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Bath City F.C.

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Bath City
Bath City logo
Full nameBath City Football Club
Nickname(s)The Romans
Founded1889; 134 years ago (1889) as Bath AFC
GroundTwerton Park
Capacity8,884 (restricted to 3,528 for safety reasons)[1]
OwnerBath City Supporters' Society
ChairmanNick Blofeld
ManagerJerry Gill
LeagueNational League South
2021–22National League South, 18th of 21
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Bath City Football Club is a semi-professional football club based in Bath, Somerset, England. The club is affiliated to the Somerset FA and currently competes in the National League South, the sixth tier of English football. The club have played their home matches at Twerton Park since 1932.

Founded in 1889, the club spent the first three years of its history as Bath AFC. Bath won the Southern League Western Section in 1930, and again in 1933, which was viewed as the second best competition in England at the time.[2] The club was heavily discussed for entry into the Football League Third Division during the 1930s,[3][4] though Bath has missed out on election to the Football League on multiple occasions, including 1935, 1978 and in 1985.[5] Upon the outbreak of the Second World War, the club won the Football League North – the club's only English Football League trophy. Bath have reached the third round of the FA Cup six times, beating league sides such as; Crystal Palace (in 1931), Millwall (in 1959), and Cardiff City (in 1992).[6] The club were crowned Southern League champions in 1960 and 1978; the top tier of non-League football at the time. After a period of relative decline in the 1990s, Bath were demoted to the seventh tier in 2004, the lowest tier the club has ever been in. Albeit, they were promoted in 2007, and again in 2010, and played tier five football for the first time since 1997, though the club were relegated in 2012 and have played in the National League South since.

Bath are nicknamed the "Romans"; stemming from Bath's ancient Roman history. The first recorded attire the club wore was blue shorts and white shirts in 1900, though the club changed to black and white stripes in the early 20th Century and the colours have remained since. The club's crest depicts the Borough walls, which guarded the city during Roman times. Twerton Park; once held up to 20,000 fans but tragedies such as the Hillsborough disaster in the late 1980s and the subsequent modernisation of football stadiums has more than halved that figure.

Discover more about Bath City F.C. related topics

Bath, Somerset

Bath, Somerset

Bath is a city in the Bath and North East Somerset unitary area in the county of Somerset, England, known for and named after its Roman-built baths. At the 2021 Census, the population was 101,557. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) southeast of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site in 1987, and was later added to the transnational World Heritage Site known as the "Great Spa Towns of Europe" in 2021. Bath is also the largest city and settlement in Somerset.

1929–30 Southern Football League

1929–30 Southern Football League

The 1929–30 season was the 32nd in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Aldershot Town won the Eastern Division and Bath City won the Western Division. Aldershot were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off 4–2.

1932–33 Southern Football League

1932–33 Southern Football League

The 1932–33 season was the 35th in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Norwich City reserves won the Eastern Division, whilst Bath City won the Western Division. Norwich reserves were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off 2–1.

1931–32 FA Cup

1931–32 FA Cup

The 1931–32 FA Cup was the 57th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Newcastle United won the competition for the third time, beating Arsenal 2–1 in the final at Wembley.

1959–60 FA Cup

1959–60 FA Cup

The 1959–60 FA Cup was the 79th staging of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Wolverhampton Wanderers won the competition for the fourth time, beating Blackburn Rovers 3–0 in the final at Wembley.

Cardiff City F.C.

Cardiff City F.C.

Cardiff City Football Club is a professional association football club based in Cardiff, Wales. It competes in the Championship, the second tier of the English football league system. Founded in 1899 as Riverside A.F.C., the club changed its name to Cardiff City in 1908 and entered the Southern Football League in 1910 before joining the English Football League in 1920. The team has spent 17 seasons in the top tier of English football, the longest period being between 1921 and 1929. Their most recent season in the top flight was the 2018–19 Premier League season.

1992–93 FA Cup

1992–93 FA Cup

The 1992–93 FA Cup was the 112th season of the FA Cup, also known as The Football Association Challenge Cup. It was won by Arsenal, who beat Sheffield Wednesday 2–1 in the replay after a 1–1 draw in the final at the old Wembley Stadium. The goals were scored by Ian Wright and Andy Linighan, who scored in the 119th minute. This was the last FA Cup final to be decided by a replay before final replays were abolished in 1999.

1959–60 Southern Football League

1959–60 Southern Football League

The 1959–60 Southern Football League season was the 57th in the history of the league, an English football competition.

