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Bluey (2018 TV series)

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Bluey
An animated image of an anthropomorphic Blue Heeler puppy, jumping in the air with her arms thrown out beside her, smiling. The dog is coloured blue and displayed in front of a blue background. The word "Bluey" is above her head in white lettering.
GenrePreschool
Created byJoe Brumm
Written byJoe Brumm
Directed by
  • Richard Jeffery (animation)
  • Joe Brumm (series)
Voices of
Composers
  • Joff Bush
  • David Barber
Country of originAustralia
Original languageEnglish
No. of series3
No. of episodes141 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producers
Producer
  • Sam Moor
EditorMichael Griffin
Running time7 minutes
Production companyLudo Studio
DistributorBBC Studios
Release
Original networkABC Kids
Original release1 October 2018 (2018-10-01) –
present

Bluey is an Australian preschool animated television series that premiered on ABC Kids on 1 October 2018. The program was created by Joe Brumm and is produced by Queensland-based company Ludo Studio. It was commissioned by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the British Broadcasting Corporation, with BBC Studios holding global distribution and merchandising rights. The series made its premiere on Disney Junior in the United States and is released internationally on Disney+.

The show follows Bluey, an anthropomorphic six-year-old Blue Heeler puppy who is characterised by her abundance of energy, imagination and curiosity of the world. The young dog lives with her father, Bandit; mother, Chilli; and younger sister, Bingo, who regularly joins Bluey on adventures as the pair embark on imaginative play together. Other characters featured each represent a different dog breed. Overarching themes include the focus on family, growing up and Australian culture. The program was created and is produced in Queensland; its capital city Brisbane inspires the show's setting.

Bluey has received consistently high viewership in Australia on both broadcast television and video on demand services. It has influenced the development of merchandise and a stage show featuring its characters. The program has won two Logie Awards for Most Outstanding Children's Program as well as an International Emmy Kids Award in 2019. It has been praised by television critics for depicting a modern everyday family life, constructive parenting messages and the role of Bandit as a positive father figure.

Discover more about Bluey (2018 TV series) related topics

Children's television series

Children's television series

Children's television series are television programs designed for children, normally scheduled for broadcast during the morning and afternoon when children are awake. They can sometimes run during the early evening, allowing younger children to watch them after school. The purpose of these shows is mainly to entertain or educate. The children's series are in four categories: those aimed at infants and toddlers, those aimed at those aged 6 to 11 years old, those for adolescents and those aimed at all children.

Animated series

Animated series

An animated series is a set of animated works with a common series title, usually related to one another. These episodes should typically share the same main characters, some different secondary characters and a basic theme. Series can have either a finite number of episodes like a miniseries, a definite end, or be open-ended, without a predetermined number of episodes. They can be broadcast on television, shown in movie theatres, released direct-to-video or on the internet. Like other television series, films, including animated films, animated series can be of a wide variety of genres and can also have different demographic target audiences, from males to females ranging children to adults.

ABC Kids (Australia)

ABC Kids (Australia)

ABC Kids is the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's part-time channel, broadcasting shows between the hours of 5 am and 6:30 pm for children under 6 years old in each local Australian channel. It shares the same bandwidth as ABC TV Plus which broadcasts outside ABC Kids' scheduled hours and supplements the flagship ABC TV channel with extra adult-oriented programming. It has an educational program for children ages 2 to 13 called "ABC Reading Eggs" for Australia, internationally called "Reading Eggs" and owned by Edmentum.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) is the national broadcaster of Australia. It is principally funded by direct grants from the Australian Government and is administered by a government-appointed board. The ABC is a publicly-owned body that is politically independent and fully accountable, with its charter enshrined in legislation, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. ABC Commercial, a profit-making division of the corporation, also helps to generate funding for content provision.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

BBC Studios

BBC Studios

BBC Studios is a British content company. It is a commercial subsidiary of the BBC that was formed in April 2018 through the merger of the BBC's commercial production arm and the BBC's commercial international distribution arm, BBC Worldwide. BBC Studios creates, develops, produces, distributes, broadcasts, finances and sells content around the world, returning around £200 million to the BBC annually in dividends and content investment.

Disney Junior

Disney Junior

Disney Junior is an American pay television network owned by the Walt Disney Television unit of The Walt Disney Company through Disney Branded Television. Aimed mainly at children two to seven years old, its programming consists of original first-run television series, films, and select other third-party programming.

Disney+

Disney+

Disney+ is an American subscription video on-demand over-the-top streaming service owned and operated by the Media and Entertainment Distribution division of The Walt Disney Company. The service primarily distributes films and television series produced by The Walt Disney Studios and Walt Disney Television, with dedicated content hubs for the brands Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic, as well as Star in some regions. Original films and television series are also distributed on Disney+.

Anthropomorphism

Anthropomorphism

Anthropomorphism is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities. It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.

Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog (ACD), or simply Cattle Dog, is a breed of herding dog originally developed in Australia for droving cattle over long distances across rough terrain. This breed is a medium-sized, short-coated dog that occurs in two main colour forms. It has either red or black hair distributed fairly evenly through a white coat, which gives the appearance of a "red" or "blue" dog.

Dog breed

Dog breed

A dog breed is a particular strain of dog that was purposefully bred by humans to perform specific tasks, such as herding, hunting, and guarding. Dogs are the most variable mammal on Earth, with artificial selection producing around 450 globally recognized breeds. These breeds possess distinct traits related to morphology, which include body size, skull shape, tail phenotype, fur type, body shape, and coat colour. Their behavioral traits include guarding, herding, and hunting, and personality traits such as hyper-social behavior, boldness, and aggression. Most breeds were derived from small numbers of founders within the last 200 years. As a result, today dogs are the most abundant carnivore species and are dispersed around the world.

Brisbane

Brisbane

Brisbane, also known as Meanjin in the Indigenous Turrbal language, is the capital and most populous city of Queensland, and the third-most populous city in Australia and Oceania with a population of approximately 2.6 million. Brisbane lies at the centre of South East Queensland, which includes several other regional centres and cities. The central business district is situated within a peninsula of the Brisbane River about 15 km (9 mi) from its mouth at Moreton Bay. Brisbane is located in the hilly floodplain of the Brisbane River Valley between Moreton Bay and the Taylor and D'Aguilar mountain ranges. It sprawls across several local government areas, most centrally the City of Brisbane. The demonym of Brisbane is Brisbanite.

Characters

The child characters of Bluey are voiced by children of the program's production crew and are not credited as voice performers.[1][2]

Main

  • Bluey Heeler, a six-year-old (later seven-year-old)[3] Blue Heeler puppy. She is curious and energetic.
  • Bingo Heeler, Bluey's four-year-old (later five-year-old)[4] younger sister, a Red Heeler puppy.
  • Bandit Heeler / Dad (voiced by David McCormack),[5] the Blue Heeler father of Bluey and Bingo who is an archaeologist.[2]
  • Chilli Heeler / Mum (voiced by Melanie Zanetti),[6] the Red Heeler mother of Bluey and Bingo who works part-time in airport security.[2]

