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Bibliography of Ukrainian history

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Principalities of Kievan Rus' (1054-1132)
Principalities of Kievan Rus' (1054-1132)

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books (including translations) and journal articles about the History of Ukraine. Book entries have references to journal reviews about them when helpful and available. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below. See the Bibliography section for several additional book and chapter length bibliographies from academic publishers and online bibliographies from historical associations and academic institutions.

Inclusion criteria

Works included below are referenced in the notes or bibliographies of scholarly secondary sources or journals. Included works should: be published by an independent academic or notable non-governmental publisher; be authored by an independent and notable subject matter expert; or have significant independent scholarly journal reviews. Works published by non-academic government entities are excluded.

This bibliography is restricted to history, and specifically excludes items such modern travel logs and guide books, popular culture.[a]

Citation style

This bibliography uses APA style citations. Entries do not use templates. References to reviews and notes for entries do use citation templates. Where books which are only partially related to Ukrainian history are listed, the titles for chapters or sections should be indicated if possible, meaningful, and not excessive.

If a work has been translated into English, the translator should be included and a footnote with appropriate bibliographic information for the original language version should be included.

Regarding book titles and the spelling of Kyiv and Kiev and similar words, the form used in the latest published version should be used and the version and relevant information noted if it previously was published or reviewed under a different title.

General surveys of Ukrainian history

  • Magocsi, P. E., (2010). A History of Ukraine: The Land and Its Peoples. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Plokhy, S. (2015). The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine. New York: Basic Books.[1]
  • Reid, A. (1999). Borderland. New York: Basic Books.
  • Subtelny, O. (2008). Ukraine: A History (4th ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[2]
  • Wylegala, A., & Glowacka-Grajper, M. (2019). The Burden of the Past: History, Memory, and Identity in Contemporary Ukraine. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Surveys of Eurasian History

Works listed have substantial material and context on Ukrainian history.

Russia

  • Blum, J. (1971). Lord and Peasant in Russia from the Ninth to the Nineteenth Century. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[3][4]
  • Plokhy, S. (2017). Lost Kingdom: The Quest for Empire and the Making of the Russian Nation. New York: Basic Books.[5]
  • Thompson, J. M., & Ward, C. J. (2017). Russia: A Historical Introduction from Kievan Rus’ to the Present (8th edition). London, UK: Routledge.

Borderland studies

  • Amar, T. C. (2015). The Paradox of Ukrainian Lviv: A Borderland City between Stalinists, Nazis, and Nationalists. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[6]
  • Berezhnaya, L. (2015). A View from the Edge: Borderland Studies and Ukraine, 1991-2013. Harvard Ukrainian Studies, 34(1/4), 53–78.
  • Bilenky, S. (2018). Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905 (Illustrated edition). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[7]
  • Dabrowski, P. M. (2021). The Carpathians: Discovering the Highlands of Poland and Ukraine (NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.
  • Davies, B. (2007). Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500–1700.[8][9][10]
  • Kaminski, A. S. (1993). Republic vs. Autocracy Poland-Lithuania and Russia 1686-1697 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[11][12][13]
  • Markovits, A. S., & Sysyn, F. E. (Eds.). (1982). Nationbuilding and the Politics of Nationalism: Essays on Austrian Galicia (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[14][15]
  • Rieber, A. J. (2014). The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands: From the Rise of Early Modern Empires to the End of the First World War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Samokhvalov, V. (2018). Fractured Eurasian Borderlands: The Case of Ukraine. In A. Ohanyan (Ed.), Russia Abroad: Driving Regional Fracture in Post-Communist Eurasia and Beyond. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press.
  • Snyder, T. (2004). The Reconstruction of Nations: Poland, Ukraine, Lithuania, Belarus, 1569–1999. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • ———. (2010). Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. New York: Basic Books.[16][17]
  • Staliūnas, D. (2007). Between Russification and Divide and Rule: Russian Nationality Policy in the Western Borderlands in mid-19th Century. Jahrbücher Für Geschichte Osteuropas, 55(3), 357–373.
  • Staliūnas, D., & Aoshima, Y., (eds.). (2021). The Tsar, the Empire, and the Nation: Dilemmas of Nationalization in Russia's Western Borderlands, 1905–1915. Historical Studies in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Budapest: Central European University Press.[18]
  • Thaden, E. (1984). Russia’s Western Borderlands, 1710-1980, Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
  • Ther, P., & Kreutzmüller, C. (2014). The Dark Side of Nation-States: Ethnic Cleansing in Modern Europe. New York: Berghahn Books.[19]
  • Von, H. & Herbert J. (2011). War in a European Borderland: Occupations and Occupation Plans in Galicia and Ukraine; 1914–1918. Seattle, WA: University of Washington.

Discover more about General surveys of Ukrainian history related topics

Serhii Plokhy

Serhii Plokhy

Serhii Plokhy, or Plokhii is the Mykhailo Hrushevsky professor of Ukrainian history at Harvard University, where he also serves as the director of the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.

Bibliography of Russian history

Bibliography of Russian history

The bibliography of Russian history consists of the following sections:Bibliography of the history of the Early Slavs and Rus' Bibliography of Russian history (1223–1613) Bibliography of Russian history (1613–1917) Bibliography of the Russo-Japanese War Bibliography of Russia during World War I Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War Bibliography of Stalinism and the Soviet Union Bibliography of the Soviet Union during World War II Bibliography of the Post Stalinist Soviet Union Bibliography of Russian history (1991–present)

Alfred Rieber

Alfred Rieber

Alfred J. Rieber is an American historian specializing in Russian and Soviet history.

Timothy D. Snyder

Timothy D. Snyder

Timothy David Snyder is an American historian specializing in the modern history of Central and Eastern Europe, who is the Richard C. Levin Professor of History at Yale University and a permanent fellow at the Institute for Human Sciences in Vienna.

Bloodlands

Bloodlands

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin is a book by Yale historian Timothy D. Snyder that was first published by Basic Books on 28 October 2010. It is about mass murders committed during World War II in territories controlled by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

Period histories

Ukraine before the Russian empire

This section includes works on Ukrainian history before the establishment of the Russian Empire.

Ukraine during the Russian empire

This section includes works on Ukrainian history generally after the establishment of the Russian Empire until the Russian Revolution.

