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Blood Simple

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Blood Simple
Blood-simple-movie-poster-md.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byJoel Coen
Written byJoel Coen
Ethan Coen
Produced byEthan Coen
Starring
CinematographyBarry Sonnenfeld
Edited by
Music byCarter Burwell
Production
companies
  • River Road Productions
  • Foxton Entertainment
Distributed byCircle Films
Release date
Running time
96 minutes[1]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$1.5 million[2]
Box office$2.7 million[2][3]

Blood Simple is a 1984 American independent neo-noir crime film written, edited, produced, and directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, and starring John Getz, Frances McDormand, Dan Hedaya, and M. Emmet Walsh. Its plot follows a Texas bartender who finds himself in the midst of a murder plot when his boss discovers that he is having a love affair with his wife. It was the directorial debut of the Coens and the first major film of cinematographer Barry Sonnenfeld, who later became a director, as well as the feature-film debut of McDormand.

The film's title derives from the Dashiell Hammett novel Red Harvest (1929), in which the term "blood simple" describes the addled, fearful mind-set of people after prolonged immersion in violent situations.[4] Stylistically, the film has been noted for its blending elements of neo-noir, pulp crime stories, and low-budget horror films.[5] In 2001, a director's cut was released, the same year that it was ranked number 98 on AFI's 100 Years...100 Thrills.

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Independent film

Independent film

An independent film, independent movie, indie film, or indie movie is a feature film or short film that is produced outside the major film studio system, in addition to being produced and distributed by independent entertainment companies. Independent films are sometimes distinguishable by their content and style and the way in which the filmmakers' personal artistic vision is realized. Usually, but not always, independent films are made with considerably lower budgets than major studio films.

Crime film

Crime film

Crime films, in the broadest sense, is a film genre inspired by and analogous to the crime fiction literary genre. Films of this genre generally involve various aspects of crime and its detection. Stylistically, the genre may overlap and combine with many other genres, such as drama or gangster film, but also include comedy, and, in turn, is divided into many sub-genres, such as mystery, suspense or noir.

Coen brothers

Coen brothers

Joel Daniel Coen and Ethan Jesse Coen, collectively known as the Coen brothers, are American filmmakers. Their films span many genres and styles, which they frequently subvert or parody. Their most acclaimed works include Raising Arizona (1987), Miller's Crossing (1990), Barton Fink (1991), Fargo (1996), The Big Lebowski (1998), O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000), No Country for Old Men (2007), True Grit (2010), Inside Llewyn Davis (2013), and The Ballad of Buster Scruggs (2018).

John Getz

John Getz

John William Getz is an American character actor. After starting his acting career on stage, he has appeared in numerous television series and films.

Frances McDormand

Frances McDormand

Frances Louise McDormand is an American actress and producer. Throughout her career spanning over four decades, McDormand has received numerous accolades, including four Academy Awards, two Primetime Emmy Awards, and one Tony Award, making her one of the few performers to achieve the "Triple Crown of Acting". Additionally, she has received two Golden Globe Awards, three British Academy Film Awards, and four Screen Actors Guild Awards. Although primarily recognized for her roles in small-budget independent films, McDormand's worldwide box office gross exceeds $2.2 billion helped by her appearances in Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011) and Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (2012).

Dan Hedaya

Dan Hedaya

Daniel G. Hedaya is an American actor. He established himself as a supporting actor, often playing sleazy villains or wisecracking supporting characters. He has had supporting roles in films such as True Confessions (1981), The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension, Tightrope, Blood Simple, Commando (1985), Wise Guys (1986), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), The Addams Family (1991), Rookie of the Year (1993), Boiling Point (1993), Clueless (1995), The First Wives Club, Daylight, Marvin's Room, Alien Resurrection (1997), A Civil Action, A Night at the Roxbury, The Hurricane, Dick, Shaft, The Crew, Swimfan (2002), Robots, and Strangers with Candy.

