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Bibliography of Russian history (1613–1917)

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This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books (including translations) and journal articles about the history of Russia and its empire from 1613 until 1917. It specifically excludes topics related to the Russian Revolution; see Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War for information on these subjects. Book entries may have references to reviews published in academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

A brief selection of English translations of primary sources is included. The sections "General Surveys" and "Biographies" contain books; other sections contain both books and journal articles. Book entries have references to journal articles and reviews about them when helpful. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below; see Further Reading for several book and chapter-length bibliographies. The External Links section contains entries for publicly available select bibliographies from universities.

Inclusion criteria

Works included are referenced in the notes or bibliographies of scholarly secondary sources or journals. Included works should either be published by an academic or widely distributed publisher, be authored by a notable subject matter expert as shown by scholarly reviews and have significant scholarly journal reviews about the work. To keep the bibliography length manageable, only items that clearly meet the criteria should be included.

Citation style

This bibliography uses APA style citations. Entries do not use templates. References to reviews and notes for entries do use citation templates. Where books which are only partially related to Russian history are listed, the titles for chapters or sections should be indicated if possible, meaningful, and not excessive.

If a work has been translated into English, the translator should be included and a footnote with appropriate bibliographic information for the original language version should be included.

When listing works with titles or names published with alternative English spellings, the form used in the latest published version should be used and the version and relevant bibliographic information noted if it previously was published or reviewed under a different title.

General works

General works on Russian history which have significant content about pre-1917 history.

  • Billington, J. (2010). The Icon and Axe: An Interpretative History of Russian Culture. New York: Vintage.[1]
  • Blum, J. (1971). Lord and Peasant in Russia from the Ninth to the Nineteenth Century. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.[2][3]
  • Bogatyrev, S. (Ed.). (2004). Russia Takes Shape. Patterns of Integration from the Middle Ages to the Present. Helsinki: Finnish Academy of Science and Letters.[4][5]
  • Bushkovitch, P. (2011). A Concise History of Russia (Illustrated edition). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[6][7]
  • Cherniavsky, M. (Ed.). (1970). The Structure of Russian History: Interpretive Essays. New York, NY: Random House.
  • Christian, D. (1998). A History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia (2 vols.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.[8][9][10][11]
  • Connolly, R. (2020). The Russian Economy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Freeze, G. L. (2009). Russia: A History (Revised edition). Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Forsyth, J. (1992). A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581–1990. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[12][13]
  • Grousset, R. (1970). The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia (N. Walford, Trans.). New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.[14]
  • Lieven, D., Perrie, M., & Suny, R. (Eds.). (2006). The Cambridge History of Russia (3 vols.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[a]
  • Pipes, R. (1974). Russia Under the Old Regime. New York, NY: Charles Scribner's Sons.[15][16][17][18]
  • Riasanovsky, N. V. (2018). A History of Russia (9th edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Shubin, D. H. (2005). A History of Russian Christianity (4 vols.). New York: Agathon Press
  • Thompson, J. M., & Ward, C. J. (2017). Russia: A Historical Introduction from Kievan Rus’ to the Present (8th edition). London, UK: Routledge.

Period works

  • Anisimov, E. V. (2004). Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia. New York: Praeger.[19][20][21]
  • Baron, S. (1988). The Jews under Tsars and Soviets. New York: Schocken Books.
  • Beer, D. (2016). The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars. London: Vintage.[22]
  • Dowler, W. (2010). Russia in 1913. DeKalb: DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[23][24]
  • Erickson, M., & Erickson L. (Eds.). (2005). Russia: War, Peace and Diplomacy: Essays in Honour of John Erickson. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson.[25]
  • Fuller, Jr. W. C. (1992). Strategy and Power in Russia, 1600–1914. New York: Free Press.[26][27]
  • Hellie, R. (2005). The Structure of Russian Imperial History. History and Theory, 44(4), 88–112.
  • Hosking, G. (1997). Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[28][29][30][31]
  • Hughes, L. (2008). The Romanovs: Ruling Russia 1613–1917. New York: Bloomsbury.[32][33][34][35]
  • Khodarkovsky, M. Of Christianity, Enlightenment, and Colonialism: Russia in the North Caucasus, 1500–1800. Journal of Modern History, 71(1999), 394–430.
  • Kleimola, A. M. (1979). Up Through Servitude: The Changing Condition of the Muscovite Elite in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Russian History, 6(2), 210–229.
  • LeDonne, J. P. (1991). Absolutism and Ruling Class: The Formation of the Russian Political Order, 1700–1825. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[36][37][38][39]
  • Lieven, D. (1989). Russia’s Rulers under the Old Regime. New Haven: Yale University Press.[40][41][42]
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1997). Between Heaven and Hell: The Story of a Thousand Years of Artistic Life in Russia. New York: Viking.
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1981). The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias. New York: Doubleday.[43][44]
  • Lincoln, W. B. (2001). Sunlight at Midnight: St Petersburg and the Rise of Modern Russia. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[45][46][47]
  • Mironov, B. N., & Eklof, B. (2000). The Social History of Imperial Russia, 1700–1917 (2 vols.). , Oxfordshire, UK: Westview Press.[48]
  • Montefiore, S. (2017). Romanovs: 1613–1918, New York: Vintage.[49]
  • Seton-Watson, H. (1967). The Russian Empire 1801–1917 (Oxford History of Modern Europe). Oxford: Oxford University Press.[50][51][52][53]
  • Weeks, T. R. (1996). Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863-1914. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[54][55][56]
  • Williams, B. (2021). Late Tsarist Russia, 1881–1913 (Routledge Studies in the History of Russian and Eastern Europe). New York: Routledge.[57]

Topical works

  • Alexander, J. T. (1969). Autocratic Politics in a National Crisis: The Imperial Russian Government and Pugachev’s Revolt 1773–1775. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[58][59][60][61]
  • Anisimov, E. V. (1993). The Reforms of Peter the Great: Progress through Coercion in Russia. New York: Routledge.[62][63][64][65]
  • Ascher, A. P. A. (2001). Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia. Stanford: Stanford University Press.[66][67][68]
  • Beer, D. (2013). Decembrists, Rebels, and Martyrs in Siberian Exile: The “Zerentui Conspiracy” of 1828 and the Fashioning of a Revolutionary Genealogy. Slavic Review, 72(3), 528–551.
  • Crummey, R. O. (1983). Aristocrats and Servitors: The Boyar Elite, 1613–89. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[69][70][71]
  • Daly, J. W. (1997). Autocracy under Siege: Security Police and Opposition in Russia 1866–1905. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[72][73][74][75]
  • Daly, J. W. (2004). The Watchful State 1906–17: Security Police and Opposition in Russia. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.
  • Dunning, C. S. L. (2001). Russia’s First Civil War: The Time of Troubles and the Founding of the Romanov Dynasty. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.[76][77][78]
  • Eklof, B. Bushnell, J., & Zakharova, L. (Eds.). (1994). Russia’s Great Reforms, 1855–1881. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[79][80][81]
  • Emmons, T. (2014). The Formation of Political Parties and the First National Elections in Russia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[82][83][84]
  • Fuller, Jr. W. C. (2006). The Foe Within: Fantasies of Treason and the End of Imperial Russia. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[85][86]
  • Hughes, L. (1997). Russia in the Age of Peter the Great. New Haven: Yale University Press.[87][88][89]
  • Kates, G. (2001). Monsieur d’Eon is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade. New York: Basic Books.[90][91]
  • Kelly, L. (2006). Diplomacy and Murder in Tehran: Alexander Griboyedov and Imperial Russia’s Mission to the Shah of Persia. New York: I.B. Tauris.[92][93]
  • Kleimola, A. (1979). Up Through Servitude: The Changing Condition of the Muscovite Elite in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Russian History, 6(2), 210–229.
  • LeDonne, J. P. (1984). Ruling Russia: Politics and Administration in the Age of Absolutism 1762–96. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[94][95][96]
  • Levin, E. (2014). A Child of Christian Blood: Murder and Conspiracy in Tsarist Russia: The Beilis Blood Libel. New York: Knopf Doubleday/Schocken Books.
  • Lewitter, L. (1958). Peter the Great, Poland, and the Westernization of Russia. Journal of the History of Ideas, 19(4), 493–506.
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1990). The Great Reforms: Autocracy, Bureaucracy, and the Politics of Change in Imperial Russia. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[97][98][99]
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1982). In the Vanguard of Reform: Russia’s Enlightened Bureaucrats. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[100][101]
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1983). In War’s Dark Shadow: The Russians before the Great War. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[102][103]
  • McDonald, E., & McDonald, D. (2011). Fanny Lear: Love and Scandal in Tsarist Russia. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Madariaga, I. de, (1981). Russia in the Age of Catherine the Great. New Haven: Yale University Press.[104][105]
  • Manning, R. (1982). The Crisis of the Old Order in Russia: Gentry and Government. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[106][107][108]
  • Mazour, R. J. (1937). The First Russian Revolution, 1825: The Decembrist Movement, its Origins, Development, and Significance . Berkeley: University of California Press.[109][110][111]
  • Merridale, C. (2013). Red Fortress: The Secret Heart of Russia’s History. London: Penguin.[112]
  • Perrie, M. (2002). Pretenders and Popular Monarchism in Early Modern Russia: The False Tsars of the Time of Troubles. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[113][114][115]
  • Pflaum, R. (1968). The Emperor’s Talisman: The Life of the Duc de Morny. New York: Meredith Press.
  • Ransel, D. L. (1975). The Politics of Catherinian Russia: The Panin Party. New Haven: Yale University Press.[116][117][118]
  • Saul, N. E. (1970). Russia and the Mediterranean, 1797–1807. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.[119][120]
  • Sumner, B. H. (1962). Russia and the Balkans 1870–1880. Hamden: Archon Books.[121][122][123]
  • Tairova-Yakovleva, T. (2020). Ivan Mazepa and the Russian Empire. Translated by J. Surer. Peter Jacyk Centre for Ukrainian Historical Research Monograph Series, vol. 11. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2020.[124]
  • Venturi, F. (1960). Roots of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia (F. Haskell, Trans.). New York: Alfred A. Knopf.[125][126]
  • Vitale, S. (1997). Pushkin’s Button. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux.[127]
  • Walicki, A. (1975). The Slavophile Controversy: History of a Conservative Utopia in Nineteenth-century Russian Thought. (H. Andrews-Rusiecka, Trans.) Oxford: Oxford University Press.[128][129]

Fall of the Romanovs

  • King, G., & Wilson, P. (2005). The Fate of the Romanovs. Hoboken: Wiley.
  • Rappaport, H. (2008). Ekaterinburg: The Last Days of the Romanovs. London: St Martins Press.
  • Steinberg, M. D., & Khrustalëv, V. M. (1997). The Fall of the Romanovs. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Economics