  • Bilenky, S. (2012). Romantic Nationalism in Eastern Europe: Russian, Polish, and Ukrainian Political Imaginations. Redwood City: Stanford University Press.[33]
  • Fisher, A. W. (1970). The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[34][35][36]
  • Friesen, L. (2009). Rural Revolutions in Southern Ukraine: Peasants, Nobles, and Colonists, 1774-1905 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[37]
  • Heuman, S. (1998). Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[38][39][40]
  • Kappeler, A. (2001). The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History (A. Clayton, trans.). Harlow: Longman.
  • Kohut, Z. E. (1989). Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s–1830s (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[41][42][43]
  • LeDonne, J. P. (1997). The Russian Empire and the World 1700–1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • O’Neill, K. (2017). Claiming Crimea: A History of Catherine the Great’s Southern Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press.[44]
  • Subtelny, O. (1980). Russia and the Ukraine: The Difference That Peter I Made. The Russian Review, 39(1), 1–17.

Ukraine during the Soviet era

This section covers Ukrainian history from 1917–1991.

  • Boriak, H., Graziosi, A., Hajda, L. A., Kessler, G., Maksudov, S., Pianciola, N., & Grabowicz, G. G. (2009). Hunger by Design: The Great Ukrainian Famine and Its Soviet Context (H. Hryn, Ed.; Illustrated edition). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[45]
  • Bruski, J. J., & Bałuk-Ulewiczowa, T. (2016). Between Prometheism and Realpolitik: Poland and Soviet Ukraine, 1921–1926. Krakow, Poland: Jagiellonian University Press.
  • Conquest, R. (1970). The Nation Killers: The Soviet Deportation of Nationalities. New York: Macmillan.
  • Conquest, R. (2006). The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine. London: Pimlico.[46][47][48]
  • Hagenloh, P. (2009). Stalin's Police: Public Order and Mass Repression in the USSR, 1926–1941. Washington, D.C: Woodrow Wilson Center Press.
  • Himka, J.-P. (1992). Western Ukraine between the Wars. Canadian Slavonic Papers, 34(4), 391–412.
  • Khlevniuk, O. (2004). The History of the Gulag: From Collectivization to the Great Terror. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press
  • Liber, G. (2010). Soviet Nationality Policy, Urban Growth, and Identity Change in the Ukrainian SSR 1923-1934 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[49][50][51]
  • Liber, G. (2016). Total Wars and the Making of Modern Ukraine, 1914-1954. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[52]
  • Mace, J. E. (1983). Communism and the Dilemmas of National Liberation: National Communism in Soviet Ukraine, 1918-1933 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[53][54]
  • Martin, T. (1998). The Origins of Soviet Ethnic Cleansing. The Journal of Modern History, 70(4), 813–861.
  • McBride, J. (2016). Peasants into Perpetrators: The OUN-UPA and the Ethnic Cleansing of Volhynia, 1943–1944. Slavic Review, 75(3), 630–654.
  • Naimark, N. M. (2012). Stalin's Genocides. Princeton: Princeton University Press.
  • Pauly, M. (2014). Breaking the Tongue: Language, Education, and Power in Soviet Ukraine, 1923–1934. University of Toronto Press.[55]
  • Snyder, T. (2010). Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. New York: Basic Books.[16]
  • Stachiw, M. (1969). Western Ukraine at the Turning Point of Europe's History 1918–1923. (2 vols.). New York: Shevchenko Scientific Society.
  • Veryha, W. (1984). Famine in Ukraine in 1921–1923 and the Soviet Government's Countermeasures. Nationalities Papers, 12(2), 265–286.
  • Von, H. & Herbert J. (2011). War in a European Borderland: Occupations and Occupation Plans in Galicia and Ukraine; 1914–1918. Seattle, WA: University of Washington.
  • Wheatcroft, S. (2012). The Soviet Famine of 1946–1947, the Weather and Human Agency in Historical Perspective. Europe-Asia Studies, 64(6), 987–1005.
  • Yekelchyk S. (2015). Stalin's Empire of Memory: Russian-Ukrainian Relations in the Soviet Historical Imagination. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Russian Revolution and Civil War

  • Abramson, H. (1999). A Prayer for the Government: Ukrainians and Jews in Revolutionary Times, 1917-1920 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Ukrainian Research Institute of Harvard University.[56][57][58]
  • Adams, A. E. (1963). Bolsheviks in the Ukraine: The Second Campaign, 1918–1919. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Applebaum, A. (2017). Chapter 1: The Ukrainian Revolution, 1917. In Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine. New York: Doubleday.[59][60][61]
  • Baker, M. (1999). Beyond the National: Peasants, Power, and Revolution in Ukraine. Journal of Ukrainian Studies, 24(1), 39–67.
  • Baker, M. R. (2016). Peasants, Power, and Place: Revolution in the Villages of Kharkiv Province, 1914–1921 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[62]
  • Borys, J. & Armstrong, J. A. (1980). The Sovietization of Ukraine, 1917-1923: The Communist Doctrine and Practice of National Self-Determination. Edmonton, AB: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies.
  • Dornik, W. (Ed.). (2022). The Emergence of Ukraine: Self-Determination, Occupation, and War in Ukraine, 1917-1922. University of Alberta Press.[63]
  • Edelman, R. (1985). Rural Proletarians and Peasant Disturbances: The Right Bank Ukraine in the Revolution of 1905. The Journal of Modern History, 57(2), 248–277.
  • Guthier, S. (1979). The Popular Base of Ukrainian Nationalism in 1917. Slavic Review, 38(1), 30–47.
  • Hunczak, T. (1977). The Ukraine 1917–1921: A Study in Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.
  • Kenez, P. (1971, 1977). Civil war in South Russia (2 vols.). Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Kuchabsʹkyĭ, V. & Fagan, G. (2009). Western Ukraine in Conflict with Poland and Bolshevism, 1918–1923. Toronto: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press.[64][65]
  • Malle, S. (2009). The Economic Organization of War Communism 1918-1921 (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[66][67][68]
  • Procyk, A. (1995). Russian Nationalism and Ukraine: The Nationality Policy of the Volunteer Army during the Civil War. Edmonton: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press.
  • Reshetar, J. S. (1952). The Ukrainian Revolution, 1917–1920, A Study in Nationalism. Princeton: NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Skirda, A. (2004). Nestor Makhno, Anarchy's Cossack: The Struggle for Free Soviets in the Ukraine 1917–1921. Edinburgh: AK Press.
  • Velychenko, S. (2010). State Building in Revolutionary Ukraine: A Comparative Study of Government and Bureaucrats, 1917–22. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Von, H. & Hunczak, T. (1977). The Ukraine, 1917-1921: A Study in Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  • Yekelchyk, S. (2019). The Ukrainian Meanings of 1918 and 1919. Harvard Ukrainian Studies, 36(1/2), 73–86.