Cinematographer

Cinematographer

The cinematographer or director of photography is the person responsible for the photographing or recording of a film, television production, music video or other live action piece. The cinematographer is the chief of the camera and light crews working on such projects and would normally be responsible for making artistic and technical decisions related to the image and for selecting the camera, film stock, lenses, filters, etc. The study and practice of this field is referred to as cinematography.

Barry Sonnenfeld

Barry Sonnenfeld

Barry Sonnenfeld is an American filmmaker and television director. He originally worked as a cinematographer for the Coen brothers before directing films such as The Addams Family (1991) and its sequel Addams Family Values (1993), Get Shorty (1995), the Men in Black trilogy (1997–2012), and Wild Wild West (1999).

Dashiell Hammett

Dashiell Hammett

Samuel Dashiell Hammett was an American writer of hard-boiled detective novels and short stories. He was also a screenwriter and political activist. Among the enduring characters he created are Sam Spade, Nick and Nora Charles, the Continental Op and the comic strip character Secret Agent X-9.

Horror film

Horror film

Horror is a film genre that seeks to elicit fear or disgust in its audience for entertainment purposes.

Director's cut

Director's cut

A director's cut is an edited version of a film that is supposed to represent the director's own approved edit in contrast to the theatrical release. "Cut" explicitly refers to the process of film and game editing; in preparing a film for release, the director's cut is preceded by the assembly and rough editor's cut and usually followed by the final cut meant for the public film release and video game release.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Thrills

AFI's 100 Years...100 Thrills

Part of the AFI 100 Years… series, AFI's 100 Years…100 Thrills is a list of the top 100 most exciting movies in American cinema. The list was unveiled by the American Film Institute on June 12, 2001, during a CBS special hosted by Harrison Ford.

Plot

Bartender Ray and housewife Abby are driving through a heavy downpour at night, discussing Abby's bad marriage to Ray's boss Julian Marty. After gradually admitting they are attracted to each other, they stop at a motel and have sex. Lorren Visser, a private detective, takes photos of the tryst and delivers them to Marty.

Abby grabs some belongings from home, including a small pistol Marty gifted to her, and warns Ray to stay away from the bar. Instead, Ray goes and asks Marty for his unpaid wages. Marty mocks Ray, predicting that Abby will betray him the way she did Marty and when confronted will say, "I haven't done anything funny."

The next morning Marty attempts to kidnap Abby from Ray's home, but she beats him up. Humiliated, he offers Visser $10,000 to kill the couple. Visser agrees and tells him to "go fishing" and establish an alibi. Visser breaks into Ray's home and steals Abby's gun. He presents photos of the couple's corpses to Marty as evidence. Marty goes to the bathroom to vomit and then opens the safe to give Visser his fee, surreptitiously placing one of the photos inside. Visser suddenly shoots Marty with Abby's gun, leaving it and taking the money. However, Visser doesn't realize his cigarette lighter is underneath the fish Marty caught on his trip.

It is then revealed that Visser doctored photos of the couple asleep to look as if he shot them. Ray, deciding to confront Marty about his wages again, returns to the bar and discovers his body, accidentally discharging Abby's gun when he steps on it. Assuming the worst, he puts the gun in Marty's coat pocket and the body in the backseat of his car. While driving, he is shocked to discover that Marty is still alive, albeit barely. Ray drives into a field and begins to bury Marty in a shallow grave. Finding the gun, Marty takes aim and pulls the trigger three times, falling on an empty chamber each time. Ray gingerly takes the gun and finishes burying Marty as he screams in terror.

A distraught Ray goes to Abby's new apartment and tries to explain that he "cleaned up your mess." She, unnerved by the blood on his clothes, says "I haven't done anything funny," which disturbs him further and leads to an argument. Visser calls the apartment but does not speak when Abby picks up; she assumes and tells Ray that it was Marty. Horrified, he drops the gun as he leaves. Later, he is confronted by Meurice, the other bartender, who tells him about a phone message Marty left regarding money stolen from the safe (Marty's cover story for the $10,000 he paid Visser).