1977–78 Southern Football League

1977–78 Southern Football League

The 1977–78 Southern Football League season was the 75th in the history of the league, an English football competition.

2006–07 Southern Football League

2006–07 Southern Football League

The 2006–07 season was the 104th in the history of the Southern League, which is an English football competition featuring semi-professional and amateur clubs from the South West, South Central and Midlands of England and South Wales. This season was the first to feature the new Division One sections after reform of the Isthmian League structure.

2009–10 Football Conference

2009–10 Football Conference

The 2009–10 Football Conference season was the sixth season with the Football Conference consisting of three divisions, and the thirty-first season overall. The Conference covers the top two levels of Non-League football in England. The Conference Premier is the fifth highest level of the overall pyramid, whilst the Conference North and Conference South exist at the sixth level. The top team and the winner of the play-off of the National division were promoted to Football League Two. The bottom four were scheduled to be relegated to the North or South divisions, but in the event two teams were expelled and only the bottom two clubs were relegated with them. The champions of the North and South divisions were promoted to the National division, alongside the play-off winners from each division. The bottom three in each of the North and South divisions were relegated to the premier divisions of the Northern Premier League, Isthmian League or Southern League. For sponsorship reasons, the Conference Premier was frequently referred to as the Blue Square Premier.

Bath city walls

Bath city walls

Bath's city walls were a sequence of defensive structures built around the city of Bath in England. Roman in origin, then restored by the Anglo-Saxons, and later strengthened in the High medieval period, the walls formed a complete circuit, covering the historic core of the modern city, an area of approximately 23 acres (9.3 ha) including the Roman Baths and medieval Bath Abbey. In the present-day however, the walls have largely disappeared, though the route they took is evident from the street layout; one of the gates partially remains.

History

Formation and early years (1889–1925)

Bath City squad in 1913, taken at the Belvoir Castle Ground in Twerton
Bath City squad in 1913, taken at the Belvoir Castle Ground in Twerton

In 1889 Bath City were formed as Bath AFC (Bath Association Football Club) and commenced play at the North Parade Ground in Bathwick.[7][8] The club competed in their first ever recorded match on 10 October 1889, in which they lost 9–4 to Trowbridge Town at The North Parade Ground.[9] One of the first games that Bath AFC played away was against Eastville Rovers in Clifton, Bristol in front of a crowd of 5,000 on 30 October 1889.[10] Fixtures in the club's primordial season included ties against the likes of, Weston-super-Mare, Swindon and Gloucester.[11] The following season, Bath played regular friendlies with local Somerset sides, including the likes of Yeovil Casuals and Taunton United. By 1891, the club was struggling heavily financially. As a consequence, it was put forward that the club amalgamate with Bath Football Club.[12][13]

For nine years the club seized play. Until, on 13 September 1900, Bath AFC was re-formed by members of the Bath Association Cricket Club, led by eventual player, William Hyman, and thus Bath City FC, by name was officially born.[14][15] Hyman went on to score 131 goals for Bath, making him the club's second all-time top goal scorer, he also frequently acted as the club's honorary secretary in board meetings.[14][16] During the meeting at Railway Hotel in which the club was formed, members suggested that the team's attire ought to be blue shorts and white shirts, though, these colours only lasted for a short while. In 1900, the club bought The Belvoir Castle Ground in East Twerton, next to the railway line. Concurrently, the club entered competitive football, and commenced play in The Wiltshire Football League, finishing seventh in their first season.[17][18] They changed names from Bath City to Bath Railway in 1902.[19] That year, an annual competition known as the "Bath District League" was formed, in which the club competed against fellow Bath clubs, such as Bath Rovers, Weston All Saints and Twerton Street Michaels.[20][21] On 26 July 1905, they reverted names back to Bath City FC.[22][23]

City squad during the war in 1916, taken at the Belvoir Castle
City squad during the war in 1916, taken at the Belvoir Castle

The following year, the club joined The Bristol and District League Division One, in which they remained for two years. In 1908, they joined the Western League Division Two.[24] After moving to a higher division, the club decided to field their reserve team for the Bath District League, instead of the first.[25] In 1909, Charles Pinker was appointed manager,[26] and that year, the club moved up to The Western League Division One.[27] Bath finished third at this level in the 1910–11 season.[28] and then went on to rank second in The Western League Division One during the 1913–14 season.[29] Five years later, Bath City departed both The Belvoir Castle and Twerton, for the Lambridge Show Ground in Larkhall next to the River Avon. Bath remained in the Western League until 1921, in which they joined the English Section of the Southern League,[30] one of the strongest leagues outside the Football League.[31][32] In 1921, manager Charles Pinker left the club after a successful twelve-year period.[33] He was replaced by former Swindon Town player, Billy Tout, who led the club into the top division of non-League football for the first time. Tout retained this role until 1925.[34]