Empire

  • Becker, S. (2004). Russia’s Protectorates in Central Asia: Bukhara and Khiva, 1865–1924. London: Routledge.[137][138][139]
  • Bilenky, S. (2018). Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905 (Illustrated edition). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[140]
  • Bobroff, R. P. (2006). Roads to Glory: Late Imperial Russia and the Turkish Straits. London: I.B.Tauris.[141][142][143]
  • Figes, O. (2010). Crimea. London: Metropolitan Books.
  • Fisher, A. W. (1970). The Russian Annexation of the Crimea 1772–1783. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[144][145][146]
  • Friesen, A. E. (2020). Colonizing Russia's Promised Land: Orthodoxy and Community on the Siberian Steppe. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[147]
  • Gammer, M. (1994). Muslim Resistance to the Tsar: Shamil and the Conquest of Chechnia and Daghestan. London: Routledge.[148][149][150]
  • Geyer, D. (1987). Russian Imperialism: The Interaction of Domestic and Foreign Policy 1860–1914. New Haven: Yale University Press.[151][152][153]
  • Heuman, S. (1998). Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[154][155][156]
  • Hosking, G. (1997). Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[157][158][159]
  • Kappeler, A. (2001). The Russian Empire: A Multiethnic History (A. Clayton, trans.). Harlow: Longman.
  • Keller, S. (2020). Russia and Central Asia: Coexistence, Conquest, Convergence. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[160]
  • Khalid, A. (2021). Central Asia: A New History from the Imperial Conquests to the Present. Princeton: Princeton University Press.[161]
  • Khodarkovsky, M. (1992). Where Two Worlds Met: The Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600–1771. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[162][163][164]
  • Khodarkovsky, M. (2002). Russia’s Steppe Frontier: The Making of a Colonial Empire, 1500–1800. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[165][166][167]
  • Kirmse, S. B. (2020). The Lawful Empire: Legal Change and Cultural Diversity in Late Tsarist Russia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[147]
  • Kohut, Z. E. (1989). Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s–1830s (Harvard Series In Ukrainian Studies). Cambridge: Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute.[168][169][170]
  • LeDonne, J. P. (1997). The Russian Empire and the World 1700–1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • LeDonne, J. P. (2020) Forging a Unitary State: Russia's Management of the Eurasian Space, 1650–1850. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[160]
  • Marzec, W., & Turunen, R. (2018). Socialisms in the Tsarist Borderlands: Poland and Finland in a Contrastive Comparison, 1830–1907. Contributions to the History of Concepts, 13(1), 22–50.
  • Miller, A. (2015). The Romanov Empire and the Russian Nation. In A. Miller & S. Berger (Eds.), Nationalizing Empires (pp. 309–368). Central European University Press.
  • Miller, C. (2021). We Shall Be Masters: Russian Pivots to East Asia from Peter the Great to Putin. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[161]
  • Morrison, A., Drieu, C., & Chokobaeva, A. (Eds.). (2020). The Central Asian Revolt of 1916: A Collapsing Empire in the Age of War and Revolution. Manchester: Manchester University Press.[147]
  • Morrison, A. (2021). The Russian Conquest of Central Asia: A Study in Imperial Expansion, 1814–1914. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[161]
  • Mosse, W. E. (1963). The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System 1855–71: The Story of a Peace Settlement. New York: Macmillan.[171][172][173][174]
  • O’Neill, K. (2017). Claiming Crimea: A History of Catherine the Great’s Southern Empire. New Haven: Yale University Press.[175]
  • Riegg, S. B. (2020). Russia's Entangled Embrace: The Tsarist Empire and the Armenians, 1801–1914. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, Ithaca.[147]
  • Rywkin, M. (ed.). (1988). Russian Colonial Expansion to 1917. London: Mansell Publishing.[176][177][178]
  • Staliūnas, D. (2007). Between Russification and Divide and Rule: Russian Nationality Policy in the Western Borderlands in mid-19th Century. Jahrbücher Für Geschichte Osteuropas, 55(3), 357–373.
  • Staliūnas, D., & Aoshima, Y., (eds.). (2021). The Tsar, the Empire, and the Nation: Dilemmas of Nationalization in Russia's Western Borderlands, 1905–1915. Historical Studies in Eastern Europe and Eurasia. Budapest: Central European University Press.[179]
  • Steller, G. W. (2020). Eastbound through Siberia: Observations from the Great Northern Expedition'. (Translated and annotated by M. A. Engel and K. E. Willmore). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[180]
  • Subtelny, O. (1980). Russia and the Ukraine: The Difference That Peter I Made. The Russian Review, 39(1), 1–17.
  • Subtelny, O. (2008). Ukraine: A History (4th ed.). Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[181]
  • Weeks, T. R. (1996). Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863-1914. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[54][55][56]

Indigenous peoples and ethnic groups

  • Under Construction

Violence and terror

Religion and philosophy

Women and family

  • Engel, B. A. (2021). Marriage, Household, and Home in Modern Russia from Peter the Great to Vladimir Putin (The Bloomsbury History of Modern Russia Series). London and New York: Bloomsbury Academic.[193]
  • Friedman, R. (2020). Modernity, Domesticity and Temporality in Russia: Time at Home. London: Bloomsbury.[194]
  • Ilic, M. (Ed.). (2017). The Palgrave Handbook of Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Russia and the Soviet Union. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Kates, G. (2001). Monsieur d’Eon is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade. New York: Basic Books.[195][196]
  • Marrese, M. L. (2002). A Woman's Kingdom: Noblewomen and the Control of Property in Russia, 1700–1861. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.[197][198]
  • Martin, R. E. (2012). A Bride for the Tsar: Brideshows and Marriage Politics in Early Modern Russia. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.
  • McDonald, E., & McDonald, D. (2011). Fanny Lear: Love and Scandal in Tsarist Russia, Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Culture

Foreign Relations

Other

Discover more about Topical works related topics

Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War

Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the Revolutionary and Civil War era of Russian (Soviet) history. The sections "General Surveys" and "Biographies" contain books; other sections contain both books and journal articles. Book entries may have references to reviews published in English language academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below; see Further Reading for several book and chapter length bibliographies. The External Links section contains entries for publicly available select bibliographies from universities.Inclusion criteria

Bibliography of Ukrainian history

Bibliography of Ukrainian history

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the History of Ukraine. Book entries have references to journal reviews about them when helpful and available. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below. See the Bibliography section for several additional book and chapter length bibliographies from academic publishers and online bibliographies from historical associations and academic institutions.Inclusion criteria

Bibliography of the history of Central Asia

Bibliography of the history of Central Asia

This is a select bibliography of English language books and journal articles about the History of Central Asia. A brief selection of English translations of primary sources is included. Book entries have references to journal articles and reviews about them when helpful. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below; see Further Reading for several book and chapter-length bibliographies. The External Links section contains entries for publicly available select bibliographies from universities. this bibliography specifically excludes non-history related works and self-published books.Inclusion criteria

Religion in Russia

Religion in Russia

Religion in Russia is diverse, with Christianity, especially Russian Orthodoxy, being the most widely professed faith, but with significant minorities of non-religious people and adherents of other faiths. A 1997 law on religion recognises the right to freedom of conscience and creed to all the citizenry, the spiritual contribution of Orthodox Christianity to the history of Russia, and respect to "Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Judaism and other religions and creeds which constitute an inseparable part of the historical heritage of Russia's peoples", including ethnic religions or paganism, either preserved, or revived. According to the law, any religious organisation may be recognised as "traditional", if it was already in existence before 1982, and each newly founded religious group has to provide its credentials and re-register yearly for fifteen years, and, in the meantime until eventual recognition, stay without rights.

Christianity in Russia

Christianity in Russia

Christianity in Russia is the most widely professed religion in the country. The largest tradition is the Russian Orthodox Church. According to official sources, there are 170 eparchies of the Russian Orthodox Church, 145 of which are grouped in metropolitanates. There are from 500,000 to one million Old Believers, who represents an older form of Russian Orthodox Christianity, and who separated from the Orthodox Church in the 17th century as a protest against Patriarch Nikon's church reforms.

Russian Orthodox Church

Russian Orthodox Church

The Russian Orthodox Church, alternatively legally known as the Moscow Patriarchate, is the largest autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Christian church. It has 194 dioceses inside Russia. The primate of the ROC is the Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus'. The ROC, as well as its primate, officially ranks fifth in the Eastern Orthodox order of precedence, immediately below the four ancient patriarchates of the Greek Orthodox Church: Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem.

Old Believers

Old Believers

Old Believers or Old Ritualists are Eastern Orthodox Christians who maintain the liturgical and ritual practices of the Russian Orthodox Church as they were before the reforms of Patriarch Nikon of Moscow between 1652 and 1666. Resisting the accommodation of Russian piety to the contemporary forms of Greek Orthodox worship, these Christians were anathematized, together with their ritual, in a Synod of 1666–67, producing a division in Eastern Europe between the Old Believers and those who followed the state church in its condemnation of the Old Rite. Russian speakers refer to the schism itself as raskol (раскол), etymologically indicating a "cleaving-apart".

Protestantism in Russia

Protestantism in Russia

Protestants in Russia constitute 1–2% of the overall population of the country. Additionally there are around 15.000-20.000 Dukhobors and 40.000 Molokans in Russia, who have similarities to Protestantism. By 2004, there were 4,435 registered Protestant societies representing 21% of all registered religious organizations, which is second place after Eastern Orthodoxy. By contrast in 1992 the Protestants reportedly had 510 organizations in Russia.

Islam in Russia

Islam in Russia

Although Islam is a minority religion in Russia, Russia has the largest Muslim population in Europe. According to US Department of State in 2017, Muslims in Russia numbered 14 million or roughly 10% of the total population. According to a comprehensive survey conducted in 2012, Muslims were 6.5% of Russia's population. However, the populations of two federal subjects with Islamic majorities were not surveyed due to social unrest, which together had a population of nearly 2 million, namely Chechnya and Ingushetia, thus the total number of Muslims may be slightly larger. The Grand Mufti of Russia, Sheikh Rawil Gaynetdin, places the Muslim population of Russia at 25 million as of 2018.

Buddhism in Russia

Buddhism in Russia

Historically, Buddhism was incorporated into Siberia in the early 17th century. Buddhism is considered to be one of Russia's traditional religions and is legally a part of Russian historical heritage. Besides the historical monastic traditions of Buryatia, Tuva and Kalmykia, the religion of Buddhism is now spreading all over Russia, with many ethnic Russian converts.

Hinduism in Russia

Hinduism in Russia

Hinduism has been spread in Russia primarily due to the work of scholars from the religious organization International Society for Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON) and by itinerant Swamis from India and small communities of Indian immigrants. While ISKCON appear to have a relatively strong following in Russia, the other organizations in the list have a marginal presence in this country. There is an active Tantra Sangha operating in Russia. According to the 2012 official census, there are 140,000 Hindus in Russia, which accounts for 0.1% population of Russia. A majority of Russian Hindus were Vaishnavites.

Military and conflicts

  • Blanch, L. (1960). The Sabres of Paradise: Conquest and Vengeance in the Caucasus. New York: Viking Press.
  • Donnelly, A. (1968). The Russian Conquest of Bashkiria 1552–1740. Yale University.[238][239][240]
  • Duffy, C. (1981). Russia’s Military Way to the West: Origins and Nature of Russian Military Power 1700–1800. London: Routledge.[241][242]
  • Englund, P. (2012). The Battle That Shook Europe: Poltava and the Birth of the Russian Empire. London: I.B. Tauris.
  • Frost, R. I., (2000). The Northern Wars, 1558–1721. London: Longman.[243]
  • Gatrell, P. (2010). Government, Industry and Rearmament in Russia, 1900-1914: The Last Argument of Tsarism (Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[244][245][246]
  • Marshall, A. (2006). Russian General Staff 1860–1917. London: Routledge.
  • Menning, B. (1992). Bayonets before Bullets: The Imperial Russian Army, 1861–1914. Bloomington: Indian University Press.[247][248]
  • Rich, D. A. (1997). The Tsar’s Colonels: Professionalism, Strategy, and Subversion in Late Imperial Russia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[249][250][251]
  • Schönle, A. (2001). Garden of the Empire: Catherine's Appropriation of the Crimea. Slavic Review, 60(1), 1-23.

Russia and Napoleon

  • Lieven, D. (2010). Russia against Napoleon: The True Story of the Campaigns of War and Peace. New York: Penguin Books.[252]
  • Zamoyski, A. (2012). 1812: Napoleon’s Fatal March on Moscow. New York: Harper Press.[253]

The Russo-Japanese War

Russia during World War I

Discover more about Military and conflicts related topics

French invasion of Russia

French invasion of Russia

The French invasion of Russia, also known as the Russian campaign, the Second Polish War, the Army of Twenty nations, and the Patriotic War of 1812 was launched by Napoleon Bonaparte to force the Russian Empire back into the continental blockade of the United Kingdom. Napoleon's invasion of Russia is one of the best studied military campaigns in history and is listed among the most lethal military operations in world history. It is characterized by the massive toll on human life: in less than six months nearly a million soldiers and civilians died.

Alexander I of Russia

Alexander I of Russia

Alexander I was Emperor of Russia from 1801, the first King of Congress Poland from 1815, and the Grand Duke of Finland from 1809 to his death. He was the eldest son of Emperor Paul I and Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg.

Bibliography of the Russo-Japanese War

Bibliography of the Russo-Japanese War

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the Russo-Japanese War, the period leading up to the war, and the immediate aftermath. It specifically excludes topics related to the Russian Revolution; see Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War for information on these subjects. Book entries may have references to reviews published in academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

Russo-Japanese War

Russo-Japanese War

The Russo-Japanese War was fought between the Empire of Japan and the Russian Empire during 1904 and 1905 over rival imperial ambitions in Manchuria and the Korean Empire. The major theatres of military operations were located in Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden in Southern Manchuria, and the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan. Russia sought a warm-water port on the Pacific Ocean both for its navy and for maritime trade. Vladivostok remained ice-free and operational only during the summer; Port Arthur, a naval base in Liaodong Province leased to Russia by the Qing dynasty of China from 1897, was operational year round. Russia had pursued an expansionist policy east of the Urals, in Siberia and the Far East, since the reign of Ivan the Terrible in the 16th century. Since the end of the First Sino-Japanese War in 1895, Japan had feared Russian encroachment would interfere with its plans to establish a sphere of influence in Korea and Manchuria.

Bibliography of Russia during World War I

Bibliography of Russia during World War I

This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books and journal articles about the Russia during the First World War, the period leading up to the war, and the immediate aftermath. For works on the Russian Revolution, please see Bibliography of the Russian Revolution and Civil War. Book entries may have references to reviews published in English language academic journals or major newspapers when these could be considered helpful.