While burning the doctored photos, Visser realizes that Marty kept one and that he cannot find his lighter. Knowing these can implicate him, he returns to the bar and attempts to break into the safe, but is thwarted by the arrival of Abby, who thinks the damage to the safe was caused by Ray and starts to realize Marty might be dead. Later, she has a nightmare of Marty, warning her that Ray will kill her as well. She goes to confront Ray who, now thoroughly confused, tells her Marty was still alive when Ray buried him.

While Abby tells Meurice about her suspicions, Ray goes to the bar himself and, opening the safe, discovers the doctored photo. Believing Abby is in danger, he realizes someone is following him on the way to her apartment. When Abby arrives and discovers Ray sitting in the dark, she turns the lights on, thinking it will protect her from him. Visser, who is on a rooftop across the street with a rifle, shoots and kills Ray. Abby manages to smash the lightbulb with her shoes and hides in the bathroom.

Entering the apartment, Visser searches Ray for the lighter (which was overlooked by everyone) and goes into the bathroom, only to find Abby has climbed out the window into the next apartment. When he reaches around to open the window she stabs him with Ray's knife, pinning his hand to the sill. As she backs away in shock, Visser empties his gun into the wall, then punches through it to remove the knife. Returning to the apartment, Abby picks up her gun and shoots Visser through the bathroom door. Abby says, "I'm not afraid of you, Marty." Visser, lying mortally wounded on the floor, bursts into laughter and responds, "Well, ma'am, if I see him, I'll sure give him the message."

Cast

Discover more about Cast related topics

John Getz

John Getz

John William Getz is an American character actor. After starting his acting career on stage, he has appeared in numerous television series and films.

Frances McDormand

Frances McDormand

Frances Louise McDormand is an American actress and producer. Throughout her career spanning over four decades, McDormand has received numerous accolades, including four Academy Awards, two Primetime Emmy Awards, and one Tony Award, making her one of the few performers to achieve the "Triple Crown of Acting". Additionally, she has received two Golden Globe Awards, three British Academy Film Awards, and four Screen Actors Guild Awards. Although primarily recognized for her roles in small-budget independent films, McDormand's worldwide box office gross exceeds $2.2 billion helped by her appearances in Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011) and Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted (2012).

Dan Hedaya

Dan Hedaya

Daniel G. Hedaya is an American actor. He established himself as a supporting actor, often playing sleazy villains or wisecracking supporting characters. He has had supporting roles in films such as True Confessions (1981), The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension, Tightrope, Blood Simple, Commando (1985), Wise Guys (1986), Joe Versus the Volcano (1990), The Addams Family (1991), Rookie of the Year (1993), Boiling Point (1993), Clueless (1995), The First Wives Club, Daylight, Marvin's Room, Alien Resurrection (1997), A Civil Action, A Night at the Roxbury, The Hurricane, Dick, Shaft, The Crew, Swimfan (2002), Robots, and Strangers with Candy.

M. Emmet Walsh

M. Emmet Walsh

Michael Emmet Walsh is an American actor who has appeared in over 200 films and television series, including in small but important supporting roles in dozens of major studio features of the 1970s and 1980s. He starred in Blood Simple (1984), the Coen Brothers' first film for which he won the Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead. He also appeared in Carl Reiner's comedy The Jerk (1979), Robert Redford's drama Ordinary People (1980), Ridley Scott's science fiction film Blade Runner (1982), Barry Sonnenfeld's steampunk western Wild Wild West (1999) and Brad Bird's animated film The Iron Giant (1999). Roger Ebert said that "No movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M. Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad".

Samm-Art Williams

Samm-Art Williams

Samm-Art Williams is an American playwright and screenwriter, and a stage and film/TV actor and television producer. Much of his work concerns the African-American experience.