Recurring

  • Muffin Heeler, Bluey and Bingo's three-year-old Blue Heeler cousin.
  • Socks Heeler, Bluey and Bingo's one-year-old cousin and Muffin's sister, who is still learning to walk on two legs and talk.
  • Chloe, a kind and gentle Dalmatian who is Bluey's best friend.
  • Lucky, an energetic golden Labrador who is Bluey's next-door neighbour. He loves sports and playing with his father.
  • Honey, a thoughtful beagle who is Bluey's friend. She is sometimes shy and requires encouragement to fully participate.
  • Mackenzie, an adventurous Border Collie who is Bluey's friend from school, and originally from New Zealand.
  • Coco, a pink poodle who is Bluey's friend. She is sometimes impatient when playing games.
  • Snickers, a dachshund who is Bluey's friend. He has an interest in science.
  • Jack, a lively Jack Russell Terrier with attention deficit issues.
  • Rusty, a Red Kelpie from the bush, whose father is in the army.
  • Indy, an imaginative and free-spoken Afghan Hound.
  • Judo, a Chow Chow[7] who lives next door to the Heelers, and is domineering over Bluey and Bingo during gameplay.
  • Pom Pom, a timid Pomeranian who is Bluey and Bingo's friend. She is small but hardy, and often looked down upon due to her small size.
  • The Terriers, triplet Miniature Schnauzer brothers.
  • Uncle Stripe Heeler (voiced by Dan Brumm),[8] Bandit's younger brother and the father of Muffin and Socks.
  • Aunt Trixie Heeler (voiced by Myf Warhurst),[9] Uncle Stripe's wife and the mother of Muffin and Socks.
    • Warhurst also voices Indy's Mum, an Afghan Hound who sells organic baked goods at the market.[10]
  • Mrs. Retriever (voiced by Ann Kerr),[11] a Golden Retriever and Bingo's kindergarten teacher.
  • Calypso (voiced by Megan Washington),[9] a Blue Merle Australian Shepherd and Bluey's school teacher.
  • Pat / Lucky's Dad (voiced by Brad Elliot),[12] a Labrador Retriever and Lucky's father, who lives next door to the Heelers, and often involves himself in their gameplay.[13]
  • Chris Heeler / Nana (voiced by Chris Brumm),[13] Bandit and Stripe's mother, and grandmother to their children.
  • Bob Heeler (voiced by Ian McFadyen),[14] Bandit and Stripe's father, and grandfather to their children.
  • Uncle Radley “Rad” Heeler (voiced by Patrick Brammall),[16] Bandit and Stripe's brother, a cross between a Red and Blue Heeler, who works away on an oil rig.
  • Frisky (voiced by Claudia O'Doherty),[16] Bluey's godmother, who develops a relationship with Uncle Rad.
  • Mort / Grandad (voiced by Laurie Newman),[17] Chilli's father, and Bluey and Bingo's grandfather, who served in the army when he was younger.
  • Wendy (voiced by Beth Durack, series 1–2; Emily Taheny, series 3) a Chow Chow[7] and Judo's mother, who lives next door to the Heelers, and is often disrupted by or inadvertently involved with their gameplay.

Notable guests

Discover more about Characters related topics

Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dog

The Australian Cattle Dog (ACD), or simply Cattle Dog, is a breed of herding dog originally developed in Australia for droving cattle over long distances across rough terrain. This breed is a medium-sized, short-coated dog that occurs in two main colour forms. It has either red or black hair distributed fairly evenly through a white coat, which gives the appearance of a "red" or "blue" dog.

David McCormack

David McCormack

David Liam McCormack is an Australian musician and singer-songwriter. He is best known as frontman of Brisbane-based rock group Custard, and for voicing the character Bandit in the animated children's series Bluey.

Archaeology

Archaeology

Archaeology or archeology is the scientific study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, sites, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities. It is usually considered an independent academic discipline, but may also be classified as part of anthropology, history or geography.

Airport security

Airport security

Airport security includes the techniques and methods used in an attempt to protect passengers, staff, aircraft, and airport property from malicious harm, crime, terrorism, and other threats.

Dalmatian (dog)

Dalmatian (dog)

The Dalmatian is a breed of dog, which has a white coat marked with black or brown-colored spots. Originating as a hunting dog, it was also used as a carriage dog in its early days. The origins of this breed can be traced back to present-day Croatia and its historical region of Dalmatia. It is thought that early ancestors of the breed were certain breeds of pointers and a spotted Great Dane. Today, it is a popular family pet and many dog enthusiasts enter Dalmatians into kennel club competitions.

Beagle

Beagle

The beagle is a breed of small scent hound, similar in appearance to the much larger foxhound. The beagle was developed primarily for hunting hare, known as beagling. Possessing a great sense of smell and superior tracking instincts, the beagle is the primary breed used as a detection dog for prohibited agricultural imports and foodstuffs in quarantine around the world. The beagle is intelligent and is a popular pet due to its size, good temper, and a lack of inherited health problems.

Border Collie

Border Collie

The Border Collie is a Northumbrian breed of herding dog of medium size. Widely considered to be the most intelligent dog breed, they are descended from landrace sheepdogs once found all over the British Isles, but became standardised in the Anglo-Scottish border region. They are now mostly used as working dogs to herd livestock, specifically sheep.

Dachshund

Dachshund

The dachshund, also known as the wiener dog, badger dog, and sausage dog, is a short-legged, long-bodied, hound-type dog breed. The dog may be smooth-haired, wire-haired, or long-haired, and comes in a variety of colors.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by excessive amounts of inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity that are pervasive, impairing in multiple contexts, and otherwise age-inappropriate.

Australian Kelpie

Australian Kelpie

The Australian Kelpie, or simply Kelpie, is an Australian sheepdog capable of mustering and droving with little or no guidance. It is a medium-sized dog and comes in a variety of colours. The Kelpie has been exported throughout the world and is used to muster livestock, primarily sheep, cattle and goats.

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

The Afghan Hound is a hound that is distinguished by its thick, fine, silky coat and its tail with a ring curl at the end. The breed is selectively bred for its unique features in the cold mountains of Afghanistan. Its local name is Tāžī Spay or Sag-e Tāzī. Other names for this breed are Tāzī, Balkh Hound, Baluchi Hound, Barakzai Hound, Shalgar Hound, Kabul Hound, Galanday Hound or sometimes incorrectly African Hound. As with other sighthounds, they have the ability to run fast and turn well.

Chow Chow

Chow Chow

The Chow Chow is a spitz-type of dog breed originally from northern China. The Chow Chow is a sturdily built dog, square in profile, with a broad skull and small, triangular, erect ears with rounded tips. The breed is known for a very dense double coat that is either smooth or rough. The fur is particularly thick in the neck area, giving it a distinctive ruff or mane appearance. The coat may be shaded/self-red, black, blue, cinnamon/fawn, or cream.

Development

Conception

An Australian Cattle Dog, known as a "Blue Heeler", which the character of Bluey resembles.
An Australian Cattle Dog, known as a "Blue Heeler", which the character of Bluey resembles.

In July 2017, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) and the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) co-commissioned Bluey as an animated series for preschool children to be developed by Queensland production company Ludo Studio.[24][25] The production received funding from Screen Australia and Screen Queensland, with the setting of the series drawing upon the unique semi-tropical Queensland climate. Created by Joe Brumm, the series was inspired by his experience in raising two daughters. Brumm wanted to portray the importance of children participating in imaginative play, creating the title character Bluey as a Cattle Dog to give the series an Australian voice.[24] Brumm had previously worked on children's programs in the United Kingdom as a freelance animator and decided to create Bluey as a replica of the program Peppa Pig for an Australian audience.[9][26] He conceived the idea independently in 2016, and produced a one-minute pilot through his company Studio Joho, with a small team in their spare time.[8] Brumm approached Ludo Studio to develop the series; co-founders Charlie Aspinwall and Daley Pearson pitched the pilot at conferences such as MIPCOM in France.[8][27][28] Brumm stated that the first pilot contained some "dangerous" character behaviours which drew the attention of studio executives;[8] this included Bandit pushing Bluey and Bingo on a swing in an unsafe way.[8][13] Pearson expressed that it was difficult to pitch the series as it was not high-concept; but rather "just a show about family and games".[6][29]

The studio developed a five-minute animation sample that was pitched at the Asian Animation Summit in Brisbane in 2016, and was thereby noticed by ABC and BBC executives.[26][30][31] Michael Carrington of the ABC viewed the presentation and secured $20,000 of funding for the studio to produce a refined, seven-minute pilot.[8][30] The new pilot was presented at the Asian Animation Summit in 2017.[8] The two networks officially ordered 52 seven-minute episodes of Bluey, with the BBC investing 30 percent of the funding and acquiring the global rights for distribution and merchandising.[9][24] The series was produced entirely in Australia by a local team, many of whom were first-time animators from Brisbane.[9] The program was announced to premiere in Australia on ABC Kids, followed by CBeebies.[24][25]

Production

Writing

"There's no counting in Bluey, there's no learning this or that ... just show 'em playing. It's to show parents that the kids aren't just mucking around. They're learning to play, learning to share ... and generally you can just put your feet up and let 'em do it."