World War II and the Holocaust in Ukraine

Works listed here should have substantial information about events in Ukraine or relating to Ukrainians, not general works on World War II or the Holocaust.

Holocaust
Military history
  • Buttar, P. (2018). On a Knife's Edge: The Ukraine, November 1942-March 1943. Oxford: Osprey Publishing.
  • ————. (2019). Retribution: The Soviet Reconquest of Central Ukraine, 1943. Oxford: Osprey Publishing.
  • ————. (2020). The Reckoning: The Defeat of Army Group South, 1944. Oxford: Osprey Publishing.
  • Stahel, D. (2012). Kiev 1941: Hitler's Battle for Supremacy in the East. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[79][80]

Independent Ukraine

This section covers Ukrainian history from 1991—present.

  • Aslund, A., & McFaul, M. (2006). Revolution in Orange: The Origins of Ukraine's Democratic Breakthrough. New York: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
  • Birch, S. (2000). Elections and Democratization in Ukraine. New York: Macmillan.
  • Ivan Katchanovski, Fukuyama, F., & Umland, A. (2014). Cleft Countries—Regional Political Divisions and Cultures in Post-Soviet Ukraine and Moldova. Germany: Stuttgart Ibidem.
  • Kuzio, T. (2015). Contemporary Ukraine: Dynamics of Post-Soviet Transformation. London: Routledge.
  • Kuzio, T. (2016). Ukraine State and Nation Building. London Routledge.
  • Plokhy, S. (2021). The Frontline: Essays on Ukraine’s Past and Present (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.

The Russo-Ukraine war

This section primarily covers the period from 2014–present.

  • D'Anieri, P. (2019). Ukraine and Russia: From Civilized Divorce to Uncivil War. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[81]
  • Grigas, A. (2016). Beyond Crimea: The New Russian Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press.[82]
  • Menon, R., Rumer, E. B., & Chasman, D. (2015). Conflict in Ukraine: The Unwinding of the Post–Cold War Order. MIT Press.[83][84]
  • Wood, E., Pomeranz, W., Merry, E. W., & Trudolyubov, M. (2015). Roots of Russia’s War in Ukraine. New York: Woodrow Wilson Center Press and Columbia University Press.[85]

Discover more about Period histories related topics

Bibliography of the history of the Early Slavs and Rus'

Bibliography of the history of the Early Slavs and Rus'

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the Early Slavs and Rus' and its borderlands until the Mongol invasions beginning in 1223. Book entries may have references to reviews published in academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

Bibliography of Russian history (1223–1613)

Bibliography of Russian history (1223–1613)

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the history of Russia and its borderlands from the Mongol invasions until 1613. Book entries may have references to reviews published in academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

Russian Empire

Russian Empire

The Russian Empire was the final period of the Russian monarchy from 1721 to 1917, ruling across large parts of Eurasia. It succeeded the Tsardom of Russia following the Treaty of Nystad, which ended the Great Northern War. The rise of the Russian Empire coincided with the decline of neighbouring rival powers: the Swedish Empire, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, Qajar Iran, the Ottoman Empire, and Qing China. It also held colonies in North America between 1799 and 1867. Covering an area of approximately 22,800,000 square kilometres (8,800,000 sq mi), it remains the third-largest empire in history, surpassed only by the British Empire and the Mongol Empire; it ruled over a population of 125.6 million people per the 1897 Russian census, which was the only census carried out during the entire imperial period. Owing to its geographic extent across three continents at its peak, it featured great ethnic, linguistic, religious, and economic diversity.

Bibliography of Russian history (1613–1917)

Bibliography of Russian history (1613–1917)

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the history of Russia and its empire from 1613 until 1917. It specifically excludes topics related to the Russian Revolution; see Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War for information on these subjects. Book entries may have references to reviews published in academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

Russian Revolution

Russian Revolution

The Russian Revolution was a period of political and social revolution that took place in the former Russian Empire which began during the First World War. This period saw Russia abolish its monarchy and adopt a socialist form of government following two successive revolutions and a bloody civil war. The Russian Revolution can also be seen as the precursor for the other European revolutions that occurred during or in the aftermath of WWI, such as the German Revolution of 1918.

Southern Front of the Russian Civil War

Southern Front of the Russian Civil War

The Southern Front of the Russian Civil War was a theatre of the Russian Civil War.

Robert Conquest

Robert Conquest

George Robert Acworth Conquest was a British historian and poet.

The Harvest of Sorrow

The Harvest of Sorrow

The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine is a 1986 book by British historian Robert Conquest published by the Oxford University Press. It was written with the assistance of historian James Mace, a junior fellow at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, who started doing research for the book following the advice of the director of the institute. Conquest wrote the book in order "to register in the public consciousness of the West a knowledge of and feeling for major events, involving millions of people and millions of deaths, which took place within living memory."

Oleg Khlevniuk

Oleg Khlevniuk

Oleg Vitalyevich Khlevniuk is a historian and a senior researcher at the State Archive of the Russian Federation in Moscow. Much of his writing on Stalinist Soviet Union is based on newly released archival documents, including personal correspondence, drafts of Central Committee paperwork, new memoirs, and interviews with former functionaries and the families of Politburo members. Gleb Pavlovsky has characterized him as a "leading Russian historian of Stalinism." He also a corresponding fellow of Royal Historical Society.

Bloodlands

Bloodlands

Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin is a book by Yale historian Timothy D. Snyder that was first published by Basic Books on 28 October 2010. It is about mass murders committed during World War II in territories controlled by Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union.

Serhy Yekelchyk

Serhy Yekelchyk

Serhy Yekelchyk is a Ukrainian Canadian historian, who has published widely on modern Ukrainian and Russian history and Russian-Ukrainian relations.

Anne Applebaum

Anne Applebaum

Anne Elizabeth Applebaum is an American journalist and historian. She has written extensively about the history of Communism and the development of civil society in Central and Eastern Europe.