Production

Development

After writing the screenplay, the Coen brothers—neither of whom had any prior experience in filmmaking—shot a preemptive dummy theatrical trailer for the film, which showed "a man dragging a shovel alongside a car stopped in the middle of the road, back towards another man he was going to kill" and "a shot of backlit gun holes in a wall."[6] The trailer featured actor Bruce Campbell, playing the Julian Marty role, and was shot by recent film school graduate Barry Sonnenfeld.[7][8]

After completing the trailer, the Coens began exhibiting it with the hope of convincing investors to help fund the full-length feature film.[7] Daniel Bacaner was one of the first people to invest money in the project. He also became its executive producer and introduced the Coens to other potential backers. The entire process of raising the necessary $1.5 million took a year.[9]

Filming

The film was shot in several locations in the towns of Austin and Hutto, Texas over a period of 8 weeks in the fall of 1982. The film spent a year in postproduction and was completed by 1983.[10]

Blood Simple was Frances McDormand's screen debut.[6] All Coen brothers films are co-produced and co-directed by Joel and Ethan Coen, although Ethan was credited as the sole producer and Joel the sole director until 2004. The Coens share editing credit under the pseudonym Roderick Jaynes.[11]

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Reception and legacy

Critical response

While the film was only a modest box-office success, it was a huge critical success. It holds a 93% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 105 reviews, with an average rating of 8.3/10. The critical consensus reads: "Brutally violent and shockingly funny in equal measure, Blood Simple offers early evidence of the Coen Brothers' twisted sensibilities and filmmaking ingenuity."[12] Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned the film a score of 83 out of 100, based on 33 critics, indicating "universal acclaim".[13]

Pauline Kael negatively called it "a crude, ghoulish story with thriller themes".[14]

Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert (the latter putting the film at #10 on his Top Ten list of 1985 and reviewed again on its 15th anniversary) each gave it a thumbs up on the movie review show At the Movies.[15][16][17][18]

Box office

The film grossed $2.7 million worldwide.[2] Its first big public viewing was the USA Film Festival in Dallas, followed by the Sundance Film Festival, where it received the Grand Jury Prize. The brothers took the film to the Toronto Film Festival, Cannes, and the New York Film Festival. They were very proud of their film, particularly in light of having raised the funds using their self-made trailer.[19]

Home media

The original MCA Home Video VHS tape and LaserDisc was released on October 10, 1985, with a 96-minute running time.[20] The film was released on Universal Pictures Home Entertainment VHS tape for a second time in 1995 with a 99-minute run time.[21] Unusual for such an exercise, the "Director's Cut" is some 3 minutes shorter than the original 1985 theatrical release. The Coens reduced the run time with tighter editing, shortening some shots and removing others altogether. Additionally, they resolved long-standing rights issues with the music; the original theatrical version of the film made prominent use of The Four Tops' "It's the Same Old Song" (1965); the Coens had replaced it with Neil Diamond's "I'm a Believer" (1966) for the 1995 U.S. home video edition on VHS. The Director's Cut reinstated the Four Tops track.[22]

Universal Home Video released a DVD version of the film in 2001, and again in 2005 as part of a DVD box set titled The Coen Brothers Collection. A Blu-ray edition was released in 2011 by 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment.[23]

In 2016, The Criterion Collection released the film on Blu-ray and DVD, featuring a new 4K digital transfer supervised and approved by Barry Sonnenfeld and the Coens, along with various new special features.[5]

In popular culture

The film was referenced in a 1992 episode (Master Ninja II) of the cult satirical sci-fi TV series Mystery Science Theater 3000.[24]

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Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes

Rotten Tomatoes is an American review-aggregation website for film and television. The company was launched in August 1998 by three undergraduate students at the University of California, Berkeley: Senh Duong, Patrick Y. Lee, and Stephen Wang. Although the name "Rotten Tomatoes" connects to the practice of audiences throwing rotten tomatoes in disapproval of a poor stage performance, the original inspiration comes from a scene featuring tomatoes in the Canadian film Léolo (1992).