—Joe Brumm, 2019[9]

The stories featured in Bluey depict Bluey and Bingo engaging in imaginative play. Brumm wanted to show that self-directed and unstructured play is natural in shaping children and allowing them to develop.[1] He consulted research based on socio-dramatic play, reading the works of Sara Smilansky and Vivian Paley, who both had backgrounds in early childhood education.[28] The episodes show the parents as guides for their children, who allow them to explore their immediate surroundings independently, giving them opportunities to practise adult roles.[1] Brumm drew inspiration for scripts from his own experiences in watching his daughters play, which he described was "as natural to them as breathing".[8][9][25] The program's scripts show how children can use gameplay to learn lessons and integrate the world of adults into their own; Brumm noticed how his children would recreate interactions such as visits to the doctor, through roleplay.[8][32] Pearson stated that gameplay represents children's first experiences of collaboration, cooperation, responsibility and emotions such as jealousy.[8] Brumm discovered the importance of play-based learning after his daughter struggled with formal education, which led him to exclude elements of literacy and numeracy in Bluey and focus on the depiction of life skills.[9] Brumm stated that he wanted the series to depict his experience as a parent rather than aim for children to be explicitly taught something. His creative aims were to make children laugh, and show parents what children can learn while engaged in play.[28]

The characters of Bluey each represent a particular dog breed, some of which are drawn from Brumm's personal life. Brumm had a Blue Heeler named Bluey throughout his childhood, in addition to a Dalmatian named Chloe. Bandit is based on a Blue Heeler belonging to his father's friend. Bandit's career as an archaeologist was inspired by Brumm's older sibling Adam.[8]

Brumm writes the majority of episode scripts, with Aspinwall labelling the series as an "observational" show, depicting Brumm's family life, and producer Sam Moor describing it as "[Brumm's] life on screen";[29][30] when producing the pilot, Brumm's daughters were aged between four and six, like Bluey and Bingo. Brumm's process for writing sometimes begins with making notes about his family's experiences; including games his children play and the conflict that arises between them. For this reason, Brumm has described the process as a challenge for other writers on the series. Moor stated that there are few writers besides Brumm, mostly animators already working on the series.[8] The program was designed to be a co-viewing experience for parents and their children to enjoy together.[9][27] Brumm described the process of writing each episode as "a chance to make a short film".[33] The conflict and humour in the episodes stems from Bandit's relationship with his daughters.[30] Bluey has been described as "rough and tumble" by Pearson, with both her and Bingo being seen to subvert the stereotypes of female characters, but rather have the characteristics of real puppies. This has led to uninformed viewers questioning if the characters are boys or girls. Pearson has credited the decision of Bluey and Bingo being girls to resemble the real families of Brumm, Aspinwall and McCormack.[29] In relation to the humour of the series, Brumm has stated there is a lot of physical activity and "craziness".[33]

Storyboarding and animation

Bluey is animated in-house at Ludo Studio in Brisbane, in Fortitude Valley, where approximately 50 people work on the program.[28][29] Costa Kassab serves as one of the art directors of the series, who has been credited with drawing the locations of the series which are based on real places in Brisbane, including parks and shopping centres.[29] Locations featured in the series have included Queen Street Mall and South Bank, as well as landmarks such as The Big Pelican on the Noosa River.[13] Brumm determines the specific locations which are to be included. Post-production of the series takes place externally in South Brisbane.[29]

Approximately fifteen episodes of the series are developed by the studio at any one time across a range of production stages. After story ideas are conceived, the script-writing process takes place for up to two months. The episodes are then storyboarded by artists, who produce 500 to 800 drawings over three weeks while consulting the writer's script. After the storyboard is finished, a black and white animatic is produced, to which the dialogue recorded independently by voice artists is added. The episodes are then worked on for four weeks by animators, background artists, designers, and layout teams. The entire production team views a near-completed episode of Bluey on a Friday. Pearson stated that over time, the viewings developed into test screenings, with members of production bring their family, friends and children to watch the episode. The complete production process for an episode takes three to four months.[29][34] Moor described the program's colour palette as "a vibrant pastel".[34]

During the lockdown period of the 2019–22 COVID-19 pandemic, the production staff of 50 were required to work on the episodes remotely from home. A skeleton crew of three remained working on the series at the studio.[8] After restrictions eased in May, this number increased to ten and later 20.[35] Production on the third series concluded in April 2022.[34]

Casting

The series features David McCormack, from the band Custard, as the voice of Bluey's father, Bandit. He was initially approached to read what he assumed would only be "a couple of lines", but ended up voicing Bandit for the entire pilot. McCormack performs his voice work for the series remotely in Sydney, which is then sent to the production company in Brisbane. He stated that he does not hear any other voice actors or view footage while recording, and that he does not alter his own voice to produce Bandit's dialogue.[5] Melanie Zanetti provides the voice of Bluey's mother, Chilli; she became interested in the series after reading the script for the pilot.[6]

Brumm's mother, Chris Brumm, voices Nana Heeler, while his younger brother, Dan Brumm, voices Uncle Stripe, as well as working as a sound designer on the series.[8][13] The child characters of the series, including Bluey and Bingo, are voiced by some of the children of the program's production crew.[1][2]

Music

Joff Bush serves as one of the primary composers of Bluey, writing half of the soundtrack himself and leading a group of additional composers, including David Barber.[36][37] Bush graduated from the Queensland Conservatorium, where he met Pearson, and before Bluey worked on series such as The Family Law and Australian Survivor. Bush has stated that each episode has its own unique musical style, and he likes to become involved in the episodes as they are scripted. Live instruments are regularly played for the recordings.[36] Every episode of Bluey is individually scored, a decision made by Brumm, who was inspired by the original compositions for Charlie and Lola while working on the series in the United Kingdom.[26]

Classical music is regularly used throughout the underscore, with pieces such as Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" and Mozart's "Rondo Alla Turca (from Sonata No. 11)" being interpreted by composers.[38] A movement from The Planets by Gustav Holst is prominently featured in the episode "Sleepytime".[39] Bush composed the theme song for Bluey, and he has been nominated for several APRA Screen Music Awards, in 2019 for the soundtrack of the episode "Teasing" and in 2020 for "Flat Pack".[36][40][41] He was nominated for the APRA Award for Most Performed Screen Composer – Overseas in 2022, and the show's score won Best Music for Children's Programming in 2021.[42][43] The music for Bluey is licensed by Universal Music Publishing on behalf of BBC Worldwide Music Publishing.[40] The first soundtrack for the series by Bush, Bluey: The Album, was released on 22 January 2021.[44] It debuted at number one on the ARIA Albums Chart,[45] and became the first children's album to reach the top of the charts in Australia.[46] It won Best Children's Album at the 2021 ARIA Music Awards,[47] and won the 2021 APRA Award for Best Soundtrack Album.[42] A second soundtrack, Dance Mode!, is scheduled for release on 21 April 2023.[48]

Discover more about Development related topics

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) is the national broadcaster of Australia. It is principally funded by direct grants from the Australian Government and is administered by a government-appointed board. The ABC is a publicly-owned body that is politically independent and fully accountable, with its charter enshrined in legislation, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. ABC Commercial, a profit-making division of the corporation, also helps to generate funding for content provision.

