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Bibliography of the post-Stalinist Soviet Union

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This is a select bibliography of English language books (including translations) and journal articles about the post-Stalinist era of Soviet history. A brief selection of English translations of primary sources is included. The sections "General Surveys" and "Biographies" contain books; other sections contain both books and journal articles. Book entries have references to journal articles and reviews about them when helpful. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below; see Further Reading for several book and chapter-length bibliographies. The External Links section contains entries for publicly available select bibliographies from universities.

Inclusion criteria

The period covered is 1953–1991, beginning with the death of Stalin and ending with the dissolution of the Soviet Union. Topics include the Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Gorbachev eras, including the transition periods of collective leadership, and significant related events and topics such as the Cold War, the Hungarian Revolution, Detente and Glasnost. This bibliography does not include newspaper articles (except in primary sources and references), fiction, photo collections or films created during or about this period.

Works included are referenced in the notes or bibliographies of scholarly secondary sources or journals. Included works should either be published by an academic or widely distributed publisher, be authored by a notable subject matter expert as shown by scholarly reviews and have significant scholarly journal reviews about the work. To keep the bibliography length manageable, only items that clearly meet the criteria should be included.

Citation style

This bibliography uses APA style citations. Entries do not use templates. References to reviews and notes for entries do use citation templates. Where books which are only partially related to Russian history are listed, the titles for chapters or sections should be indicated if possible, meaningful, and not excessive.

If a work has been translated into English, the translator should be included and a footnote with appropriate bibliographic information for the original language version should be included.

When listing works with titles or names published with alternative English spellings, the form used in the latest published version should be used and the version and relevant bibliographic information noted if it previously was published or reviewed under a different title.

Discover more about Bibliography of the post-Stalinist Soviet Union related topics

Death and state funeral of Joseph Stalin

Death and state funeral of Joseph Stalin

Joseph Stalin, second leader of the Soviet Union, died on 5 March 1953 at his Kuntsevo Dacha at the age of 74, after suffering a stroke. He was given a state funeral in Moscow on 9 March, with four days of national mourning declared. The day of the funeral, hundreds or thousands of citizens present in the area to pay their respects died in a human crush.

Joseph Stalin

Joseph Stalin

Joseph Vissarionovich Stalin was a Georgian-born revolutionary and Soviet political leader who led the Soviet Union from 1924 until his death in 1953. He held power as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (1922–1952) and Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union (1941–1953). Initially governing the country as part of a collective leadership, he consolidated power to become a dictator by the 1930s. Ideologically adhering to the Leninist interpretation of Marxism, he formalised these ideas as Marxism–Leninism, while his own policies are called Stalinism.

Dissolution of the Soviet Union

Dissolution of the Soviet Union

The dissolution of the Soviet Union was the process of internal disintegration within the Soviet Union (USSR) which resulted in the end of the country's and its federal government's existence as a sovereign state, thereby resulting in its constituent republics gaining full sovereignty on 26 December 1991. It brought an end to General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev's effort to reform the Soviet political and economic system in an attempt to stop a period of political stalemate and economic backslide. The Soviet Union had experienced internal stagnation and ethnic separatism. Although highly centralized until its final years, the country was made up of fifteen top-level republics that served as homelands for different ethnicities. By late 1991, amid a catastrophic political crisis, with several republics already departing the Union and the waning of centralized power, the leaders of three of its founding members declared that the Soviet Union no longer existed. Eight more republics joined their declaration shortly thereafter. Gorbachev resigned in December 1991 and what was left of the Soviet parliament voted to end itself.

Cold War

Cold War

The Cold War is a term commonly used to refer to a period of geopolitical tension between the United States and the Soviet Union and their respective allies, the Western Bloc and the Eastern Bloc. Historians do not fully agree on its starting and ending points, but the period is generally considered to span from the announcement of the Truman Doctrine on 12 March 1947 to the dissolution of the Soviet Union on 26 December 1991. The term cold war is used because there was no large-scale fighting directly between the two superpowers, but they each supported major regional conflicts known as proxy wars. The conflict was based around the ideological and geopolitical struggle for global influence by these two superpowers, following their temporary alliance and victory against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in 1945. Aside from the nuclear arsenal development and conventional military deployment, the struggle for dominance was expressed via indirect means such as psychological warfare, propaganda campaigns, espionage, far-reaching embargoes, rivalry at sports events, and technological competitions such as the Space Race.

Hungarian Revolution of 1956

Hungarian Revolution of 1956

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956, also known as the Hungarian Uprising, was a countrywide revolution against the government of the Hungarian People's Republic (1949–1989) and the Hungarian domestic policies imposed by the Soviet Union (USSR).

Glasnost

Glasnost

Glasnost has several general and specific meanings – a policy of maximum openness in the activities of state institutions and freedom of information, the inadmissibility of hushing up problems, and so on. It has been used in Russian to mean "openness and transparency" since at least the end of the 18th century.

APA style

APA style

APA style is a writing style and format for academic documents such as scholarly journal articles and books. It is commonly used for citing sources within the field of behavioral and social sciences, including sociology, education, health sciences, criminal justice, and anthropology, as well as psychology. It is described in the style guide of the American Psychological Association (APA), which is titled the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The guidelines were developed to aid reading comprehension in the social and behavioral sciences, for clarity of communication, and for "word choice that best reduces bias in language". APA style is widely used, either entirely or with modifications, by hundreds of other scientific journals, in many textbooks, and in academia. The current edition is its seventh revision.

General surveys of Soviet history

These works contain significant overviews of the Post-Stalinist era.

Discover more about General surveys of Soviet history related topics

History of the Soviet Union

History of the Soviet Union

The history of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union (USSR) reflects a period of change for both Russia and the world. Though the terms "Soviet Russia" and "Soviet Union" often are synonymous in everyday speech, when referring to the foundations of the Soviet Union, "Soviet Russia" often specifically refers to brief period between the October Revolution of 1917 and the creation of the Soviet Union in 1922.

Henry Holt and Company

Henry Holt and Company

Henry Holt and Company is an American book-publishing company based in New York City. One of the oldest publishers in the United States, it was founded in 1866 by Henry Holt and Frederick Leypoldt. Currently, the company publishes in the fields of American and international fiction, biography, history and politics, science, psychology, and health, as well as books for children's literature. In the US, it operates under Macmillan Publishers.

Alexander Nekrich

Alexander Nekrich

Aleksandr Moiseyevich Nekrich, 3 March 1920, Baku – 31 August 1993, Boston) was a Soviet Russian historian. He emigrated to the United States in 1976. He is known for his works on the history of the Soviet Union, especially under Joseph Stalin’s rule.

Geoffrey Hosking

Geoffrey Hosking

Geoffrey Alan Hosking is a British historian of Russia and the Soviet Union and formerly Leverhulme Research Professor of Russian History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) at University College, London. He also co-founded Nightline.

Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press

Harvard University Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, the university appointed as Director George Andreou.

Michael Kort

Michael Kort

Michael Kort is an American historian, academic, and author who studies and has written extensively about the history of the Soviet Union. He teaches at Boston University.

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press is the university press of the University of Cambridge. Granted letters patent by King Henry VIII in 1534, it is the oldest university press in the world. It is also the King's Printer.

Martin Malia

Martin Malia

Martin Edward Malia was an American historian specializing in Russian history. He taught at the University of California at Berkeley from 1958 to 1991.

Free Press (publisher)

Free Press (publisher)

Free Press was an American independent book publisher that later became an imprint of Simon & Schuster. It was one of the best-known publishers specializing in serious nonfiction, including path-breaking sociology books of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. After a period under new ownership in the 1980s of publishing neoconservative books, it was purchased by Simon & Schuster in 1994. By 2012, the imprint ceased to exist as a distinct entity; however, some books were still being published using the Free Press imprint.

Martin McCauley (historian)

Martin McCauley (historian)

Martin McCauley is an Irish historian and former senior lecturer at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, at University College London. He is a member of the Limehouse Group of Analysts and a regular commentator in the media on Russian affairs.

Alexander Nove

Alexander Nove

Alexander Nove, FRSE, FBA was a Professor of Economics at the University of Glasgow and a noted authority on Russian and Soviet economic history. According to Ian D. Thatcher, "[T]he consensus is that he was one of the most significant scholars of 'Soviet' studies in its widest sense and beyond."

Arkana Publishing

Arkana Publishing

Arkana Publishing is a publishing imprint of Penguin Group of mainly esoteric literature.

Period studies

  • Beschloss, M. R. (1991). The Crisis Years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960–1963. New York: E. Burlingame Books.[18][19]
  • Cousins, N. (1972). The Improbable Triumvirate: John F. Kennedy, Pope John, Nikita Khrushchev. New York: W.W. Norton.
  • Dornberg, J. (1974). Brezhnev: The Masks of Power. New York: Basic Books.[20]
  • McCauley, M. (Ed.). (1987). Khrushchev and Khrushchevism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[21]
  • McGlinchey, E. (2014). Fast Forwarding the Brezhnev Years: Osh in Flames. Russian History, 41(3), 373–391.
  • Rutland, P., & Smolkin-Rothrock, V. (2014). Looking Back at Brezhnev. Russian History, 41(3), 299–306.
  • Strong, J. W. (1971). The Soviet Union under Brezhnev and Kosygin: The Transition Years. New York: NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold.[22][23]
  • Tatu, M. [fr] (1974). Power in the Kremlin: From Khrushchev to Kosygin (2nd Edition). New York: Viking Press.[24]
  • Tompson, W. J. (2014). The Soviet Union under Brezhnev. London, UK: Routledge.
  • Willerton, J. (1987). Patronage Networks and Coalition Building in the Brezhnev Era. Soviet Studies, 39(2), 175–204.
  • Zubok, V. M. (2007). A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press.[25][26]

Discover more about Period studies related topics

Social history

  • Cook, L. J. (1993). The Soviet Social Contract and Why It Failed: Welfare Policy and Workers’ Politics from Brezhnev to Yeltsin. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[27][28]
  • Dimitrov, M. (2014). Tracking Public Opinion Under Authoritarianism: The Case of the Soviet Union During the Brezhnev Era. Russian History, 41(3), 329–353.
  • Galmarini, M. (2016). The Right to Be Helped: Deviance, Entitlement, and the Soviet Moral Order (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[29]
  • Hopkins, M. W. (1985). Russia's Underground Press: The Chronicle of Current Events. New York: Praeger.[30][31]
  • Hosking, G. A. (1991). The Awakening of the Soviet Union. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[32][33]
  • Kerblay, B., & Swyer, R. (1983). Modern Soviet Society. New York: Pantheon.[34][35]
  • Kozlov, D., & Gilburd, E. (Eds.). (2013). The Thaw: Soviet Society and Culture during the 1950s and 1960s. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[36][37]
  • LaPierre, B. (2012). Hooligans in Khrushchev's Russia: Defining, Policing, and Producing Deviance during the Thaw. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.[38][39]
  • Lorimer, F. (1979). The Population of the Soviet Union: History and Prospects. New York: AMS Press.[40][41]
  • Mawdsley, E., & White, S. (2004). The Soviet Elite from Lenin to Gorbachev: The Central Committee and Its Members, 1917–1991. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[42][43]
  • Matthews, M. (1989). Patterns of Deprivation in the Soviet Union Under Brezhnev and Gorbachev. Stanford: Hoover Institution Press.[44][45]
  • ———. (2011). Education in the Soviet Union: Policies and Institutions Since Stalin. London: Routledge.[46][47]
  • Millar, J. R. (1988). Politics, Work, and Daily Life in the USSR: A Survey of Former Soviet Citizens. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[48][49]
  • Raleigh, D. (2011). Soviet Baby Boomers: An Oral History of Russia's Cold War Generation. New York: Oxford University Press.[50][51]
  • Roucek, J. (1961). The Soviet Treatment of Minorities. Phylon, 22(1), 15–23.
  • Shtromas, A., Wenturis, N., & Hornung, K. (1990). Political Change and Social Development: The Case of the Soviet Union. Frankfurt: Peter Lang Publishing.[52][53]
  • Weinberg, E. (1992). Perestroika and Soviet Sociology. The British Journal of Sociology, 43(1), 1–10.