Regional studies

Black Sea

  • Under construction

Crimea

  • Başer, A. (2019). Conflicting Legitimacies in the Triangle of the Noghay Hordes, Crimean Khanate, and Ottoman Empire. Harvard Ukrainian Studies, 36(1/2), 105–122.
  • Figes, O. (2010). Crimea. London: Metropolitan Books.
  • Fisher, A. W. (1970). The Russian Annexation of the Crimea 1772–1783. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[86][87][88]
  • Klein, D. (2012). The Crimean Khanate between East and West. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag.[89]
  • Kolodziejczyk, D. (2011). The Crimean Khanate and Poland-Lithuania (Annotated edition). Lieden: Brill Publishers.[90]
  • Mosse, W. E. (1963). The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System 1855–71: The Story of a Peace Settlement. New York: Macmillan.[91][92][93][94]
  • O’Neill, K. (2017). Claiming Crimea: A History of Catherine the Great’s Southern Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press.[44]
  • Sasse, G. (2007). The Crimea Question: Identity, Transition, and Conflict (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[95][96]

Donbas

  • Under construction

Topical histories

Arts and culture

  • Blacker, U. (2022). Managing the Arts in Soviet Ukraine. Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History, 23(2), 389-399.
  • Czaplicka, J. (Ed.). (2005). Lviv: A City in the Crosscurrents of Culture (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[97][98]
  • Grabowicz, G. G. (1981). Toward a History of Ukrainian Literature (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[99][100][101]
  • Ilnytzkyj, O. S. (1998). Ukrainian Futurism, 1914–1930: A Historical and Critical Study (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[102][103]
  • Makaryk, I., & Tkacz, V. (2015). Modernism in Kyiv: Jubilant Experimentation. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[104]
  • Martynowych, O. T. (2014). The Showman and the Ukrainian Cause: Folk Dance, Film, and the Life of Vasile Avramenko. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.[105]

Customs, traditions, and folklore

  • Martynowych, O. T. (2014). The Showman and the Ukrainian Cause: Folk Dance, Film, and the Life of Vasile Avramenko. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.[106]

Chernobyl

Cossacks

  • O'Rourke, S. (2008). The Cossacks. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Economics

  • Koropeckyj, I. S. (Ed.). (1991). Ukrainian Economic History: Interpretive Essays (Illustrated edition) (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[115][116]

Famine

Gulag, ethnic cleansing and terror

Language

Gender and family

Sexual orientation

  • Under construction

Human rights

  • Under construction

Nationalism

Nuclear disarmament

  • Kostenko, Y., & D’Anieri, P. (2021). Ukraine’s Nuclear Disarmament: A History (S. Krasynska, L. Wolanskyj, & O. Jennings, Trans.). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.

Orange Revolution

  • Under construction

Religion and philosophy

Rural and agricultural history

  • Friesen, L. (2009). Rural Revolutions in Southern Ukraine: Peasants, Nobles, and Colonists, 1774-1905 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[37]

Urban and industrial history

  • Amar, T. C. (2015). The Paradox of Ukrainian Lviv: A Borderland City between Stalinists, Nazis, and Nationalists. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[135]
  • Bilenky, S. (2018). Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905 (Illustrated edition). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[136]
  • Czaplicka, J. (Ed.). (2005). Lviv: A City in the Crosscurrents of Culture (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[97][98]
  • Herlihy, P. (1991). Odessa: A History, 1794–1914 (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[137][138][139]
  • Mick, C. (2011). Incompatible Experiences: Poles, Ukrainians and Jews in Lviv under Soviet and German Occupation, 1939-44. Journal of Contemporary History, 46(2), 336–363.
  • Ther, P., & Czaplicka, J. (2000). [http://www.jstor.org/stable/41036818 War versus Peace: Interethnic Relations in Lviv during the First Half of the Twentieth Century. Harvard Ukrainian Studies, 24, 251–284

Discover more about Topical histories related topics

Bibliography of the post-Stalinist Soviet Union

Bibliography of the post-Stalinist Soviet Union

This is a select bibliography of English language books and journal articles about the post-Stalinist era of Soviet history. A brief selection of English translations of primary sources is included. The sections "General Surveys" and "Biographies" contain books; other sections contain both books and journal articles. Book entries have references to journal articles and reviews about them when helpful. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below; see Further Reading for several book and chapter-length bibliographies. The External Links section contains entries for publicly available select bibliographies from universities.Inclusion criteria

Svetlana Alexievich

Svetlana Alexievich

Svetlana Alexandrovna Alexievich is a Belarusian investigative journalist, essayist and oral historian who writes in Russian. She was awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in Literature "for her polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time". She is the first writer from Belarus to receive the award.

Keith Gessen

Keith Gessen

Keith A. Gessen is a Russian-born American novelist, journalist, and literary translator. He is co-founder and co-editor of American literary magazine n+1 and an assistant professor of journalism at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. In 2008 he was named a "5 under 35" honoree by the National Book Foundation.

Journal of Folklore Research

Journal of Folklore Research

The Journal of Folklore Research: An International Journal of Folklore and Ethnomusicology is a triannual peer-reviewed academic journal covering research on folklore, folklife, and ethnomusicology. It was established in 1942 and is published by Indiana University Press.

Peter Gould (geographer)

Peter Gould (geographer)

Peter Gould (1932–2000) was an Evan Pugh Professor Emeritus of Geography at Penn State University. Throughout his tenure at Penn State University, Gould received many awards including the Lauréat Prix International de Géographie Vautrin Lud, the Retzius Gold Metal of the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography, as well as an honorary Doctor of Science from the Universitaire de Strasbourg. Dr. Gould was a main contributor to the quantitative revolution in the field of Geography.

Midnight in Chernobyl

Midnight in Chernobyl

Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster (2019) by Adam Higginbotham is a history of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that occurred in Soviet Ukraine in 1986. It won the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction in 2020. Higginbotham spent more than a decade interviewing eyewitnesses and reviewing documents from the disaster including some that were recently declassified. Higginbotham considers it the first English-language account that is close to the truth.

Sergey Kapitsa

Sergey Kapitsa

Sergey Petrovich Kapitsa was a Russian physicist and demographer. He was best known as host of the popular and long-running Russian scientific TV show, Evident, but Incredible. His father was the Nobel laureate Soviet-era physicist Pyotr Kapitsa, and his brother was the geographer and Antarctic explorer Andrey Kapitsa.

David R. Marples

David R. Marples

David Roger Marples is a British-born Canadian historian and Distinguished University Professor at the Department of History & Classics, University of Alberta. He specializes in history and contemporary politics of Belarus, Russia and Ukraine.

