Ayutthaya as the kingdom would fall nine years after his death.[4]: 68–69 

"His reign of 25 years is important for being the last peaceful period of Ayudhya during which literature with the arts and crafts flurished." However, the king himself was known for "cruelty to people and animals alike," with seven of his sons meeting violent deaths.[4]: 67–68 

Much of what survives in Ayutthaya today dates back to Borommakot's massive renovations of Ayutthaya temples in the second quarter of the 18th century.[5] King Rama I attempted to emulate the religious customs of Ayutthaya during Borommakot's reign in the early Bangkok period and even postponed his coronation until he was certain that his coronation was confidently modelled off of Borommakot's coronation.[6]

Ayutthya civil war

Prince Phon (Thai: พร) was the son of Sanpet VIII. His elder brother, Prince Phet (เพชร), succeeded the throne as Sanphet IX (Thai Sa) in 1708.[7]: 277  Phon was then appointed as the Front Palace. However, Thai Sa decided that upon his death the throne would be given to his second eldest son, Prince Aphai, since Thai Sa's eldest son had entered the priesthood. In 1732, Thai Sa died and a civil war commenced. Phon led his armies against his nephews, Prince Aphai and Prince Paramet. The civil war within Ayutthaya was "a big fight, bigger than any which had occurred in Siam in former times". With the victory ensured, Phon executed his nephews, the government civil servant allies, and took the throne as King Borommakot.[7]: 280–281 

Discover more about Ayutthya civil war related topics

Thai language

Thai language

Thai, or Central Thai, is a Tai language of the Kra–Dai language family spoken by the Central Thai people and a vast majority of Thai Chinese. It is the sole official language of Thailand.

Suriyenthrathibodi

Suriyenthrathibodi

Sanphet VIII or Suriyenthrathibodi was the King of Ayutthaya from 1703 to 1709 and the second ruler of the Ban Phlu Luang Dynasty. Suriyenthrathibodi was also known by the noble title he held before ascending the throne, Luang Sorasak. He was the adopted son of Phetracha, the founder of the Ban Phlu Luang dynasty.

Thai Sa

Thai Sa

Phet or King of Banyongrattanat Palace or known as the King Thaisa was the King of Ayutthaya from 1709 to 1733 and the third ruler from the Ban Phlu Luang dynasty.

Front Palace

Front Palace

Krom Phra Ratchawang Bowon Sathan Mongkhon กรมพระราชวังบวรสถานมงคล, colloquially known as the Front Palace, was the title of the uparaja of Siam, variously translated as "viceroy", "vice king" or "Lord/Prince of the Front Palace", as the titleholder resided in the physical residence of the same name. The office of Front Palace was considered second only to the king and regarded as the heir presumptive. The name, with its dual meaning, originated in the Ayutthaya period, and the holder later gained significant powers during the Rattanakosin period. Front Palace occupants were usually a son or brother of the reigning monarch. The office existed until the death of the last occupant, Prince Vichaichan, in 1885. King Chulalongkorn then abolished the office of an heir presumptive, introducing in its stead the Western concept of a crown prince as heir apparent, and styled the new office "Crown Prince of Siam".

Accession to the throne and rule

Because the Samuha Kalahom had lent the support to Prince Aphai, Borommakot removed the power of Samuha Kalahom by depriving its authorities over southern Siam and transferred the power to Kromma Tha instead. The Samuha Kalahom remained as a mere military figurehead.

In spite of the bloodshed that preceded his reign, Borommakot was known for his reconstruction of Buddhist temples and the peace and prosperity Ayutthaya finally enjoyed again. In 1753, Borommakot sent two Siamese monks to rehabilitate Theravada Buddhism in Sri Lanka.[7]: 282–283, 295 

In 1741, Borommakot made his son Thammathibet the Front Palace. Thammathibet proved to be an able prince and was also known for being a poet. However, Thammathibet had affairs with two of Borommakot's concubines, Princess Sangwan[7]: 296  and Princess Nim—a severe crime. The lovers were caught in 1746 and the three were beaten. The Front Palace was lashed 120 stokes and the two concubines 30 each. The Front Palace died while he was beaten and Princess Sangwan died 3 days later. Princess Nim survived, but she was banished from the court.

Borommakot then appointed his third son, Duea (เดื่อ; later became Uthumphon), as the Front Palace. Borommakot skipped his second son, Ekkathat, because he thought that Ekkathat was not suitable to be a king.[7]: 297 

However, Ekkathat still had designs on the throne, and the subsequent struggles of the princes for the throne would contribute to the fall of Ayutthaya in 1767, during the reign of Ekkathat.[7]: 298–300 

Renovation projects

Wihan Phra Mongkhon Bophit, massively renovated under King Borommakot
Wihan Phra Mongkhon Bophit, massively renovated under King Borommakot

Borommakot dramatically transformed the skyline of Ayutthaya, much of what survives in Ayutthaya today dates from his reign.

Wihan Phra Mongkhon Bophit underwent major renovations by Borommakot, resulting in its current wihan design. Heavily damaged by the Burmese sack in 1767, the wihan was completely restored in the 20th century.[8]

King Borommakot renovated both Wat Mahathat, Phitsanulok, and Wat Mahathat Thung Yang, as according to the Ayutthaya chronicles. The Ayutthaya Royal Palace and Wat Phu Khao Thong was also the scene of massive renovations partaken by Borommakot.