Culture

Ethnic Groups

Religion

Gender and sexuality

Children and family

Human rights

  • Alexeyeva, L. (1985). Soviet Dissent: Contemporary Movements for National, Religious, and Human Rights. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press.[92]
  • Behrends, J. C., Kolář, P., & Lindenberger, T. (Eds.). (2022). Violence After Stalin: Institutions, Practices, and Everyday Life in the Soviet Bloc 1953–1989. Stuttgart: ibidem Press.
  • Bergman, J. (2009). Meeting the Demands of Reason: The life and thought of Andrei Sakharov. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[93][94]
  • Bukovskiĭ, V. K. (2019). Judgment in Moscow: Soviet Crimes and Western Complicity. (A. Kojevnikov, Trans.) Westlake Village: Ninth Of November Press.[c][95][96]
  • Prigge, W. (2004). The Latvian Purges of 1959: A Revision Study. Journal of Baltic Studies, 35(3), 211–230.
  • Snyder, S. B. (2013). Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War. New York: Cambridge University Press.[97][98]

Rural life, labor, and agriculture

Urban life, labor, and industry

Other topics

Discover more about Social history related topics

Education in the Soviet Union

Education in the Soviet Union

Education in the Soviet Union was guaranteed as a constitutional right to all people provided through state schools and universities. The education system that emerged after the establishment of the Soviet Union in 1922 became internationally renowned for its successes in eradicating illiteracy and cultivating a highly educated population. Its advantages were total access for all citizens and post-education employment. The Soviet Union recognized that the foundation of their system depended upon an educated population and development in the broad fields of engineering, the natural sciences, the life sciences and social sciences, along with basic education.

Geoffrey Hosking

Geoffrey Hosking

Geoffrey Alan Hosking is a British historian of Russia and the Soviet Union and formerly Leverhulme Research Professor of Russian History at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) at University College, London. He also co-founded Nightline.

Eleonory Gilburd

Eleonory Gilburd

Eleonory Gilburd is an American historian. She studied at the University of Chicago and at UC Berkeley. She specializes in the history and culture of modern Russia and the Soviet Union, especially the era of the Khrushchev Thaw. Her first book To See Paris and Die: The Soviet Lives of Western Culture received critical acclaim and was nominated for the Pushkin Book Prize. It also won a number of academic prizes in the field of Slavic studies.

Evan Mawdsley

Evan Mawdsley

Evan Mawdsley is a British historian and former Professor of International History at the University of Glasgow's School of Humanities. He is currently a Professorial Research Fellow. He specializes in Russian history and the history of World War II.

James R. Millar

James R. Millar

James Robert Millar was an American political scientist and economist. He was a renowned expert on the Soviet economy.

Donald Raleigh (historian)

Donald Raleigh (historian)

Donald J. Raleigh is an American scholar specializing in twentieth-century Russian history. He is the Jay Richard Judson Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He obtained his BA degree from Knox College in 1971, followed by MA and PhD degrees from Indiana University. He has written extensively on the Russian Revolution, on local history, and on Soviet oral history. He edited the scholarly journal Soviet (Russian) Studies in History and the monograph series The New Russian History.

Culture of the Soviet Union

Culture of the Soviet Union

The culture of the Soviet Union passed through several stages during the country's 69-year existence. It was contributed to by people of various nationalities from every one of fifteen union republics, although a majority of the influence was made by Russians. The Soviet state supported cultural institutions, but also carried out strict censorship.

Music of the Soviet Union

Music of the Soviet Union

The music of the Soviet Union varied in many genres and epochs. The majority of it was considered to be part of the Russian culture, but other national cultures from the Republics of the Soviet Union made significant contributions as well. The Soviet state supported musical institutions, but also carried out content censorship. According to Lenin, "Every artist, everyone who considers himself an artist, has the right to create freely according to his ideal, independently of everything. However, we are Communists and we must not stand with folded hands and let chaos develop as it pleases. We must systemically guide this process and form its result."

Cinema of the Soviet Union

Cinema of the Soviet Union

The cinema of the Soviet Union includes films produced by the constituent republics of the Soviet Union reflecting elements of their pre-Soviet culture, language and history, albeit they were all regulated by the central government in Moscow. Most prolific in their republican films, after the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic, were Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ukraine, and, to a lesser degree, Lithuania, Belarus and Moldavia. At the same time, the nation's film industry, which was fully nationalized throughout most of the country's history, was guided by philosophies and laws propounded by the monopoly Soviet Communist Party which introduced a new view on the cinema, socialist realism, which was different from the one before or after the existence of the Soviet Union.

Mikhail Epstein

Mikhail Epstein

Mikhail Naumovich Epstein is a Russian-American literary scholar and essayist who is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Cultural Theory and Russian Literature at Emory University, Atlanta, US. He moved there from Moscow, USSR, in 1990. He has also worked as a Professor of Russian and Cultural Theory at Durham University, UK, from 2012 to 2015, where he was the founder and Director of the Centre for Humanities Innovation at Durham University.

Alexander Nove

Alexander Nove

Alexander Nove, FRSE, FBA was a Professor of Economics at the University of Glasgow and a noted authority on Russian and Soviet economic history. According to Ian D. Thatcher, "[T]he consensus is that he was one of the most significant scholars of 'Soviet' studies in its widest sense and beyond."

Dimitry Pospielovsky

Dimitry Pospielovsky

Dimitry Vladimirovich Pospielovsky was a historian, a professor emeritus of history at the University of Western Ontario. He was a prominent researcher in the history of the Russian Orthodox Church.

Government and politics

Nikita S. Khrushchev
Nikita S. Khrushchev
Leonid Brezhnev
Leonid Brezhnev
Mikhail Gorbachev
Mikhail Gorbachev

De-Stalinisation

Glasnost and Perestroika

Soviet Armed Forces

  • Colton, T. J. (2014). Commissars, Commanders, and Civilian Authority: The Structure of Soviet Military Politics. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[178]
  • Kolkowicz, R. (1967). The Soviet Military and the Communist Party. London, UK: Routledge.[179]
  • Odom, W. E. (2000). The Collapse of the Soviet Military. New Haven: Yale University Press.[180][181]
  • Suvorov, V. Suvorov, V., & Hackett, J. (1987). Inside the Soviet Army. London: Grafton Books.[182]
  • Suvorov, V. (1989). Spetsnaz: The Story Behind the Soviet SAS. London: Grafton.

Chernobyl

Dissolution of the Soviet Union and Bloc

Tanks in Red Square during the 1991 August coup attempt
Tanks in Red Square during the 1991 August coup attempt

     For works about the history of post-Soviet Russia, see Bibliography of Russian history (1991–present)

The Legacy of the Soviet Union

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Government of the Soviet Union

Government of the Soviet Union

The Government of the Soviet Union, formally the All-Union Government of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, commonly abbreviated to Soviet Government, was the executive and administrative organ of state in the former Soviet Union. It had four different names throughout its existence; Council of People's Commissars (1923–1946), Council of Ministers (1946–1991), Cabinet of Ministers and Committee on the Operational Management of the National Economy. It also was known as Workers-Peasants Government of the Soviet Union.

Christopher Andrew (historian)

Christopher Andrew (historian)

Christopher Maurice Andrew, is an Emeritus Professor of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Cambridge with an interest in international relations and in particular the history of intelligence services.

George W. Breslauer

George W. Breslauer

George W. Breslauer is an academic in the field of social sciences and the former executive vice chancellor and provost of UC Berkeley.

Archie Brown (historian)

Archie Brown (historian)

Archibald Haworth Brown, is a British political scientist. In 2005, he became an emeritus professor of politics at the University of Oxford and an emeritus fellow of St Antony's College, Oxford, where he served as a professor of politics and director of St Antony's Russian and East European Centre. He has written widely on Soviet and Russian politics, on communist politics more generally, on the Cold War, and on political leadership.

Leonard Schapiro

Leonard Schapiro

Leonard Bertram Naman Schapiro was the leading British scholar of the origins and development of the Soviet political system. He taught for many years at the London School of Economics, where he was Professor of Political Science with Special Reference to Russian Studies. Schapiro was best known for his magisterial study, the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, though his early work on the rise to power of the Bolshevik Party, The Origins of the Communist Autocracy, was his most intellectually ambitious and innovative contribution to the field of Soviet studies. Because of his prominence in the field and his insistence on viewing the USSR through a normative lens, Schapiro accumulated his share of detractors, including those who were uncomfortable with his embrace of totalitarianism as a descriptor of Soviet rule and those who alleged that his reputed ties to British intelligence services made him little more than a political propagandist. Nothing could be further from the truth than this latter claim, which ignores the depth and rigor of Schapiro's scholarship.

Methuen Publishing

Methuen Publishing

Methuen Publishing Ltd is an English publishing house. It was founded in 1889 by Sir Algernon Methuen (1856–1924) and began publishing in London in 1892. Initially Methuen mainly published non-fiction academic works, eventually diversifying to encourage female authors and later translated works. E. V. Lucas headed the firm from 1924 to 1938.

Klaus von Beyme

Klaus von Beyme

Klaus Gustav Heinrich von Beyme was a German political scientist who was Professor of Political Science Emeritus at the Faculty of Economic and Social Sciences of the University of Heidelberg.

Martin Walker (reporter)

Martin Walker (reporter)

Martin Walker is the author of the popular Bruno detective series. After working at The Guardian from 1971 to 1999, Walker joined United Press International (UPI) in 2000 as an international correspondent in Washington, D.C., and is now editor-in-chief emeritus of UPI. He was a member of A.T. Kearney's Global Business Policy Council.

De-Stalinization

De-Stalinization

De-Stalinization comprised a series of political reforms in the Soviet Union after the death of long-time leader Joseph Stalin in 1953, and the thaw brought about by ascension of Nikita Khrushchev to power, and his 1956 secret speech On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences, which denounced Stalin's cult of personality and the Stalinist political system.

20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union

The 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union was held during the period 14–25 February 1956. It is known especially for First Secretary Nikita Khrushchev's "Secret Speech", which denounced the personality cult and dictatorship of Joseph Stalin.

Oleg Khlevniuk

Oleg Khlevniuk

Oleg Vitalyevich Khlevniuk is a historian and a senior researcher at the State Archive of the Russian Federation in Moscow. Much of his writing on Stalinist Soviet Union is based on newly released archival documents, including personal correspondence, drafts of Central Committee paperwork, new memoirs, and interviews with former functionaries and the families of Politburo members. Gleb Pavlovsky has characterized him as a "leading Russian historian of Stalinism." He also a corresponding fellow of Royal Historical Society.

Glasnost

Glasnost

Glasnost has several general and specific meanings – a policy of maximum openness in the activities of state institutions and freedom of information, the inadmissibility of hushing up problems, and so on. It has been used in Russian to mean "openness and transparency" since at least the end of the 18th century.

Soviet territories

Baltics

Byelorussia

Caucasus

  • Under construction

Central Asia

  • Keller, S. (2020). Russia and Central Asia: Coexistence, Conquest, Convergence. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[223]
  • Khalid, A. (2021). Central Asia: A New History from the Imperial Conquests to the Present. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[217]
  • Reeves, M. (2022). Infrastructures of Empire in Central Asia. Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, 23(2), 364-370.
  • Rywkin, M. (2015). Moscow's Muslim Challenge: Soviet Central Asia. New York: Routledge.[224][225]
  • Stronski, P. (2010). Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press.[226][227]

Ukraine

Discover more about Soviet territories related topics

Michael Dobbs (journalist)

Michael Dobbs (journalist)

Michael Dobbs is a British-American non-fiction author and journalist.

John B. Dunlop

John B. Dunlop

John Barrett Dunlop is an American political scientist, an emeritus senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, an expert on Soviet and Russian politics from 1980s to the present.