Metacritic

Metacritic

Metacritic is a website that aggregates reviews of films, TV shows, music albums, video games and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged. Metacritic was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of green, yellow or red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It is regarded as the foremost online review aggregation site for the video game industry.

Pauline Kael

Pauline Kael

Pauline Kael was an American film critic who wrote for The New Yorker magazine from 1968 to 1991. Known for her "witty, biting, highly opinionated and sharply focused" reviews, Kael's opinions often ran contrary to those of her contemporaries.

Gene Siskel

Gene Siskel

Eugene Kal Siskel was an American film critic and journalist for the Chicago Tribune. Along with colleague Roger Ebert, he hosted a series of movie review programs on television from 1975 until his death in 1999.

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Joseph Ebert was an American film critic, film historian, journalist, screenwriter, and author. He was a film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times from 1967 until his death in 2013. In 1975, Ebert became the first film critic to win the Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Neil Steinberg of the Chicago Sun-Times said Ebert "was without question the nation's most prominent and influential film critic," and Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times called him "the best-known film critic in America."

At the Movies (1982 TV program)

At the Movies (1982 TV program)

At the Movies is an American movie review television program that aired from 1982 to 1990. It was produced by Tribune Entertainment and was created by Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert when they left their show Sneak Previews, which they began on Chicago's PBS station, WTTW, in 1975.

LaserDisc

LaserDisc

The LaserDisc (LD) is a home video format and the first commercial optical disc storage medium, initially licensed, sold and marketed as MCA DiscoVision in the United States in 1978. Its diameter typically spans 30 cm (12 in). Unlike most optical disc standards, LaserDisc is not fully digital, and instead requires the use of analog video signals.

It's the Same Old Song

It's the Same Old Song

"It's the Same Old Song" is a song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. It was released in 1965 as the second single from their second album. Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song is today one of The Tops' signature songs, and was reportedly created—from initial concept to commercial release—in 24 hours. It reached No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 2 on the Billboard R&B chart. It also reached number 34 in the UK.

Neil Diamond

Neil Diamond

Neil Leslie Diamond is an American singer-songwriter. He has sold more than 130 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling musicians of all time. He has had ten No. 1 singles on the Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary charts: "Cracklin' Rosie", "Song Sung Blue", "Longfellow Serenade", "I've Been This Way Before", "If You Know What I Mean", "Desirée", "You Don't Bring Me Flowers", "America", "Yesterday's Songs", and "Heartlight". Thirty-eight songs by Diamond have reached the top 10 on the Billboard Adult Contemporary charts, including "Sweet Caroline". He has also acted in films, making his screen debut in the 1980 musical drama film The Jazz Singer.

I'm a Believer

I'm a Believer

"I'm a Believer" is a song written by Neil Diamond and recorded by the Monkees in 1966 with the lead vocals by Micky Dolenz. The single, produced by Jeff Barry, hit the number-one spot on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart for the week ending December 31, 1966, and remained there for seven weeks, becoming the last No. 1 hit of 1966 and the biggest-selling single for all of 1967. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 5 song for 1967. While originally published by Screen Gems-Columbia Music (BMI), it is now published by Stonebridge Music/EMI Foray Music (SESAC), with administration passed to Sony/ATV Music Publishing and Universal Music Publishing Group.

DVD

DVD

The DVD is a digital optical disc data storage format. It was invented and developed in 1995 and first released on November 1, 1996, in Japan. The medium can store any kind of digital data and has been widely used for video programs or formerly for storing software and other computer files as well. DVDs offer significantly higher storage capacity than compact discs (CD) while having the same dimensions. A standard DVD can store up to 4.7 GB of storage, while variants can store up to a maximum of 17.08 GB.