The Truth About Chernobyl

The Truth About Chernobyl

The Truth About Chernobyl is a 1991 book by Grigori Medvedev. Medvedev served as deputy chief engineer at the No. 1 reactor unit of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant while the plant was under construction. At the time of the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, Medvedev was deputy director of the main industrial department in the Soviet Ministry of Energy dealing with the construction of nuclear power stations. Since Medvedev knew the Chernobyl plant well, he was sent back as a special investigator immediately after the 1986 catastrophe.

Piers Paul Read

Piers Paul Read

Piers Paul Read FRSL is a British novelist, historian and biographer. He was first noted in 1974 for a book of reportage, Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors, later adapted as a feature film and a documentary. Read was educated at St. John's College, Cambridge, where he studied history.

Russian famine of 1921–1922

Russian famine of 1921–1922

The Russian famine of 1921–1922, also known as the Povolzhye famine, was: a severe famine in the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic which began early in the spring of 1921 and lasted through 1922. The famine resulted from the combined effects of economic disturbance because of the Russian Revolution and Russian Civil War, the government policy of war communism, exacerbated by rail systems that could not distribute food efficiently.

Holodomor

Holodomor

The Holodomor, also known as the Terror-Famine or the Great Famine, was a man-made famine in Soviet Ukraine from 1932 to 1933 that killed millions of Ukrainians. The Holodomor was part of the wider Soviet famine of 1932–1933 which affected the major grain-producing areas of the Soviet Union.

Biographies

  • Erlacher, T. (2021). Ukrainian Nationalism in the Age of Extremes: An Intellectual Biography of Dmytro Dontsov (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.
  • Frick, D. (1995). Meletij Smotryc’kyj. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[129][130]
  • Sysyn, F. (1985). Between Poland and the Ukraine: The Dilemma of Adam Kysil. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[140][141][142]

Volodymyr Zelenskyy

Works below should strictly follow the guidelines for this bibliography. To avoid abuse, works here should have independent English language academic reviews or reviews by major English language publications (e.g. New York Times, The Atlantic).

  • Under construction

Historiography, identity, and memory studies

Historiography

Identity

Memory studies

Other works

Reference works

Early Slavs

  • Kievan Rus. (2016). Encyclopedia Britannica.
  • Auty, R., Obelensky, D., et al. (2010). Companion to Russian Studies (Vol. 1, An Introduction to Russian History; Vol.2, Russian Language and Literature; Vol. 3, An Introduction to Russian Art and Architecture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Barnes, I., & Lieven, D. (2015). Restless Empire: A Historical Atlas of Russia (Illustrated edition). Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.
  • Brown, A. et al. (1982). The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Russia and the Soviet Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Channon, J., & Hudson, R. (1995). The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia. New York: Penguin.
  • Gilbert, M. (2007). The Routledge Atlas of Russian History (4th edition). London: Routledge.
  • Ivan Katchanovski, Kohut, Z. E., Nebesio, B. Y., & Yurkevich, M. (2013). Historical Dictionary of Ukraine. (Second edition). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.
  • Langer, L. N. (2001). Historical Dictionary of Medieval Russia. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press.
  • Lerski, H. (1996). Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing.
  • Magocsi, P. R. (2017). Carpathian Rus’: A Historical Atlas. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[150]
  • Millar, J. R. (Ed.). (2004). Encyclopedia of Russian History (4 vols.). New York: Macmillan Library Reference.

Ukraine

English language translations of primary sources

  • Heifetz, E. (1921). The Slaughter of the Jews in the Ukraine in 1919. Text

Academic journals

The list below contains journals referenced in this bibliography and which have substantial contributions about Slavic and Russian history.

Bibliographies

Books

Below are recent works from mainstream and academic publishers which contain bibliographies of Ukrainian history.

  • Further Reading appendix in Plokhy, S. (2015). The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine. New York: Basic Books.

Online

Below are online bibliographies of Ukrainian history from historical associations and academic institutions.

Primary sources

Source: "Bibliography of Ukrainian history", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliography_of_Ukrainian_history.

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References

Notes

  1. ^ Memoirs and diaries with a clear historical importance as shown by academic citations and publishing are included in a section.