Martha Brill Olcott

Martha Brill Olcott

Martha Brill Olcott is an American expert on Central Asia and the Caspian. She was a senior associate with the Russian and Eurasian Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, co-directing the Carnegie Moscow Center's Project on Ethnicity and Politics in the former Soviet Union. She taught political science at Colgate University from 1975 until 1998. She joined the Carnegie Foundation in 1995. She previously served as a special consultant to Acting United States Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger and as director of the Central Asian American Enterprise Fund.

Teodor Shanin

Teodor Shanin

Teodor Shanin was a British sociologist who was for many years Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester. He was credited with pioneering the study of Russian peasantry in the West, and is best known for his first book, The Awkward Class: Political Sociology of Peasantry in a Developing Society, Russia, 1910–25. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Shanin moved to Russia where, with funding from The Open Society Institute, Ford Foundation and others, he founded the Moscow School for the Social and Economic Sciences in 1995. Shanin was President of the Moscow School, Professor Emeritus of the University of Manchester, and an Honorary Fellow of the Russian Academy of Agricultural Sciences.

Ideology and propaganda

  • Benn, D. (1969). New Thinking in Soviet Propaganda. Soviet Studies, 21(1), 52–63.
  • ———. (1985). Soviet Propaganda: The Theory and the Practice. The World Today, 41(6), 112–115.
  • Eberstadt, N. (1988). The Poverty of Communism. London: Routledge.[230]
  • Ebon, M. (1987). The Soviet Propaganda Machine. New York: McGraw-Hill.[231]
  • Fainberg, D. (2020). Cold War Correspondents: Soviet and American Reporters on the Ideological Frontlines'. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.[217]
  • Fürst, J., Pons, S., & Selden, M. (Eds.). (2017). The Cambridge History of Communism: Volume 3, Endgames? Late Communism in Global Perspective, 1968 to the Present. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[d]
  • Hixson, W. L. (1998). Parting the Curtain: Propaganda, Culture, and the Cold War, 1945-1961. New York: Macmillan.[232][233]
  • Mitchell, R. (1972). The Brezhnev Doctrine and Communist Ideology. The Review of Politics, 34(2), 190–209.
  • Nagorski, Z. (1971). Soviet International Propaganda: Its Role, Effectiveness, and Future. The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 398, 130–139.

Economy

  • Allen, R. (2001). The Rise and Decline of the Soviet Economy. The Canadian Journal of Economics / Revue Canadienne D'Economique, 34(4), 859–881.
  • Evans, A. (1977). Developed Socialism in Soviet Ideology. Soviet Studies, 29(3), 409–428.
  • Gatrell, P. and Lewis, R. (1992). Russian and Soviet Economic History. The Economic History Review, 45(4), pp. 743-754.
  • Gidadhubli, R. (1983). Andropov on Soviet Economy after Brezhnev. Economic and Political Weekly, 18(4), 103–104.
  • Goldman, M. I. (1983). U.S.S.R. in Crisis: The Failure of an Economic System. New York: Norton.
  • Hanson, P. (2003). The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Economy: An Economic History of the USSR from 1945. London, UK: Longman.
  • Hewett, E. A. (1988). Reforming the Soviet Economy: Equality versus Efficiency. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution.[234][235]
  • Hoffmann, E. P., & Laird, R. F. (1982). The Politics of Economic Modernization in the Soviet Union. Ithaca, N.Y: Cornell University Press.
  • Marrese, M., & Vaňous, J. (1983). Soviet Subsidization of Trade with Eastern Europe: A Soviet Perspective. Berkeley, CA : Institute of International Studies, University of California Press.
  • Miller, C. (2016). The Struggle to Save the Soviet Economy: Mikhail Gorbachev and the Collapse of the USSR. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.
  • Millar, J. R., & Linz, S. J. (1990). The Soviet Economic Experiment. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.
  • Rowen, H. S., & Wolf, C. J. (1990). The Impoverished Superpower: Perestroika and the Burden of Soviet Military Spending. San Francisco: ICS Press.[236][237]
  • Rutland, P. (2010). The Politics of Economic Stagnation in the Soviet Union: The Role of Local Party Organs in Economic Management (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[238][239]
  • Shmelev, N., & Popov, V. (1989). The Turning Point: Revitalizing the Soviet Economy. London, UK: Tauris.[240]
  • Simis, K. (1982). USSR: The Corrupt Society: The Secret World of Soviet Capitalism. New York: Simon & Schuster.[241]
  • Suri, J. (2006). The Promise and Failure of 'Developed Socialism': The Soviet 'Thaw' and the Crucible of the Prague Spring, 1964-1972. Contemporary European History, 15(2), 133–158.
  • Zweynert, J. (2014). 'Developed Socialism' and Soviet Economic Thought in the 1970s and Early '80s. Russian History, 41(3), 354–372.

Discover more about Economy related topics

Era of Stagnation

Era of Stagnation

The "Era of Stagnation" is a term coined by Mikhail Gorbachev in order to describe the negative way in which he viewed the economic, political, and social policies of the Soviet Union that began during the rule of Leonid Brezhnev (1964–1982) and continued under Yuri Andropov (1982–1984) and Konstantin Chernenko (1984–1985). It is sometimes called the "Brezhnevian Stagnation" in English.

1965 Soviet economic reform

1965 Soviet economic reform

The 1965 Soviet economic reform, sometimes called the Kosygin reform or Liberman reform, was a set of planned changes in the economy of the USSR. A centerpiece of these changes was the introduction of profitability and sales as the two key indicators of enterprise success. Some of an enterprise's profits would go to three funds, used to reward workers and expand operations; most would go to the central budget.

1973 Soviet economic reform

1973 Soviet economic reform

The 1973 Soviet economic reform was an economic reform initiated by Alexei Kosygin, the Chairman of the Council of Ministers. During Leonid Brezhnev's rule of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), the Soviet economy began to stagnate; this period is referred to by some historians as the Era of Stagnation. After the failed 1965 reform Kosygin initiated another reform in 1973 to enhance the powers and functions of the regional planners by establishing associations. The reform was never fully implemented, and members of the Soviet leadership complained that the reform had not even been fully implemented by the time of the 1979 reform.

1979 Soviet economic reform

1979 Soviet economic reform

The 1979 Soviet economic reform, or "Improving planning and reinforcing the effects of the economic mechanism on raising the effectiveness in production and improving the quality of work", was an economic reform initiated by Alexei Kosygin, the Chairman of the Council of Ministers. During Leonid Brezhnev's rule of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) the Soviet economy began to stagnate; this period is referred to by historians as the Era of Stagnation. Even after several reform attempts by Kosygin and his protégés, the economic situation in the country continued to deteriorate. In contrast to his earlier reform initiative, the 26th Congress decided that his government would implement the reform during the Eleventh five-year plan from 1981–1985. This never happened, and even Brezhnev complained that implementation of the reform had been slow. This unfinished reform is seen by some as the last major pre-perestroika reform initiative put forward by the Soviet government.

External Relations

The Soviet Bloc in Europe

Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia
Soviet Invasion of Czechoslovakia
Crowd cheers Hungarian troops in Budapest
Crowd cheers Hungarian troops in Budapest
  • Archard, L. (2018). Hungarian Uprising: Budapest's Cataclysmic Twelve Days, 1956. Barnsley, UK: Pen and Sword Military.
  • Baring, A. (1972). Uprising in East Germany. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[242][243]
  • Brzezinski, Z. K. (1960). The Soviet Bloc: Unity and Conflict. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[244][245]
  • Corda, M. (2007). Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. New York: Harper Perennial.[246]
  • Dawisha, K. (1984). The Kremlin and the Prague Spring. Berkeley: University of California Press.[247][248]
  • Eörsi, L. (2006). The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Myths and Realities. Boulder, CO: Social Science Monographs.[249]
  • Fehér, F., & Heller, A. (1983). Hungary 1956 Revisited: The Message of a Revolution - A Quarter of a Century After. London, UK: Allen and Unwin.[250][251]
  • Gati, C. (1986). Hungary and the Soviet Bloc. Durham: Duke University Press.[252][253]
  • ———. (1990). The Bloc that Failed: Soviet-East European Relations in Transition. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[254][255]
  • ———. (2006). Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.[256][257]
  • Ginsburgs, G. (1960). Demise and Revival of a Communist Party: An Autopsy of the Hungarian Revolution. The Western Political Quarterly, 13(3), 780–802.
  • Granville, J. (2003). Reactions to the Events of 1956: New Findings from the Budapest and Warsaw Archives. Journal of Contemporary History, 38(2), 261–290.
  • ———, & Garthoff, R. L. (2004). The First Domino: International Decision Making during the Hungarian Crisis of 1956. College Station: Texas A&M University Press.[258][259]
  • Gyáni, G. (2006). Memory and Discourse on the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. Europe-Asia Studies, 58(8), 1199–1208.
  • Györkei, J. D., & Horváth, M. (1999). Soviet Military Intervention in Hungary, 1956. New York: Central European University Press.[260]
  • Lendvai, P., & Major, A. (2008). One Day that Shook the Communist World: The 1956 Hungarian Uprising and Its Legacy. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[261]
  • Lévesque, J. (1997). The Enigma of 1989: The USSR and the Liberation of Eastern Europe. Berkeley: University of California Press.[262]
  • Litván, G., Bak, J. M., & Legters, L. H. (1996). The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Reform, Revolt and Repression 1953-1963. London, UK: Longman.[263]
  • Mastny, V. (1999). The Soviet Non-Invasion of Poland in 1980-1981 and the End of the Cold War. Europe-Asia Studies, 51(2), 189–211.
  • Matthews, J. P. C. (2007). Explosion: The Hungarian Revolution of 1956. New York: Hippocrene Books.
  • Michener, J. A. (1984). The Bridge at Andau: The Compelling True Story of a Brave, Embattled People. New York: Corgi/Penguin Books.[264]
  • Miller, R. F., & Féhér, F. (1984). Khrushchev and the Communist World. London, UK: Croom Helm.[265]
  • Millington, R. (2014). State, Society and Memories of the Uprising of 17 June 1953 in the GDR. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Mlynár, Z. (1986). Nightfrost in Prague: The End of Humane Socialism. London: C. Hurst.[266]
  • Moorthy, K. K. (1971). Tito and Brezhnev: Outward Cementing?. Economic and Political Weekly, 6(44), 2233–2233.
  • Narayanswamy, R. (1989). Eastern Europe: Divided over Perestroika. Economic and Political Weekly, 24(4), 186–188.
  • Ostermann, C. F., & Byrne, M. (2001). Uprising in East Germany 1953: The Cold War, the German Question, and the First Major Upheaval Behind the Iron Curtain. Budapest: Central European University Press.[267]
  • Persak, K. (2006). The Polish: Soviet Confrontation in 1956 and the Attempted Soviet Military Intervention in Poland. Europe-Asia Studies, 58(8), 1285–1310.
  • Péter, L. (2008). Resistance, Rebellion and Revolution in Hungary and Central Europe: Commemorating 1956. London: Hungarian Cultural Centre, University of Central London.[268]
  • Pók, A. (1998). 1956 Revisited. Contemporary European History, 7(2), 263–270.
  • Richter, J. (1993). Re-Examining Soviet Policy towards Germany in 1953. Europe-Asia Studies, 45(4), 671–691.
  • Sebestyen, V. (2006). Twelve Days: The Story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution. New York: Vintage Books.[269]
  • Stanciu, C. (2014). Autonomy and Ideology: Brezhnev, Ceauşescu and the World Communist Movement. Contemporary European History, 23(1), 115–134.
  • Stoneman, A. (2015). Socialism With a Human Face: The Leadership and Legacy of the Prague Spring. The History Teacher, 49(1), 103–125.
  • Valenta, J., & Dubček, A. (1991). Soviet Intervention in Czechoslovakia, 1968: Anatomy of a Decision. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University. Press.[270]
  • Westad, O. A., Holtsmark, S. G., & Neumann, I. B. (1994). The Soviet Union in Eastern Europe, 1945-89. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Williams, K. (1996). New Sources on Soviet Decision Making during the 1968 Czechoslovak Crisis. Europe-Asia Studies, 48(3), 457–470.
  • Windsor, P., & Roberts, A. (1969). Czechoslovakia 1968: Reform, Repression and Resistance. New York: Columbia University Press.