Blu-ray

Blu-ray

The Blu-ray Disc (BD), often known simply as Blu-ray, is a digital optical disc data storage format. It was invented and developed in 2005 and released on June 20, 2006 worldwide. It is designed to supersede the DVD format, and capable of storing several hours of high-definition video. The main application of Blu-ray is as a medium for video material such as feature films and for the physical distribution of video games for the PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X. The name "Blu-ray" refers to the blue laser used to read the disc, which allows information to be stored at a greater density than is possible with the longer-wavelength red laser used for DVDs.

Accolades

Discover more about Accolades related topics

Sundance Film Festival

Sundance Film Festival

The Sundance Film Festival is an annual film festival organized by the Sundance Institute. It is the largest independent film festival in the United States, with more than 46,660 attending in 2016. It takes place each January in Park City, Utah; Salt Lake City, Utah; and at the Sundance Resort, and acts as a showcase for new work from American and international independent filmmakers. The festival consists of competitive sections for American and international dramatic and documentary films, both feature films and short films, and a group of out-of-competition sections, including NEXT, New Frontier, Spotlight, Midnight, Sundance Kids, From the Collection, Premieres, and Documentary Premieres.

1st Independent Spirit Awards

1st Independent Spirit Awards

The 1st Independent Spirit Awards, honoring the best in independent filmmaking for 1985, were announced on March 22, 1986. The ceremony was hosted by Peter Coyote and Jeanne Lucas. It was held at 385 North, a restaurant in Los Angeles.

Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese

Martin Charles Scorsese is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and actor. He is the recipient of many major accolades, including an Academy Award, a Grammy Award, three Emmy Awards, four British Academy Film Awards, two Directors Guild of America Awards, an AFI Life Achievement Award and the Kennedy Center Honor in 2007. Five of his films have been inducted into the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant".

After Hours (film)

After Hours (film)

After Hours is a 1985 American black comedy thriller film directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Joseph Minion. The film follows Paul Hackett, portrayed by Griffin Dunne, as he experiences a series of misadventures while making his way home from New York City's SoHo district during the night.

M. Emmet Walsh

M. Emmet Walsh

Michael Emmet Walsh is an American actor who has appeared in over 200 films and television series, including in small but important supporting roles in dozens of major studio features of the 1970s and 1980s. He starred in Blood Simple (1984), the Coen Brothers' first film for which he won the Independent Spirit Award for Best Male Lead. He also appeared in Carl Reiner's comedy The Jerk (1979), Robert Redford's drama Ordinary People (1980), Ridley Scott's science fiction film Blade Runner (1982), Barry Sonnenfeld's steampunk western Wild Wild West (1999) and Brad Bird's animated film The Iron Giant (1999). Roger Ebert said that "No movie featuring either Harry Dean Stanton or M. Emmet Walsh in a supporting role can be altogether bad".

Soundtrack

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[28]

Carter Burwell wrote the Blood Simple score, the first of his collaborations with the Coen brothers. Blood Simple was also the first feature-film score for Burwell, and after his work on this film, he became a much-in-demand composer in Hollywood.[29] By 2016, he had scored 16 of the Coen brothers' films.[29]

The score for Blood Simple is a mix of solo piano and electronic ambient sounds. One track, "Monkey Chant", is based on kecak, the "Ramayana Monkey Chant" of Bali.[30]

In 1987, seven selections from Burwell's Blood Simple score were released on a 17-track album that also features selections from the soundtrack of the Coens' next film, Raising Arizona (1987).

Blood Simple selections on the 1987 album:

  1. "Crash and Burn" (2:40)
  2. "Blood Simple" (3:33)
  3. "Chain Gang" (4:47)
  4. "The March" (3:34)
  5. "Monkey Chant" (1:04)
  6. "The Shooting" (2:52)
  7. "Blood Simpler" (1:22)

Other songs from the film that are not on the album:[1]

Discover more about Soundtrack related topics

AllMusic

AllMusic

AllMusic is an American online music database. It catalogs more than three million album entries and 30 million tracks, as well as information on musicians and bands. Initiated in 1991, the database was first made available on the Internet in 1994. AllMusic is owned by RhythmOne.

