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Battle of Artemivsk

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Battle of Artemivsk
Part of the War in Donbas (2014–2022)
1404502196 img 6177.jpg
Battle in the center of Artemivsk (July 4, 2014)
Date12 April – 6 July 2014
Location
Artemivsk, Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine
Result

Ukrainian victory

  • Establishment of full control over the city by Ukrainian forces
  • Successful defense of military warehouses
Belligerents
 Ukraine  Donetsk People's Republic
Commanders and leaders
Ukraine Vasyl Krutov
Ukraine Olexandr Trepak
Igor Strelkov
Units involved

Ukrainian Ground Forces

National Guard of Ukraine
Russian people's militias in Ukraine

The Battle of Artemivsk was a 2014 battle fought in the city of Artemivsk (since 2016 known as Bakhmut) during the War in Donbas in eastern Ukraine as part of the wider Russo-Ukrainian War. It involved armed confrontation between the Special Operations Forces of Ukraine and pro-Russian militias representing the Donetsk People’s Republic.

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Bakhmut

Bakhmut

Bakhmut is a city in Donbas and the administrative centre of Bakhmut Raion in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine. It is located on the Bakhmutka River, about 89km north of Donetsk city, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 71,094

War in Donbas (2014–2022)

War in Donbas (2014–2022)

The War in Donbas was an armed conflict in the Donbas region of Ukraine, part of the broader Russo-Ukrainian War. In March 2014, immediately following the Euromaidan protest movement and subsequent Revolution of Dignity, protests by pro-Russian, anti-government separatist groups arose in the Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts of Ukraine, collectively called the Donbas. These demonstrations began around the same time as Russia's annexation of Crimea, and were part of wider pro-Russian protests across southern and eastern Ukraine. Declaring the Donetsk and Luhansk People's Republics ; armed Russian-backed separatist groups; largely from Russia, Crimea, and Eastern Ukraine; seized government buildings throughout the Donbas, leading to armed conflict with Ukrainian government forces.

Russo-Ukrainian War

Russo-Ukrainian War

The Russo-Ukrainian War is an ongoing international conflict between Russia and Russian-controlled separatists against Ukraine, which began in February 2014. Following Ukraine's Revolution of Dignity, Russia annexed Crimea from Ukraine and supported pro-Russian separatists in the war in Donbas against Ukrainian government forces; fighting for the first eight years of the conflict also included naval incidents, cyberwarfare, and heightened political tensions. In February 2022, the conflict saw a major escalation as Russia launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

Special Operations Forces (Ukraine)

Special Operations Forces (Ukraine)

The Special Operations Forces are the special forces of Ukraine and one of the five branches of the Armed Forces of Ukraine, with headquarters in Kyiv.

Donetsk People's Republic

Donetsk People's Republic

The Donetsk People's Republic is an unrecognised republic of Russia in the occupied parts of eastern Ukraine's Donetsk Oblast, with its capital in Donetsk. The DPR was created by militarily-armed Russian-backed separatists in 2014, and it initially operated as a breakaway state until it was annexed by Russia in 2022.

Background

In the aftermath of Euromaidan, from March to May 2014, pro-Russian unrest occurred in many cities of the eastern, central, and southern regions Ukraine. The demonstrations were encouraged by the Russian annexation of Crimea.[1] The protests, known as the “Russian Spring” in Russia, took place under Russian flags and with pro-Russian slogans, and put forward a wide range of demands in reaction to the pro-European outlook of the new Ukrainian government — from the federalization of Ukraine to calls for the division of the territory of Ukraine and for annexation by Russia, in a similar fashion to that of Crimea.[2]

Pro-Russian protests

On March 1, 2014, the first pro-Russian rally took place in the city. The organizers of the rally sounded openly separatist calls for unification with Russia and demanded a referendum be held. On the same day, the Russian flag was raised over the city council building.[3]