Eastern Front (World War I)

Eastern Front (World War I)

The Eastern Front or Eastern Theater of World War I was a theater of operations that encompassed at its greatest extent the entire frontier between Russia and Romania on one side and Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire, and Germany on the other. It stretched from the Baltic Sea in the north to the Black Sea in the south, involved most of Eastern Europe, and stretched deep into Central Europe as well. The term contrasts with "Western Front", which was being fought in Belgium and France.

Biographies

  • Hughes, L. (2008). The Romanovs: Ruling Russia 1613–1917. New York: Bloomsbury
  • Lincoln, W. B. (1981). The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias. New York: Doubleday
  • Montefiore, S. (2017). Romanovs: 1613–1918, New York: Vintage.

Peter the Great

  • Bushkovitch, P. (2001). Peter the Great: The Struggle for Power, 1671–1725. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[254][255][256]
  • Bushkovitch, P. (2016). Peter the Great. London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  • Hughes, L. (1997). Russia in the Age of Peter the Great. New Haven: Yale University Press.[257]

Catherine the Great

  • Alexander, J. T. (1989). Catherine the Great: Life and Legend. New York: Oxford University Press.[258][259]
  • Dixon, S. (2010). Catherine the Great. London: Routledge.[260][261]
  • Madariaga, I. de, (1981). Russia in the Age of Catherine the Great. New Haven: Yale University Press.[262][263]
  • Rounding, V. (2007). Catherine the Great: Love, Sex and Power. London: St Martins Press.[264][265]
  • Zaretsky, R. (2019). Catherine and Diderot: The Empress, the Philosopher, and the Fate of the Enlightenment. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.[266]

Alexander I

  • Hartley, J. M. (1994). Alexander I. London: Addison-Wesley Longman.
  • Rey, M. P. (2012). Alexander I: The Tsar Who Defeated Napoleon. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[267][268][269]

Nicholas I

  • Lincoln, W. B. (1978). Nicholas I: Emperor and Autocrat of All the Russias. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[270][271][272]
  • Riasanovsky, N. V. (1959). Nicholas I and Official Nationality in Russia, 1825–1855. Berkeley: University of California Press.[273][274][275]

Alexander II

  • Almedingen, E. M. (1962). The Emperor Alexander II: A Study. London: Bodley Head.[276]
  • Radzinsky, E. (2005). Alexander II: The Last Great Tsar. New York: Free Press.
  • Rieber, A. (1971). Alexander II: A Revisionist View. The Journal of Modern History, 43(1), 42–58.

Rasputin

  • Fuhrman, J. T. (2012). Rasputin: The Untold Story. Hoboken: Wiley.
  • Smith, D. (2016). Rasputin: Faith, Power and the Twilight of the Romanovs. London: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.[277]

Nicholas II

  • Frankland, N. (1961). Imperial Tragedy: Nicholas II, Last of the Tsars. New York: Coward-McCann.[278]
  • Ferro, M. (1995). Nicholas II: Last of the Tsars. New York: Oxford University Press.[279]
  • Lieven, D. (1993). Nicholas II: Emperor of all the Russias. London, UK: John Murray Publishing.[280][281]
  • Massie, R. K. (2012). Nicholas and Alexandra: The Classic Account of the Fall of the Romanov Dynasty. New York: Modern Library.
  • Maylunas, A., & Mironenko, S. (2000). Lifelong Passion: Nicholas and Alexandra: Their Own Story. New York: Doubleday.
  • Montefiore, S. (2016). The Romanovs: 1613–1918. New York: Knopf.[282]
  • Perry, J. C. & Pleshakov, C. V. (1999). The Flight Of The Romanovs: A Family Saga. New York: Basic Books.[283]
  • Radzinsky, E. (1992). The Last Tsar: The Life And Death Of Nicholas II. New York: Doubleday.[284]
  • Rappaport, H. (2009). The Last Days of the Romanovs: Tragedy at Ekaterinburg. New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Rounding, V. (2012). Alix and Nicky: The Passion of the Last Tsar and Tsarina. London: St Martins Press.
  • Service, R. W. (2017). The Last of the Tsars: Nicholas II and the Russian Revolution. New York: Pegasus Books.

Authors

Other

  • Alexander, J. T. (1973). Emperor of the Cossacks: Pugachev and the Frontier Jacquerie of 1773–75. Lawrence, KS: Kansas University Press.[289][290]
  • Anisimov, E. V. (1995). Elizabeth: Her Reign and her Russia, 1741–1761. Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International Press.[291][292]
  • Barratt, G. (1975). The Rebel on the Bridge: A life of the Decembrist Baron Andrey Rozen, 1800–84. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press.[293][294]
  • Batalden, S. K. (1982). Catherine II’s Greek Prelate: Eugenios Voulgaris in Russia 1771–1806. New York: Columbia University Press.
  • Byrnes, R. F. (1968). Pobedonostsev: His Life and Thought. Bloomington: Indian University Press.[295][296]
  • Cockfield, J. H. (2002). White Crow: The Life and Times of the Grand Duke Nicholas Mikhailovich Romanov, 1859–1919. Westport: Praeger.[297][298]
  • Crawford, R., & Crawford, D. (1997). Michael and Natasha: The Life and Love of the Last Tsar of Russia. New York: Prentice Hall.[299]
  • Curtiss, M. A. (1974). Forgotten Empress: Anna Ivanovna and Her Era. New York: Ungar Publishing Company.[300][301]
  • Fairweather, M. (1997). Pilgrim Princess: A Life of Princess Zinaida Volkonsky. London: Carroll & Graf Publishers.
  • Green, A. (2010). Moses Montefiore: Jewish Liberator, Imperial Hero. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[302][303][304]
  • Hall, C. (2006). Little Mother of Russia: A Biography of the Empress Marie Feodorovna, 1847–1928. London: Holmes & Meier.[305]
  • Hughes, L. (1990). Sophia, Regent of Russia 1654–1704. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Jenkins, M. (1969). Arakcheev: Grand Vizier of the Russian Empire. New York: Dial Press.[306][307]
  • Josselson, M., & Josselson, D. (1980). The Commander: A Life of Barclay de Tolly. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[308][309]
  • Jones, W. G. (1984). Nikolay Novikov: Enlightener of Russia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[310][311][312]
  • Longworth, P. (1984). Alexis, Tsar of All the Russias. London: Vintage.[313][314][315]
  • Longworth, P. (1965). The Art of Victory: The Life and Achievements of Field Marshal Suvorov, 1729–1800. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.[316][317]
  • Longworth, P. (1972). The Three Empresses: Catherine I, Anne, and Elizabeth of Russia. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.[318][319][320][321]
  • McGrew, R. E. (1992). Paul I of Russia, 1754–1801. Oxford: Oxford University Press.[322][323]
  • Montefiore, S. (2000). The Prince of Princes: The Life of Potemkin. London: Thomas Dunne Books.
  • Ransel, D. L. (2008). A Russian Merchant’s Tale: The Life and Adventures of Ivan Alekseevich Tolchënov, Based on His Diary. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[324][325][326]
  • Rappaport, H. (2015). Four Sisters: The Lost Lives of the Romanov Grand Duchesses. London: St. Martin's Press.
  • Rhinelander, A. L. H. (1990). Prince Michael Vorontsov: Viceroy to the Tsar. Montreal: Carleton University Press.[327][328][329]
  • Robinson, P. (2014). Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich: Supreme Commander of the Russian Army. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press.[330][331]
  • Sutherland, C. (1984). The Princess of Siberia: The Story of Maria Volkonsky and the Decembrist Exiles. Farrar, Straus and Giroux.[332]
  • Van der Kiste, J., & Hall, C. (2013). Once a Grand Duchess: Xenia, Sister of Nicholas II. London: Sutton Publishing.
  • Wcislo, F. (2011). Tales of Imperial Russia: The Life and Times of Sergei Witte, 1849–1915. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Discover more about Biographies related topics

House of Romanov

House of Romanov

The House of Romanov was the reigning imperial house of Russia from 1613 to 1917. They achieved prominence after the Tsarina, Anastasia Romanova, was married to the First Tsar of Russia, Ivan the Terrible.

Catherine the Great

Catherine the Great

Catherine II, most commonly known as Catherine the Great, was the reigning empress of Russia from 1762 to 1796. She came to power following the overthrow of her husband, Peter III. Under her long reign, inspired by the ideas of the Enlightenment, Russia experienced a renaissance of culture and sciences, which led to many new cities, universities, and theaters being founded; along with large-scale immigration from the rest of Europe, and the recognition of Russia as one of the great powers of Europe.

Alexander I of Russia

Alexander I of Russia

Alexander I was Emperor of Russia from 1801, the first King of Congress Poland from 1815, and the Grand Duke of Finland from 1809 to his death. He was the eldest son of Emperor Paul I and Sophie Dorothea of Württemberg.

Decembrist revolt

Decembrist revolt

The Decembrist Revolt took place in Russia on 26 December [O.S. 14 December] 1825, during the interregnum following the sudden death of Emperor Alexander I.

Alexander II of Russia

Alexander II of Russia

Alexander II was Emperor of Russia, King of Poland and Grand Duke of Finland from 2 March 1855 until his assassination.

Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse)

Alexandra Feodorovna (Alix of Hesse)

Alexandra Feodorovna, Princess Alix of Hesse and by Rhine at birth, was the last Empress of Russia as the consort of Emperor Nicholas II from their marriage on 26 November [O.S. 14 November] 1894 until his forced abdication on 15 March [O.S. 2 March] 1917. A favourite granddaughter of Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, she was, like her grandmother, one of the most famous royal carriers of haemophilia and bore a haemophiliac heir, Alexei Nikolaevich, Tsarevich of Russia. Her reputation for encouraging her husband's resistance to the surrender of autocratic authority and her known faith in the Russian mystic Grigori Rasputin severely damaged her popularity and that of the Romanov monarchy in its final years. She and her immediate family were all killed while in Bolshevik captivity in 1918, during the Russian Revolution. In 2000, the Russian Orthodox Church canonized her as Saint Alexandra the Passion Bearer.

Marc Ferro

Marc Ferro

Marc Ferro was a French historian.

Dominic Lieven

Dominic Lieven

Dominic Lieven is a research professor at Cambridge University and a Fellow of the British Academy and of Trinity College, Cambridge.

John Murray (publishing house)

John Murray (publishing house)

John Murray is a British publisher, known for the authors it has published in its long history including, Jane Austen, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Lord Byron, Charles Lyell, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Herman Melville, Edward Whymper, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, and Charles Darwin. Since 2004, it has been owned by conglomerate Lagardère under the Hachette UK brand. Business publisher Nicholas Brealey became an imprint of John Murray in 2015.

John Curtis Perry

John Curtis Perry

John Curtis Perry also known as John Perry is an East Asian and Oceanic studies professor and historian. He is the Henry Willard Denison Professor Emeritus of History at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. He was also the director of that school's Maritime Studies program and founding president of the Institute for Global Maritime Studies, until his retirement in 2014.

Edvard Radzinsky

Edvard Radzinsky

Edvard Stanislavovich Radzinsky is a Russian playwright, television personality, screenwriter, and the author of more than forty popular history books.

Helen Rappaport

Helen Rappaport

Helen F. Rappaport, is a British author and former actress. She specialises in the Victorian era and revolutionary Russia.

Historiography

Memory studies

  • Bellows, A. B. (2020). American Slavery and Russian Serfdom in the Post-Emancipation Imagination. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press.[266]

Primary sources

A limited number of English language primary sources referred to in the above works.[b]

  • Herzen, A. (1968). My Past and Thoughts: The memoirs of Alexander Herzen (4 vols.) (C. Garnett, Trans.). New York: Knopf.
  • Steller, G. W. (2020). Eastbound through Siberia: Observations from the Great Northern Expedition. (Translated and annotated by M. A. Engel and K. E. Willmore). Bloomington: Indiana University Press.[180]

Reference works

  • Kievan Rus. (2016). Encyclopedia Britannica.
  • Auty, R., Obelensky, D., et al. (2010). Companion to Russian Studies (Vol. 1, An Introduction to Russian History; Vol.2, Russian Language and Literature; Vol. 3, An Introduction to Russian Art and Architecture). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Barnes, I., & Lieven, D. (2015). Restless Empire: A Historical Atlas of Russia (Illustrated edition). Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.
  • Brown, A. et al. (1982). The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Russia and the Soviet Union. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Channon, J., & Hudson, R. (1995). The Penguin Historical Atlas of Russia. New York: Penguin.
  • Gilbert, M. (2007). The Routledge Atlas of Russian History (4th edition). London: Routledge.
  • Ivan Katchanovski, Kohut, Z. E., Nebesio, B. Y., & Yurkevich, M. (2013). Historical Dictionary of Ukraine. (Second edition). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.
  • Langer, L. N. (2001). Historical Dictionary of Medieval Russia. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press.
  • Lerski, H. (1996). Historical Dictionary of Poland, 966-1945. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing.
  • Magocsi, P. R. (2017). Carpathian Rus’: A Historical Atlas. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.[333]
  • Millar, J. R. (Ed.). (2004). Encyclopedia of Russian History (4 vols.). New York: Macmillan Library Reference.