Discover more about Accession to the throne and rule related topics

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon and officially the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, is an island country in South Asia. It lies in the Indian Ocean, southwest of the Bay of Bengal, and southeast of the Arabian Sea; it is separated from the Indian subcontinent by the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Strait. Sri Lanka shares a maritime border with India and the Maldives. Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte is its legislative capital, and Colombo is its largest city and financial centre.

Uthumphon

Uthumphon

Uthumphon Maha Thammarachathirat III or Uthumphon Mahaphon Phinit was the 32nd and penultimate monarch of the Ayutthaya Kingdom, ruling in 1758 for about three months. Facing various throne claimants, Uthumphon was finally forced to abdicate and enter monkhood. His preference of being a monk rather than keep the throne, earned him the epithet "King Hawat", or "the king who lives in the temple".

Ekkathat

Ekkathat

Ekkathat or Borommoracha III or King of Suriyamarin Throne Hall was the 6th monarch of the Ban Phlu Luang dynasty, the 33rd and the last monarch of Ayutthaya Kingdom, ruling from 1758 to 7 April 1767, prior to the fall of Ayutthaya. Moreover, he was called by the people in his time as "King Khiruean", which meant "the king with skin disease", due to his chloasma.

Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat

Wat Phra Si Rattana Mahathat

Wat Phra Sri Rattana Mahathat (Thai: วัดพระศรีรัตนมหาธาตุ; "Temple of the Great Jewelled Reliquary"), colloquially referred to as Wat-Phra-Sri or Wat Yai (Thai: วัดใหญ่; "Big Temple"), is a Buddhist temple (wat) in Phitsanulok Province, Thailand, where it is located on east bank of Nan River, near Naresuan Bridge and opposite Phitsanulok Provincial Hall. It is about 337 km from Bangkok.

Chedi Phukhao Thong

Chedi Phukhao Thong

Chedi Phukhao Thong is a 50-metre chedi, or Buddhist tower, in the village of Phukhao Thong near Ayutthaya in central Thailand. Visitors can climb as far a landing halfway up the chedi, from which the surrounding rice fields and the town of Ayutthaya can be seen. In 2014 it was possible for the public to visit the shrine inside the central tower.

Legacy

Boromakot was revered by the later Bangkok aristocracy for his religious reforms at attempting to solve the issues of social turmoil, something which the later Bangkok aristocracy would attempt to implement in the Rattanakosin Kingdom under King Rama I's reign.

Rama I attempted to emulate the religious customs of Ayutthaya during Borommakot's reign in the early Bangkok period and even postponed his coronation until he was certain that his coronation was confidently modelled off of Borommakot's coronation.[9]

Issue

# Consort and Concubines Children
1. Khao, Princess Aphainuchit Thammathibet, Prince Senaphithak (or Narathibet)
Princess Borom
Princess Suriya Wong
Princess Suriya
Princess Thida
Princess Ratsami
Inthasudawadi, Princess Yisan Seni
2. Phlap, Princess Phiphit Montri Princess Siripracha (or Prachawadi)
Princess Siriprapha (or Praphawadi)
Princess Inthawadi (or Phinthawadi)
Princess Kasattri
Ekkathat, Prince Anurak Montri
Princess Buachan (or Chanthrawadi)
Princess Nuan (or Num)
Uthumphon Ratchakuman, Prince Phon Phinit
3. Princess Inthasucha Thewi Princess Kunthon
Prince Aphon
Princess Mongkut
Prince Sangkhit
4. Concubine Si Princess Pha-op
Maengmao, Princess Wimonphat
Prince Sathit
Prince Phong
Prince Taeng
5. Concubine Phi Prince In
6. Others Khaek, Prince Thepphiphit
Mangkhut, Prince Chit Sunthon
Rot, Prince Sunthonthep
Pan, Prince Sepphakdi
Princess Fakthong

Ancestry

Source: "Borommakot", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borommakot.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

Notes
  1. ^ "History of Ayutthaya - Historical Events - Timeline 1700-1799". www.ayutthaya-history.com.
  2. ^ Baker, Chris; Phongpaichit, Pasuk. A History of Thailand Third Edition (p. 301). Cambridge University Press. Kindle Edition.
  3. ^ พระนามพระมหากษัตริย์สมัยอยุธยา [Names of Ayutthayan Kings] (in Thai). Royal Institute of Thailand. 2002-06-03. Archived from the original on 2013-12-03. Retrieved 2014-09-20.
  4. ^ a b Chakrabongse, C., 1960, Lords of Life, London: Alvin Redman Limited
  5. ^ "The Siam Society Lecture: A History of Ayutthaya (28 June 2017)".
  6. ^ Baker, Chris; Phongpaichit, Pasuk (2017). A History of Ayutthaya: Siam in the Early Modern World. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1-316-64113-2.
  7. ^ a b c d e f Rajanubhab, D., 2001, Our Wars With the Burmese, Bangkok: White Lotus Co. Ltd., ISBN 9747534584
  8. ^ Vandenburg, Tricky. "Wat Yai Chaimongkhon". History of Ayutthaya – Temples and Ruins. Retrieved 19 December 2021.
  9. ^ Baker, Chris; Phongpaichit, Pasuk (2017). A History of Ayutthaya: Siam in the Early Modern World. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1-316-64113-2.
Borommakot
Born: 1680 Died: 26 April 1758
Regnal titles
Preceded by King of Ayutthaya
1733–1758
Succeeded by
Viceroy of Ayutthaya
1709–1733
Succeeded by
Vacant
Title last held by
Chopkhotchaprasit
Deputy Viceroy of Ayutthaya
circa 1703–1708
Vacant
Title next held by
Anurak Devesh
of Rattanakosin Kingdom

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.