Similar rallies continued until the second half of April 2014. The pro-Russian rhetoric and slogans did not change, but the number of participants in the demonstrations gradually became fewer and fewer.[4] On April 13, 2014, the Ukrainian authorities launched an “anti-terrorist operation” to restore control over the Donetsk region and the city of Artemivsk in particular.[5]

Ukrainian authorities organised the removal of weapons from military warehouses in early March 2014 to prevent armed conflict in the area.[6]

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2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine

2014 pro-Russian unrest in Ukraine

From the end of February 2014, demonstrations by pro-Russian and anti-government groups took place in major cities across the eastern and southern regions of Ukraine in the aftermath of the Revolution of Dignity, which resulted in the success of Euromaidan in ousting then-President Viktor Yanukovych. The unrest, supported by Russia in the early stages of the Russo-Ukrainian War, has been referred to in Russia as the "Russian Spring".

Euromaidan

Euromaidan

Euromaidan, or the Maidan Uprising, was a wave of demonstrations and civil unrest in Ukraine, which began on 21 November 2013 with large protests in Maidan Nezalezhnosti in Kyiv. The protests were sparked by the Ukrainian government's sudden decision not to sign the European Union–Ukraine Association Agreement, instead choosing closer ties to Russia and the Eurasian Economic Union. Ukraine's parliament had overwhelmingly approved of finalizing the Agreement with the EU, while Russia had put pressure on Ukraine to reject it. The scope of the protests widened, with calls for the resignation of President Viktor Yanukovych and the Azarov Government. The protesters opposed what they saw as widespread government corruption, the influence of oligarchs, abuse of power, and violation of human rights in Ukraine. Transparency International named Yanukovych as the top example of corruption in the world. The violent dispersal of protesters on 30 November caused further anger. The Euromaidan led to the 2014 Revolution of Dignity.

Ukraine

Ukraine

Ukraine is a country in Eastern Europe. It is the second-largest European country after Russia, which it borders to the east and northeast. Ukraine covers approximately 600,000 square kilometres (230,000 sq mi). Prior to the ongoing Russian invasion, it was the eighth-most populous country in Europe, with a population of around 41 million people. It is also bordered by Belarus to the north; by Poland, Slovakia, and Hungary to the west; and by Romania and Moldova to the southwest; with a coastline along the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov to the south and southeast. Kyiv is the nation's capital and largest city. Ukraine's state language is Ukrainian; Russian is also widely spoken, especially in the east and south.

Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation

Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation

In February and March 2014, Russia invaded and subsequently annexed the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. This event took place in the aftermath of the Revolution of Dignity and is part of the wider Russo-Ukrainian War.

Russia

Russia

Russia, or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country spanning Eastern Europe and Northern Asia. It is the largest country in the world, with its internationally recognised territory covering 17,098,246 square kilometres (6,601,670 sq mi), and encompassing one-eighth of Earth's inhabitable landmass. Russia extends across eleven time zones and shares land boundaries with fourteen countries. It is the world's ninth-most populous country and Europe's most populous country, with a population of over 147 million people. The country's capital and largest city is Moscow. Saint Petersburg is Russia's cultural centre and second-largest city. Other major urban areas include Novosibirsk, Yekaterinburg, Nizhny Novgorod, and Kazan.

Donetsk Oblast

Donetsk Oblast

Donetsk Oblast, also referred to as Donechchyna (Донеччина), is an oblast in eastern Ukraine. It is Ukraine's most populous province, with around 4.1 million residents. Its administrative centre is Donetsk, though due to the ongoing Russo-Ukrainian War, the regional administration was moved to Kramatorsk. Historically, the region has been an important part of the Donbas region. From its creation in 1938 until November 1961, it bore the name Stalino Oblast as Donetsk was then named "Stalino", in honour of Joseph Stalin. As part of the de-Stalinization process, it was renamed after the Siversky Donets river, the main artery of Eastern Ukraine. Its population is estimated as 4,100,280

Artemivsk, Luhansk Oblast

Artemivsk, Luhansk Oblast

Kypuche, formerly known as Artemivsk is a city in Perevalsk Raion of Luhansk Oblast in eastern Ukraine. Population: 7,162 , 7,506 (2013 est.).