Foreign policy and relations

  • Anderson, R. D. (1993). Public Politics in an Authoritarian State: Making Foreign Policy During the Brezhnev Years. Washington DC: NCROL.[271][272]
  • Baroch, C. (1971). The Brezhnev Doctrine. American Bar Association Journal, 57(7), 686–690.
  • Burke, J. (1993). Gorbachev's Eurasian Strategy. World Affairs, 155(4), 156–168.
  • Du Quenoy, P. (2003). The Role of Foreign Affairs in the Fall of Nikita Khrushchev in October 1964. The International History Review, 25(2), 334–356.
  • Edmonds, R. (1983). Soviet Foreign Policy: The Brezhnev Era. Cambridge, UK: Oxford University Press.[273][274]
  • Gittings, J. (1968). Survey of the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1963-1967. London, UK: Royal Institute of International Affairs.[275][276]
  • Garthoff, R. L. (1994). Détente and Confrontation: American-Soviet Relations from Nixon to Reagan. Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution Press.[277][278]
  • Grachev, A. (2013). Gorbachev's Gamble: Soviet Foreign Policy and the End of the Cold War. Oxford: Wiley Press.[279][280]
  • Griffith, W. E. (1964). The Sino-Soviet Rift. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.[281][282]
  • Haykal, M. Ḥasanayn. (1978). The Sphinx and the Commissar: The Rise and Fall of Soviet Influence in the Middle East. New York: Harper & Row.[283]
  • Johnson, E. (2001). Nikita Khrushchev, Andrei Voznesensky, and the Cold Spring of 1963: Documenting the End of the Post-Stalin Thaw. World Literature Today, 75(1), 30–39.
  • Kharlamov, M., & Ajubei, A., & Vadeyev, O. (1960). Face to Face with America: The Story of N.S. Khrushchov's Visit to the U.S.A. September 15–27, 1959. Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House.
  • Klinghoffer, A. (1986). US-Soviet Relations and Angola. Harvard International Review, 8(3), 15–19.
  • Li, D., & Xia, Y. (2018). Mao and the Sino-Soviet Split, 1959-1973. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • Lynch, A. (2011). The Soviet Study of International Relations (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[284][285][286]
  • Lyne, R. (1987). Making Waves: Gorbachev's Public Diplomacy, 1985-86. Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science, 36(4), 235–253.
  • Mehrotra, S. (2010). India and the Soviet Union: Trade and Technology Transfer (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[287][288][289]
  • Papp, D. (1995). Soviet Foreign Policy and Domestic Politics. Mershon International Studies Review, 39(2), 290–293.
  • Patman, R. (2010). The Soviet Union in the Horn of Africa: The Diplomacy of Intervention and Disengagement (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[290][291][292][293]
  • Pavlov, Y. I. (1994). Soviet-Cuban Alliance 1959-1991. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.[294][295]
  • Pittman, A. (2009). From Ostpolitik to Reunification: West German-Soviet Political Relations since 1974 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[296][297][298][299]
  • Prizel, I. (2012). Latin America through Soviet Eyes: The Evolution of Soviet Perceptions during the Brezhnev Era 1964-1982 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[300][301]
  • Racioppi, L. (2009). Soviet Policy towards South Asia since 1970 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[302][303]
  • Rea, K. (1975). Peking and the Brezhnev Doctrine. Asian Affairs, 3(1), 22–30.
  • Roberts, G. K. (2008). The Soviet Union in World Politics: Coexistence, Revolution and Cold War, 1945-1991. London: Routledge.[304][305]
  • Stent, A. (2010). From Embargo to Ostpolitik: The Political Economy of West German-Soviet Relations, 1955-1980 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[306][307][308][309]
  • Thornton, R. C. (1985). Soviet Asian Strategy in the Brezhnev Era and Beyond. Washington, DC: Washington Institute for Values in Public Policy.
  • Ulam, A. B. (1974). Expansion and Coexistence: Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-73. New York: Praeger.[310]
  • ———. (1983). Dangerous Relations: The Soviet Union in World Politics, 1970-1982. New York: Oxford University Press.[311][312]
  • Wehling, F. (1997). Irresolute Princes: Kremlin Decision Making in Middle East Crises, 1967-1973. New York: Macmillan.[313][314]
  • Westad, O. A. (2011). Brothers in Arms: The Rise and Fall of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945–1963. Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press.[315][316]

The Cold War

Checkpoint Charlie, October 27, 1961
Checkpoint Charlie, October 27, 1961
  • Barrass, G. S. (2009). The Great Cold War: A Journey through the Hall of Mirrors. Palo Alto: Stanford University Press.[317]
  • Beschloss, M. R. (1986). Mayday: Eisenhower, Khrushchev and the U-2 Affair. New York: Harper & Row.[318]
  • Beschloss, M. R., & Talbott, S. (1994). At the Highest Levels: The Inside Story of the End of the Cold War. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.[319][320]
  • Blanton, T., & Savranskaya, S. (2011). Looking Back: Reykjavik: When Abolition Was Within Reach. Arms Control Today, 41(8), 46–51.
  • Brown, A. (2020). The Human Factor: Gorbachev, Reagan, and Thatcher, and the End of the Cold War. Cambridge, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Brugioni, D. A., & McCort, R. F. (1991). Eyeball to Eyeball: The Inside Story of the Cuban Missile Crisis. New York: Random House.[321][322]
  • Brun, E., & Hersh, J. (1978). Paradoxes in the Political Economy of Détente. Theory and Society, 5(3), 295–344.
  • English, R. (2000). Russia and the Idea of the West: Gorbachev, Intellectuals, and the End of the Cold War. New York: Columbia University Press.[323][324]
  • Farnham, B. (2001). Reagan and the Gorbachev Revolution: Perceiving the End of Threat. Political Science Quarterly, 116(2), 225–252.
  • Fursenko, A. A., & Naftali, T. J. (1997). One Hell of a Gamble: Khrushchev, Castro and Kennedy, 1958-1964. New York: Norton.[325]
  • –––, & ———. (2006). Khrushchev's Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary. New York: Norton.[326]
  • Gaddis, J. L. (1998). We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History. Oxford, UK: Clarendon Press.[327]
  • ———. (2007). The Cold War: A New History. New York: Penguin Books.[328][329]
  • Garthoff, R. L. (2007). Reflections on the Cuban Missile Crisis. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press.[330]
  • Gelman, H. (1984). The Brezhnev Politburo and the Decline of Détente. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[331][332]
  • Gribkov, A. I., Smith, W. Y., & Friendly, A. (1994). Operation ANADYR: U.S. and Soviet Generals Recount the Cuban Missile Crisis. Chicago: Edition Q.[333]
  • Hoffman, D. E. (2009). The Dead Hand: The Untold Story of the Cold War Arms Race and its Dangerous Legacy. New York: Doubleday.[334]
  • Kempe, F. (2011). Berlin 1961: Kennedy, Khruschev, and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth. New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons.
  • Lebow, R., Mueller, J., & Wohlforth, W. (1995). Realism and the End of the Cold War. International Security, 20(2), 185–187.
  • Liebich, A. (1995). Mensheviks Wage the Cold War. Journal of Contemporary History, 30(2), 247–264.
  • MacGregor, I. (2019). Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, The Berlin Wall, and the Most Dangerous Place On Earth. New York: Scribner.
  • Miles, S. (2020). Engaging the Evil Empire: Washington, Moscow, and the Beginning of the End of the Cold War'. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[335]
  • Miller, D. (2012). The Cold War: A Military History. London, UK: Pimlico.[336][337]
  • Nash, P. (1997). The Other Missiles of October: Eisenhower, Kennedy, and the Jupiters, 1957-1963. Chapel Hill: University of California Press.[338]
  • Nelson, K. L. (1995). The Making of Détente: Soviet-American Relations in the Shadow of Vietnam. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.[339][340]
  • Patman, R. (1999). Reagan, Gorbachev and the Emergence of 'New Political Thinking'. Review of International Studies, 25(4), 577–601.
  • Schrag, P. G. (1992). Global Action: Nuclear Test Ban Diplomacy at the End of the Cold War. New York: Routledge.[341]
  • Schwebel, S. (1972). The Brezhnev Doctrine Repealed and Peaceful Co-Existence Enacted. The American Journal of International Law, 66(5), 816–819.
  • Seaborg, G. T., Loeb, B. S., & Harriman, W. A. (1983). Kennedy, Khrushchev and the Test Ban. Berkeley: University of California Press.[342][343]
  • Taylor, F. (2006). The Berlin Wall: A World Divided, 1961-1989. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing.
  • Thompson, N. (2011). Nuclear War and Nuclear Fear in the 1970s and 1980s. Journal of Contemporary History, 46(1), 136–149.
  • Watry, D. M. (2014). Diplomacy at the Brink: Eisenhower, Churchill, and Eden in the Cold War. Baton Rouge, LA: Louisiana State University Press.[344]
  • Westad, O. A. (1992). Rethinking Revolutions: The Cold War in the Third World. Journal of Peace Research, 29(4), 455–464.
  • ———. (2016). The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[345]
  • ———. (2019). The Cold War: A World History. New York: Basic Books.[346]
  • Zubok, V. M. (2007). A Failed Empire: The Soviet Union in the Cold War from Stalin to Gorbachev. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press.[347][348]

Afghanistan

Discover more about External Relations related topics

East German uprising of 1953

East German uprising of 1953

The East German uprising of 1953 was an uprising that occurred in East Germany from 16 to 17 June 1953. It began with a strike action by construction workers in East Berlin on 16 June against work quotas during the Sovietization process in East Germany. Demonstrations in East Berlin turned into a widespread uprising against the Government of East Germany and the Socialist Unity Party the next day, involving over one million people in about 700 localities across the country. Protests against declining living standards and unpopular Sovietization policies led to a wave of strikes and protests that were not easily brought under control and threatened to overthrow the East German government. The uprising in East Berlin was violently suppressed by tanks of the Soviet forces in Germany and the Kasernierte Volkspolizei, while demonstrations continued in over 500 towns and villages for several more days before dying out.

Afghanistan–Russia relations

Afghanistan–Russia relations

Relations between Afghanistan and Russia first emerged in the 19th century. At the time they were placed in the context of "The Great Game", Russian–British confrontations over Afghanistan from 1840 to 1907. The Soviet Union was the first country to establish diplomatic relations with Afghanistan following the Third Anglo-Afghan War in 1919. On 28 February 1921, Afghanistan and Soviet Russia signed a Friendship Treaty. The Soviet Union intervened in Afghanistan against the Basmachi movement in 1929 and 1930.

Foreign interventions by the Soviet Union

Foreign interventions by the Soviet Union

Over the course of its history, the Soviet Union intervened in foreign countries on numerous occasions.

Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie was the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War (1947–1991), as named by the Western Allies.

Cold War

Cold War

The Cold War is a term commonly used to refer to a period of geopolitical tension between the United States and the Soviet Union and their respective allies, the Western Bloc and the Eastern Bloc. Historians do not fully agree on its starting and ending points, but the period is generally considered to span from the announcement of the Truman Doctrine on 12 March 1947 to the dissolution of the Soviet Union on 26 December 1991. The term cold war is used because there was no large-scale fighting directly between the two superpowers, but they each supported major regional conflicts known as proxy wars. The conflict was based around the ideological and geopolitical struggle for global influence by these two superpowers, following their temporary alliance and victory against Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in 1945. Aside from the nuclear arsenal development and conventional military deployment, the struggle for dominance was expressed via indirect means such as psychological warfare, propaganda campaigns, espionage, far-reaching embargoes, rivalry at sports events, and technological competitions such as the Space Race.