Queensland

Queensland

Queensland is a state situated in northeastern Australia, and is the second-largest and third-most populous of the Australian states. It is bordered by the Northern Territory, South Australia and New South Wales to the west, southwest and south respectively. To the east, Queensland is bordered by the Coral Sea and the Pacific Ocean; to its north is the Torres Strait, separating the Australian mainland from Papua New Guinea. With an area of 1,852,642 square kilometres (715,309 sq mi), Queensland is the world's sixth-largest sub-national entity; it is larger than all but 15 countries. Due to its size, Queensland's geographical features and climates are diverse, including tropical rainforests, rivers, coral reefs, mountain ranges and sandy beaches in its tropical and sub-tropical coastal regions, as well as deserts and savanna in the semi-arid and desert climatic regions of its interior.

Freelancer

Freelancer

Freelance, freelancer, or freelance worker, are terms commonly used for a person who is self-employed and not necessarily committed to a particular employer long-term. Freelance workers are sometimes represented by a company or a temporary agency that resells freelance labor to clients; others work independently or use professional associations or websites to get work.

Peppa Pig

Peppa Pig

Peppa Pig is a British preschool animated television series by Astley Baker Davies. The show follows Peppa, an anthropomorphic female piglet, and her family, as well as her peers portrayed as other animals. The show first aired on 31 May 2004. The seventh season began broadcasting on 5 March 2021. Peppa Pig has been broadcast in over 180 countries.

MIPCOM

MIPCOM

MIPCOM is an annual trade show held in the French town of Cannes, traditionally in the month of October and running for 4 days. It is owned and organized by Reed MIDEM, a subsidiary of Reed Exhibitions.

Brisbane

Brisbane

Brisbane, also known as Meanjin in the Indigenous Turrbal language, is the capital and most populous city of Queensland, and the third-most populous city in Australia and Oceania with a population of approximately 2.6 million. Brisbane lies at the centre of South East Queensland, which includes several other regional centres and cities. The central business district is situated within a peninsula of the Brisbane River about 15 km (9 mi) from its mouth at Moreton Bay. Brisbane is located in the hilly floodplain of the Brisbane River Valley between Moreton Bay and the Taylor and D'Aguilar mountain ranges. It sprawls across several local government areas, most centrally the City of Brisbane. The demonym of Brisbane is Brisbanite.

ABC Kids (Australia)

ABC Kids (Australia)

ABC Kids is the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's part-time channel, broadcasting shows between the hours of 5 am and 6:30 pm for children under 6 years old in each local Australian channel. It shares the same bandwidth as ABC TV Plus which broadcasts outside ABC Kids' scheduled hours and supplements the flagship ABC TV channel with extra adult-oriented programming. It has an educational program for children ages 2 to 13 called "ABC Reading Eggs" for Australia, internationally called "Reading Eggs" and owned by Edmentum.

Sara Smilansky

Sara Smilansky

Sara Smilansky was a professor at Tel Aviv University in Israel and was a senior researcher for The Henrietta Szold Institute: The National Institute for Research in the Behavioral Sciences for the Ruth Bressler Center for Research in Education. She has been a visiting professor for many well known universities such as the University of Maryland, College Park. She focused her research on play training and its effects on children. Her research included studying both Israeli and American, as well as advantaged and disadvantaged, children. She wrote multiple books on children's play and its relation to learning, the effect of divorce and death on children, and the development of twins. Her research on children's play included working with Jean Piaget.

Dog breed

Dog breed

A dog breed is a particular strain of dog that was purposefully bred by humans to perform specific tasks, such as herding, hunting, and guarding. Dogs are the most variable mammal on Earth, with artificial selection producing around 450 globally recognized breeds. These breeds possess distinct traits related to morphology, which include body size, skull shape, tail phenotype, fur type, body shape, and coat colour. Their behavioral traits include guarding, herding, and hunting, and personality traits such as hyper-social behavior, boldness, and aggression. Most breeds were derived from small numbers of founders within the last 200 years. As a result, today dogs are the most abundant carnivore species and are dispersed around the world.

Gender role

Gender role

A gender role, also known as a sex role, is a social role encompassing a range of behaviors and attitudes that are generally considered acceptable, appropriate, or desirable for a person based on that person's sex. Gender roles are usually centered on conceptions of masculinity and femininity, although there are exceptions and variations.

Fortitude Valley, Queensland

Fortitude Valley, Queensland

Fortitude Valley is an inner suburb of the City of Brisbane, the state capital of Queensland, Australia. In the 2021 census, Fortitude Valley had a population of 9,708 people. The suburb features two pedestrian malls at Brunswick Street Mall and Chinatown, and is one of the hubs of Brisbane's nightlife, renowned for its nightclubs, bars and adult entertainment.

Queen Street Mall

Queen Street Mall

The Queen Street Mall is a pedestrian mall located on Queen Street in the centre of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. The mall extends approximately 500 metres (1,600 ft) from George Street to Edward Street, and has more than 700 retailers over 40,000 square metres (430,000 sq ft) of retail space, which includes six major shopping centres. It was intended to bring more people into the central business district.

Themes

Queenslander residential architecture inspires the designs of animated houses in the series.
Queenslander residential architecture inspires the designs of animated houses in the series.

A central theme of the series is the influence of a supportive family; this is reflected in the relationships between Bluey, Bingo, Bandit and Chilli.[2] The Heeler family are presented as a nuclear family. Brumm was eager to reflect contemporary parenting practices, with both adults shown to be working parents; Bandit as an archaeologist and Chilli working part-time in airport security.[2][6][26] Bethany Hiatt of The West Australian explains that the series depicts the realities of modern-day fatherhood, with Bandit seen regularly doing housework and engaging in imaginative play with his children.[27] Chilli's role as a mother is explored as she balances both work and family life.[49] Her struggles with newborn motherhood and encounters of competitiveness in a parenting group are depicted through flashbacks of Bluey experiencing significant developmental milestones.[50] Both parents are shown to acknowledge and validate the emotions of their children, such as Bluey's distress after the death of a bird.[23][51] Bluey and Bingo are shown to navigate their sibling relationship throughout the episodes, learning how to work together, compromise, and resolve conflicts.[33][52] Episodes detail the family's contemporary domestic lifestyle, with Philippa Chandler of The Guardian describing the series as "social realism".[30][53]

Jacaranda trees are featured in the series as an example of flora in Australia.
Jacaranda trees are featured in the series as an example of flora in Australia.