Timeline

April

On April 7, Ukrainian symbols were removed from the building of the Artemiv City Council.[7]

On April 12, the authorities of the Donetsk People's Republic in Artemivsk were declared separatists by the Ukrainian government. The pro-Russian authorities in Donetsk Oblast anticipated a repetition of the annexation of Crimea, although this did not come.[8]

On April 19, the forces of the 3rd Special Purpose Regiment reinforced the garrison of the small arms storage arsenal in the village of Paraskoviivka.[9]

Oleksandr Trepak, together with several reconnaissance groups, went to the Artemvisk area. Together with Special Purpose Units of the Military Law Enforcement Service, Kirovohrad (now Kropvynytskyi) residents guarded the Center for Armored Weapons Provision, located in Artemvisk (1282nd Center for providing armored weapons and equipment — Unit A2730) and the base for storing small arms in the village of Paraskoviivka (Unit A-4176).[9]

On April 24, the first assault by separatists on the military unit located in Artemivsk took place, although this was unsuccessful.[10]

May

On May 25, separatists succeeded in disrupting the holding of the 2014 Ukrainian presidential election in the city.[11]

June

On June 7, Volodymyr Chobotka, the commander of the armored forces base, was wounded and taken prisoner in the city. Pekar's group of 6 people left in a white civilian van to get him after the alarm was raised. A group of militants drove off to meet them in a similar-looking civilian car. The deputy commander of the group of the 3rd regiment with the call sign, Merzavchik, was the first to orientate himself - the militants' car was shot by machine guns. In a few seconds, three militants were killed, one was wounded and one was captured. Among the militants killed was Veles, the "commandant of the city of Artemivsk". Pekar's group took away the weapons and documents of the militants.[12]

A reconnaissance group of 8 special forces soldiers began an operation to search for and evacuate an seriously wounded officer. For this, it was necessary to seize a separatist checkpoint at the entrance to the city and hold it for around 3 hours to allow another group to evacuate a wounded man by helicopter. During the battle, the commander of the unit, Oleksandr Trepak, received a gunshot wound to the leg, but he refused to evacuate and for two days led the repulse of the militants' attacks on the Central Artillery Armament Base.[13]

We well understood that the Russian mercenaries would try to take possession of armored vehicles and small arms, so we prepared reliable posts and secrets, morally prepared for the meeting of the "guests".[13]

On June 20, a second assault by separatists took place on a military unit located in the city.[14] Special forces repelled an attack on Ukrainian warehouses from Horlivka with the help of grenade launchers. The next offensive took place with the support of mortar fire, the T-64 tank and infantry went on the offensive, but this attempt was also unsuccessful. Ukrainian soldiers suppressed the mortar, cut off the infantry and hit the enemy's combat vehicle.[15]

The battles for military warehouses in Artemivsk became one of the first cases of the use of T-64 tanks by pro-Russian militants. During this time, the defenders of the base first learned about the presence of T-64 tanks in the armed forces during the night, from June 20 to 21, when a tank fired at the ATP building adjacent to the military part. After this incident, the Ukrainian military decided to step up and "reanimated" one T-64 and one BMP-2 from those in storage (a total of 260 T-64, T-80 and T-72 tanks, 270 armored personnel carriers, 227 BMPs, 129 BRM-1K).[16]