Carter Burwell

Carter Burwell

Carter Benedict Burwell is an American film composer. He has consistently collaborated with the Coen brothers, having scored most of their films. Burwell has also scored three of Todd Haynes's films, three of Spike Jonze's films, and all the films of Martin McDonagh. He has received Academy Awards nominations for Best Original Score for Haynes's Carol (2015) and McDonagh's Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017).

Film score

Film score

A film score is original music written specifically to accompany a film. The score comprises a number of orchestral, instrumental, or choral pieces called cues, which are timed to begin and end at specific points during the film in order to enhance the dramatic narrative and the emotional impact of the scene in question. Scores are written by one or more composers under the guidance of or in collaboration with the film's director or producer and are then most often performed by an ensemble of musicians – usually including an orchestra or band, instrumental soloists, and choir or vocalists – known as playback singers – and recorded by a sound engineer. The term is less frequently applied to music written for other media such as live theatre, television and radio programs, and video game, and said music is typically referred to as either the soundtrack or incidental music.

Kecak

Kecak

Kecak, known in Indonesian as tari kecakilolahhe, is a form of Balinese Hindu dance and music drama that was developed in the 1930s in Bali, Indonesia. Since its creation, it has been performed primarily by men, with the first women's kecak group having started in 2006. The dance is based on the story of the Ramayana and is traditionally performed in temples and villages across Bali.

Bali

Bali

Bali is a province of Indonesia and the westernmost of the Lesser Sunda Islands. East of Java and west of Lombok, the province includes the island of Bali and a few smaller neighbouring islands, notably Nusa Penida, Nusa Lembongan, and Nusa Ceningan to the southeast. The provincial capital, Denpasar, is the most populous city in the Lesser Sunda Islands and the second-largest, after Makassar, in Eastern Indonesia. The upland town of Ubud in Greater Denpasar is considered Bali's cultural centre. The province is Indonesia's main tourist destination, with a significant rise in tourism since the 1980s. Tourism-related business makes up 80% of its economy.

It's the Same Old Song

It's the Same Old Song

"It's the Same Old Song" is a song recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. It was released in 1965 as the second single from their second album. Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song is today one of The Tops' signature songs, and was reportedly created—from initial concept to commercial release—in 24 hours. It reached No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 2 on the Billboard R&B chart. It also reached number 34 in the UK.

Louie Louie

Louie Louie

"Louie Louie" is a rhythm and blues song written and composed by American musician Richard Berry in 1955, recorded in 1956, and released in 1957. It is best known for the 1963 hit version by the Kingsmen and has become a standard in pop and rock. The song is based on the tune "El Loco Cha Cha" popularized by bandleader René Touzet and is an example of Afro-Cuban influence on American popular music.

Mort Dixon

Mort Dixon

Mort Dixon was an American lyricist.

Allie Wrubel

Allie Wrubel

Elias Paul "Allie" Wrubel was an American composer and songwriter.

He'll Have to Go

He'll Have to Go

"He'll Have to Go" is an American country and pop hit recorded on October 15, 1959, by Jim Reeves. The song, released in the fall of 1959, went on to become a hit in both genres early in 1960.

Joe Allison

Joe Allison

Joseph Marion Allison was an American songwriter, radio and television personality, record producer, and country music business executive. Allison won five BMI performance awards for hit singles he wrote and a 2 million performance award for writing "He'll Have to Go". He co-founded the Country Music Association. CMT called him "one of the most influential figures in the rise of modern country music."