The glory years and missing out on Football League (1925–1958)

Chart of Bath City's league performance from their entry into the Southern League in 1921-22 to the present.[35]
Chart of Bath City's league performance from their entry into the Southern League in 1921-22 to the present.[35]

In 1925, Pinker was re-appointed at Bath City, though he failed to capture the same success in the Southern League as he had done in The Western League, finishing fourteenth and then eleventh. In August 1926, the club were on the brink of extinction, partly, due to the fans being "disheartened by the ill-fortune of recent seasons" and the lack of "sufficient backing".[36] However, on 21 August in 1926, there was a large meeting, consisting mostly of the clubs supporters and officials. Due to the appointment of a new committee, and the increase in the number of supporters' club shareholders, the required £500 sum was met, and the club was "saved".[37] A year later, Ted Davis was appointed at Bath City.[38][39] In 1929, Davis won the club their first competitive trophy, The Somerset Cup.[40] The following season, the team finished first in the Southern League Western Section - the clubs highest-ever league placing. Though Bath lost 3–2 in the play offs to Eastern Section Champions Aldershot Town, hence, they were less applicable for election to the Third Division. The season was labelled "the best in the club's history by the Bath Chronicle."[41] In 1932, the club returned to Twerton, and started playing home games at the newly built Twerton Park, with the community laying out flags and bunting the length of the High Street to "celebrate the return of football to the area."[42] In 1933, the club won the Southern League Western Section for a second time, but lost in the final to play–off Eastern Section Champions Norwich City 2–1. During this period, they were heavily being discussed for entry into the Football League Third Division.[3][4] In 1937, Davis left Bath for Colchester United.[43][44] The team remained in the Southern League until 1939, with former Liverpool player and Scottish international", Alex Raisbeck as first team coach from 1938 to 1939.[45]

Raisbeck left to be replaced by Ted Davis, his second spell at Bath. In the summer of 1939, Arthur Mortimer was appointed as the clubs knew chairman.[46] Upon the Outbreak of the Second World War, the club were, by chance, accepted to join the temporary Football League North, competing with the likes of Liverpool, Manchester United, Aston Villa and Everton, finishing the eventual champions under Davis, thereby becoming the only semi-professional side ever to win a Football League trophy.[47][48] In 1944, the club were, once again, in talks for entry into the English Football League, with the aim of being admitted into either the Third Division, or the planned Fourth Division, which had not yet been established. Bath were told during a meeting at the Guildhall by one of the leading members of the Football League reconstructing committee, that the opportunity to join the planned fourth division was " Bath's for the asking". At the time, Twerton Park was also in heavy discussion for expansion, to a capacity of 40,000, in aim to become; "a stadium worthy of the city and the west".[49][50]

However, on 27 July 1945, the Football League's management committee refused to allow any non-league clubs into the Third Division, despite Third League clubs "wanting Bath City to join".[51] Thus, after the War, with the resumption of competitive football, they were forced to resume playing in the Southern League.[52] Ted Davis, then left the club in 1947. In total, Davis spent 17 years as first team coach. He went on to become the most successful and longest serving manager in the club's history, winning seven trophies. Following his departure, the 1950s saw a large array of different coaches manage the club. Vic Woodley was the first to succeed Davis, appointed on 6 June 1947.[53] Though he left in 1950 after four mid-lower placed finishes,[54] and was replaced by Eddie Hapgood.[55][56] Attendances on average during the 1940s and 1950s were some of the highest recorded in the club's history. Notable large home attendances during this period included; 17,000 in 1944 vs Aston Villa[57] 14,000 vs Southend United in the 1952–53 season and 11,700 at Twerton Park against rivals Yeovil Town in 1957.[58] In 1956, Hapgood left the club after winning two Somerset Cups in 1952 and 1953. He was replaced by Paddy Sloan, who only remained for the 1956–57 season.