The day after the attack on the checkpoint № 1 Ribgosp, on June 27, 2014, pro-Russian militants carried out a large-scale third attack on the base.[17] At night, they fired on military units stationed in the city using grenade launchers and small arms.[18] Among the equipment they used was a T-64BV tank. Defenders of the base fired at it RPG-18 and RPG-22, but failed to beat it and the tank was able to leave the scene of the battle alone. At the same time, the military unit A-4176 was stormed, where as a result of the battle, the T-64BV of pro-Russian militants was lined up and captured.[16] The tank removed from the militants was checked for affiliation: the serial was not in the register of Ukrainian tanks, and the installed battery belonged 205th Separate Motor Rifle Brigade (Budionnovsk, Stavropol region, RF).[19] It was one of three tanks in the arms of Russian occupiers spotted by the media at the time.[20]

On June 30, pro-Russian separatists launched a fourth attack on a military unit located in the city.[21]

July

In early July, pro-Russian militants retreated from the city and on July 5, 2014, Artemisk was returned to Ukrainian control.[22]

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Donetsk People's Republic

Donetsk People's Republic

The Donetsk People's Republic is an unrecognised republic of Russia in the occupied parts of eastern Ukraine's Donetsk Oblast, with its capital in Donetsk. The DPR was created by militarily-armed Russian-backed separatists in 2014, and it initially operated as a breakaway state until it was annexed by Russia in 2022.

Artemivsk, Luhansk Oblast

Artemivsk, Luhansk Oblast

Kypuche, formerly known as Artemivsk is a city in Perevalsk Raion of Luhansk Oblast in eastern Ukraine. Population: 7,162 , 7,506 (2013 est.).

Bakhmut

Bakhmut

Bakhmut is a city in Donbas and the administrative centre of Bakhmut Raion in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine. It is located on the Bakhmutka River, about 89km north of Donetsk city, the administrative center of the oblast. Population: 71,094

Kropyvnytskyi

Kropyvnytskyi

Kropyvnytskyi is a city in central Ukraine on the Inhul river with a population of 219,676 . It is an administrative center of the Kirovohrad Oblast.

2014 Ukrainian presidential election

2014 Ukrainian presidential election

Snap presidential elections held in Ukraine on 25 May 2014 resulted in Petro Poroshenko being elected President of Ukraine. Originally scheduled to take place on 29 March 2015, the date was changed following the 2014 Ukrainian revolution. Poroshenko won the elections with 54.7% of the votes, enough to win in a single round. His closest competitor, Yulia Tymoshenko, emerged with 12.81% of the votes. The Central Election Commission reported voter turnout over 60%, excluding the regions not under government control. Since Poroshenko obtained an absolute majority in the first round, a run-off second ballot was unnecessary.

Horlivka

Horlivka

Horlivka, or Gorlovka, is a city of regional significance in Donetsk Oblast, Ukraine.

Grenade launcher

Grenade launcher

A grenade launcher is a weapon that fires a specially designed, large-caliber projectile, often with an explosive, smoke, or gas warhead. Today, the term generally refers to a class of dedicated firearms firing unitary grenade cartridges. The most common type are man-portable, shoulder-fired weapons issued to individuals, although larger crew-served launchers are issued at higher levels of organization by military forces.

Mortar (weapon)

Mortar (weapon)

A mortar is usually a simple, lightweight, man-portable, muzzle-loaded weapon, consisting of a smooth-bore metal tube fixed to a base plate with a lightweight bipod mount and a sight. They launch explosive shells in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. Mortars are typically used as indirect fire weapons for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.

T-64

T-64

The T-64 is a Soviet tank manufactured in Kharkiv, and designed by Alexander Morozov. The tank was introduced in the early 1960s. It was a more advanced counterpart to the T-62: the T-64 served in tank divisions, while the T-62 supported infantry in motorized rifle divisions. It introduced a number of advanced features including composite armour, a compact engine and transmission, and a smoothbore 125-mm gun equipped with an autoloader to allow the crew to be reduced to three so the tank could be smaller and lighter. In spite of being armed and armoured like a heavy tank, the T-64 weighed only 38 tonnes. Soviet military planners considered the T-64 the first of the third-generation tanks and the first main battle tank.