The series also depicts Australian contemporary culture, and is set in semi-tropical Queensland.[24] The animation of Australian architecture in the series is designed to reflect the typical Queenslander residential designs of Brisbane; high-set suburban dwellings with characteristic verandas, against representations of Brisbane skylines.[5] The characters speak with Australian accents in local and international airings.[6] The series has a focus on the Australian sense of humour with dry wit frequently expressed through the dialogue.[30][49] Several episodes detail the exploration of Australia's climate and nature,[5] with characters encountering Australian wildlife such as fruit bats, wallabies, kookaburras and ibises.[26] Flora of Australia are also depicted in the series, including Poinciana trees and Jacaranda trees.[26] The series explores Australian sport through the inclusion of rugby league; the Maroons and the Blues are featured in a depiction of the State of Origin series.[54] However, Brumm has expressed that he did not want to exaggerate the stereotypes of Australia.[26]

The series advocates the importance of play throughout childhood. Bluey and Bingo are the vehicle used to display this theme; the episode "Trampoline" features Bandit imploring Bluey to continue creating new games to play.[9] The siblings engage in imaginative play during "mundane" activities such as visiting the doctor or going to the supermarket.[30][32] The parents are shown to engage in the play with their children.[51] Bluey and Bingo also engage in imaginative play with their friends; learning lessons such as the importance of following the rules.[55] The characters also learn lessons such as the influence of technology, the economy and personal finance through their gameplay.[52][55] Pearson has stated that the characters experience emotions such as jealousy and regret through their gameplay. He commented that, while there is no antagonist in the series, these emotions form the central conflicts of the program.[29]

The character of Jack is shown to have attention deficit issues; he states that he "can't sit still or remember anything". Upon the online character announcement, parents praised the representation of children with attention deficit issues.[19] Dougie was introduced as a profoundly deaf character who uses Auslan to communicate with his mother in the episode "Turtleboy"; the character is shown signing but it is not the focus of the episode's story. Consultants were involved to authentically animate the Auslan signs, and viewers praised the representation. The episode "Onesies" alludes to the fact that Chilli's sister Brandy cannot have children, addressing the topic of fertility without specifically labelling the reason why. It was also reported that "The Show" subtly approaches pregnancy loss.[23]

Discover more about Themes related topics

Father

Father

A father is the male parent of a child. Besides the paternal bonds of a father to his children, the father may have a parental, legal, and social relationship with the child that carries with it certain rights and obligations. A biological father is the male genetic contributor to the creation of the infant, through sexual intercourse or sperm donation. A biological father may have legal obligations to a child not raised by him, such as an obligation of monetary support. An adoptive father is a man who has become the child's parent through the legal process of adoption. A putative father is a man whose biological relationship to a child is alleged but has not been established. A stepfather is a male who is the husband of a child's mother and they may form a family unit, but who generally does not have the legal rights and responsibilities of a parent in relation to the child.

Mother

Mother

A mother is the female parent of a child. A woman may be considered a mother by virtue of having given birth, by raising a child who may or may not be her biological offspring, or by supplying her ovum for fertilisation in the case of gestational surrogacy.

Guardian Australia

Guardian Australia

Guardian Australia is the Australian website of the British global online and print newspaper, The Guardian.

Culture of Australia

Culture of Australia

The culture of Australia is primarily a Western culture, originally derived from Britain but also influenced by the unique geography of Australia and the cultural input of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander and other Australian people. The British colonisation of Australia began in 1788, and waves of multi-ethnic migration followed. Evidence of a significant Anglo-Celtic heritage includes the predominance of the English language, the existence of a democratic system of government drawing upon the British traditions of Westminster government, parliamentarianism and constitutional monarchy, American constitutionalist and federalist traditions, and Christianity as the dominant religion.

Australian English phonology

Australian English phonology

Australian English (AuE) is a non-rhotic variety of English spoken by most native-born Australians. Phonologically, it is one of the most regionally homogeneous language varieties in the world. Australian English is notable for vowel length contrasts which are absent from most English dialects.

Australian comedy

Australian comedy

Australian comedy refers to the comedy and humour performed in or about Australia or by the people of Australia. Australian humour can be traced to various origins, and today is manifested in a diversity of cultural practices and pursuits. Writers like Henry Lawson and Banjo Paterson helped to establish a tradition of laconic, ironic and irreverent wit in Australian literature, while Australian politicians and cultural stereotypes have each proved rich sources of comedy for artists from poet C. J. Dennis to satirist Barry Humphries to iconic film maker Paul Hogan, each of whom have given wide circulation to Australian slang.

Deadpan

Deadpan

Deadpan, dry humour, or dry-wit humour is the deliberate display of emotional neutrality or no emotion, commonly as a form of comedic delivery to contrast with the ridiculousness or absurdity of the subject matter. The delivery is meant to be blunt, ironic, laconic, or apparently unintentional.

Climate of Australia

Climate of Australia

Australia's climate is governed mostly by its size and by the hot, sinking air of the subtropical high pressure belt. This moves north-west and north-east with the seasons. The climate is variable, with frequent droughts lasting several seasons, thought to be caused in part by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Australia has a wide variety of climates due to its large geographical size. The largest part of Australia is desert or semi-arid. Only the south-east and south-west corners have a temperate climate and moderately fertile soil. The northern part of the country has a tropical climate, varying between grasslands and desert. Australia holds many heat-related records: the continent has the hottest extended region year-round, the areas with the hottest summer climate, and the highest sunshine duration.

Fauna of Australia

Fauna of Australia

The fauna of Australia consists of a huge variety of animals; some 46% of birds, 69% of mammals, 94% of amphibians, and 93% of reptiles that inhabit the continent are endemic to it. This high level of endemism can be attributed to the continent's long geographic isolation, tectonic stability, and the effects of a unique pattern of climate change on the soil and flora over geological time. A unique feature of Australia's fauna is the relative scarcity of native placental mammals. Consequently, the marsupials – a group of mammals that raise their young in a pouch, including the macropods, possums and dasyuromorphs – occupy many of the ecological niches placental animals occupy elsewhere in the world. Australia is home to two of the five known extant species of monotremes and has numerous venomous species, which include the platypus, spiders, scorpions, octopus, jellyfish, molluscs, stonefish, and stingrays. Uniquely, Australia has more venomous than non-venomous species of snakes.

Ibis

Ibis

The ibises are a group of long-legged wading birds in the family Threskiornithidae, that inhabit wetlands, forests and plains. "Ibis" derives from the Latin and Ancient Greek word for this group of birds. It also occurs in the scientific name of the cattle egret mistakenly identified in 1757 as being the sacred ibis.

Flora of Australia

Flora of Australia

The flora of Australia comprises a vast assemblage of plant species estimated to over 30,000 vascular and 14,000 non-vascular plants, 250,000 species of fungi and over 3,000 lichens. The flora has strong affinities with the flora of Gondwana, and below the family level has a highly endemic angiosperm flora whose diversity was shaped by the effects of continental drift and climate change since the Cretaceous. Prominent features of the Australian flora are adaptations to aridity and fire which include scleromorphy and serotiny. These adaptations are common in species from the large and well-known families Proteaceae (Banksia), Myrtaceae, and Fabaceae.

Delonix regia

Delonix regia

Delonix regia is a species of flowering plant in the bean family Fabaceae, subfamily Caesalpinioideae native to Madagascar. It is noted for its fern-like leaves and flamboyant display of orange-red flowers over summer. In many tropical parts of the world it is grown as an ornamental tree and in English it is given the name royal poinciana, flamboyant, phoenix flower, flame of the forest, or flame tree.