Eastern Bloc

Eastern Bloc

The Eastern Bloc, also known as the Communist Bloc and the Soviet Bloc, was the group of socialist states of Central and Eastern Europe, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America under the influence of the Soviet Union that existed during the Cold War (1947–1991). These states followed the ideology of Marxism–Leninism, in opposition to the capitalist Western Bloc. The Eastern Bloc was often called the Second World, whereas the term "First World" referred to the Western Bloc and "Third World" referred to the non-aligned countries that were mainly in Africa, Asia, and Latin America but notably also included former pre-1948 Soviet ally SFR Yugoslavia, which was located in Europe.

East Berlin

East Berlin

East Berlin was the de facto capital city of the German Democratic Republic from 1949 to 1990. Formally, it was the Soviet sector of Berlin, established in 1945. The American, British, and French sectors were known as West Berlin. From 13 August 1961 until 9 November 1989, East Berlin was separated from West Berlin by the Berlin Wall. The Western Allied powers did not recognize East Berlin as the GDR's capital, nor the GDR's authority to govern East Berlin. On 3 October 1990, the day Germany was officially reunified, East and West Berlin formally reunited as the city of Berlin.

Berlin Crisis of 1961

Berlin Crisis of 1961

The Berlin Crisis of 1961 occurred between 4 June – 9 November 1961, and was the last major European politico-military incident of the Cold War about the occupational status of the German capital city, Berlin, and of post–World War II Germany. The Berlin Crisis started when the USSR issued an ultimatum demanding the withdrawal of all armed forces from Berlin, including the Western armed forces in West Berlin. The crisis culminated in the city's de facto partition with the East German erection of the Berlin Wall.

1960 U-2 incident

1960 U-2 incident

On 1 May 1960, a United States U-2 spy plane was shot down by the Soviet Air Defence Forces while conducting photographic aerial reconnaissance deep inside Soviet territory. The single-seat aircraft, flown by American pilot Francis Gary Powers, had taken off from Peshawar, Pakistan, and crashed near Sverdlovsk, after being hit by an S-75 Dvina surface-to-air missile. Powers parachuted to the ground safely and was captured.

Détente

Détente

Détente is the relaxation of strained relations, especially political ones, through verbal communication. The term, in diplomacy, originates from around 1912, when France and Germany tried unsuccessfully to reduce tensions.

Cuban Missile Crisis

Cuban Missile Crisis

The Cuban Missile Crisis, also known as the October Crisis [of 1962] in Cuba, the Caribbean Crisis in Russia, or the Missile Scare, was a 35-day confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union, which escalated into an international crisis when American deployments of missiles in Italy and Turkey were matched by Soviet deployments of similar ballistic missiles in Cuba. Despite the short time frame, the Cuban Missile Crisis remains a defining moment in national security and nuclear war preparation. The confrontation is often considered the closest the Cold War came to escalating into a full-scale nuclear war.

Brezhnev Doctrine

Brezhnev Doctrine

The Brezhnev Doctrine was a Soviet foreign policy that proclaimed any threat to socialist rule in any state of the Soviet bloc in Central and Eastern Europe was a threat to them all, and therefore justified the intervention of fellow socialist states. It was proclaimed in order to justify the Soviet-led occupation of Czechoslovakia earlier in 1968, with the overthrow of the reform government there. The references to "socialism" meant control by the communist parties loyal to the Kremlin. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev repudiated the doctrine in the late 1980s, as the Kremlin accepted the peaceful overthrow of communist rule in all its satellite countries in Eastern Europe.

Other studies

  • Aronova, E. (2021). Scientific History: Experiments in History and Politics from the Bolshevik Revolution to the End of the Cold War'. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.[217]
  • Bennigsen, A., & Broxup, M. (1983). The Islamic Threat to the Soviet State. New York: Routledge.[355][356]
  • Bruno, A. (2022). Atomic Visitors from Outer Space: The Tunguska Nuclear Hypothesis in Soviet Technological Imagination. The Russian Review, 81(1) 92-109.
  • Cohen, S. F. (2011). Soviet Fates and Lost Alternatives: From Stalinism to the New Cold War. New York: Columbia University Press.[357][358]
  • Erley, M. (2021). On Russian Soil: Myth and Materiality. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.
  • Fortescue, S. (1990). Science Policy in the Soviet Union. London: Routledge.[359][360]
  • Josephson, P. R. (1997). New Atlantis Revisited: Akademgorodok, the Siberian City of Science. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[361][362]
  • Suny, R. G. (1998). The Soviet Experiment: Russia, the USSR and the Successor States (2nd Edition). Cambridge, UK: Oxford University Press.[363][364]
  • Walker, G. (2011). Soviet Book Publishing Policy (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[365][366][367]

Historiography

Memory studies

Identity studies

Biographies

  • Aron, L. R. (2001). Boris Yeltsin: A Revolutionary Life. London: HarperCollins.[369]
  • Brown, A. (1996). The Gorbachev Factor. Cambridge, UK: Oxford University Press.[370]
  • Crankshaw, E. (1966). Khrushchev: A Career. New York: Viking Press.[371][372]
  • Jenks, A. L. (2019). The Cosmonaut Who Couldn’t Stop Smiling: The Life and Legend of Yuri Gagarin (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[373][374]
  • Medvedev, R. A., & Medvedev, Z. A. (1977). Khrushchev. London: Oxford University Press.
  • Medvedev, Z. A. (1984). Andropov: His Life and Death. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
  • Murphy, P. J. (1981). Brezhnev, Soviet Politician. Jefferson: McFarland.
  • Paloczi-Horvath, G. (1960). Khrushchev: The Making of a Dictator. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.
  • Ruge, G. (1991). Gorbachev: A Biography. London: Chatto & Windus.
  • Scammell, M. (1984). Solzhenitsyn: A Biography. New York: W. W. Norton & Co.[375][376]
  • Sheehy, G. (1991). The Man Who Changed the World: The lives of Mikhail S. Gorbachev. New York: HarperPerennial.[377][378]
  • Sullivan, R. (2015). Stalin’s Daughter: The Extraordinary and Tumultuous Life of Svetlana Alliluyeva (Illustrated edition). New York: HarperCollins.
  • Taubman, W. (2003). Khrushchev: The Man and His Era. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.[379][380]
  • Taubman, W. (2017). Gorbachev: His Life and Times. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.

Discover more about Biographies related topics

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev was the First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964 and chairman of the country's Council of Ministers from 1958 to 1964. During his rule, Khrushchev stunned the communist world with his denunciation of Stalin's crimes, and embarked on a policy of de-Stalinization with his key ally Anastas Mikoyan. He sponsored the early Soviet space program, and enactment of moderate reforms in domestic policy. After some false starts, and a narrowly avoided nuclear war over Cuba, he conducted successful negotiations with the United States to reduce Cold War tensions. In 1964, the Kremlin leadership stripped him of power, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier.

Leonid Brezhnev

Leonid Brezhnev

Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev was a Soviet politician who served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union between 1964 and 1982 and Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet between 1960 and 1964 and again between 1977 and 1982. His 18-year term as General Secretary was second only to Joseph Stalin's in duration. Brezhnev's tenure as General Secretary remains debated by historians; while his rule was characterised by political stability and significant foreign policy successes, it was also marked by corruption, inefficiency, economic stagnation, and rapidly growing technological gaps with the West.

Yuri Andropov

Yuri Andropov

Yuri Vladimirovich Andropov was the sixth paramount leader of the Soviet Union and the fourth General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. After Leonid Brezhnev's 18-year rule, Andropov served in the post from November 1982 until his death in February 1984.

Konstantin Chernenko

Konstantin Chernenko

Konstantin Ustinovich Chernenko was a Soviet politician and the seventh General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. He briefly led the Soviet Union from 13 February 1984 until his death on 10 March 1985.

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev was a Soviet politician who served as the last leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 to the country's dissolution in 1991. He served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1985 and additionally as head of state beginning in 1988, as Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet from 1988 to 1989, Chairman of the Supreme Soviet from 1989 to 1990 and the only President of the Soviet Union from 1990 to 1991. Ideologically, Gorbachev initially adhered to Marxism–Leninism but moved towards social democracy by the early 1990s.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was a Russian novelist. One of the most famous Soviet dissidents, Solzhenitsyn was an outspoken critic of communism and helped to raise global awareness of political repression in the Soviet Union, in particular the Gulag system.

William Taubman

William Taubman

William Chase Taubman is an American political scientist. His biography of Nikita Khrushchev won the Pulitzer Prize for Biography in 2004 and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Biography in 2003.

Reference works

  • The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Russia and the former Soviet Union. (1994). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kasack, W. & Atack, R. (1988). Dictionary of Russian literature since 1917. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Minahan, J. (2012). The Former Soviet Union's Diverse Peoples: A Reference Sourcebook. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO.
  • Smith, S. A. (2014). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Communism. New York: Oxford University Press.[381][382]
  • Vronskaya, J. & Čuguev, V. (1992). The Biographical Dictionary of the Former Soviet Union: Prominent people in all fields from 1917 to the present. London, UK: Bowker-Saur.

Memoirs and literary accounts

  • Aleksievič, S. A., Whitby, J., & Whitby, R. (2015). Zinky Boys: Soviet Voices from the Afghanistan War. New York: W. W. Norton.
  • Borovik, A. (2008). The Hidden War: A Russian Journalist's Account of the Soviet War in Afghanistan. New York: Grove Press.[383]
  • Brezhnev, L. (1978–79). Brezhnev's trilogy (3 vols. The Minor Land, Rebirth, & Virgin Lands). Moscow: Progress Publishers.[e]
  • Dobrynin, A. F. (1995). In Confidence: Moscow's Ambassador to America's Six Cold War Presidents (1962-1986). New York: Random House.[384][385]
  • Gandlevsky, S. (2014). Trepanation of the Skull (1st edition; S. Fusso, Trans.). DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[386][387]
  • Gorbachev, M. S. (1996). Mikhail Gorbachev: Memoirs. London, UK: Doubleday.
  • Khrushchev, N. S., Crankshaw, E., & Talbott, S. (1971). Khrushchev Remembers. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Co.
  • ———., & Talbott, S. (1974). Khrushchev Remembers: The Last Testament. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Co.
  • ———., Talbott, S., Schecter, J. L., & Luchkov, V. V. (1990). Khrushchev Remembers: The Glasnost Tapes. Boston, MA: Little, Brown.[388]
  • Khrushchev, S. (2003). Nikita Khrushchev and the Creation of a Superpower. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.[f][389]
  • MacDuffie, M. (1955). The Red Carpet: 10,000 miles through Russia on a Visa from Khrushchev. New York: Norton.[390]
  • Molotov, V. M., Čuev, F., & Resis, A. (2007). Molotov Remembers: Inside Kremlin Politics: Conversations with Felix Čhuev. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee.[391][392][393]
  • Solzhenitsyn, A. I. (1991). The Oak and the Calf: Sketches of Literary Life in the Soviet Union: A Memoir. London, UK: Collins-Harvill.[394]
  • Vidali, V. (1984). Diary of the Twentieth Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. Westport: Lawrence Hill.[395][396]

Discover more about Memoirs and literary accounts related topics

Leonid Brezhnev

Leonid Brezhnev

Leonid Ilyich Brezhnev was a Soviet politician who served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union between 1964 and 1982 and Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet between 1960 and 1964 and again between 1977 and 1982. His 18-year term as General Secretary was second only to Joseph Stalin's in duration. Brezhnev's tenure as General Secretary remains debated by historians; while his rule was characterised by political stability and significant foreign policy successes, it was also marked by corruption, inefficiency, economic stagnation, and rapidly growing technological gaps with the West.