Johnny Ventura

Johnny Ventura

Juan de Dios Ventura Soriano, better known as Johnny Ventura nicknamed El Caballo Mayor, was a Dominican singer and band leader of merengue and salsa. The merengue legend was a legislator of the Lower House between 1982 and 1986. He also served as vicemayor of Santo Domingo from 1994 to 1998, and as mayor of Santo Domingo from 1998 to 2002.

Source: "Blood Simple", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_Simple.

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See also
References
  1. ^ a b c "Blood Simple". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. American Film Institute. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Blood Simple (1985) - Financial Information". The Numbers.
  3. ^ "Blood Simple (1985)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved 14 July 2016.
  4. ^ Falsani, Cathleen. (2009). The Dude Abides: The Gospel According to the Coen Brothers. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. p. 31.
  5. ^ a b "Blood Simple". The Criterion Collection. Retrieved November 22, 2020.
  6. ^ a b Ferarra, Greg "Blood Simple (1984)" (article) TCM.com
  7. ^ a b Hoad, Phil (November 6, 2017). "How we made Blood Simple". The Guardian. Archived from the original on November 22, 2020.
  8. ^ Rich, Katey (June 24, 2016). "Watch Bruce Campbell in the Fake Trailer That Started the Coen Brothers' Careers". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on July 14, 2016.
  9. ^ Robson 2003.
  10. ^ Marsh, Calum (January 15, 2015) "How 'Blood Simple' Stated A 30-Year Hollywood Firefight" Maxim
  11. ^ Yuan, Jada (January 22, 2008). "Roderick Jaynes, Imaginary Oscar Nominee for 'No Country'". Vulture. Retrieved June 22, 2021.
  12. ^ "Blood Simple (1984)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 10, 2022.
  13. ^ "Blood Simple". Metacritic. Red Ventures.
  14. ^ PLAIN AND SIMPLE|The New Yorker
  15. ^ Vision Quest, Turk 182, Blood Simple, Mischief, 1985 - Siskel and Ebert Movie Reviews
  16. ^ Best of 1985 - Siskel and Ebert Movie Reviews
  17. ^ Siskel and Ebert Top Ten Lists - Inner Mind
  18. ^ Roger Ebert.com
  19. ^ Levine 2000, pp. 17–30.
  20. ^ "LaserDisc Database - Blood Simple [40180]".
  21. ^ The Collector's Choice edition VHS on Amazon.com
  22. ^ Beckett, David (March 27, 2013). "Blood Simple – Director's Cut (2013) DVD". Film 365.
  23. ^ Spurlin, Thomas (September 20, 2011). "Blood Simple: The Director's Cut". DVD Talk. Archived from the original on November 22, 2020.
  24. ^ MST3K: Master Ninja II (FULL MOVIE) on the show's official YouTube channel (riff at 49:07-49:08)
  25. ^ 1985 Sundance Film Festival sundance.org
  26. ^ First Spirit Awards ceremony ever hosted by Peter Coyote - full show (1986)|Film Independent on YouTube
  27. ^ Film Independent. "Film Independent Spirit Awards - A Brief History - Playlist" on official YouTube channel
  28. ^ Blood Simple at AllMusic
  29. ^ a b Greiving, Tom (2016). Love The Music of Coen Brothers Films? You Can Thank Carter Burwell". Music News, National Public Radio (NPR), February 7, 2016. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  30. ^ Bakan, Michael B. (2009). "The Abduction of the Signifying Monkey Chant: Schizophonic Transmogrifications of Balinese Kecakin Fellini's Satyriconand the Coen Brothers'Blood Simple". Ethnomusicology Forum. 18: 83–106. doi:10.1080/17411910902778478. S2CID 54703956.
  31. ^ The Coen Brothers: 8 Unforgettable Music Moments - UPROXX
  32. ^ The 10 best musical moments from Coen brothers films|Far Out Magazine
Sources
External links
Awards
Preceded by Sundance Grand Jury Prize: U.S. Dramatic
1985
Succeeded by

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