Episodes

The first series premiered in Australia on ABC Kids on 1 October 2018, with 26 episodes airing daily throughout October.[1] The following 25 episodes of the series began airing on 1 April 2019.[56] The final episode of the first series, a Christmas special, aired on 12 December 2019.[57] It was reported in March 2019 that production had begun on a second series of 52 episodes; the order was officially announced in May.[9][49] The second series premiered on 17 March 2020, with the first 26 episodes airing daily, through April.[58][59] The remaining episodes began airing on 25 October 2020, and were followed by a Christmas special which aired on 1 December 2020, and an Easter special airing on 4 April 2021.[60][61][62] Preliminary discussions for the third series had begun by April 2020; the series order was made official in October.[8][35][60] The third series began airing on 5 September 2021 with a Father's Day-themed special,[63] followed by further episode blocks from 22 November 2021,[64] and 13 June 2022.[65]

SeriesEpisodesOriginally aired
First airedLast aired
152261 October 2018 (2018-10-01)26 October 2018 (2018-10-26)
261 April 2019 (2019-04-01)12 December 2019 (2019-12-12)
2522617 March 2020 (2020-03-17)11 April 2020 (2020-04-11)
2625 October 2020 (2020-10-25)4 April 2021 (2021-04-04)
352[66]265 September 2021 (2021-09-05)16 December 2021 (2021-12-16)
1113 June 2022 (2022-06-13)23 June 2022 (2022-06-23)
152023 (2023)[67]TBA

Release

Broadcast

In June 2019, the international broadcasting rights to Bluey were acquired by The Walt Disney Company, with plans to premiere on the Disney Junior television network and be distributed on the Disney+ streaming service in all territories (excluding Australia, New Zealand and China) from late 2019.[53][68][69] The series premiered on Disney Junior in the United States on 9 September 2019 and was later distributed on Disney+ on 22 January 2020 and in the United Kingdom on 1 October 2020.[70][71][72][73] The series notably features the original voice actors while airing overseas, after producers were initially asked to replace the Australian accents of the characters.[6] The second series debuted on Disney Channel in the United States on 10 July 2020.[74] The distribution deal with Disney originally encompassed the first two series of the program;[68][75] the third series was acquired in May 2021.[76] The first half of the third series debuted on Disney+ in the United States, the United Kingdom, and other licensed territories on 10 August 2022, and was followed on Disney's television networks at a later date.[34][77]

In October 2019, Bluey debuted in New Zealand, airing on TVNZ 2 and streaming on TVNZ OnDemand.[78][79] The first series made its Australian pay-TV premiere on CBeebies on 4 May 2020.[80] It made its free-to-air television debut on CBeebies in April 2021 in the United Kingdom, Singapore and Malaysia.[81][82][83]

Home media releases

The series was first distributed on DVD in Australia by Universal Sony Pictures Home Entertainment and BBC Studios, with the first two volumes, entitled Magic Xylophone and Other Stories and Horsey Ride and Other Stories released on 30 October 2019. They were followed by further volumes at later dates.[84] In the United States, the first season was released on DVD in two volumes in early 2020.[85] In the United Kingdom, the first volume was released on DVD in October 2021.[86]

Discover more about Release related topics

The Walt Disney Company

The Walt Disney Company

The Walt Disney Company, commonly known as Disney, is an American multinational, mass media and entertainment conglomerate that is headquartered at the Walt Disney Studios complex in Burbank, California. Disney was founded on October 16, 1923, by brothers Walt and Roy O. Disney as Disney Brothers Studio; it also operated under the names Walt Disney Studio and Walt Disney Productions before changing its name to The Walt Disney Company in 1986. Early in its existence, the company established itself as a leader in the animation industry, with the creation of the widely popular character Mickey Mouse, who first appeared in Steamboat Willie, which used synchronized sound, to become the first post-produced sound cartoon. The character would go on to become the company's mascot.

Disney Junior

Disney Junior

Disney Junior is an American pay television network owned by the Walt Disney Television unit of The Walt Disney Company through Disney Branded Television. Aimed mainly at children two to seven years old, its programming consists of original first-run television series, films, and select other third-party programming.

Disney+

Disney+

Disney+ is an American subscription video on-demand over-the-top streaming service owned and operated by the Media and Entertainment Distribution division of The Walt Disney Company. The service primarily distributes films and television series produced by The Walt Disney Studios and Walt Disney Television, with dedicated content hubs for the brands Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, and National Geographic, as well as Star in some regions. Original films and television series are also distributed on Disney+.

TVNZ 2

TVNZ 2

TVNZ 2 is the second New Zealand television channel owned and operated by the state-owned broadcaster Television New Zealand (TVNZ). It targets a younger audience than its sister channel, TVNZ 1. TVNZ 2's line up consists of dramas, comedies, and reality TV shows. A small number are produced in New Zealand which are either of a comedic, soap opera or reality nature, with rest of the line-up imported from mostly a Warner Bros. or HiT Entertainment or Disney catalogue or a FremantleMedia or Hasbro or Endemol soap opera/reality TV catalogue.

Pay television

Pay television

Pay television, also known as subscription television, premium television or, when referring to an individual service, a premium channel, refers to subscription-based television services, usually provided by multichannel television providers, but also increasingly via digital terrestrial, and streaming television. In the United States, subscription television began in the late 1970s and early 1980s in the form of encrypted analog over-the-air broadcast television which could be decrypted with special equipment. The concept rapidly expanded through the multi-channel transition and into the post-network era. Other parts of the world beyond the United States, such as France and Latin America have also offered encrypted analog terrestrial signals available for subscription.

Reception

Critical reception

Bluey has enjoyed a positive critical reception.[30] The series received a seal of approval from Common Sense Media, with reviewer Emily Ashby commending its positive family and social themes.[87] Bluey was praised by Philippa Chandler of The Guardian for its "sharp script" and depiction of everyday family life, while commenting that its Queensland background set it apart from other cartoons on television.[30] Readers of The New York Times's parenting blog submitted Bluey as their favourite children's show, describing it as charming, smart and "very real".[88] The series was called "laugh-out-loud funny" by Stephanie Convery of The Guardian, who credited its humour to the "quirky behaviour" of the child characters.[89] In 2019, TV Week listed Bluey at number 98 in its list of the 101 greatest Australian television shows of all time. Despite only being on air since 2018, the magazine wrote that Bluey "stole Australia's hearts faster than any other cartoon character" in what it described as a "cute, funny and modern" series.[90] The series was listed at number 14 in Junkee's list of 50 television programs that defined the decade, in which it was described as "an absolute delight".[91] In a list published by Rolling Stone of the top 100 sitcoms of all time, Bluey was listed at number 96, the only Australian series to be featured.[92] The episode "Sleepytime" has been well received, with director Richard Jeffery winning an Australian Directors' Guild Award in 2021, and the episode winning the 2022 Prix Jeunesse International Award in the category of TV – Up to 6 Years Fiction (Children's).[39][93]

The series received praise for its constructive parenting messages and depiction of Bandit Heeler as a positive father figure. The character was commended for his patient nature, willingness to do housework and play with his children.[27] Jennifer McClellan of USA Today described Bandit as "sarcastic, sympathetic and silly".[52] He has been received as "more emotionally intelligent" than the father from Peppa Pig.[30] Reporters for The Guardian wrote that the show's messages about parenting align with published literature on parental wellbeing, noting how the show depicts the importance of play and learning social skills in child development.[51] McClellan acknowledged the family dynamic of the characters; she described Chilli as the "voice of reason" and noted how Bluey and Bingo learn to navigate their sibling relationship.[52][94] Convery commented that the sisters are accurate depictions of children, and that the roles of the parents are not presented as stereotypical of their respective genders.[89] The series has also received online praise for its representation of attention deficit issues through the character of Jack, and the inclusion of Auslan through Dougie, a profoundly deaf character.[19][23]

The website of the series was criticised for, in the character description of Chilli, suggesting that her return to part-time work prevents her from being as involved a parent as other mothers; the description was later altered.[95] A separate incident saw an apology issued by the ABC in August 2020 in relation to the usage of the term "ooga booga" in the episodes "Teasing" and "Flat Pack", which was described as a term with "racial connotations and a problematic history for Indigenous Australians" through a viewer complaint.[96][97] The ABC claimed that the term had only been intended as "irreverent rhyming slang made up by children", and maintained their commitment to addressing discrimination.[97] The two episodes were temporarily removed from rotations before being edited to remove the term, which prompted mixed reactions from viewers.[96][97]