Armed Forces of Ukraine

Armed Forces of Ukraine

The Armed Forces of Ukraine, most commonly known in Ukraine as ZSU or anglicized as AFU, are the military forces of Ukraine. All military and security forces, including the Armed Forces, are under the command of the President of Ukraine and subject to oversight by a permanent Verkhovna Rada parliamentary commission. They trace their lineage to 1917, while the modern armed forces were formed after Ukrainian independence in 1991.

BMP-2

BMP-2

The BMP-2 is an amphibious infantry fighting vehicle introduced in the 1980s in the Soviet Union, following on from the BMP-1 of the 1960s.

BMP development

BMP development

The BMP series were among the first production line infantry fighting vehicles. Included in the series are the mainline BMPs, the airborne variant BMDs, and licensed modified and reverse engineered versions. BMP stands for Boyevaya Mashina Pekhoty, meaning "infantry fighting vehicle". They were initially developed in the 1960s in the Soviet Union.

Losses

Russian T-64BV № 5 was taken by trophy while defending the base. June 27, 2014
Russian T-64BV № 5 was taken by trophy while defending the base. June 27, 2014

Pro-Russian forces lost a T-64BV tank with the number 5, seized by Ukrainian fighters. An RPO-A Shmel rocket-assisted flamethrower of Russian design with the inscription "From Russia with love" was also captured. According to information from the Ministry of Defense of Ukraine, these weapons were also provided to the DPR army by Russia.[23]

Aftermath

Successful repulsion of the attack by special forces fighters and military personnel A2730 and A4176 was important, because huge reserves of weapons and ammunition, which were located in the Center for the provision of armored weapons in Artemivsk and the storage base of small arms in the village of Paraskovyivka, did not fall into the hands of the militants.

For his successful performance of the combat task, Alexander Trepak received the rank of Colonel, Order of Bogdan Khmelnytsky III. The servicemen of parts A2730 and A4176 were not mentioned or presented for awards.

Source: "Battle of Artemivsk", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Artemivsk.