Academic journals

The list below contains journals referenced in this bibliography and which have substantial contributions about Slavic and Russian history.

Source: "Bibliography of Russian history (1613–1917)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bibliography_of_Russian_history_(1613–1917).

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Further reading

Many of the above works contain bibliographies. Included below are a selection of works with large bibliographies related to Russian history.

  • Lieven, D., Perrie, M., & Suny, R. (Eds.). (2006). The Cambridge History of Russia (3 vols.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[c]
References

Notes

  1. ^ The Cambridge History of Russia: Volume 1, From Early Rus' to 1689; Volume 2, Imperial Russia, 1689–1917; Volume 3, The Twentieth Century.
  2. ^ The Cambridge History of Russia, Vols. 1 and 2 contain extensive bibliographies of Russian language primary sources.
  3. ^ The Cambridge History of Russia: Volume 1, From Early Rus' to 1689; Volume 2, Imperial Russia, 1689–1917; Volume 3, The Twentieth Century.

Citations

  1. ^ CRISP, OLGA; Billington, James H. (1970). "Review of THE ICON AND THE AXE, AN INTERPRETATIVE HISTORY OF RUSSIAN CULTURE". History. 55 (185): 431. JSTOR 24407647. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  2. ^ Crisp, Olga (1963). "Book Review: Lord and Peasant in Russia by J. Blum". The Slavonic and East European Review. 41 (97): 559–561. JSTOR 4205488.
  3. ^ Anderson, M. S. (1962). "Book Review: Lord and Peasant in Russia by J. Blum". The Economic History Review. 15 (1): 180–181. doi:10.2307/2593312. JSTOR 2593312.
  4. ^ Bogatyrev, Sergei; Swift, John (2007). "Review of Russia Takes Shape: Patterns of Integration from the Middle Ages to the Present". The Slavonic and East European Review. 85 (1): 157–158. JSTOR 4214409. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  5. ^ Weeks, Theodore R.; Bogatyrev, Sergei (2005). "Review of Russia Takes Shape: Patterns of Integration from the Middle Ages to the Present". The Russian Review. 64 (4): 696–697. JSTOR 3664239. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  6. ^ Bushkovitch, Paul.; Hosking, Geoffrey (2013). "Review of A Concise History of Russia, Bushkovitch, Paul". The Slavonic and East European Review. 91 (4): 896–898. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.91.4.0896. JSTOR 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.91.4.0896. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  7. ^ Martin, Janet; Bushkovitch, Paul (2012). "Review of A Concise History of Russia. Cambridge Concise Histories". Russian Review. 71 (4): 682–683. JSTOR 23263942. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  8. ^ Allsen, Thomas T.; Christian, David (2000). "Review of A History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia. Vol. 1, Inner Eurasia from Prehistory to the Mongol Empire". The Journal of Asian Studies. 59 (3): 723–725. doi:10.2307/2658966. JSTOR 2658966. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  9. ^ Halperin, Charles J.; David, Christian (1999). "Review of A History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia, Volume 1, Inner Eurasia from Prehistory to the Mongol Empire". The Russian Review. 58 (4): 694–695. JSTOR 2679249. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  10. ^ Jackson, Peter; Christian, David (2001). "Review of Inner Eurasia from Prehistory to the Mongol Empire, Vol. 1 of a History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia". Journal of World History. 12 (1): 198–201. doi:10.1353/jwh.2001.0015. JSTOR 20078885. S2CID 161736001. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  11. ^ Christian, David; Haining, Thomas Nivison (1999). "Review of A History of Russia, Central Asia and Mongolia. Volume 1: Inner Eurasia, from Prehistory to the Mongol Empire". The Slavonic and East European Review. 77 (3): 548–550. JSTOR 4212924. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  12. ^ Anderson, David G.; Forsyth, James (1995). "Review of A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony". Cambridge Anthropology. 18 (3): 78–80. JSTOR 23818763. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  13. ^ Forsyth, James; Pierce, Richard A. (1993). "Review of A History of the Peoples of Siberia: Russia's North Asian Colony 1581-1990". The American Historical Review. 98 (4): 1290–1291. doi:10.2307/2166736. JSTOR 2166736. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  14. ^ Huddle, Frank, Jr. (1971). "René Grousset. The Empire of the Steppes: A History of Central Asia. Translated from the French by Naomi Walford. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press. 1970". The American Historical Review. 76 (4): 1204–1205. doi:10.1086/ahr/76.4.1204. Retrieved 9 February 2021.
  15. ^ Pipes, Richard; Treadgold, Donald W. (1975). "Review of Russia under the Old Regime". Slavic Review. 34 (4): 812–814. JSTOR 2495731. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  16. ^ Riasanovsky, Nicholas V.; Pipes, Richard (1976). "Review of Russia under the Old Regime". The Russian Review. 35 (1): 103–104. doi:10.2307/127659. JSTOR 127659. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  17. ^ Pipes, Richard; KAPLAN, HERBERT H. (1977). "Review of Russia Under the Old Regime". The Polish Review. 22 (4): 94. JSTOR 25777529. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  18. ^ Pipes, Richard; Atkinson, Dorothy (1976). "Review of Russia under the Old Regime". The American Historical Review. 81 (2): 423–424. doi:10.2307/1851283. JSTOR 1851283. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  19. ^ Alexander, John T.; Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Carroll, Kathleen (2005). "Review of Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia". The Russian Review. 64 (4): 697–698. JSTOR 3664240. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  20. ^ Whittaker, Cynthia Hyla; Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Carol, Kathleen (2006). "Review of Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia". The Historian. 68 (1): 179–180. JSTOR 24453546. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  21. ^ Dawson, Ruth; Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Carroll, Kathleen (2006). "Review of Five Empresses: Court Life in Eighteenth-Century Russia". Biography. 29 (3): 497–500. doi:10.1353/bio.2006.0055. JSTOR 23540533. S2CID 159829260. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  22. ^ Legvold, Robert; Beer, Daniel (2017). "Review of The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars". Foreign Affairs. 96 (1): 170. JSTOR 44823268. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  23. ^ Lohr, Eric (2012). "Russia in 1913. By Wayne Dowler. De Kalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2010. Pp. X+351. $38.00". The Journal of Modern History. 84 (2): 535–536. doi:10.1086/664691.
  24. ^ Gaudin, Corinne (2011). "Reviewed work: Russia in 1913, Wayne Dowler". Russian Review. 70 (4): 700–701. JSTOR 41290056.
  25. ^ Neilson, Keith; Erickson, Ljubica; Erickson, Mark (2006). "Review of Russia: War, Peace and Diplomacy. Essays in Honour of John Erickson". The Russian Review. 65 (1): 156–157. JSTOR 3664068. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  26. ^ Downing, Brian M.; Fuller, William C. (1993). "Review of Strategy and Power in Russia, 1600–1914., William C. Fuller, Jr". Contemporary Sociology. 22 (2): 204–206. doi:10.2307/2075749. JSTOR 2075749. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  27. ^ Kipp, Jacob W.; Fuller, William C. (1996). "Review of Strategy and Power in Russia, 1600–1914". The Russian Review. 55 (1): 119–121. doi:10.2307/131925. JSTOR 131925. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  28. ^ Hosking, Geoffrey; Lincoln, W. Bruce (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917". Slavic Review. 57 (1): 192–193. doi:10.2307/2502073. JSTOR 2502073. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  29. ^ Dukes, Paul; Hosking, Geoffrey; LeDonne, John P. (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917; The Russian Empire and the World, 1700–1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (1): 174–178. JSTOR 153421. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  30. ^ Riasanovsky, Nicholas V.; Hosking, Geoffrey (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917". The Russian Review. 57 (1): 151. JSTOR 131730. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  31. ^ Yekelchyk, Serhy; Hosking, Geoffrey (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917". The Slavic and East European Journal. 42 (4): 780–781. doi:10.2307/309813. JSTOR 309813. S2CID 154842821. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  32. ^ Saunders, David; Hughes, Lindsey (2008). "Review of The Romanovs: Ruling Russia, 1613–1917". The English Historical Review. 123 (505): 1553–1555. doi:10.1093/ehr/cen305. JSTOR 20485438. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  33. ^ Hughes, Lindsey; Keenan, Paul (2009). "Review of The Romanovs: Ruling Russia, 1613–1917". The Slavonic and East European Review. 87 (4): 757–759. JSTOR 40650865. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  34. ^ Drozd, Andrew M.; Hughes, Lindsey (2010). "Review of The Romanovs: Ruling Russia, 1613–1917". The Slavic and East European Journal. 54 (3): 565–566. JSTOR 23345112. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  35. ^ Hughes, Lindsey; Alexander, John T. (2009). "Review of The Romanovs: Ruling Russia, 1613–1917". Slavic Review. 68 (4): 995. doi:10.2307/25593833. JSTOR 25593833. S2CID 161622050. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  36. ^ Saunders, David; LeDonne, John P. (1993). "Review of Absolutism and Ruling Class: The Formation of the Russian Political Order, 1700–1825". The English Historical Review. 108 (428): 683–684. doi:10.1093/ehr/CVIII.428.683. JSTOR 574761. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  37. ^ LeDonne, John P.; Alexander, John T. (1992). "Review of Absolutism and Ruling Class: The Formation of the Russian Political Order 1700–1825". The American Historical Review. 97 (5): 1565–1566. doi:10.2307/2166052. JSTOR 2166052. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  38. ^ Pintner, Walter M.; LeDonne, John P. (1993). "Review of Absolutism and Ruling Class: The Formation of the Russian Political Order 1700–1825". The Russian Review. 52 (1): 108–109. doi:10.2307/130874. JSTOR 130874. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  39. ^ Ranselł, David L.; LeDonne, John P. (1994). "Review of Absolutism and Ruling Class: The Formation of the Russian Political Order, 1700–1825". Russian History. 21 (3): 347–349. JSTOR 24657402. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  40. ^ Robbins, Richard G.; Lieven, Dominic (1989). "Review of Russia's Rulers under the Old Regime". Russian History. 16 (2/4): 463–464. JSTOR 24656523. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  41. ^ Freeze, Gregory L.; Lieven, Dominic C. B. (1990). "Review of Russia's Rulers under the Old Regime". The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 21 (1): 150–152. doi:10.2307/204935. JSTOR 204935. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  42. ^ Lieven, Dominic; Pearson, Thomas S. (1991). "Review of Russia's Rulers Under the Old Regime". The Journal of Modern History. 63 (4): 827–829. doi:10.1086/244422. JSTOR 2938622. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  43. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Riasanovsky, Nicholas V. (1982). "Review of The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias". The American Historical Review. 87 (3): 822–823. doi:10.2307/1864273. JSTOR 1864273. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  44. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Keep, John L. (1982). "Review of The Romanovs: Autocrats of All the Russias". Slavic Review. 41 (4): 704–705. doi:10.2307/2496876. JSTOR 2496876. S2CID 164497246. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  45. ^ Bater, James H.; Lincoln, W. Bruce (2002). "Review of Sunlight at Midnight: St Petersburg and the Rise of Modern Russia". The Economic History Review. 55 (3): 576–577. JSTOR 3091695. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  46. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Zelnik, Reginald E. (2003). "Review of Sunlight at Midnight: St. Petersburg and the Rise of Modern Russia". Slavic Review. 62 (4): 851–852. doi:10.2307/3185689. JSTOR 3185689. S2CID 164519515. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  47. ^ Qualls, Karl D.; Lincoln, W. Bruce (2002). "Review of Sunlight at Midnight: St. Petersburg and the Rise of Modern Russia". Russian History. 29 (1): 108–109. JSTOR 24660842. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  48. ^ Mironov, B. N.; Mironov, Boris N.; Zelnik, Reginald E. (2001). "Review of Sotsial'naia istoriia Rossii perioda imperii (XVIII-nachalo XX v.): Genezis lichnosti, demokraticheskoi sem'i, grazhdanskogo obshchestva i pravovogo gosudarstva [A Social History of Russia (Eighteenth to the Beginning of the Twentieth Century): The Origin of Individualism, the Democratic Family, Civil Society, and Law-Governed State]; The Social History of Imperial Russia, 1700–1917". The American Historical Review. 106 (5): 1903–1904. doi:10.2307/2692918. JSTOR 2692918. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  49. ^ Legvold, Robert; Montefiore, Simon Sebastian (2016). "Review of The Romanovs: 1613–1918". Foreign Affairs. 95 (5): 179. JSTOR 43946996. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  50. ^ Seton-Watson, Hugh; Treadgold, Donald W. (1968). "Review of The Russian Empire 1801–1917". The American Historical Review. 73 (4): 1201–1202. doi:10.2307/1847504. JSTOR 1847504. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  51. ^ Seton-Watson, Hugh; Curtiss, John Shelton (1968). "Review of The Russian Empire 1801–1917". The Journal of Modern History. 40 (4): 677–679. doi:10.1086/240334. JSTOR 1878547. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  56. ^ a b Pearson, Raymond (1998). "Reviewed work: Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863-1914, Theodore R. Weeks". The English Historical Review. 113 (452): 769–770. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXIII.452.769-b. JSTOR 578122.