Brezhnev's trilogy

Brezhnev's trilogy

The Brezhnev's trilogy (1978–79) was a series of three memoirs published under name of Leonid Brezhnev:The Minor Land Rebirth Virgin Lands

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Gorbachev

Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachev was a Soviet politician who served as the last leader of the Soviet Union from 1985 to the country's dissolution in 1991. He served as General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1985 and additionally as head of state beginning in 1988, as Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet from 1988 to 1989, Chairman of the Supreme Soviet from 1989 to 1990 and the only President of the Soviet Union from 1990 to 1991. Ideologically, Gorbachev initially adhered to Marxism–Leninism but moved towards social democracy by the early 1990s.

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev was the First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964 and chairman of the country's Council of Ministers from 1958 to 1964. During his rule, Khrushchev stunned the communist world with his denunciation of Stalin's crimes, and embarked on a policy of de-Stalinization with his key ally Anastas Mikoyan. He sponsored the early Soviet space program, and enactment of moderate reforms in domestic policy. After some false starts, and a narrowly avoided nuclear war over Cuba, he conducted successful negotiations with the United States to reduce Cold War tensions. In 1964, the Kremlin leadership stripped him of power, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier.

Sergei Khrushchev

Sergei Khrushchev

Sergei Nikitich Khrushchev was a Russian engineer and the second son of the Cold War-era Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev with his wife Nina Petrovna Khrushcheva. He moved to the United States in 1991 and became a naturalized American citizen.

Vyacheslav Molotov

Vyacheslav Molotov

Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich Molotov was a Soviet politician and diplomat, an Old Bolshevik, and a leading figure in the Soviet government from the 1920s onward. He served as Chairman of the Council of People's Commissars from 1930 to 1941 and as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1939 to 1949 and from 1953 to 1956.

Molotov Remembers: Inside Kremlin Politics

Molotov Remembers: Inside Kremlin Politics

Molotov Remembers: Inside Kremlin Politics is a 1993 book written by Russian biographer Felix Chuev and edited by American academic Albert Resis. The 1991 Russian language version of the book was published as Sto Sorok Besed s Molotovym with an afterword by Soviet Historian Sergei Kuleshov. Kirkus Reviews described Molotov Remembers as "the most extensive overview ever available by a Bolshevik founding father of the Soviet Union's youth and middle age." It is a frequently cited primary source for the period and one of the most useful memoirs of the immediate post-dissolution of the Soviet Union, from a research standpoint.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was a Russian novelist. One of the most famous Soviet dissidents, Solzhenitsyn was an outspoken critic of communism and helped to raise global awareness of political repression in the Soviet Union, in particular the Gulag system.

English language translations of primary sources

The Khrushchev Era (1953-1964)

Collections

Individual Documents

The Brezhnev Era (1964-1982)

Collections

Gorbachev Era (1982-1991)

Collections

Individual Documents

Discover more about English language translations of primary sources related topics

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is a quasi-government entity and think tank which conducts research to inform public policy. Located in the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, D.C., it is a United States presidential memorial that was established as part of the Smithsonian Institution by an act of Congress in 1968. So-named for Woodrow Wilson's achievement of being the only president of the United States to hold a PhD, the center is also a think tank, ranked multiple times by the University of Pennsylvania's Think Tanks and Civil Societies Program as among the ten best in the world.

Robert H. McNeal

Robert H. McNeal

Robert H. (Hatch) McNeal (1930–1988) was an American historian, author, and expert on the history of the Soviet Union.

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Khrushchev

Nikita Sergeyevich Khrushchev was the First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964 and chairman of the country's Council of Ministers from 1958 to 1964. During his rule, Khrushchev stunned the communist world with his denunciation of Stalin's crimes, and embarked on a policy of de-Stalinization with his key ally Anastas Mikoyan. He sponsored the early Soviet space program, and enactment of moderate reforms in domestic policy. After some false starts, and a narrowly avoided nuclear war over Cuba, he conducted successful negotiations with the United States to reduce Cold War tensions. In 1964, the Kremlin leadership stripped him of power, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier.

On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences

On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences

"On the Cult of Personality and Its Consequences", popularly known as the "Secret Speech", was a report by Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev, First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, made to the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union on 25 February 1956. Khrushchev's speech was sharply critical of the rule of the deceased General Secretary and Premier Joseph Stalin, particularly with respect to the purges which had especially marked the last years of the 1930s. Khrushchev charged Stalin with having fostered a leadership cult of personality despite ostensibly maintaining support for the ideals of communism. The speech was leaked to the West by the Israeli intelligence agency Shin Bet, which received it from the Polish-Jewish journalist Wiktor Grajewski.

Source: "Bibliography of the post-Stalinist Soviet Union", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliography_of_the_post-Stalinist_Soviet_Union.

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Further reading

Bibliographies

Bibliographies contain English and non-English language entries unless noted otherwise.

Bibliographies of Post Stalinist Era in the Soviet Union

  • Beschloss, M. R. (1991). General Sources. In The Crisis Years: Kennedy and Khrushchev, 1960-1963. New York: E. Burlingame Books.
  • Kotkin, S. (2001). Bibliography. In Armageddon Averted: The Collapse of the Soviet Union. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • McCauley, M. (1987). Bibliography. In Khrushchev and Khrushchevism. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Smith, J. and Ilić, M. (Eds.). (2011). Bibliography. In Khrushchev in the Kremlin: Policy and Government in the Soviet Union, 1953–1964. New York: Routledge.
  • Strong, J. W. (1971). Bibliography. In The Soviet Union under Brezhnev and Kosygin: The Transition Years. New York: NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold.
  • Taubman, W. (2017). Bibliography. In Gorbachev: His Life and Times. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.
  • Tompson, W. J. (2014). Bibliography. In The Soviet Union under Brezhnev. London, UK: Routledge.

Bibliographies of Russian (Soviet) History containing significant material on the Post-Stalin eras in the Soviet Union

Journals

The list below contains journals referenced in this bibliography and which have substantial contributions about Slavic and Russian history.