Viewership

Bluey has received consistently high viewership on ABC Kids in Australia, becoming the most watched children's program across all channels on broadcast television in 2018 and 2019.[27][84] The highest-rating live broadcast of the program, the final episode of the second series, "Easter", premiered on 4 April 2021 to 607,000 viewers.[98][99] It was the most-watched broadcast across all free-to-air multichannels, and the third most-watched broadcast overall.[98][99] In 2019, the series was the most-watched program through time shifting.[58][100]

In March 2019, it was reported that Bluey had become the most downloaded program in the history of ABC's video on demand and catch up TV service ABC iview, with 21.3 million total episode plays.[27] Within one year of the show's premiere, this figure had risen to 152 million, and by May 2020, there had been 261 million plays of episodes from the first series.[8][101] It was also reported that the second series had totalled 43 million episode plays by May.[101] By May 2021, episodes from both series had generated over 480 million plays.[76]

Awards and nominations

List of awards and nominations received by Bluey
Award Year Recipient(s) and nominee(s) Category Result Ref.
AACTA Awards 2019 Bluey Best Children's Program Won [102]
2020 Won [103]
2021 Won [104]
2022 Won [105]
APRA Screen Music Awards 2019 Joff Bush (for "Teasing") Best Music for Children's Television Nominated [40]
2020 Joff Bush (for "Flat Pack") Nominated [41]
2021 Joff Bush Best Music for Children's Programming Won [42]
Bluey: The Album Best Soundtrack Album Won
2022 Joff Bush Most Performed Screen Composer – Overseas Pending [43]
ARIA Music Awards 2021 Bluey: The Album Best Children's Album Won [47]
Asian Academy Creative Awards 2020 Bluey Best Preschool Programme Won [106]
2022 Bluey (for "Rain" and "Fairytale") Won [107]
Australian Book Industry Awards 2020 Bluey (for "The Beach", Penguin) Children's Picture Book of the Year (Ages 0–6) Won [108][109]
Book of the Year Won
2021 Bluey (for "The Creek", Penguin) Children's Picture Book of the Year (Ages 0–6) Nominated [110]
Australian Directors' Guild Awards 2021 Richard Jeffery (for "Sleepytime") Best Direction in a Children's TV or SVOD Drama Program Episode Won [93]
Australian Toy Association 2020 Bluey (Moose Toys) Preschool License of the Year Won [74]
BAFTA Children & Young People Awards 2022 Bluey International Won [111]
Banff World Media Festival Rockie Awards 2021 Bluey Animation: Preschool (0–4) Won [112]
Critics' Choice Television Awards 2021 Bluey[note 1] Best Animated Series Nominated [113]
International Emmy Kids Awards 2019 Bluey Kids: Preschool Won [114]
Kidscreen Awards 2021 Bluey Preschool Programming – Best Animated Series Won [115]
Creative Talent – Best Directing Won
Creative Talent – Best Writing Won
Creative Talent – Best Music Won
2023 Bluey (for Series 3) Preschool Programming – Best Animated Series Pending [116]
Logie Awards 2019 Bluey Most Outstanding Children's Program Won [117]
2022 Won [118]
Prix Jeunesse International Awards 2020 Bluey TV – Up to 6 Years Fiction (Children's) Nominated [119]
2022 Bluey (for "Sleepytime") Won [39]
Screen Producers Australia Awards 2019 Bluey Animated Series Production of the Year Won [120]
Screen Business Export of the Year Won (Tied)[note 2]
2022 Bluey (for Series 2) Children's Series Production of the Year Won [121]
TV Blackbox Awards 2021 Bluey Most Popular Children's Show Won [122]
TV Tonight Awards 2019 Bluey Best Kid's Show Won [123]
2020 Won [124]
2021 Won [125]
2022 Won [126]

Discover more about Reception related topics

Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media

Common Sense Media (CSM) is an organization that reviews and provides ratings for media and technology with the goal of providing information on their suitability for children. It also funds research on the role of media in the lives of children and advocates publicly for child-friendly policies and laws regarding media.

Junkee

Junkee

Junkee is an Australian popular culture and news website run by new media company Junkee Media. It covers various topics including film, university, food, TV, politics, travel, career, health and Internet culture. Its target demographic is 18- to 29-year-olds.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone is an American monthly magazine that focuses on music, politics, and popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, California, in 1967 by Jann Wenner, and the music critic Ralph J. Gleason. It was first known for its coverage of rock music and political reporting by Hunter S. Thompson. In the 1990s, the magazine broadened and shifted its focus to a younger readership interested in youth-oriented television shows, film actors, and popular music. It has since returned to its traditional mix of content, including music, entertainment, and politics.

Australian Directors' Guild

Australian Directors' Guild

The Australian Directors' Guild (ADG) is an industry guild representing the interests of film, television, commercials and digital media directors, including documentary makers and animators, throughout Australia. With its headquarters in Sydney, the ADG has branches in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia. As of 2022 the president of ADG is Rowan Woods.

Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians

Indigenous Australians or Australian First Nations are people with familial heritage from, and membership in, the ethnic groups that lived in Australia before British colonisation. They consist of two distinct groups: the Aboriginal peoples of the Australian mainland and Tasmania, and the Torres Strait Islander peoples from the seas between Queensland and Papua New Guinea. The term Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples or the person's specific cultural group, is often preferred, though the terms First Nations of Australia, First Peoples of Australia and First Australians are also increasingly common; 812,728 people self-identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin in the 2021 Australian Census, representing 3.2% of the total population of Australia. Of these Indigenous Australians, 91.4% identified as Aboriginal; 4.2% identified as Torres Strait Islander; while 4.4% identified with both groups. Since 1995, the Australian Aboriginal flag and the Torres Strait Islander flag have been among the official flags of Australia.

ABC iview

ABC iview

ABC iview is a video on demand and catch-up TV service run by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Currently iview video content can only be viewed by users in Australia. As of 2016, ABC iview attracts around 50 million plays monthly and accounts for around half of the total time streamed by Australian TV video services.

AACTA Awards

AACTA Awards

The Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards, known as the AACTA Awards, are presented annually by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). The awards recognise excellence in the film and television industry, both locally and internationally, including the producers, directors, actors, writers, and cinematographers. It is the most prestigious awards ceremony for the Australian film and television industry. They are generally considered to be the Australian counterpart of the Academy Awards for the U.S. and the BAFTA Awards for the U.K.

9th AACTA Awards

9th AACTA Awards

The 9th Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards is an award's ceremony to celebrate the best of Australian films and television of 2019. The main ceremony was held at The Star in Sydney and was televised on the Seven Network. First awards were presented on 4 December 2019. The recipient of the Longford Lyell Award was actor and filmmaker Sam Neill.

AACTA Award for Best Children's Television Series

AACTA Award for Best Children's Television Series

The Australian Film Institute Award for Best Children's Television Drama is awarded annually by the Australian Film Institute as part of the awards in television for excellence in children's drama. The award commenced in 1991 and in 2009 an additional category for Best Children's Television Animation was awarded.

10th AACTA Awards

10th AACTA Awards

The 10th Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards is an award's ceremony to celebrate the best of Australian films and television of 2020. The main ceremony was held at The Star in Sydney and televised on Foxtel Arts and the Seven Network.

11th AACTA Awards

11th AACTA Awards

The 11th Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards is an award's ceremony to celebrate the best of Australian films and television of 2021. The main ceremony occurred on 8 December 2021 at the Sydney Opera House and was broadcast on Network 10 and Fox Arena, returning to Network 10 after a six year absence.

12th AACTA Awards

12th AACTA Awards

The 12th Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards was an award's ceremony to celebrate the best of Australian films and television of 2022. The main ceremony occurred on 7 December 2022 at the Hordern Pavilion in Sydney and was broadcast on Network 10 and Fox Arena. The recipient of the Longford Lyell Award was costume, production and set designer Catherine Martin. The recipient of the Trailblazer Award was actor Chris Hemsworth.