  57. ^ Fedyashin, A. (2022). "Review of Late Tsarist Russia, 1881–1913". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  58. ^ Alexander, J. T.; Platonov, S. F.; Dukes, Paul (1971). "Review of Autocratic Politics in a National Crisis: The Imperial Russian Government and Pugachev's Revolt, 1773–1775; The Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis and Social Struggle in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, J. T. Alexander". The Slavonic and East European Review. 49 (117): 619–620. JSTOR 4206464. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  61. ^ Alexander, John T.; Riasanovsky, Nicholas V. (1971). "Review of Autocratic Politics in a National Crisis: The Imperial Russian Government and Pugachev's Revolt/1773–1775". The American Historical Review. 76 (1): 169. doi:10.2307/1869830. JSTOR 1869830. S2CID 145178866. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  62. ^ Bisha, Robin; Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Alexander, John T. (1994). "Review of The Reforms of Peter the Great: Progress through Coercion in Russia". The Russian Review. 53 (4): 579. doi:10.2307/130983. JSTOR 130983. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  63. ^ Cracraft, James; Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Alexander, John T (1992). "Review of THE REFORMS OF PETER THE GREAT: PROGRESS THROUGH COERCION IN RUSSIA". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 16 (3/4): 453–455. JSTOR 41036488. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  64. ^ Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Alexander, J. T; Raleigh, D; Bartlett, Roger (1994). "Review of The Reforms of Peter the Great: Progress through Coercion in Russia". The Slavonic and East European Review. 72 (3): 541–542. JSTOR 4211593. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  65. ^ Anisimov, Evgenii V.; Alexander, John T.; Crummey, Robert O. (1994). "Review of The Reforms of Peter the Great: Progress through Coercion in Russia". The American Historical Review. 99 (4): 1361–1362. doi:10.2307/2168890. JSTOR 2168890. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  66. ^ Ascher, Abraham; Bradley, Joseph (2003). "Review of P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia, Abraham Ascher". The Journal of Modern History. 75 (2): 477–479. doi:10.1086/380186. JSTOR 10.1086/380186. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  67. ^ Stockdale, Melissa K.; Ascher, Abraham (2003). "Review of P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia". Russian History. 30 (1/2): 237–239. JSTOR 24660875. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  68. ^ Weeks, Theodore R.; Ascher, Abraham (2002). "Review of P. A. Stolypin: The Search for Stability in Late Imperial Russia". The Russian Review. 61 (2): 305–306. JSTOR 3664291. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  69. ^ Crummey, Robert O.; Kaiser, Daniel H. (1984). "Review of Aristocrats and Servitors: The Boyar Elite in Russia, 1613–1689". The American Historical Review. 89 (3): 808–809. doi:10.2307/1856222. JSTOR 1856222. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  70. ^ Smith, R. E. F.; Crummey, Robert O. (1986). "Review of Aristocrats and Servitors: The Boyar Elite in Russia 1613–1689". The English Historical Review. 101 (401): 987–988. doi:10.1093/ehr/CI.CCCCI.987. JSTOR 570691. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  71. ^ Crummey, Robert O.; Raeff, Marc (1986). "Review of Aristocrats and Servitors: The Boyar Elite in Russia, 1613–1689". The Journal of Modern History. 58 (1): 378–380. doi:10.1086/243011. JSTOR 1881632. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  72. ^ Daly, Jonathan W.; Judge, Edward H. (2000). "Review of Autocracy under Siege: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1866–1905". Slavic Review. 59 (1): 219. doi:10.2307/2696940. JSTOR 2696940. S2CID 164908320. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  73. ^ Daly, Jonathan W.; Zelnik, Reginald E. (2000). "Review of Autocracy under Siege: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1866–1905". The American Historical Review. 105 (5): 1835–1836. doi:10.2307/2652197. JSTOR 2652197. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  74. ^ Schrader, Abby M.; Daly, Jonathan (2000). "Review of Autocracy under Siege: Security Police and Opposition in Russia, 1866–1905". Law and History Review. 18 (3): 671–673. doi:10.2307/744076. JSTOR 744076. S2CID 144217460. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  76. ^ Thyrêt, Isolde; Dunning, Chester S. L. (2002). "Review of Russia's First Civil War: The Time of Troubles and the Founding of the Romanov Dynasty". The Sixteenth Century Journal. 33 (4): 1186–1187. doi:10.2307/4144195. JSTOR 4144195. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  78. ^ Dunning, Chester S. L.; Kaiser, Daniel H. (2002). "Review of Russia's First Civil War: The Time of Troubles and the Founding of the Romanov Dynasty". The Journal of Modern History. 74 (4): 917–919. doi:10.1086/376262. JSTOR 10.1086/376262. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  81. ^ Johnston, Robert H.; Ekloff, Ben; Bushneil, John; Zakharova, Larissa (1994). "Review of Russia's Great Reforms, 1855–1881". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 36 (1/2): 288–289. JSTOR 40870815. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  82. ^ Emmons, Terence; Orlovsky, Daniel T. (1989). "Review of The Formation of Political Parties and the First National Elections in Russia". The Journal of Modern History. 61 (2): 437–438. doi:10.1086/468285. JSTOR 1880911. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  85. ^ Cockfield, Jamie H.; Fuller, William C. (2007). "Review of The Foe within: Fantasies of Treason and the End of Imperial Russia, William C. Fuller Jr". The American Historical Review. 112 (5): 1647–1648. doi:10.1086/ahr.112.5.1647. JSTOR 40007274. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  89. ^ Martin, Russell E.; Hughes, Lindsey (1998). "Review of Russia in the Age of Peter the Great". Russian History. 25 (4): 467–469. JSTOR 24659110. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  90. ^ Kates, Gary; Smith, Bonnie G. (1996). "Review of Monsieur d'Eon is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade". The American Historical Review. 101 (5): 1554–1555. doi:10.2307/2170235. JSTOR 2170235. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  91. ^ Calvez, Daniel J.; Kates, Gary (1998). "Review of Monsieur d'Eon Is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade". The French Review. 71 (5): 864–865. JSTOR 398945. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  95. ^ LeDonne, John P.; Hartley, Janet M. (1986). "Review of Ruling Russia: Politics and Administration in the Age of Absolutism 1762-96". The Slavonic and East European Review. 64 (4): 611–612. JSTOR 4209387. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  96. ^ Jones, Robert E.; LeDonne, John P.; Meehan-Waters, Brenda (1987). "Review of Provincial Development in Russia: Catherine II and Jacob Sievers; Ruling Russia: Politics and Administration in the Age of Absolutism, 1762–1796". The Journal of Modern History. 59 (1): 202–204. doi:10.1086/243182. JSTOR 1880399. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  97. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Moon, David (1993). "Review of The Great Reforms: Autocracy, Bureaucracy, and the Politics of Change in Imperial Russia". The Journal of Modern History. 65 (1): 235–237. doi:10.1086/244633. JSTOR 2124840. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  98. ^ Lincoln, W. B.; Bartlett, R. P. (1991). "Review of The Great Reforms: Autocracy, Bureaucracy and the Politics of Change in Imperial Russia". The Slavonic and East European Review. 69 (4): 751–752. JSTOR 4210822. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  100. ^ Orlovsky, Daniel T.; Lincoln, W. Bruce (1984). "Review of In the Vanguard of Reform: Russia's Enlightened Bureaucrats 1825–1861". The Russian Review. 43 (3): 298–300. doi:10.2307/129347. JSTOR 129347. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  101. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Pintner, Walter M. (1983). "Review of In the Vanguard of Reform: Russia's Enlightened Bureaucrats, 1825–1861". The American Historical Review. 88 (5): 1298–1299. doi:10.2307/1904972. JSTOR 1904972. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  102. ^ Lincoln, W. Bruce; Robbins, Richard G. (1984). "Review of In War's Dark Shadow: The Russians before the Great War". Slavic Review. 43 (3): 478–479. doi:10.2307/2499413. JSTOR 2499413. S2CID 164550985. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  103. ^ Emmons, Terence; Lincoln, W. Bruce (1986). "Review of In War's Dark Shadow: The Russians before the Great War". The Russian Review. 45 (1): 76–77. doi:10.2307/129425. JSTOR 129425. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  104. ^ de Madariaga, Isabel; Gleason, Walter (1983). "Review of Russia in the Age of Catherine the Great". The American Historical Review. 88 (1): 146–147. doi:10.2307/1869445. JSTOR 1869445. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  105. ^ de Madariaga, Isabel; Andreyev, Nikolay (1982). "Review of Russia in the Age of Catherine the Great". The Slavonic and East European Review. 60 (1): 113–115. JSTOR 4208456. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  106. ^ Shukman, H.; Manning, Roberta Thompson (1987). "Review of The Crisis of the Old Order in Russia: Gentry and Government". The English Historical Review. 102 (402): 263–264. doi:10.1093/ehr/CII.CCCCII.263. JSTOR 572543. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  107. ^ Ransel, David L.; Manning, Roberta Thompson (1984). "Review of The Crisis of the Old Order in Russia: Gentry and Government". The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 14 (4): 854–856. doi:10.2307/203478. JSTOR 203478. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  109. ^ Mazour, Anatole G.; Kerner, Robert J.; Churchill, Rogers P. (1939). "Review of The First Russian Revolution, 1825. The Decembrist Movement, Its Origins, Development, and Significance". The Journal of Modern History. 11 (1): 88–89. doi:10.1086/236315. JSTOR 1872913. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  110. ^ Mazour, Anatole G.; Mosely, Philip E. (1938). "Review of The First Russian Revolution, 1825, the Decembrist Movement: Its Origins, Development, and Significance". The American Historical Review. 43 (3): 619–620. doi:10.2307/1865650. JSTOR 1865650. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  111. ^ Mazour, Anatole G.; Yakobson, Serge (1938). "Review of The First Russian Revolution, 1825. The Decembrist Movement, Its Origins, Development, and Significance". The Slavonic and East European Review. 16 (47): 484–486. JSTOR 4203382. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  112. ^ Merridale, Catherine.; Weeks, Theodore R. (2014). "Review of Red Fortress: The Secret Heart of Russia's History, Merridale, Catherine". The Slavonic and East European Review. 92 (3): 554–556. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.92.3.0554. JSTOR 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.92.3.0554. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  113. ^ Dukes, Paul; Perrie, Maureen (1997). "Review of Pretenders and Popular Monarchism in Early Modern Russia. The False Tsars of the Time of Troubles". The English Historical Review. 112 (449): 1278–1279. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXII.449.1278. JSTOR 577165. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  119. ^ Saul, Norman E.; Ragsdale, Hugh (1971). "Review of Russia and the Mediterranean, 1797–1807". The Journal of Modern History. 43 (1): 154–155. doi:10.1086/240602. JSTOR 1877940. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  120. ^ Saul, Norman E.; Grimsted, Patricia Kennedy (1971). "Review of Russia and the Mediterranean, 1797–1807". The American Historical Review. 76 (3): 806. doi:10.2307/1851711. JSTOR 1851711. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  121. ^ Sumner, B. H.; Seton-Watson, R. W. (1939). "Review of Russia and the Balkans (1870–1880)". The Slavonic and East European Review. 19 (53/54): 327–329. JSTOR 4203605. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  124. ^ Yekelchyk, S. (2022). "Review of Ivan Mazepa and the Russian Empire". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. S2CID 246913570.