Citations

  1. ^ Sydorenko, A. (2016). "Review of The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine, by S. Plokhy". The Russian Review. 75 (3): 534–535. JSTOR 43919477.
  2. ^ Switalski, John (1990). "Reviewed work: Ukraine: A History, Orest Subtelny". The Polish Review. 35 (3/4): 276–280. JSTOR 25778520.
  3. ^ Crisp, Olga (1963). "Book Review: Lord and Peasant in Russia by J. Blum". The Slavonic and East European Review. 41 (97): 559–561. JSTOR 4205488.
  4. ^ Anderson, M. S. (1962). "Book Review: Lord and Peasant in Russia by J. Blum". The Economic History Review. 15 (1): 180–181. doi:10.2307/2593312. JSTOR 2593312.
  5. ^ Kumar, K. (2018). "Review of Lost Kingdom: The Quest for Empire and the Making of the Russian Nation from 1470 to the Present". Slavic Review. 77 (3): 828–829. doi:10.1017/slr.2018.251. JSTOR 26565700. S2CID 165192290.
  6. ^ David, Kathryn (2017). "Reviewed work: THE PARADOX OF UKRAINIAN LVIV: A BORDERLAND CITY BETWEEN STALINISTS, NAZIS, AND NATIONALISTS, Tarik Cyril Amar". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 35 (1/4): 547–550. JSTOR 44983563.
  7. ^ Remy, Johannes (2019). "Reviewed work: IMPERIAL URBANISM IN THE BORDERLANDS: KYIV, 1800–1905, Serhiy Bilenky". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 497–500. JSTOR 48585326.
  8. ^ King, Charles (2010). "Reviewed work: Warfare, State, and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500-1700, Brian L. Davies". Slavic Review. 69 (1): 247. doi:10.1017/S0037677900017162. JSTOR 25621775. S2CID 164995300.
  9. ^ Monahan, Erika (2010). "Reviewed work: Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500-1700, Brian L. Davies". The Russian Review. 69 (1): 152–154. JSTOR 20621185.
  10. ^ Hausmann, G. (2010). "Reviewed work: Warfare, State and Society on the Black Sea Steppe, 1500–1700. Warfare and History, Brian L. Davies". The Slavonic and East European Review. 88 (4): 740–741. JSTOR 41061920.
  11. ^ Frost, Robert I. (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697, Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". The Slavonic and East European Review. 73 (3): 543–545. JSTOR 4211891.
  12. ^ Hughes, Lindsey (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697., Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". Slavic Review. 54 (2): 472–473. doi:10.2307/2501663. JSTOR 2501663.
  13. ^ Longworth, Philip (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697, Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". The American Historical Review. 100 (5): 1622–1623. doi:10.2307/2170009. JSTOR 2170009.
  14. ^ Hurst, Michael (1984). "Reviewed work: Nationbuilding and the Politics of Nationalism: Essays on Austrian Galicia, A. S. Markovits, F. E. Sysyn". The Slavonic and East European Review. 62 (3): 457–458. JSTOR 4208933.
  15. ^ Wynar, Lubomyr R. (1984). "Reviewed work: Nationbuilding and the Politics of Nationalism: Essays on Austrian Galicia., Andrei S. Markovits, Frank e. Sysyn". Slavic Review. 43 (4): 712–713. doi:10.2307/2499353. JSTOR 2499353.
  16. ^ a b Rubenstein, Joshua (November 26, 2010). "The Devils' Playground (review of Bloodlands by Timothy Snyder)". The New York Times. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  17. ^ Moorhouse, Roger (November 8, 2010). "Review: Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin". History Extra. BBC. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  18. ^ Weeks, T. R. (2022). "Review of The Tsar, the Empire, and the Nation: Dilemmas of Nationalization in Russia's Western Borderlands, 1905–1915". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  19. ^ a b Solonari (2015). "Review: The Dark Side of Nation-States: Ethnic Cleansing in Modern Europe". Slavic Review. 74 (2): 371. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.2.371.
  20. ^ Smith, T. Allan; Barford, P.M. (2001). "Review of The Early Slavs. Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 43 (4): 579–580. JSTOR 40870401. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  21. ^ Barford, P[aul] M.; KNOLL, PAUL W. (2002). "Review of The Early Slavs. Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe". The Polish Review. 47 (4): 420–422. JSTOR 25779352. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  22. ^ Barford, P. M.; Bogucki, Peter (2002). "Review of The Early Slavs: Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe". Slavic Review. 61 (4): 817–818. JSTOR 3090392. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  23. ^ Barford, P. M.; Gassowski, Jerzy F. (2005). "Review of The Early Slavs: Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe". American Journal of Archaeology. 109 (1): 124–125. doi:10.1086/AJS40025129. JSTOR 40025129. S2CID 245297261. Retrieved February 27, 2021.
  24. ^ Sedlar, Jean W.; Krekić, Bariša (1995). "Review of East Central Europe in the Middle Ages, 1000-1500". The American Historical Review. 100 (5): 1551. doi:10.2307/2169913. JSTOR 2169913. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  25. ^ Shepard, Jonathan; Curta, Florin (2008). "Review of Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250". The Catholic Historical Review. 94 (2): 326–327. doi:10.1353/cat.0.0035. JSTOR 25027293. S2CID 154240587. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  26. ^ Petkov, Kiril; Curta, Florin (2007). "Review of Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250". Speculum. 82 (3): 694–695. doi:10.1017/S0038713400010381. JSTOR 20466014. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  27. ^ Dolukhanov, Pavel M.; Bogucki, Peter (1997). "Review of The Early Slavs: Eastern Europe from the Initial Settlement to the Kievan Rus". Slavic Review. 56 (3): 551–552. JSTOR 2500930. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  28. ^ Dolukhanov, Pavel M.; Todd, Malcolm (1997). "Review of The Early Slavs: Eastern Europe from the Initial Settlement to the Kievan Rus". The Slavonic and East European Review. 75 (2): 359–360. JSTOR 4212385. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  29. ^ Drozd, Andrew M.; Plokhy, Serhii (2008). "Review of The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus". The Slavic and East European Journal. 52 (2): 326–327. JSTOR 20459696. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  30. ^ Plokhy, Serhii; Kaiser, Daniel H. (2007). "Review of The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus". Slavic Review. 66 (4): 749–750. JSTOR 20060402. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  31. ^ Boeck, Brian J.; Plokhy, Serhii (2009). "Review of The Origins of the Slavic Nations: Premodern Identities in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus". The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 39 (4): 587–588. doi:10.1162/jinh.2009.39.4.587. JSTOR 40263564. S2CID 142632446. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  32. ^ Bouchard, Constance B. (2017). "Reviewed work: Ties of Kinship: Genealogy and Dynastic Marriage in Kyivan Rus, Christian Raffensperger". Medieval Prosopography. 32: 268–270. JSTOR 26630005.