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See also
References
  1. ^ "Pro-Russia protests in Ukraine". BBC News. 1 March 2014. Archived from the original on 5 November 2022. Retrieved 5 November 2022.
  2. ^ Shaprio, Ari (16 April 2014). "Ukrainian Tanks Roll In — But Above Them Russian Flags Fly". NPR. p. 1. Archived from the original on 6 November 2022. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  3. ^ Avakyan, Gayane (1 March 2014). "В Артемовске прошел массовый пророссийский митинг (ФОТО)" [A massive pro-Russian rally was held in Artemovsk (PHOTO)]. 06274.com.ua (in Ukrainian). Archived from the original on 6 November 2022. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  4. ^ "7 лет свободы Бахмута. В этой интерактивной хронике все, что пережил город во время оккупации" [7 years of Bakhmut's freedom. In this interactive chronicle, everything that the city experienced during the occupation]. Свої.City (in Ukrainian). Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  5. ^ "РНБО розпочинає масштабну АТО із залученням Збройних Сил - Турчинов" [The National Security Council begins a large-scale anti-terrorist operation involving the Armed Forces - Turchynov]. Українська правда (in Ukrainian). 13 April 2014. Retrieved 6 November 2022.
  6. ^ Kots, Alexander; Steshin, Dmitry (22 March 2014). "Луганские партизаны: 20 тысяч штыков мы вам гарантируем" [Lugansk partisans: we guarantee you 20 thousand bayonets]. Komsomolskaya Pravda (in Russian). Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  7. ^ Smith, Matt; Butenko, Victoria (7 April 2014). "Ukraine says it retakes building seized by protesters". CNN. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  8. ^ "В Артемівську сепаратисти на даху міськради підняли прапор "Донецької республіки"" [In Artemivsk, separatists raised the flag of the "Donetsk Republic" on the roof of the city council]. ТСН.ua (in Ukrainian). 13 April 2014. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  9. ^ a b "Інформаційні матеріали до 5-річчя звільнення від російської окупації міст східної України «Вертаємо своє»" [Information materials dedicated to the 5th anniversary of liberation from Russian occupation of the cities of eastern Ukraine "Turning our own"]. Ukrainian Institute of National Memory (in Ukrainian). 7 May 2019. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  10. ^ "Військову частину в Артемівську обстрілювали з автоматів та гранатометів" [The military unit in Artemivsk was fired upon with machine guns and grenade launchers]. Espreso TV (in Ukrainian). 24 April 2014. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  11. ^ "Терористи спалили виборчу дільницю в Артемівську" [Terrorists burned down the polling station in Artemivsk]. Segodnya (in Ukrainian). 25 May 2014. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  12. ^ Butenko, Victoria; Smith-Spark, Laura; Magnay, Diana (29 August 2014). "U.S. official says 1,000 Russian troops enter Ukraine". CNN. Archived from the original on 8 November 2022. Retrieved 8 November 2022.
  13. ^ a b ""ПОКИ ІДЕ ВІЙНА – БУДУ КОМАНДИРОМ ЗАГОНУ!"" ["WHILE THE WAR IS GOING ON - I WILL BE THE UNIT COMMANDER!"]. gur.gov.ua. Main Directorate of Intelligence. 5 March 2015. Archived from the original on 17 November 2022. Retrieved 17 November 2022.
  14. ^ "Танкова база в Артемівську після п'ятого нападу терористів (ФОТОФАКТ)" [Tank base in Artemivsk after the fifth terrorist attack (PHOTO)]. Espreso TV (in Ukrainian). 27 June 2014. Archived from the original on 17 November 2022. Retrieved 17 November 2022.
  15. ^ "Слідами сучасних українських героїв. Російсько-українська війна: Битва за Артемівськ (2014)" [In the footsteps of modern Ukrainian heroes. Russian-Ukrainian War: Battle for Artemivsk (2014)]. Archived from the original on 17 November 2022. Retrieved 17 November 2022.
  16. ^ a b Zhirokhov, Michael. "ПЯТЬ ШТУРМОВ АРТЕМОВСКОЙ БАЗЫ" [FIVE STORMS OF THE ARTEMOV BASE]. liga.net. Archived from the original on 17 November 2022. Retrieved 17 November 2022.
  17. ^ "В Артемівську бойовики штурмували військову частину" [Militants stormed a military unit in Artemivsk]. Espreso TV. 20 June 2014. Archived from the original on 19 November 2022. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  18. ^ "Українські військові знищили танк терористів та ще один захопили" [The Ukrainian military destroyed a terrorist tank and captured another one]. mil.gov.ua. Armed Forces of Ukraine. 27 June 2014. Archived from the original on 30 October 2017. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  19. ^ "Міноборони: Захоплений вчора танк в зоні АТО потрапив в Україну з Росії" [Ministry of Defense: The tank captured yesterday in the ATO zone entered Ukraine from Russia]. unian.ua (in Ukrainian). 29 June 2014. Archived from the original on 19 November 2022. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  20. ^ "Ukraine captures 'Russian' T-64 MBT near Donetsk". Janes Information Services. 30 June 2014. Archived from the original on 29 April 2015. Retrieved 19 November 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  21. ^ "В Артемівську терористи на танках штурмували військову частину" [In Artemivsk, terrorists stormed a military unit on tanks]. theinsider.ua. 27 June 2014. Archived from the original on 19 November 2022. Retrieved 19 November 2022.
  22. ^ "Ukrainian president hails breakthrough as Slavyansk seized from separatists". the Guardian. 6 July 2014. Retrieved 20 December 2022.
  23. ^ "Значна частина вилучених у терористів зразків озброєння та військової техніки потрапили на схід України з території Російської Федерації" [A significant part of samples of weapons and military equipment seized from terrorists got to the east of Ukraine from the territory of the Russian Federation]. mil.gov.ua. Armed Forces of Ukraine. 29 June 2014. Archived from the original on 29 September 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)

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