  125. ^ Tucker, Robert C.; Venturi, Franco; Haskell, Francis; Yarmolinsky, Avrahm (1963). "Review of Roots of Revolution: A History of the Populist and Socialist Movements in Nineteenth Century Russia; Road to Revolution: A Century of Russian Radicalism". The Slavic and East European Journal. 7 (1): 90–91. doi:10.2307/304815. JSTOR 304815. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  127. ^ Levitt, Marcus C.; Vitale, Serena; Goldstein, Ann; Rothschild, Jon (2000). "Review of Pushkin's Button". The Slavic and East European Journal. 44 (1): 124–125. doi:10.2307/309640. JSTOR 309640. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  128. ^ Liebich, André; WALICKI, ANDRZEJ; Andrews-Rusiecka, Hilda (1977). "Review of The Slavophile Controversy: History of a Conservative Utopia in Nineteenth Century Russian Thought". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 19 (1): 94–95. JSTOR 40867076. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  130. ^ Kahan, Arcadius; Alexander, J. T. (1987). "Review of The Plow, the Hammer, and the Knout: An Economic History of Eighteenth-Century Russia". The Journal of Modern History. 59 (3): 646–648. doi:10.1086/243279. JSTOR 1879912. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  137. ^ Donnelly, Alton S.; Becker, Seymour (1969). "Review of Russia's Protectorates in Central Asia: Bukhara and Khiva, 1865–1924". The Russian Review. 28 (1): 93–94. doi:10.2307/126995. JSTOR 126995. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  140. ^ Remy, Johannes (2019). "Reviewed work: IMPERIAL URBANISM IN THE BORDERLANDS: KYIV, 1800–1905, Serhiy Bilenky". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 497–500. JSTOR 48585326.
  141. ^ Bobroff, Ronald Park; Goldfrank, David M. (2007). "Review of Roads to Glory: Late Imperial Russia and the Turkish Straits". The American Historical Review. 112 (3): 954–955. JSTOR 40006836. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  142. ^ Neilson, Keith; Bobroff, Ronald P. (2008). "Review of Roads to Glory: Late Imperial Russia and the Turkish Straits". The Russian Review. 67 (1): 135–136. JSTOR 20620698. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  143. ^ Bobroff, Ronald Park; Steinberg, John W. (2008). "Review of Roads to Glory: Late Imperial Russia and the Turkish Straits". Slavic Review. 67 (2): 495–496. JSTOR 27652896. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  144. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Fisher, Alan W. (1972). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". The English Historical Review. 87 (343): 428. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXXVII.CCCXLIII.428. JSTOR 563359. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  145. ^ Parry, V. J.; Fisher, Alan W. (1971). "Review of The Russian Annexation of the Crimea, 1772–1783". Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. 34 (1): 155–157. doi:10.1017/S0041977X00141795. JSTOR 614645. S2CID 162471671. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
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  147. ^ a b c d e f "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 80 (2): 312–350. 2021. doi:10.1111/russ.12315. S2CID 235409133.
  148. ^ Golden, Peter B.; Gammer, Moshe (1995). "Review of Muslim Resistance to the Tsar. Shamil and the Conquest of Chechnia and Daghestan". International Journal of Middle East Studies. 27 (4): 520–523. doi:10.1017/S0020743800062620. JSTOR 176377. S2CID 161453871. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  149. ^ Rhinelander, Anthony; Gammer, Moshe (1995). "Review of Muslim Resistance to the Tsar: Shamil and the Conquest of Chechnia and Daghestan". The International History Review. 17 (4): 795–797. JSTOR 40107460. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  150. ^ Zelkina, Anna; Gammer, Moshe (1997). "Review of Muslim Resistance to the Tsar. Shamil and the Conquest of Chechnia and Daghestan". Journal of Islamic Studies. 8 (1): 117–118. doi:10.1093/jis/8.1.117. JSTOR 26198507. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  151. ^ Fuller, William C.; Geyer, Dietrich; Little, Bruce (1988). "Review of Russian Imperialism. The Interaction of Domestic and Foreign Policy 1860–1914". The Russian Review. 47 (2): 194–196. doi:10.2307/129973. JSTOR 129973. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  152. ^ Geyer, Dietrich; Little, Bruce; Von Laue, Theodore H. (1988). "Review of Russian Imperialism: The Interaction of Domestic and Foreign Policy 1860–1914". Slavic Review. 47 (2): 328. doi:10.2307/2498480. JSTOR 2498480. S2CID 164413064. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  153. ^ Geyer, Dietrich; Little, Bruce; Lieven, D. C. B. (1989). "Review of Russian Imperialism. The Interaction of Domestic and Foreign Policy, 1860–1914". The Slavonic and East European Review. 67 (2): 332. JSTOR 4210020. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  154. ^ Haigh, Elizabeth V. (1998). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". Russian History. 25 (4): 473–474. JSTOR 24659113.
  155. ^ Hamburg, G. M. (2000). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". Slavic Review. 59 (1): 221–222. doi:10.2307/2696942. JSTOR 2696942. S2CID 164741259.
  156. ^ Armstrong, John A. (1999). "Reviewed work: Kistiakovsky: The Struggle for National and Constitutional Rights in the Last Years of Tsarism, Susan Heuman". The American Historical Review. 104 (2): 680–681. doi:10.2307/2650548. JSTOR 2650548.
  157. ^ Hosking, Geoffrey; Lincoln, W. Bruce (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917". Slavic Review. 57 (1): 192–193. doi:10.2307/2502073. JSTOR 2502073. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  158. ^ Yekelchyk, Serhy; Hosking, Geoffrey (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917". The Slavic and East European Journal. 42 (4): 780–781. doi:10.2307/309813. JSTOR 309813. S2CID 154842821. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  159. ^ Dukes, Paul; Hosking, Geoffrey; LeDonne, John P. (1998). "Review of Russia: People and Empire, 1552–1917; The Russian Empire and the World, 1700–1917: The Geopolitics of Expansion and Containment". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (1): 174–178. JSTOR 153421. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  160. ^ a b c "Book reviews". The Russian Review. 80 (4): 711–750. 3 September 2021. doi:10.1111/russ.12342. S2CID 239134609.
  161. ^ a b c d "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 1 April 2022. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
  162. ^ Khodarkovsky, Michael; Bregel, Yuri (1993). "Review of Where Two Worlds Met: The Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600–1771". Slavic Review. 52 (4): 901–902. doi:10.2307/2499698. JSTOR 2499698. S2CID 164596231. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  163. ^ Khodarkovsky, Michael; Schorkowitz, Dittmar (1996). "Review of Where Two Worlds Met: The Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600–1771". Central Asiatic Journal. 40 (1): 138–140. JSTOR 41928047. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  164. ^ Bormanshinow, Arash; Khodarkovsky, Michael (1994). "Review of Where Two Worlds Met: The Russian State and the Kalmyk Nomads, 1600–1771". Mongolian Studies. 17: 119–126. JSTOR 43193200. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  165. ^ Schmidt, Albert J.; Khodarkovsky, Michael (2003). "Review of Russia's Steppe Frontier: The Making of a Colonial Empire, 1500–1800". Russian History. 30 (1/2): 227–228. JSTOR 24660868. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  166. ^ Stevens, Carol B.; Khodarkovsky, Michael (2003). "Review of Russia's Steppe Frontier: The Making of a Colonial Empire, 1500–1800". The Russian Review. 62 (4): 646–647. JSTOR 3664803. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  167. ^ Khodarkovsky, Michael; Bartlett, Roger (2004). "Review of Russia's Steppe Frontier: The Making of a Colonial Empire, 1500–1800". The Slavonic and East European Review. 82 (1): 107–108. JSTOR 4213864. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  168. ^ Dukes, Paul (1990). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon e. Kohut". The Slavonic and East European Review. 68 (3): 567–568. JSTOR 4210411.
  169. ^ Le Donne, John (1990). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon e. Kohut". The American Historical Review. 95 (5): 1584–1585. doi:10.2307/2162831. JSTOR 2162831.
  170. ^ Sysyn, Frank E. (1993). "Reviewed work: Russian Centralism and Ukrainian Autonomy: Imperial Absorption of the Hetmanate, 1760s-1830s, Zenon Kohut". The Russian Review. 52 (1): 120–121. doi:10.2307/130885. JSTOR 130885.
  171. ^ Mosse, W. E.; Medlicott, W. N. (1965). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System, 1855–1871". The Slavonic and East European Review. 43 (101): 462–463. JSTOR 4205682. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  172. ^ Mosse, W. E.; Jelavich, Barbara (1964). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System, 1855-71: The Story of a Peace Settlement". Slavic Review. 23 (4): 747–748. doi:10.2307/2492217. JSTOR 2492217. S2CID 164814466. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  173. ^ Spencer, Frank; Mosse, W. E. (1965). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System 1855–1871: The Story of a Peace Settlement". The English Historical Review. 80 (317): 863–864. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXX.CCCXVII.863. JSTOR 559390. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  174. ^ Mosse, W. E.; Craig, Gordon A. (1965). "Review of The Rise and Fall of the Crimean System, 1855-71: The Story of a Peace Settlement". The Journal of Modern History. 37 (2): 263–264. doi:10.1086/239681. JSTOR 1878354. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  175. ^ Kotenko, Anton (2019). "Reviewed work: CLAIMING CRIMEA: A HISTORY OF CATHERINE THE GREat's SOUTHERN EMPIRE, Kelly O'Neill". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 36 (3/4): 495–497. JSTOR 48585325.
  176. ^ Bartlett, R. P.; Hunczak, T.; Geyer, D.; Rywkin, Michael (1991). "Review of Russian Colonial Expansion to 1917". The English Historical Review. 106 (421): 1016–1017. doi:10.1093/ehr/CVI.CCCCXXI.1016. JSTOR 574453. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  177. ^ Bodger, Alan; Rywkin, Michael (1989). "Review of Russian Colonial Expansion to 1917". The International History Review. 11 (2): 356–358. JSTOR 40106018. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  178. ^ Rywkin, Michael; Jones, S. F. (1989). "Review of Russian Colonial Expansion to 1917". The Slavonic and East European Review. 67 (4): 635–637. JSTOR 4210126. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  179. ^ Weeks, T. R. (2022). "Review of The Tsar, the Empire, and the Nation: Dilemmas of Nationalization in Russia's Western Borderlands, 1905–1915". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  180. ^ a b "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81: 146–198. 2022. doi:10.1111/russ.12354. S2CID 245412060.
  181. ^ Switalski, John (1990). "Reviewed work: Ukraine: A History, Orest Subtelny". The Polish Review. 35 (3/4): 276–280. JSTOR 25778520.
  182. ^ White, James M. (2018). "Reviewed work: Framing Mary: The Mother of God in Modern, Revolutionary, and Post-Soviet Russian Culture, Amy Singleton Adams, Vera Shevzov". The Slavic and East European Journal. 62 (4): 750–751. JSTOR 45408780.
  183. ^ Marker, Gary (2018). "Reviewed work: Mother of the Church: Sofia Svechina, the Salon, and the Politics of Catholicism in Nineteenth-Century Russia and France, Tatyana V. Bakhmetyeva". The Slavic and East European Journal. 62 (1): 219–220. JSTOR 45408825.
  184. ^ Michelson, P. L. (2022). "Review of Good for the Souls: A History of Confession in the Russian Empire". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. S2CID 246913570.
  185. ^ Kivelson, Valerie A. (1998). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture, Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". The Russian Review. 57 (4): 621–622. JSTOR 131388.
  186. ^ Monas, Sidney (1999). "Book Reviews The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture.Edited by Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1997". The Journal of Modern History. 71 (2): 517–518. doi:10.1086/235287. S2CID 151549209.
  187. ^ Merridale, Catherine (1998). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture, Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (5): 930–931. JSTOR 153913.
  188. ^ Wanner, Adrian (1997). "Reviewed work: The Occult in Russian and Soviet Culture., Bernice Glatzer Rosenthal". Slavic Review. 56 (4): 815–816. doi:10.2307/2502164. JSTOR 2502164. S2CID 164465958.
  189. ^ Kefeli, A. (2022). "Review of Sharia in the Russian Empire: The Reach and Limits of Islamic Law in Central Eurasia". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. S2CID 246913570.
  190. ^ Chakars, M. (2022). "Review of Under the Shadow of White Tara: Buriat Buddhists in Imperial Russia". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  191. ^ Dunning, Chester; Zitser, Ernest A. (2005). "Review of The Transfigured Kingdom: Sacred Parody and Charismatic Authority at the Court of Peter the Great, Ernest A. Zitser". The American Historical Review. 110 (3): 901–902. doi:10.1086/ahr.110.3.901. JSTOR 10.1086/ahr.110.3.901. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  192. ^ Marker, Gary; Zitser, Ernest A. (2005). "Review of The Transfigured Kingdom: Sacred Parody and Charismatic Authority at the Court of Peter the Great". Social History. 30 (4): 527–529. JSTOR 4287276. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  193. ^ "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 1 April 2022. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