  33. ^ Yekelchyk, Serhy (2017). "Reviewed work: ROMANTIC NATIONALISM IN EASTERN EUROPE: RUSSIAN, POLISH, AND UKRAINIAN POLITICAL IMAGINATIONS. Stanford Studies on Central and Eastern Europe, Serhiy Bilenky". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 35 (1/4): 536–539. JSTOR 44983559.
  34. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Fisher, Alan W. (1972). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". The English Historical Review. 87 (343): 428. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXXVII.CCCXLIII.428. JSTOR 563359. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  35. ^ Parry, V. J.; Fisher, Alan W. (1971). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. 34 (1): 155–157. doi:10.1017/S0041977X00141795. JSTOR 614645. S2CID 162471671. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  36. ^ Hö., E.; Fisher, Alan W. (1971). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea 1772—1783". Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas. 19 (4): 620–621. JSTOR 41044447. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  37. ^ a b Kohut, Zenon E. (2010). "Reviewed work: Rural Revolutions in Southern Ukraine: Peasants, Nobles, and Colonists 1774-1905, Leonard G. Friesen". The Russian Review. 69 (1): 156–157. JSTOR 20621188.
  38. ^ Haigh, Elizabeth V. (1998). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". Russian History. 25 (4): 473–474. JSTOR 24659113.
  39. ^ Hamburg, G. M. (2000). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". Slavic Review. 59 (1): 221–222. doi:10.2307/2696942. JSTOR 2696942. S2CID 164741259.
  40. ^ Armstrong, John A. (1999). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". The American Historical Review. 104 (2): 680–681. doi:10.2307/2650548. JSTOR 2650548.
  41. ^ Dukes, Paul (1990). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon e. Kohut". The Slavonic and East European Review. 68 (3): 567–568. JSTOR 4210411.
  42. ^ Le Donne, John (1990). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon e. Kohut". The American Historical Review. 95 (5): 1584–1585. doi:10.2307/2162831. JSTOR 2162831.
  43. ^ Sysyn, Frank E. (1993). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon Kohut". The Russian Review. 52 (1): 120–121. doi:10.2307/130885. JSTOR 130885.
  44. ^ a b Kotenko, Anton (2019). "Reviewed work: CLAIMING CRIMEA: A HISTORY OF CATHERINE THE GREat's SOUTHERN EMPIRE, Kelly O'Neill". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 495–497. JSTOR 48585325.
  45. ^ a b Miller, Ian (2011). "Reviewed work: Hunger by Design: The Great Ukrainian Famine and its Soviet Context, Halyna Hryn". Europe-Asia Studies. 63 (7): 1305–1307. JSTOR 41302146.
  46. ^ Smith, George B. (1987). "Reviewed Work: The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine. by Robert Conquest". The Journal of Politics. 49 (3): 904–905. doi:10.2307/2131299. JSTOR 2131299.
  47. ^ Kosiński, L. A. (1987). "Reviewed Work: The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine by Robert Conquest". Population and Development Review. 13 (1): 149–153. doi:10.2307/1972127. JSTOR 1972127.
  48. ^ Hunter, Holland (1988). "Reviewed Work: The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine by Robert Conquest". The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. 496: 152. doi:10.1177/0002716288496001025. JSTOR 1046337. S2CID 220839885.
  49. ^ Weeks, Theodore R. (1995). "Reviewed work: Soviet Nationality Policy, Urban Growth, and Identity Change in the Ukrainian SSR, 1923-1934, George O. Liber, Stephen White". The Journal of Modern History. 67 (2): 522–523. doi:10.1086/245170. JSTOR 2125138.
  50. ^ Siegelbaum, Lewis H. (1994). "Reviewed work: Soviet Nationality Policy, Urban Growth, and Identity Change in the Ukrainian SSR 1923-1934, George O. Liber". The American Historical Review. 99 (1): 269–270. doi:10.2307/2166276. JSTOR 2166276.
  51. ^ Bohachevsky-Chomiak, Martha (1994). "Reviewed work: Soviet Nationality Policy, Urban Growth, and Identity Change in the Ukrainian SSR, 1923-1934., George O. Liber". Slavic Review. 53 (3): 964–966. doi:10.2307/2501612. JSTOR 2501612.
  52. ^ Zaitsev, Oleksandr (2019). "Reviewed work: TOTAL WARS AND THE MAKING OF MODERN UKRAINE, 1914–1954, George O. Liber". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (1/2): 203–207. JSTOR 48585266.
  53. ^ Swoboda, Victor (1985). "Reviewed work: Communism and the Dilemmas of National Liberation: National Communism in Soviet Ukraine, 1918-1933, James e. Mace". The Slavonic and East European Review. 63 (1): 138–139. JSTOR 4209061.
  54. ^ Reshetar, John S. (1985). "Reviewed work: Communism and the Dilemmas of National Liberation: National Communism in Soviet Ukraine, 1918-1933., James e. Mace". Slavic Review. 44 (2): 351–352. doi:10.2307/2497788. JSTOR 2497788.
  55. ^ Kolomiyets, Lada (2019). "Reviewed Work: BREAKING THE TONGUE: LANGUAGE, EDUCATION, AND POWER IN SOVIET UKRAINE, 1923–1934 by Matthew D. Pauly". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 504–507.
  56. ^ Yekelchyk, Serhy (2000). "Reviewed work: A Prayer for the Government: Ukrainians and Jews in Revolutionary Times, 1917-1920, Henry Abramson". The Russian Review. 59 (4): 650–651. JSTOR 2679295.
  57. ^ Bohachevsky-Chomiak, Martha (2000). "Reviewed work: A Prayer for the Government: Ukrainians and Jews in Revolutionary Times, 1917-1920, Henry Abramson". Slavic Review. 59 (4): 899–901. doi:10.2307/2697444. JSTOR 2697444.
  58. ^ Löwe, Heinz‐Dietrich (2002). "A Prayer for the Government: Ukrainians and Jews in Revolutionary Times, 1917–1920. By Henry Abramson. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute, 1999". The Journal of Modern History. 74 (2): 457–459. doi:10.1086/343447.
  59. ^ a b Kuzio, Taras (2018). "Red Famine. Stalin's War on Ukraine". Europe-Asia Studies. 70 (8): 1334–1335. doi:10.1080/09668136.2018.1520510. S2CID 54880488.
  60. ^ a b Fitzpatrick, Sheila (August 25, 2017). "Red Famine by Anne Applebaum review – did Stalin deliberately let Ukraine starve?". The Guardian Book Reviews. Retrieved February 1, 2020.
  61. ^ a b Hochschild, Adam (October 18, 2017). "Stalinist Crimes in Ukraine That Resonate Today". New York Times Book Review. Retrieved February 1, 2020.
  62. ^ Hudson, Hugh D.; Baker, Mark R. (2017). "Reviewed work: Peasants, Power, and Place: Revolution in the Village of Kharkiv Province, 1914–1921, BakerMark R". Slavic Review. 76 (2): 528–529. doi:10.1017/slr.2017.109. JSTOR 26565112. S2CID 165087282.
  63. ^ Wilson, Sophia (2017). "Reviewed work: THE EMERGENCE OF UKRAINE: SELF-DETERMINATION, OCCUPATION, AND WAR IN UKRAINE, 1917-1922, Wolfram Dornik, Georgiy Kasianov, Hannes Leidinger, Peter Lieb, Alexei Miller, Bogdan Musial, Vasyl Rasevych, Gus Fagan". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 35 (1/4): 539–542. JSTOR 44983560.