Notes
  1. ^ Contains a 60 page scholarly select bibliography of works relating to the history of the Soviet Union.
  2. ^ Currently Volume 3: War, Conquest, and Catastrophe, 1939–1945; and Volume 5: After Stalin, 1953–1967 are available of this multi-volume project.
  3. ^ Originally published in Russian in 1995.
  4. ^ The notes at the end of each essay (chapter) includes substantial bibliographic entries.
  5. ^ Authorship is highly disputed and it is highly doubtful that Brezhnev was the actual author.
  6. ^ Memoir written by Sergei Khruschev about his father.
  7. ^ Documents from the immediate post-war period through the construction of the Wall and its eventual destruction.
  8. ^ Contains 25 pieces of communication, delivered from October 22 through December 14, 1962, in both English and Russian.
  9. ^ Including all his speeches and proposals to the United Nations and major addresses and news conferences.
  10. ^ Commonly known as the "Secret Speech". Given during the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.
  11. ^ Project RYaN was the 1980s KGB intelligence program related to anticipating a nuclear first strike on the Soviet Union by the United States.
  12. ^ Contains only English language works. 3rd Edition has an updated (2016) bibliography with specific sections on the post-Stalin eras.
References
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  2. ^ Frank, Peter (1986). "Reviewed work: Rethinking the Soviet Experience. Politics and History since 1917, Stephen F. Cohen". Soviet Studies. 38 (3): 432–433. JSTOR 151705.
  3. ^ Meyer, Alfred G.; Heller, Mikhail; Nekrich, Aleksandr; Carlos, Phyllis B. (1988). "Utopia in Power: The History of the Soviet Union from 1917 to the Present". Russian Review. 47 (3): 344. doi:10.2307/130610. JSTOR 130610.
  4. ^ Dallin, Alexander (1988). "Utopia in Power: The History of the Soviet Union from 1917 to the Present. By Mikhail Heller and Aleksandr M. Nekrich. Translated by Phyllis B. Carlos. New York: Summit Books, 1986". Slavic Review. 47 (2): 319–320. doi:10.2307/2498472. JSTOR 2498472.
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  63. ^ Loewenstein, Karl (2010). "Reviewed work: Zhivago's Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia, Vladislav Zubok". The Russian Review. 69 (1): 177–178. JSTOR 20621206.
  64. ^ Raleigh, Donald J. (2010). "Zhivago's Children: The Last Russian Intelligentsia. By Vladislav Zubok. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press/Belknap, 2009. Pp. Xi+453. $35.00". The Journal of Modern History. 82 (4): 1010–1011. doi:10.1086/656180.
  65. ^ White, James M. (2018). "Reviewed work: Framing Mary: The Mother of God in Modern, Revolutionary, and Post-Soviet Russian Culture, Amy Singleton Adams, Vera Shevzov". The Slavic and East European Journal. 62 (4): 750–751. JSTOR 45408780.
  66. ^ Tempest, Richard (2007). "Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and the Modern Russo-Jewish Question. By Nathan D. Larson. Soviet and Post-Soviet Politics and Society, no. 14. Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2005". Slavic Review. 66: 179. doi:10.2307/20060209. JSTOR 20060209. S2CID 155735365.
  67. ^ Orbach, Alexander (1991). "Reviewed work: The Jews of the Soviet Union: The History of a National Minority, Benjamin Pinkus; the Jews in the Soviet Union since 1917: Paradox of Survival, Nora Levin". The Journal of Modern History. 63 (1): 206–209. doi:10.1086/244311. JSTOR 2938578.
  68. ^ Kochan, Lionel (1992). "Reviewed work: The Jews of the Soviet Union. The History of a National Minority, Benjamin Pinkus". The English Historical Review. 107 (422): 277–278. JSTOR 575842.
  69. ^ Miller, Jack (1989). "Reviewed work: The Jews in the Soviet Union since 1917: Paradox of Survival, Nora Levin; the Jews of the Soviet Union: The History of a National Minority, Benjamin Pinkus". Soviet Studies. 41 (4): 670–671. JSTOR 152559.
  70. ^ Seltzer, Robert M. (1993). "Reviewed work: The Jews of the Soviet Union: The History of a National Minority, Benjamin Pinkus". The American Historical Review. 98 (3): 911. doi:10.2307/2167659. JSTOR 2167659.
  71. ^ Fletcher, William C. (1986). "The Russian Church Under the Soviet Regime, 1917-1982". Slavic Review. 45 (2): 366–367. doi:10.2307/2499239. JSTOR 2499239.
  72. ^ Sysyn, Frank; Pospielovsky, Dimitry (1986). "The Russian Church under the Soviet Regime, 1917-1982". Russian Review. 45: 87. doi:10.2307/129433. JSTOR 129433.
  73. ^ Cunningham, James W. (1994). "Reviewed work: Religious Policy in the Soviet Union, Sabrina Petra Ramet". Russian History. 21 (4): 482–485. JSTOR 24658504.
  74. ^ Mojzes, Paul (1994). "Religious Policy in the Soviet Union. Ed. Sabrina P. Ramet. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1993". Slavic Review. 53 (3): 896–897. doi:10.2307/2501556. JSTOR 2501556. S2CID 164447058.
  75. ^ Klier, John D. (1993). "Reviewed work: The Struggle for Soviet Jewish Emigration, 1948-1967, Yaacov Ro'i". The Slavonic and East European Review. 71 (1): 182–183. JSTOR 4211195.
  76. ^ Korros, Alexandra S. (1993). "Reviewed work: The Struggle for Soviet Jewish Emigration, 1948-1967, Yaacov Ro'i". The Russian Review. 52 (3): 434–435. doi:10.2307/130758. JSTOR 130758.
  77. ^ Kivelson, Valerie A. (1998). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture, Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". The Russian Review. 57 (4): 621–622. JSTOR 131388.
  78. ^ Monas, Sidney (1999). "Book Reviews The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture.Edited by Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1997". The Journal of Modern History. 71 (2): 517–518. doi:10.1086/235287. S2CID 151549209.
  79. ^ Merridale, Catherine (1998). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture, Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (5): 930–931. JSTOR 153913.
  80. ^ Wanner, Adrian (1997). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture., Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". Slavic Review. 56 (4): 815–816. doi:10.2307/2502164. JSTOR 2502164. S2CID 164465958.
  81. ^ Olcott, Martha B. (1983). "Reviewed work: Moscow's Muslim Challenge: Soviet Central Asia, Michael Rywkin". Soviet Studies. 35 (3): 428–429. JSTOR 151375.
  82. ^ Strong, John W. (1983). "Reviewed work: Moscow's Muslim Challenge: Soviet Central Asia, Michael Rywkin". Studies in Soviet Thought. 26 (3): 264–265. JSTOR 20099275.
  83. ^ Dumanèciã, M. (2022). "Book Reviews: Regulating Homosexuality in Soviet Russia, 1956–91: A Different History". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  84. ^ McCallum, C. (2022). "Book Reviews: Men Out of Focus: The Soviet Masculinity Crisis in the Long Sixties". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  85. ^ "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 2022-04-01. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
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  88. ^ Huber, Joan; Lapidus, Gail Warshofsky (1979). "Women in Soviet Society: Equality, Development, and Social Change". Social Forces. 57 (4): 1428. doi:10.2307/2577299. JSTOR 2577299.
  89. ^ Jancar, Barbara W. (1979). "Reviewed work: Women in Soviet Society: Equality, Development and Social Change, Gail Warshofsky Lapidus". Soviet Studies. 31 (4): 603–605. JSTOR 150925.
  90. ^ "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 80 (3): 510–549. 2021. doi:10.1111/russ.12329. S2CID 26990304.
  91. ^ "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 2022-04-01. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
  92. ^ Dewhirst, Martin (1987). "Reviewed work: Soviet Dissent. Contemporary Movements for National, Religious, and Human Rights, Ludmilla Alexeyeva". Soviet Studies. 39 (1): 156–158. JSTOR 151459.
  93. ^ Horvath, Robert (2010). "Reviewed work: Meeting the Demands of Reason: The Life and Thought of Andrei Sakharov, Jay Bergman". Slavic Review. 69 (4): 1017–1018. doi:10.1017/S0037677900010275. JSTOR 27896179. S2CID 164611027.
  94. ^ Jenks, Andrew (2012). "Meeting the Demands of Reason: The Life and Thought of Andrei Sakharov. By Jay Bergman. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009". The Journal of Modern History. 84: 274–276. doi:10.1086/663171.
  95. ^ Dewhirst, Martin (2020). "Judgment in Moscow. Soviet Crimes and Western Complicity". Europe-Asia Studies. 72: 132–133. doi:10.1080/09668136.2019.1700702. S2CID 214297377.
  96. ^ Madeira, Victor (2020). "Judgment in Moscow: Soviet crimes and western complicity". International Affairs. 96: 253–255. doi:10.1093/ia/iiz176.
  97. ^ Schifter, Richard (2012). "Reviewed work: Human rights activism and the end of the Cold War, Sarah B. Snyder". International Affairs. 88 (1): 179–181. JSTOR 41428561.
  98. ^ Nolan, Mary (2013). "Human Rights Activism and the End of the Cold War: A Transnational History of the Helsinki Network. By Sarah B. Snyder. Human Rights in History. Edited by Stefan-Ludwig Hoffman and Samuel Moyn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011". The Journal of Modern History. 85 (2): 419–420. doi:10.1086/669779.
  99. ^ Jacobs, Everett M. (1973). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Rural Community. A Symposium, James R. Millar". Soviet Studies. 25 (2): 321–322. JSTOR 150902.
  100. ^ Photiadis, John D.; Millar, James R. (1971). "The Soviet Rural Community: A Symposium". Social Forces. 50 (2): 266. doi:10.2307/2576953. JSTOR 2576953.
  101. ^ McCauley, Martin (1971). "Reviewed work: A Century of Russian Agriculture: From Alexander II to Khrushchev, L. Volin". The Slavonic and East European Review. 49 (117): 620–621. JSTOR 4206465.
  102. ^ Lewin, Moshe (1972). "Reviewed work: A Century of Russian Agriculture: From Alexander II to Khrushchev., Lazar Volin". Journal of Economic Literature. 10 (1): 97–99. JSTOR 2720922.
  103. ^ Young, Anthony G. (1998). "Reviewed work: Moscow: Governing the Socialist Metropolis, Timothy Colton". Russian History. 25 (4): 478–479. JSTOR 24659116.
  104. ^ Hoffmann, David L. (1997). "Book Reviews Moscow: Governing the Socialist Metropolis. By Timothy J. Colton. Russian Research Center Studies, volume 88. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 1995. Pp. Xvi+939". The Journal of Modern History. 69 (2): 411–412. doi:10.1086/245532. S2CID 151543612.
  105. ^ Beissinger, Mark R. (1983). "Reviewed work: Industrial Innovation in the Soviet Union, R. Amann, J. M. Cooper; the Modernization of Soviet Industrial Management: Socioeconomic Development and the Search for Viability, William J. Conyngham". The Russian Review. 42 (3): 335–336. doi:10.2307/129833. JSTOR 129833.
  106. ^ Linz, Susan J. (1984). "Reviewed work: The Modernization of Soviet Industrial Management: Socioeconomic Development and the Search for Viability., William J. Conyngham". Slavic Review. 43 (1): 129–130. doi:10.2307/2498778. JSTOR 2498778.
  107. ^ Siegelbaum, Lewis H. (1993). "Reviewed work: Soviet Workers and De-Stalinization: The Consolidation of the Modern System of Soviet Production Relations, 1953-1964, Donald Filtzer". Europe-Asia Studies. 45 (3): 552–554. JSTOR 153277.
  108. ^ Connor, Walter D. (1994). "Reviewed work: Soviet Workers and De-Stalinization: The Consolidation of the Modern System of Soviet Production Relations, 1953-1964., Donald Filtzer". Slavic Review. 53 (1): 254. doi:10.2307/2500356. JSTOR 2500356.
  109. ^ Wright, Arthur W. (1992). "Reviewed work: Crisis Amid Plenty: The Politics of Soviet Energy under Brezhnev and Gorbachev, Thane Gustafson". The Energy Journal. 13 (1): 159–161. JSTOR 41322460.
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  111. ^ McMillan, Carl H. (1993). "Reviewed work: Energy and the Soviet Bloc: Alliance Politics after Stalin, William M. Reisinger". Europe-Asia Studies. 45 (6): 1122. JSTOR 152675.
  112. ^ Gitz, Bradley R. (1993). "Reviewed work: Energy and the Soviet Bloc: Alliance Politics after Stalin., William M. Reisinger". The Journal of Politics. 55 (4): 1215–1217. doi:10.2307/2131981. JSTOR 2131981.
  113. ^ Matthews, Mervyn (1983). "Reviewed work: Soviet Trade Unions: Their Development in the 1970s, Blair A. Ruble". The Slavonic and East European Review. 61 (2): 305–306. JSTOR 4208670.
  114. ^ Urban, Michael E. (1983). "Reviewed work: Soviet Trade Unions: Their Development in the 1970s, Blair A. Ruble". The American Political Science Review. 77 (3): 789–791. doi:10.2307/1957321. JSTOR 1957321. S2CID 151623386.
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  116. ^ Cox, Terry (1996). "Reviewed work: Making Workers Soviet: Power, Class and Identity, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Ronald Grigor Suny". Europe-Asia Studies. 48 (7): 1260–1261. JSTOR 153126.
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  123. ^ Brugger, Andreas (2015). "Reviewed work: Everyone to Skis! Skiing in Russia and the Rise of Soviet Biathlon, Frank, William D". Journal of Sport History. 42 (2): 247–248. JSTOR 10.5406/jsporthistory.42.2.0247.
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  143. ^ Unger, Aryeh L. (1983). "Reviewed work: Authority, Power and Policy in the USSR, T. H. Rigby, Archie Brown, Peter Reddaway". Soviet Studies. 35 (1): 111–112. JSTOR 151499.
  144. ^ Kenez, Peter; Rigby, T. H.; Brown, Archie; Reddaway, Peter (1981). "Authority, Power and Policy in the USSR". Russian Review. 40 (3): 347. doi:10.2307/129386. JSTOR 129386.
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  147. ^ Florinsky, Michael T.; Schapiro, Leonard (1960). "The Communist Party of the Soviet Union". Political Science Quarterly. 75 (4): 586. doi:10.2307/2145811. JSTOR 2145811.
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  150. ^ Campbell, John C.; Walker, Martin (1987). "The Waking Giant: Gorbachev's Russia". Foreign Affairs. 65 (5): 1113. doi:10.2307/20043256. JSTOR 20043256.
  151. ^ Dallin, Alexander; Medvedev, Zhores A.; Zemtsov, Ilya (1984). "Andropov". Russian Review. 43 (2): 185. doi:10.2307/129753. JSTOR 129753.
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  153. ^ Rudkin, Charles (1994). "Reviewed work: Patronage and Politics in the USSR, John P. Willerton". The Slavonic and East European Review. 72 (4): 771–773. JSTOR 4211693.