  194. ^ "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. 1 April 2022. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. ISSN 0036-0341.
  195. ^ Kates, Gary; Smith, Bonnie G. (1996). "Review of Monsieur d'Eon is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade". The American Historical Review. 101 (5): 1554–1555. doi:10.2307/2170235. JSTOR 2170235. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  196. ^ Calvez, Daniel J.; Kates, Gary (1998). "Review of Monsieur d'Eon Is a Woman: A Tale of Political Intrigue and Sexual Masquerade". The French Review. 71 (5): 864–865. JSTOR 398945. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  197. ^ Farrow, Lee A.; Marrese, Michelle Lamarche (2003). "Review of A Woman's Kingdom: Noblewomen and the Control of Property in Russia, 1700–1861". The Russian Review. 62 (3): 468–469. JSTOR 3664484. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  198. ^ Lindenmeyr, Adele; Marrese, Michelle Lamarche (2004). "Review of A Woman's Kingdom: Noblewomen and the Control of Property in Russia, 1700–1861". Journal of Social History. 38 (2): 553–555. doi:10.1353/jsh.2004.0129. JSTOR 3790469. S2CID 142518608. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  199. ^ Cynthia Marsh (2017). "Reviewed work: Russian Realisms: Literature and Painting, 1840–1890". The Slavonic and East European Review. 95 (4): 744. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.4.0744.
  200. ^ Blake, Elizabeth; Brunson, Molly (2017). "Reviewed work: Russian Realisms: Literature and Painting, 1840–1890, BrunsonMolly". Slavic Review. 76 (3): 824–825. doi:10.1017/slr.2017.213. JSTOR 26565211. S2CID 165994741.
  201. ^ Skinner, Barbara; Chrissidis, Nikolaos A. (2017). "Reviewed work: An Academy at the Court of the Tsars: Greek Scholars and Jesuit Education in Early Modern Russia, ChrissidisNikolaos A". Slavic Review. 76 (3): 854–855. doi:10.1017/slr.2017.234. JSTOR 26565232. S2CID 165466162.
  202. ^ Hughes, Lindsey; Cracraft, James (1990). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Architecture". The Russian Review. 49 (3): 336–337. doi:10.2307/130167. JSTOR 130167. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  203. ^ Cracraft, James; Schmidt, Albert J.; Schlogel, Karl; Gaehtgens, Thomas W. (1990). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Architecture; The Architecture and Planning of Classical Moscow: A Cultural History; Jenseits des Groben Oktober: Das Laboratorium der Moderne Petersburg, 1909–1921". The Journal of Modern History. 62 (4): 891–894. doi:10.1086/600624. JSTOR 1881087. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  204. ^ Cracraft, James; Cheneviere, Antoine; Mellor, Barbara; Sears, Sarah; Bely, Anna Borisovna; Caron-Delion, Marilyn; Thyssen-Bornemisza, Hans Heinrich; Schmidt, Albert J. (1990). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Architecture.; Russian Furniture: The Golden Age, 1780–1840". Slavic Review. 49 (2): 316–318. doi:10.2307/2499518. JSTOR 2499518. S2CID 164150226. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  205. ^ Cracraft, James; Crummey, Robert O. (1998). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Imagery". Slavic Review. 57 (4): 913–914. doi:10.2307/2501079. JSTOR 2501079. S2CID 165068251. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  206. ^ Bruess, Gregory; Cracraft, James (1999). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Imagery". The Russian Review. 58 (2): 321–322. JSTOR 2679591. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  207. ^ Cracraft, James; Hughes, Lindsey (1999). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Imagery". The Slavonic and East European Review. 77 (1): 171–173. JSTOR 4212817. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  208. ^ Lovell, Stephen; Cracraft, James (2005). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Culture". The English Historical Review. 120 (487): 781–783. doi:10.1093/ehr/cei256. JSTOR 3489425. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  209. ^ Zhivov, Viktor; Cracraft, James (2005). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Culture". The Slavic and East European Journal. 49 (2): 337–338. doi:10.2307/20058284. JSTOR 20058284. S2CID 161791693. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  210. ^ Cracraft, James; Hughes, Lindsey (2005). "Review of The Petrine Revolution in Russian Culture". The Slavonic and East European Review. 83 (4): 760–762. JSTOR 4214190. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  211. ^ Galina Mardilovich (2016). The Modern Language Review. 111 (2): 598. doi:10.5699/modelangrevi.111.2.0598. {{cite journal}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  212. ^ Thurston, Robert W. (2014). "Reviewed work: When Art Makes News: Writing Culture and Identity in Imperial Russia, Katia Dianina". The Russian Review. 73 (4): 614–615. JSTOR 43662135.
  213. ^ Swoboda, Marina (2022). "Review of: Russia's Theatrical Past: Court Entertainment in the Seventeenth Century". The Russian Review. 81 (2): 363–398. doi:10.1111/russ.12367. S2CID 246913570.
  214. ^ Chernetsky, V. (2022). "Review of The City in Russian Culture". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  215. ^ Ritzarev, Marina; Jones, W. Gareth (2008). "Review of Eighteenth-Century Russian Music". Slavic Review. 67 (2): 513–514. JSTOR 27652912. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  216. ^ Haldey, Olga; Ritzarev, Marina (2007). "Review of Eighteenth-Century Russian Music". The Russian Review. 66 (2): 323–324. JSTOR 20620545. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  217. ^ Jensen, Claudia R.; Ritzarev, Marina (2008). "Review of Eighteenth-Century Russian Music". Music & Letters. 89 (1): 113–117. doi:10.1093/ml/gcm075. JSTOR 30162942. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  218. ^ Waldron, Peter; Wortman, Richard S. (2002). "Review of Scenarios of Power: Myth and Ceremony in Russian Monarchy". Europe-Asia Studies. 54 (1): 165–166. JSTOR 826231. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  219. ^ Porter, Thomas Earl; Wortman, Richard S. (2000). "Review of Scenarios of Power: Myth and Ceremony in Russian Monarchy. Volume Two". Russian History. 27 (3): 345–346. JSTOR 24659323. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  220. ^ Wortman, Richard S.; Gleason, Abbott (2002). "Review of From Alexander II to the Abdication of Nicholas II". The Journal of Modern History. 74 (2): 454–456. doi:10.1086/343445. JSTOR 10.1086/343445. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  221. ^ Zhuravleva, V. I. (2022). "Review of The Catacazy Affair and the Uneasy Path of Russian-American Relations". The Russian Review. 81 (3): 566–598. doi:10.1111/russ.12378. S2CID 248954384.
  222. ^ Frost, Robert I. (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697, Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". The Slavonic and East European Review. 73 (3): 543–545. JSTOR 4211891.
  223. ^ Hughes, Lindsey (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697., Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". Slavic Review. 54 (2): 472–473. doi:10.2307/2501663. JSTOR 2501663. S2CID 164598985.
  224. ^ Longworth, Philip (1995). "Reviewed work: Republic vs. Autocracy: Poland-Lithuania and Russia, 1686-1697, Andrzej Sulima Kamiński". The American Historical Review. 100 (5): 1622–1623. doi:10.2307/2170009. JSTOR 2170009.
  225. ^ Robbins, Richard G. (1998). "Reviewed work: The Politics of Punishment: Prison Reform in Russia, 1863-1917, Bruce F. Adams". The American Historical Review. 103 (4): 1282–1283. doi:10.2307/2651288. JSTOR 2651288.
  226. ^ Ruud, Charles A. (1996). "Reviewed work: The Politics of Punishment: Prison Reform in Russia, 1863-1917, Bruce F. Adams". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 38 (3/4): 524–525. JSTOR 40869864.
  227. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Cross, Anthony (1998). "Review of By the Banks of the Neva. Chapters from the Lives and Careers of the British in Eighteenth-Century Russia". The English Historical Review. 113 (452): 746. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXIII.452.746-a. JSTOR 578095. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  228. ^ Cross, A. G.; de Madariaga, Isabel (1997). "Review of By the Banks of the Neva: Chapters from the Lives and Careers of the British in Eighteenth Century Russia". The Slavonic and East European Review. 75 (4): 746–748. JSTOR 4212522. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  229. ^ Tsapina, Olga; Cross, Anthony G.; Smith, Douglas; Greenleaf, Monika; Moeller-Sally, Stephen (2000). "Review of By the Banks of the Neva: Chapters from the Lives and Careers of the British in Eighteenth-Century Russia; Working the Rough Stone: Freemasonry and Society in Eighteenth-Century Russia; Russian Subjects: Empire, Nation, and the Culture of the Golden Age". Eighteenth-Century Studies. 33 (2): 301–305. doi:10.1353/ecs.2000.0018. JSTOR 30053693. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  230. ^ Ashin, Paul (1988). "Reviewed work: Odessa: A History, 1794-1914, Patricia Herlihy". Journal of Social History. 21 (4): 838–840. doi:10.1353/jsh/21.4.838. JSTOR 3788037.
  231. ^ Rieber, Alfred J. (1988). "Reviewed work: Odessa: A History, 1794-1914, Patricia Herlihy". The American Historical Review. 93 (4): 1087. doi:10.2307/1863636. JSTOR 1863636.
  232. ^ Bater, James H. (1988). "Reviewed work: Odessa: A History, 1794-1914, Patricia Herlihy". The Economic History Review. 41 (4): 657–658. doi:10.2307/2596624. JSTOR 2596624.
  233. ^ Turk, Eleanor L.; Raeff, Marc (1984). "Review of The Well-Ordered Police State: Social and Institutional Change through Law in the Germanies and Russia, 1600–1800". German Studies Review. 7 (3): 556–557. doi:10.2307/1428890. JSTOR 1428890. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  234. ^ Jackson, M. W.; Raeff, Marc (1984). "Review of The Well-Ordered Police State: Social and Institutional Change through Law in the Germanies and Russia, 1600–1800". The American Political Science Review. 78 (3): 839–840. doi:10.2307/1961898. JSTOR 1961898. S2CID 147903679. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  235. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Raeff, Marc (1986). "Review of The Well-Ordered Police State: Social and Institutional Change through Law in the Germanies and Russia, 1600–1800". The English Historical Review. 101 (398): 250–251. doi:10.1093/ehr/CI.CCCXCVIII.250. JSTOR 571395. Retrieved 14 March 2021.
  236. ^ Blejwas, Stanislaus A. (1998). "Reviewed work: Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863-1914, Theodore R. Weeks". The American Historical Review. 103 (5): 1653–1654. doi:10.2307/2650078. JSTOR 2650078.
  237. ^ Pearson, Raymond (1998). "Reviewed work: Nation and State in Late Imperial Russia: Nationalism and Russification on the Western Frontier, 1863-1914, Theodore R. Weeks". The English Historical Review. 113 (452): 769–770. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXIII.452.769-b. JSTOR 578122.
  238. ^ Entner, Marvin L.; Donnelly, Alton S. (1969). "Review of The Russian Conquest of Bashkiria 1552–1740: A Case Study in Imperialism". The Journal of Asian Studies. 29 (1): 177–178. doi:10.2307/2942556. JSTOR 2942556. S2CID 162343188. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  239. ^ Donnelly, Alton S.; Fisher, Alan W. (1969). "Review of The Russian Conquest of Bashkiria 1552–1740: A Case Study in Imperialism". The American Historical Review. 74 (3): 1043–1044. doi:10.2307/1873230. JSTOR 1873230. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  240. ^ Anderson, M. S.; Donnelly, Alton S. (1970). "Review of The Russian Conquest of Bashkiria, 1552–1740: A Case Study in Imperialism". The English Historical Review. 85 (337): 847–848. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXXXV.337.847. JSTOR 563595. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  241. ^ Snow, George; Duffy, Christopher (1983). "Review of Russia's Military Way to the West. Origins and Nature of Russian Military Power 1700–1800". Russian History. 10 (1): 97–98. JSTOR 24652787. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  242. ^ Keep, John; Duffy, Christopher (1983). "Review of Russia's Military Way to the West: Origins and Nature of Russian Military Power, 1700–1800". The Russian Review. 42 (1): 102–103. doi:10.2307/129459. JSTOR 129459. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  243. ^ BLACK, JEREMY; Frost, Robert I. (2001). "Review of The Northern Wars 1558–1721". History. 86 (283): 403–404. JSTOR 24425468. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  244. ^ Owen, Thomas C. (1995). "Reviewed work: Government, Industry and Rearmament in Russia, 1900-1914: The Last Argument of Tsarism., Peter Gatrell". The Journal of Economic History. 55 (3): 705–706. doi:10.1017/S0022050700041838. JSTOR 2123682. S2CID 154518864.
  245. ^ Graf, Daniel W. (1997). "Reviewed work: Government, Industry and Rearmament in Russia, 1900-1914: The Last Argument of Tsarism., Peter Gatrell". The Journal of Military History. 61 (2): 384–385. doi:10.2307/2953994. JSTOR 2953994.
  246. ^ Rieber, Alfred J. (1997). "Reviewed work: Government, Industry, and Rearmament in Russia, 1900-1914: The Last Argument of Tsarism, Peter Gatrell". The Russian Review. 56 (2): 312. doi:10.2307/131676. JSTOR 131676.