  64. ^ Gilley, C. R. (2011). "Reviewed Work: Western Ukraine in Conflict with Poland and Bolshevism, 1918––1923 by Kuchabsky, Vasyl., Gus Fagan". The Slavonic and East European Review. 89 (4): 766–768. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.89.4.0766. JSTOR 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.89.4.0766.
  65. ^ Prusin, A. (2009). "Reviewed Work: Western Ukraine in Conflict with Poland and Bolshevism, 1918-1923 by Vasyl' Kuchabsky". The Polish Review. 54 (3): 372–375. JSTOR 25779827.
  66. ^ Lih, Lars T. (1987). "Reviewed work: The Economic Organization of War Communism 1918-1921, Silvana Malle". The Russian Review. 46 (4): 455–456. doi:10.2307/130310. JSTOR 130310.
  67. ^ Husband, William B. (1987). "Reviewed work: The Economic Organization of War Communism, 1918-1921., Silvana Malle". Slavic Review. 46 (1): 158. doi:10.2307/2498651. JSTOR 2498651.
  68. ^ Rosenberg, William G. (1987). "Reviewed work: The Economic Organization of War Communism, 1918-1921, Silvana Malle". The American Historical Review. 92 (3): 712–713. doi:10.2307/1870016. JSTOR 1870016.
  69. ^ Chopard, Thomas (2017). "Reviewed work: The Great West Ukrainian Prison Massacre of 1941, Ksenya KIEBUZINSKI, Alexander MOTYL". Cahiers du Monde Russe. 58 (4): 707–710. doi:10.4000/monderusse.10164. JSTOR 26615935.
  70. ^ Van Tuyll, Hubert P. (2001). "Reviewed work: Collaboration in the Holocaust: Crimes of the Local Police in Belorussia and Ukraine, 1941-44, Martin Dean". The Russian Review. 60 (3): 448–449. JSTOR 2679687.
  71. ^ Ezergailis, Andrew (2001). "Reviewed work: Collaboration in the Holocaust: Crimes of the Local Police in Belorussia and Ukraine, 1941-44, Martin Dean". The American Historical Review. 106 (2): 686–687. doi:10.2307/2651788. JSTOR 2651788.
  72. ^ Bartov, Omer (2001). "Reviewed work: Collaboration in the Holocaust: Crimes of the Local Police in Belorussia and Ukraine, 1941-44, Martin Dean". Slavic Review. 60 (1): 174–175. doi:10.2307/2697669. JSTOR 2697669. S2CID 145220716.
  73. ^ Clarkson, A. (2008). "Review of Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine". The English Historical Review. 123 (505): 1600–1601. doi:10.1093/ehr/cen309.
  74. ^ Hagen, W. (2007). "Review of Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine". Slavic Review. 66 (2): 335–336. JSTOR. https://doi.org/10.2307/20060246. doi:10.2307/20060246. JSTOR 20060246. S2CID 164222556.
  75. ^ Himka, J. (2006). "Review of Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine". The International History Review. 28 (3): 634–636.
  76. ^ Lumans, V. (2006). "Review of Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine". Central European History. 39 (3): 534–536. doi:10.1017/S000893890638017X. S2CID 145702878.
  77. ^ O'Sullivan (2015). "Review of Nazi Policy on the Eastern Front, 1941: Total War, Genocide, and Radicalization, by Alex J. Kay, Jeff Rutherford, and David Stahel". Slavic Review. 74 (2): 408. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.2.408.
  78. ^ Mawdsley, Evan (2014). "Reviewed work: Nazi Policy on the Eastern Front, 1941: Total War, Genocide, and Radicalization, Alex J. Kay, Jeff Rutherford, David Stahel". The English Historical Review. 129 (539): 1006–1007. doi:10.1093/ehr/ceu197. JSTOR 24474316.
  79. ^ Citino, Robert M. (2012). "Reviewed work: Kiev 1941: Hitler's Battle for Supremacy in the East, David Stahel". Russian Review. 71 (3): 539–540. JSTOR 23263894.
  80. ^ Slepyan, Kenneth (2013). "Kiev 1941: Hitler's Battle for Supremacy in the East. By David Stahel". Slavic Review. 72 (2): 420–421. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.2.0420. S2CID 164459820.
  81. ^ Lennon, Olena (2019). "Reviewed work: UKRAINE AND RUSSIA: FROM CIVILIZED DIVORCE TO UNCIVIL WAR, Paul d'Anieri". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 512–514. JSTOR 48585331.
  82. ^ Marples, David R. (2019). "Reviewed work: BEYOND CRIMEA: THE NEW RUSSIAN EMPIRE, Agnia Grigas". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 515–517. JSTOR 48585332.
  83. ^ Legvold, Robert (2015). "Reviewed work: Conflict in Ukraine: The Unwinding of the Post—Cold War Order, RAJAN MENON, EUGENE B. RUMER". Foreign Affairs. 94 (5): 193. JSTOR 24483774.
  84. ^ d'Anieri, Paul (2016). "Ukraine, Russia, and the West: The Battle over Blame". The Russian Review. 75 (3): 498–503. doi:10.1111/russ.12087. JSTOR 43919447.
  85. ^ Delwaide, Jacobus (2017). "Reviewed work: ROOTS OF RUSSia's WAR IN UKRAINE, Elizabeth A. Wood, William e. Pomeranz, e. Wayne Merry, Maxim Trudolyubov". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 35 (1/4): 550–553. JSTOR 44983564.
  86. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Fisher, Alan W. (1972). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". The English Historical Review. 87 (343): 428. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXXVII.CCCXLIII.428. JSTOR 563359. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  87. ^ Parry, V. J.; Fisher, Alan W. (1971). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. 34 (1): 155–157. doi:10.1017/S0041977X00141795. JSTOR 614645. S2CID 162471671. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  88. ^ Hö., E.; Fisher, Alan W. (1971). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea 1772—1783". Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas. 19 (4): 620–621. JSTOR 41044447. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  89. ^ Kravets, Maryna (2017). "Reviewed work: THE CRIMEAN KHANATE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST (15TH-18TH CENTURY) Forschungen zur osteuropäischen Geschichte 78, Denise Klein". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 35 (1/4): 532–536. JSTOR 44983558.
  90. ^ Kravets, Maryna (2019). "Reviewed work: THE CRIMEAN KHANATE AND POLAND-LITHUANIA: INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY ON THE EUROPEAN PERIPHERY (15TH–18TH CENTURY); A STUDY OF PEACE TREATIES FOLLOWED BY ANNOTATED DOCUMENTS, Dariusz Kołodziejczyk". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (1/2): 195–200. JSTOR 48585264.
  91. ^ Mosse, W. E.; Medlicott, W. N. (1965). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System, 1855–1871". The Slavonic and East European Review. 43 (101): 462–463. JSTOR 4205682. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  92. ^ Mosse, W. E.; Jelavich, Barbara (1964). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System, 1855-71: The Story of a Peace Settlement". Slavic Review. 23 (4): 747–748. doi:10.2307/2492217. JSTOR 2492217. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
  93. ^ Spencer, Frank; Mosse, W. E. (1965). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System 1855–1871: The Story of a Peace Settlement". The English Historical Review. 80 (317): 863–864. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXX.CCCXVII.863. JSTOR 559390. Retrieved March 14, 2021.
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