  154. ^ Olcott, Martha Brill (1995). "Reviewed work: Patronage and Politics in the USSR., John P. Willerton". Slavic Review. 54 (1): 206–208. doi:10.2307/2501188. JSTOR 2501188.
  155. ^ Dobson, Miriam (2016). "De-Stalinization Reconsidered: Persistence and Change in the Soviet Union. Ed. Thomas M. Bohn, Rayk Einax, and Michel Abesser. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag, 2014". Slavic Review. 75 (4): 1048–1050. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.75.4.1048. S2CID 217853348.
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  157. ^ Connor, Walter D. (1994). "Soviet Workers and De-Stalinization: The Consolidation of the Modern System of Soviet Production Relations, 1953-1964. By Donald Filtzer. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992". Slavic Review. 53: 254. doi:10.2307/2500356. JSTOR 2500356.
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  160. ^ McAuley, Alastair (1988). "Reviewed work: The Challenge: Economics of Perestroika, Abel Aganbegyan". Soviet Studies. 40 (4): 646–648. JSTOR 151815.
  161. ^ Remington, Thomas F. (2008). "Reviewed work: Seven Years That Changed the World: Perestroika in Perspective, Archie Brown". The Russian Review. 67 (2): 360–362. JSTOR 20620789.
  162. ^ Sakwa, Richard (2008). "Seven Years That Changed the World: Perestroika in Perspective. By Archie Brown. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007". Slavic Review. 67 (3): 728–731. doi:10.2307/27652952. JSTOR 27652952. S2CID 144804277.
  163. ^ Tormey, Simon (1991). "Voices of glasnost: Interviews with Gorbachev's reformers". International Affairs. 67 (3): 614–615. doi:10.2307/2622027. JSTOR 2622027.
  164. ^ Chotiner, Barbara Ann; Cohen, Stephen F.; Heuvel, Katrina Vanden (1991). "Voices of Glasnost: Interviews with Gorbachev's Reformers". Russian Review. 50 (2): 234. doi:10.2307/131178. JSTOR 131178.
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  166. ^ Becker, Jonathan (2001). "Gorbachev's Glasnost: The Soviet Media in the First Phase of Perestroika. By Joseph Gibbs. Eastern European Studies, no. 9. College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 1999". Slavic Review. 60: 199–200. doi:10.2307/2697691. JSTOR 2697691. S2CID 158470290.
  167. ^ Campbell, John C.; Gorbachev, Mikhail (1988). "Perestroika: New Thinking for Our Country and the World". Foreign Affairs. 66 (4): 883. doi:10.2307/20043531. JSTOR 20043531.
  168. ^ Benson, Carol Ford (1989). "Reviewed work: Perestroika: New Thinking for Our Country and the World, Mikhail Gorbachev". Naval War College Review. 42 (1): 151–153. JSTOR 44642398.
  169. ^ Duncan, Peter J. S. (2003). "Reviewed work: Conversations with Gorbachev: On Perestroika, the Prague Spring, and the Crossroads of Socialism, Mikhail Gorbachev, Zdeněk Mlynář, George Shriver". The Slavonic and East European Review. 81 (4): 774–775. JSTOR 4213832.
  170. ^ Ozinga, James R. (2003). "Ideology or People?". The Russian Review. 62 (2): 294–299. doi:10.1111/1467-9434.00278. JSTOR 3664186.
  171. ^ Kolosi, Tamás; Sík, Endre (1991). "Reviewed work: Soviet Society under Perestroika, David Lane". European Sociological Review. 7 (3): 296–297. JSTOR 522697.
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  173. ^ Benn, David Wedgwood (1992). "Reviewed work: Glasnost, Perestroika and the Soviet Media, Brian McNair". Soviet Studies. 44 (3): 544–545. JSTOR 152438.
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  175. ^ Remington, Thomas F.; Nove, Alec (1990). "Glasnost' in Action: Cultural Renaissance in Russia". Russian Review. 49 (4): 511. doi:10.2307/130549. JSTOR 130549.
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  179. ^ Beaulieu, R. A. (1968). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Military and the Communist Party, Roman Kolkowicz". Naval War College Review. 20 (10): 97. JSTOR 44640659.
  180. ^ Kipp, Jacob W. (2000). "Reviewed work: The Collapse of the Soviet Military, William E. Odom". Naval War College Review. 53 (1): 152–154. JSTOR 44643075.
  181. ^ Mawdsley, Evan (2000). "Reviewed work: The Collapse of the Soviet Military, William E. Odom". Europe-Asia Studies. 52 (1): 165–166. JSTOR 153759.
  182. ^ Tsypkin, Mikhail (1983). "Reviewed work: Inside the Soviet Army, Viktor Suvorov". Naval War College Review. 36 (4): 103–105. JSTOR 44642260.
  183. ^ Krasner, Barbara (2020). "Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets". The Oral History Review. 47: 144–145. doi:10.1080/00940798.2019.1705703. S2CID 213658347.
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  185. ^ Harasymiw, Bohdan (1995). "Reviewed work: The Collapse of a Single-Party System: The Disintegration of the CPSU, Graeme Gill". Russian History. 22 (4): 488–490. JSTOR 24657789.
  186. ^ Connor, Walter (1995). "Follow the Leader: The Decline and Fall of the Communist Party". Harvard International Review. 17 (3): 68–69. JSTOR 42761203.
  187. ^ Ishiyama, John T. (1996). "Reviewed work: The Collapse of a Single-Party System: The Disintegration of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union., Graeme Gill; from Leningrad to St. Petersburg: Democratization in a Russian City., Robert W. Orttung". The Journal of Politics. 58 (3): 926–929. doi:10.2307/2960476. JSTOR 2960476.
  188. ^ Adams, Mark B.; Graham, Loren R. (1995). "The Ghost of the Executed Engineer: Technology and the Fall of the Soviet Union". Technology and Culture. 36: 168. doi:10.2307/3106345. JSTOR 3106345.
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  190. ^ Rutland, Peter (2003). "Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse, 1970–2000. By Stephen Kotkin. New York: Oxford University Press, 2001". Slavic Review. 62 (4): 866–868. doi:10.2307/3185703. JSTOR 3185703. S2CID 165022615.
  191. ^ Joshi, Shashank (2010). "Reviewed work: Armageddon Averted: The Soviet Collapse 1970–2000, Stephen Kotkin". Europe-Asia Studies. 62 (4): 699–701. JSTOR 27808741.
  192. ^ Fierman, William (1994). "Reviewed work: Soviet Disunion. A History of the Nationalities Problem in the USSR, Bohdan Nahaylo, Victor Swoboda". Russian History. 21 (1): 100–101. JSTOR 24657273.
  193. ^ Pribic, Rado; Nahaylo, Bohdan; Swoboda, Victor (1991). "Soviet Disunion: A History of the Nationalities Problem in the USSR". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 22 (2): 330. doi:10.2307/205888. JSTOR 205888.
  194. ^ Goode, J. Paul (2012). "Reviewed work: Moscow, December 25, 1991: The Last Day of the Soviet Union, Conor O'Clery". Political Science Quarterly. 127 (4): 727–728. doi:10.1002/j.1538-165X.2012.tb01158.x. JSTOR 23563249.
  195. ^ Cohn, Edward (2014). "Reviewed work: The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union, Serhii Plokhy". The Russian Review. 73 (4): 656–657. JSTOR 43662173.
  196. ^ Kotkin, Stephen (2015). "The Last Empire: The Final Days of the Soviet Union. By Serhii Plokhy. New York: Basic Books, 2014". Slavic Review. 74: 202–203. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.1.202. S2CID 164761834.
  197. ^ "Reviewed work: Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire, David Remnick; Black Hundred: The Rise of the Extreme Right in Russia, Walter Laqueur". The Wilson Quarterly. 17 (4): 82–83. 1993. JSTOR 40258780.
  198. ^ Sakwa, Richard (1994). "Reviewed work: The Rise of Russia and the Fall of the Soviet Empire, John B. Dunlop; Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire, David Remnick". The Slavonic and East European Review. 72 (3): 575–576. JSTOR 4211616.
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  201. ^ Kangas, Roger D. (1995). "Reviewed work: The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution, and the Collapse of the Soviet Union, Ronald Grigor Suny". Russian History. 22 (3): 357–358. JSTOR 24658471.
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  204. ^ Critchlow, James (1992). "Reviewed work: The Nationalities Factor in Soviet Politics and Society, Mark Beissinger". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 16 (1/2): 224–225. JSTOR 41036469.
  205. ^ Bremmer, Ian (1992). "Reviewed work: The Nationalities Factor in Soviet Politics and Society., Lubomyr Hajda, Mark Beissinger". Contemporary Sociology. 21 (2): 205–206. doi:10.2307/2075438. JSTOR 2075438.
  206. ^ Åslund, Anders (1997). "Suddenly and Peacefully". The National Interest (47): 107–110. JSTOR 42896944.
  207. ^ Legvold, Robert; Dobbs, Michael (1997). "Down with Big Brother: The Fall of the Soviet Empire". Foreign Affairs. 76 (3): 139. doi:10.2307/20048076. JSTOR 20048076.
  208. ^ Campbell, John C.; Dunlop, John B. (1984). "The Faces of Contemporary Russian Nationalism". Foreign Affairs. 62 (5): 1259. doi:10.2307/20042044. JSTOR 20042044.
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  210. ^ White, Stephen (1995). "The Rise of Russia and the Fall of the Soviet Empire. By John B. Dunlop. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993". Slavic Review. 54: 193–194. doi:10.2307/2501176. JSTOR 2501176.
  211. ^ Legvold, Robert; Dunlop, John B. (1994). "The Rise of Russia and the Fall of the Soviet Empire". Foreign Affairs. 73 (3): 165. doi:10.2307/20046704. JSTOR 20046704.
  212. ^ Duncan, Peter J. S. (1992). "Reviewed work: Federalism and Nationalism: The Struggle for Republican Rights in the USSR, Gregory Gleason". Soviet Studies. 44 (1): 158–159. JSTOR 152257.
  213. ^ Rowland, Richard H.; Gleason, Gregory; Hazard, John N. (1992). "Federalism and Nationalism: The Struggle for Republican Rights in the USSR". Russian Review. 51 (2): 282. doi:10.2307/130715. JSTOR 130715.
  214. ^ Critchlow, James (1992). "Reviewed work: The Nationalities Factor in Soviet Politics and Society, Lubomyr Hajda, Mark Beissinger". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 16 (1/2): 224–225. JSTOR 41036469.
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  216. ^ Russell, John (1996). "Reviewed work: Last of the Empires: A History of the Soviet Union, 1945-1991, John L. H. Keep". Europe-Asia Studies. 48 (6): 1050–1051. JSTOR 152653.
  217. ^ a b c d "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 2022-04-01. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
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  219. ^ Pribic, Rado; Nahaylo, Bohdan; Swoboda, Victor (1991). "Soviet Disunion: A History of the Nationalities Problem in the USSR". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 22 (2): 330. doi:10.2307/205888. JSTOR 205888.
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  223. ^ "Book reviews". The Russian Review. 80 (4): 711–750. September 3, 2021. doi:10.1111/russ.12342. S2CID 239134609.
  224. ^ Olcott, Martha B. (1983). "Reviewed work: Moscow's Muslim Challenge: Soviet Central Asia, Michael Rywkin". Soviet Studies. 35 (3): 428–429. JSTOR 151375.
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  228. ^ Weiner, Amir (2000). "Reviewed work: Freedom and Terror in the Donbas: A Ukrainian-Russian Borderland, 1870s-1990s, Hiroaki Kuromiya". The Russian Review. 59 (2): 304–306. JSTOR 2679778.
  229. ^ Argenbright, Robert (1999). "Reviewed work: FREEDOM AND TERROR IN THE DONBAS: A UKRAINIAN-RUSSIAN BORDERLAND, 1870s-1990s, Hiroaki Kuromiya". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 23 (3/4): 203–205. JSTOR 41036801.
  230. ^ Lane, David (1989). "The Poverty of Communism. By Nick Eberstadt. New Brunswick: Transaction Books, 1988". American Political Science Review. 83 (4): 1412–1413. doi:10.2307/1961714. JSTOR 1961714.
  231. ^ Campbell, John C.; Ebon, Martin (1987). "The Soviet Propaganda Machine". Foreign Affairs. 65 (4): 907. doi:10.2307/20043153. JSTOR 20043153.
  232. ^ Reid, Susan E. (1998). "Reviewed work: Parting the Curtain: Propaganda, Culture, and the Cold War, 1945-1961, Walter L. Hixson". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (1): 170–172. JSTOR 153419.
  233. ^ Reid, Brian Holden (1998). "Reviewed work: Parting the Curtain: Propaganda, Culture and the Cold War, 1945-1961, Walter L. Hixson". The Slavonic and East European Review. 76 (4): 764–765. JSTOR 4212768.
  234. ^ Holzman, Franklyn D. (1989). "Reviewed work: Reforming the Soviet Economy: Equality Versus Efficiency., Ed. A. Hewett". Journal of Economic Literature. 27 (1): 95–97. JSTOR 2726957.
  235. ^ Blazyca, George (1989). "Reviewed work: Reforming the Soviet Economy: Equality versus Efficiency, A. Hewitt". Soviet Studies. 41 (1): 161–162. JSTOR 152388.
  236. ^ Uhler, Walter C.; Wolf, Charles (1991). "Reviewed work: The Impoverished Superpower: Perestroika and the Soviet Military Burden, Henry S. Rowen, Charles Wolf Jr". Naval War College Review. 44 (4): 142–143. JSTOR 44638586.
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  240. ^ Harrison, Mark (1991). "Reviewed work: The Turning Point: Revitalizing the Soviet Economy, Nikolai Shmelev, Vladimir Popov, Michele A. Berdy". The Slavonic and East European Review. 69 (3): 582–583. JSTOR 4210732.
  241. ^ Maggs, Peter B. (1983). "USSR: The Corrupt Society; the Secret World of Soviet Capitalism. By Konstantin M. Simis. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1982. An American in Leningrad. By Logan Robinson. New York and London: W. W. Norton, 1982. 320 pp". Slavic Review. 42 (3): 501–503. doi:10.2307/2496076. JSTOR 2496076.
  242. ^ Croan, Melvin (1973). "Uprising in East Germany: June 17, 1953. By Arnulf Baring. Translated by Gerald Onn. Introduction by David Schoenbaum. Foreword by Richard Lowenthal. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1972". Slavic Review. 32 (2): 404. doi:10.2307/2496002. JSTOR 2496002.
  243. ^ Granville, Johanna; Ostermann, Christian F. (2003). "Uprising in East Germany 1953: The Cold War, the German Question, and the First Major Upheaval behind the Iron Curtain". German Studies Review. 26 (3): 691. doi:10.2307/1432813. JSTOR 1432813.
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  316. ^ "Brothers in Arms: The Rise and Fall of the Sino-Soviet Alliance, 1945-1963. Odd Arne Westad". The China Journal. 43: 159–160. 2000. doi:10.2307/2667544. JSTOR 2667544.
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