Other media

Books

In April 2019, BBC Studios entered a partnership with Penguin Random House Australia with a deal to publish three Bluey books before the end of 2019.[127] "The Beach", "Fruit Bat", and a sticker activity book entitled "Time to Play", were released on 5 November 2019.[128] All three books were recognised as the highest-selling releases in the weekly Australian book charts of November 2019,[129][130] and had sold a combined total of 350,000 copies by January 2020.[131] The combined sales of the first nine books reached 1 million in June 2020;[132] and the figure for all books had reached 5 million by October 2022.[133] In September 2020, the partnership with Penguin Random House was expanded to include global distribution rights, allowing the books to be released in the United States and the United Kingdom.[134]

Merchandise

Moose Toys was named as the global toy partner for Bluey in June 2019; the company announced that toys would be released in Australia by the end of 2019, and later in the United States.[135] Plush character toys of Bluey and Bingo were released in November, and a character figurine set was released in December.[136] The plush Bluey topped the Toys "R" Us release chart of Christmas 2019, while the demand for the plush Bingo exceeded the number of toys being supplied to stores.[137][138] By December, over 100,000 plush character toys had been sold in Australia.[138] The toy line was launched in the United States in June 2020.[74][139]

In January 2020, Bluey partnered with Bonds to release a clothing range for children, including pyjamas and socks featuring character designs.[140][141] A more comprehensive clothing range was made available at Australian retailers in March, including clothing, sleepwear and underwear.[142] A range of adult pyjamas were released in May 2020 through Peter Alexander stores, which became the fastest selling collection in the retailer's history.[143] Commemorative birth certificates featuring Bluey artwork were made available to Queensland residents from March.[144] Bauer Media Group released the first issue of a monthly Bluey magazine in May.[145] A lifestyle range of children's furniture was released in June 2020.[146]

Stage show

It was announced that a stage show based on Bluey was being developed in November 2019.[75] The live stage show, titled Bluey's Big Play, toured in fifty theatres around Australia and featured the characters from the series.[75][147] The tour was initially scheduled to begin in May 2020, but was delayed due to restrictions relating to the COVID-19 pandemic.[148] After eased restrictions, two preview performances were held at the Canberra Theatre Centre in January 2021 before further shows across the country.[149] Bluey's Big Play also toured the United States, debuting at the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in November 2022.[34][77] A balloon of the Bluey character appeared at Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in November 2022.[150]

Discover more about Other media related topics

List of Bluey books

List of Bluey books

Bluey is an Australian animated television series for preschool children that premiered on ABC Kids on 1 October 2018. In April 2019, BBC Studios entered a partnership with Penguin Random House Australia with a deal to publish three Bluey books before the end of 2019. "The Beach", "Fruit Bat", and a sticker activity book entitled "Time to Play", were released on 5 November 2019. All three books were recognised as the highest-selling releases in the weekly Australian book charts of November 2019, and had sold a combined total of 350,000 copies by January 2020. "The Beach" was the highest-selling title of 2019 and sold 129,516 copies in the two months after its release. Additional books; "Bob Bilby" and "Easter Fun!", a craft book, were released on 3 March 2020, followed by a colouring book entitled "Big Backyard" on 31 March, and "The Creek" on 28 April. The combined sales of the first nine books reached 1 million in June 2020; the combined sales of all books reached 5 million in October 2022. In September 2020, the partnership with Penguin Random House was expanded to include global distribution rights, allowing the books to be released in the United States and the United Kingdom. As of December 2022, 50 titles have been released or are scheduled to be released in Australia.

BBC Studios

BBC Studios

BBC Studios is a British content company. It is a commercial subsidiary of the BBC that was formed in April 2018 through the merger of the BBC's commercial production arm and the BBC's commercial international distribution arm, BBC Worldwide. BBC Studios creates, develops, produces, distributes, broadcasts, finances and sells content around the world, returning around £200 million to the BBC annually in dividends and content investment.

Penguin Random House

Penguin Random House

Penguin Random House LLC is an Anglo-American multinational conglomerate publishing company formed on July 1, 2013, from the merger of Penguin Group and Random House.

Moose Toys

Moose Toys

Moose Toys is an Australian-owned toy design, development and distribution company founded in 1985. Moose is headquartered in Australia, has over 600 staff and distributes to over 100 countries.

Stuffed toy

Stuffed toy

A stuffed toy is a toy doll with an outer fabric sewn from a textile and stuffed with flexible material. They are known by many names, such as plush toys, plushies, stuffed animals, and stuffies; in Britain and Australia, they may also be called soft toys or cuddly toys. The stuffed toy originated from the Steiff company of Germany in the late 19th century and gained popularity following the creation of the teddy bear in the United States in 1903, at the same time the German toy inventor Richard Steiff designed a similar bear. In 1903, Peter Rabbit was the first fictional character to be made into a patented stuffed toy. In the 1970s, London-based Hamleys, the world's oldest toy store, bought the rights to Paddington Bear stuffed toys. In the 1990s, Ty Warner created Beanie Babies, a series of animals stuffed with plastic pellets that were popular as collector's items.

Toys "R" Us

Toys "R" Us

Toys "R" Us is an American toy, clothing, and baby product retailer owned by Tru Kids and various others. The company was founded in 1957; its first store was built in April 1948, with its headquarters located in Parsippany-Troy Hills, New Jersey, in the New York metropolitan area.

Bonds (clothing)

Bonds (clothing)

Pacific Brands Underwear Group, known under its core brand Bonds, was an Australian manufacturer and is now a subsidiary of Hanesbrands. It is an importer of men's, women's and children's underwear and clothing. The head office is located at 115 Cotham Rd in Kew, Melbourne. They sell a range of clothing including underwear and sleepwear.

Peter Alexander (fashion designer)

Peter Alexander (fashion designer)

Peter Alexander is an Australian fashion designer known for pyjamas, loungewear and giftware.

Bauer Media Group

Bauer Media Group

Heinrich Bauer Publishing, trading as Bauer Media Group, is a German multimedia conglomerate headquartered in Hamburg. It operates worldwide and owns more than 600 magazines, over 400 digital products and 50 radio and TV stations, as well as print shops, postal, distribution and marketing services. Bauer has a workforce of approximately 11,000 in 17 countries.

Hulu Theater

Hulu Theater

The Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden is a theater located in New York City's Madison Square Garden. It seats between 2,000 and 5,600, and is used for concerts, shows, sports, meetings, and other events. It is located beneath the main Madison Square Garden arena that hosts MSG's larger events.

Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden

Madison Square Garden, colloquially known as The Garden or by its initials MSG, is a multi-purpose indoor arena in New York City. It is located in Midtown Manhattan between Seventh and Eighth avenues from 31st to 33rd Street, above Pennsylvania Station. It is the fourth venue to bear the name "Madison Square Garden"; the first two were located on Madison Square, on East 26th Street and Madison Avenue, with the third Madison Square Garden (1925) farther uptown at Eighth Avenue and 50th Street.

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is an annual parade in New York City presented by the U.S.-based department store chain Macy's. The Parade first took place in 1924, tying it for the second-oldest Thanksgiving parade in the United States with America's Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit. The three-hour parade is held in Manhattan, ending outside Macy's Herald Square, takes place from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Thanksgiving Day, and has been televised nationally on NBC since 1953. The Parade's workforce is made up of Macy's employees and their friends and family, all of whom work as volunteers.

Source: "Bluey (2018 TV series)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluey_(2018_TV_series).

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Notes
  1. ^ The series was listed under Disney+ as a distributor.[113]
  2. ^ Bluey was tied with Animal Kingdom.[120]
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