  247. ^ Mawdsley, Evan; Menning, Bruce W. (1994). "Review of Bayonets before Bullets: The Imperial Russian Army, 1861–1914". War in History. 1 (1): 113–115. doi:10.1177/096834459400100114. JSTOR 26004528. S2CID 161161217. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  248. ^ Steinberg, John W.; Menning, Bruce W. (1995). "Review of Bayonets before Bullets: The Imperial Russian Army, 1861–1914". The Russian Review. 54 (1): 139–141. doi:10.2307/130798. JSTOR 130798. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  249. ^ Rich, David Alan; Robbins, Richard G. (2000). "Review of The Tsar's Colonels: Professionalism, Strategy, and Subversion in Late Imperial Russia". Slavic Review. 59 (2): 456–457. doi:10.2307/2697085. JSTOR 2697085. S2CID 165074498. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  266. ^ a b "Book Reviews". The Russian Review. 80: 138–170. 2021. doi:10.1111/russ.12303. S2CID 235366440.
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  276. ^ Ragsdale, Hugh; Almedingen, E. M. (1967). "Review of The Emperor Alexander I". The Russian Review. 26 (2): 196–197. doi:10.2307/127073. JSTOR 127073. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  278. ^ Kilcoyne, Martin (1962). "Noble Frankland, Imperial Tragedy: Nicholas II, Last of the Tsars. New York: Coward-Mc Cann, 1961. 193". Slavic Review. 21: 161. doi:10.2307/3000552. JSTOR 3000552. S2CID 164705316.
  279. ^ McDonald, David Maclaren (1994). "Reviewed work: Nicholas II: Last of the Tsars, Marc Ferro". Russian History. 21 (4): 477–478.
  280. ^ Perrie, Maureen (1996). "Reviewed work: Nicholas II. Emperor of All the Russias, Dominic Lieven". The English Historical Review. 111 (440): 249–250. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXI.440.249.
  281. ^ Pearson, Raymond (1995). "Reviewed work: Nicholas II: Emperor of All the Russias, Dominic Lieven". The Slavonic and East European Review. 73 (1): 143–144.
  282. ^ Legvold, Robert (2016). "Reviewed work: The Romanovs: 1613–1918, Simon Sebastian Montefiore". Foreign Affairs. 95 (5): 179.
  283. ^ Jena, Detlef (2001). "Reviewed work: The Flight of the Romanovs. A Family Saga, Curtis Perry, Constantine Pleshakov". Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas. 49 (2): 302.
  284. ^ Kulikowski, Mark (1993). "Reviewed work: The Last Tsar: The Life and Death of Nicholas II, Edvard Radzinsky, Marian Schwartz". Russian History. 20 (1/4): 320–322. doi:10.1163/187633193X00478.
  285. ^ Bartlett, Rosamund; Denner, Michael A. (2013). "Review of Tolstoy: A Russian Life". Slavic Review. 72 (3): 664–666. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.3.0664. S2CID 164689220.
  286. ^ Lantz, Kenneth; Frank, Joseph (2010). "Review of Dostoevsky: A Writer in His Time". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 52 (1/2): 236–237. JSTOR 40871570. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  287. ^ Riasanovsky, Nicholas V.; O'Meara, Patrick (1986). "Review of K. F. Ryleev: A Political Biography of the Decembrist Poet". Russian History. 13 (4): 445. JSTOR 24655868. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  288. ^ O'Meara, Patrick; Bristol, Evelyn (1985). "Review of K. F. Ryleev: A Political Biography of the Decembrist Poet". Slavic Review. 44 (3): 578–579. doi:10.2307/2498063. JSTOR 2498063. S2CID 157449274. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  291. ^ Hartley, J. M.; Alexander, John T.; Anisimov, Evgeny V. (1998). "Review of Empress Elizabeth. Her Reign and Her Russia, 1741–1761". The English Historical Review. 113 (452): 744–745. doi:10.1093/ehr/CXIII.452.744. JSTOR 578094. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  293. ^ Walker, Franklin A.; Barratt, Glynn (1976). "Review of The Rebel on the Bridge. A Life of the Decembrist Baron Andrey Rozen 1800-84". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 18 (4): 470–471. JSTOR 40867515. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  294. ^ Arens, Olavi; Barratt, Glynn (1979). "Review of The Rebel on the Bridge: A Life of the Decembrist Baron Andrey Rozen 1800–84". Journal of Baltic Studies. 10 (2): 175–177. JSTOR 43210970. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  295. ^ Raeff, Marc; Byrnes, Robert F. (1970). "Review of Pobedonostsev: His Life and Thought". Political Science Quarterly. 85 (3): 528–530. doi:10.2307/2147903. JSTOR 2147903. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  296. ^ Keep, John; Byrnes, Robert F.; Pobedonostsev (1969). "Review of Pobedonostsev: His Life and Thought". The Russian Review. 28 (2): 225–227. doi:10.2307/127510. JSTOR 127510. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  297. ^ Cockfield, Jamie H.; Korros, Alexandra (2004). "Review of White Crow: The Life and Times of the Grand Duke Nicholas Mikhailovich Romanov, 1859–1919". Slavic Review. 63 (4): 892–893. doi:10.2307/1520461. JSTOR 1520461. S2CID 164435865. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  299. ^ Marples, David R.; Crawford, Rosemary; Crawford, Donald (1998). "Review of Michael and Natasha: The Life and Love of the Last Tsar of Russia". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 40 (3/4): 477–478. JSTOR 40870020. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  300. ^ Curtiss, Mina; Ransel, David L. (1975). "Review of A Forgotten Empress: Anna Ivanovna and Her Era, 1730–1740". Slavic Review. 34 (3): 588. doi:10.2307/2495569. JSTOR 2495569. S2CID 164311563. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  302. ^ Green, Abigail; Bar-Yosef, Eitan (2011). "Review of Moses Montefiore: Jewish Liberator, Imperial Hero". The American Historical Review. 116 (3): 873–874. JSTOR 23308352. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
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  304. ^ Schroeter, Daniel; Green, Abigail (2011). "Review of Moses Montefiore: Jewish Liberator, Imperial Hero". The English Historical Review. 126 (523): 1553–1556. doi:10.1093/ehr/cer313. JSTOR 41343283. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  305. ^ Alexander, John T.; Hall, Coryne (2003). "Review of Little Mother of Russia: A Biography of the Empress Marie Feodorovna (1847–1928)". The Historian. 65 (5): 1226–1227. JSTOR 24452589. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  306. ^ Jenkins, Michael; Byrnes, Robert F. (1969). "Review of Arakcheev, Grand Vizier of the Russian Empire: A Biography". The American Historical Review. 75 (1): 171–172. doi:10.2307/1842010. JSTOR 1842010. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  307. ^ Jenkins, Michael; McConnell, Allen (1970). "Review of Arakcheev: Grand Vizier of the Russian Empire". Slavic Review. 29 (1): 102–104. doi:10.2307/2493099. JSTOR 2493099. S2CID 163653613. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  308. ^ McConnell, Allen; Josselson, Michael; Josselson, Diana (1981). "Review of The Commander: A Life of Barclay de Tolly". The Russian Review. 40 (2): 187–188. doi:10.2307/129214. JSTOR 129214. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  309. ^ Josselson, Michael; Josselson, Diana; Menning, Bruce W. (1981). "Review of The Commander: A Life of Barclay de Tolly". Slavic Review. 40 (3): 469–471. doi:10.2307/2496204. JSTOR 2496204. S2CID 164896042. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  310. ^ Jones, W. Gareth; Papmehl, K. A. (1985). "Review of Nikolay Novikov: Enlightener of Russia". Slavic Review. 44 (4): 713–714. doi:10.2307/2498545. JSTOR 2498545. S2CID 164625539. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  311. ^ Jones, W. Gareth; Bartlett, R. P. (1985). "Review of Nikolay Novikov: Enlightener of Russia". The Slavonic and East European Review. 63 (4): 602–603. JSTOR 4209195. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  312. ^ McKenna, Kevin J.; Jones, W. Gareth (1986). "Review of Nikolay Novikov: Enlightener of Russia". The Slavic and East European Journal. 30 (1): 108–110. doi:10.2307/307288. JSTOR 307288. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  313. ^ Longworth, Philip; Bartlett, R. P. (1986). "Review of Alexis, Tsar of All the Russias". The Slavonic and East European Review. 64 (3): 467–468. JSTOR 4209331. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  314. ^ Longworth, Philip; Fuhrmann, Joseph T. (1986). "Review of Alexis: Tsar of All the Russias". The American Historical Review. 91 (2): 434. doi:10.2307/1858243. JSTOR 1858243. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  315. ^ Bushkovitch, Paul; Longworth, Philip (1986). "Review of 'Alexis, Tsar of all the Russias'". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 10 (1/2): 257–258. JSTOR 41036190. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  316. ^ Govorchin, Gerald Gilbert; Longworth, Philip (1968). "Review of The Art of Victory: The Life and Achievements of Field-Marshal Suvorov, 1729–1800". The Russian Review. 27 (1): 97–98. doi:10.2307/127237. JSTOR 127237. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  317. ^ Longworth, Philip; Jelavich, Barbara (1966). "Review of The Art of Victory: The Life and Achievements of Field-Marshal Suvorov, 1729–1800". The American Historical Review. 72 (1): 241–242. doi:10.2307/1848305. JSTOR 1848305. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  318. ^ Longworth, Philip; Fuhrmann, Joseph T. (1974). "Review of The Three Empresses: Catherine I, Anne and Elizabeth of Russia". The American Historical Review. 79 (1): 198–199. doi:10.2307/1868417. JSTOR 1868417. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  319. ^ Longworth, Philip; Griffiths, David M. (1974). "Review of The Three Empresses: Catherine I, Anne and Elizabeth of Russia". Slavic Review. 33 (1): 132. doi:10.2307/2495335. JSTOR 2495335. S2CID 164473128. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  320. ^ Jennison, Earl W.; Longworth, Philip (1974). "Review of The Three Empresses: Catherine I, Anne and Elizabeth of Russia". Journal of Baltic Studies. 5 (2): 158. JSTOR 43210577. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  321. ^ Gleason, Walter; Longworth, Phillip (1974). "Review of The Three Empresses: Catherine I, Anne and Elizabeth of Russia". Eighteenth-Century Studies. 8 (2): 222–224. doi:10.2307/2737588. JSTOR 2737588. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  322. ^ Lauber, Jack M.; McGrew, Roderick E. (1993). "Review of Paul I of Russia, 1754–1801". The Historian. 56 (1): 140. JSTOR 24448922. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  323. ^ Thatcher, Isn D.; McGrew, Roderick E. (1994). "Review of Paul I of Russia, 1754–1801". History. 79 (257): 506–507. JSTOR 24422474. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  324. ^ Ransel, David L.; Randolph, John (2010). "Review of A Russian Merchant's Tale: The Life and Adventures of Ivan Alekseevich Tolchënov, Based on His Diary". The American Historical Review. 115 (1): 318–319. JSTOR 23302924. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  325. ^ Ransel, David L.; Marker, Gary (2010). "Review of A Russian Merchant's Tale: The Life and Adventures of Ivan Alekseevich Tolchënov, Based on His Diary". Slavic Review. 69 (1): 189–191. JSTOR 25621735. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  326. ^ West, James L.; Ransel, David L.; Rabinowitch, Alexander; Rosenberg, William G. (2010). "Review of A Russian Merchant's Tale: The Life and Adventures of Ivan Alekseevich Tolchënov, Based on His Diary, David L. Ransel, Alexander Rabinowitch, William G. Rosenberg". The Journal of Modern History. 82 (4): 1002–1004. doi:10.1086/656135. JSTOR 10.1086/656135. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  327. ^ Rhinelander, Anthony L. H.; Lincoln, W. Bruce (1991). "Review of Prince Michael Vorontsov: Viceroy to the Tsar". Slavic Review. 50 (4): 1013–1014. doi:10.2307/2500483. JSTOR 2500483. S2CID 165079100. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  328. ^ Brooks, E. Willis; Rhinelander, Anthony L. H. (1992). "Review of Prince Michael Vorontsov: Viceroy to the Tsar". The Russian Review. 51 (1): 118–119. doi:10.2307/131259. JSTOR 131259. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  329. ^ Henze, Paul B.; Rhinelander, Anthony L.H. (1990). "Review of Prince Michael Vorontsov, Viceroy to the Tsar". Russian History. 17 (3): 348–350. doi:10.1163/187633190X00778. JSTOR 24656329. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  330. ^ Steinberg, John W.; Robinson, Paul (2015). "Review of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich: Supreme Commander of the Russian Army". The Russian Review. 74 (3): 524–525. JSTOR 43662332. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  331. ^ Robinson, Paul; Mawdsley, Evan (2016). "Review of Grand Duke Nikolai Nikolaevich, Supreme Commander of the Russian Army, Robinson, Paul". The Slavonic and East European Review. 94 (3): 552–554. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.3.0552. JSTOR 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.3.0552. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  332. ^ Hundley, Helen S.; Sutherland, Christine (1987). "Review of The Princess of Siberia: The Story of Maria Volkonsky and the Decembrist Exiles". The Historian. 49 (2): 261–262. JSTOR 24446830. Retrieved 15 March 2021.
  333. ^ Kotenko, Anton (2020). "Reviewed work: CARPATHIAN RUS': A HISTORICAL ATLAS, Paul Robert Magocsi, Paul Robert Magocsi; HISTORICAL ATLAS OF CENTRAL EUROPE: THIRD REVISED AND EXPANDED EDITION, Magocsi Paul Robert". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 37 (1/2): 225–228. JSTOR 48627244.
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