Further glory and the yoyo years (1958–1997)

Sloan was replaced by Bob Hewison in 1957. The succeeding year, a reform similar to that of 1920 took place; a new Fourth Division was formed.[59][60] Thereupon, The Southern league descended the pyramid. By 1959, Bath were once again being heavily discussed for election to The Football League. However the chairman at the time, Arthur Mortimer, believed that "the league suited the club" he stated that: "We are providing better football here than most spectators get in the lower divisions of the Football League."[61] Hewison built arguably, the strongest side in the clubs history, signing players such as, Stan Mortensen, Charlie Fleming, Alan Skirton and Ian MacFarlane, captained by Tony Book.[62][63] The team went on to win the league in the 1959–60 season, finishing on 67 points (in 42 matches), with the division still being viewed as; “The foremost non-League competition.”[64] In the same season, the club had one of the best cup runs in their history, beating Millwall in the FA Cup first round.[65][66] and then Notts County in the second round.[67] In the third round, Bath went on to play Brighton & Hove Albion at Twerton Park, in front of a record crowd of 18,020,[68] but lost 1–0.[69] Hewison rose as the second most successful manager in the club's history, a title in which he held until 1978. In 1962, Bath were Southern League runners up.[70]

Bath City 1964 squad
Bath City 1964 squad

Two years after Hewison's departure in the spring of 1961, Former Manchester City player Malcolm Allison was appointed manager after Arthur Cole's dismissal in 1963.[71] Though Allison won no silverware with the club, in the 1963–64 season, with Tony Book as club captain, Bath finished in third place, and reached the third round of the FA Cup. He left the club in 1964 and then went on to manage league sides, including, Plymouth Argyle and Manchester City.[72][73] In 1965, under Welsh manager Ivor Powell, the club were relegated for the first time in their history. They were then promoted back to the Southern League Premier Division that year, though were poor in the 1966–67 season and finished 19th,[74] being relegated from the Southern League Premier for a second time in three years. Powell was replaced by Arnold Rodgers on 25 February 1967.[75] In the 1968–69 season they won promotion back to the Premier Division, finishing second. From 1964 to 1974 Bath City became a yo-yo club, being relegated from, and promoted back to the Premier Division on six occasions.

On 10 August 1976, Brian Godfrey was appointed as manager. Two years into his reign, in the 1977–78 season, the team won the Southern League title for a second time.[76][77] The Southern League in the 1970s was still labelled: “the best non-league division in England.”[2] Under Godfrey, the club made it to two Anglo-Italian Cup finals In 1977 and 1978;[78][79] In 1977, they lost to Udinese Calcio and then in 1978 to affiliated club Calcio Lecco.[80][81] Godfrey averaged a league position of third, and won Bath City's last "major" non-League trophy, making him the clubs second most successful manager. Though finishing first, they fell short of election to the Football League by three votes in 1978, with Wigan Athletic gaining 26 and Bath 23. As a result, the club became founding members of the Alliance Premier League, now the National League.[82][83] They finished runners-up in 1985 but champions Wealdstone did not meet Football League stadium capacity requirements, so Bath City were allowed to apply for election to the Football League Fourth Division. However, they missed out on election to the Football League for a third time. On this occasion, gaining only 8 votes.[84]

In 1986, Bristol Rovers were forced out of Eastville, officials of both clubs reached an agreement to share Twerton Park. This instigated developments to the ground as it, at one point, hosted second-tier football. Rovers ultimately moved back to Bristol after a ten-year period.[85] In 1988, Bath were relegated from the Alliance Premier League to the Southern Football League, which was now formally the sixth tier. Nevertheless, the club were promoted back the next season. In 1991 Tony Ricketts was appointed manager, replacing George Rooney.[86] They reached the third round of the FA Cup during the 1993–94 season, on 5 December 1993, the second round tie against Hereford United was broadcast live on Sky Sports.[87] The club won 2–1, progressing to the next round.[88][89] However, they lost 4–1 to Stoke City at home in the third.[90] That season, the club won the Somerset Cup, and won it again in 1995. They remained in the fifth tier from 1991 to 1997, though only managed several mid-placed finishes.[91]

Decline and subsequent relegation (1997–2017)

In the wake of Ricketts's departure in 1996, Paul Bodin was appointed manager. Following decades of playing in the top division of non-League football, the club were relegated from the 1996–97 Football Conference.[92][93] As a result, Bath returned to the Southern Football League; albeit it no longer acted as step one of the non league pyramid. In 2001, Bodin was replaced by Alan Pridham.[94] However Pridham only lasted until 2003, after being sacked in November due to a poor run of results.[95] In 2004, the club lost in the FA Cup second round to Peterborough United and in the third round of the FA Trophy to Canvey Island.[96] With the formation of the Conference South in 2004,[97] the Southern league lowered in rank once again; to the seventh division. As a result, Bath were demoted, albeit, without being relegated.[98] Subsequently, they ended up playing the lowest tier football in the club's history from 2004 to 2007, having never previously played below the sixth tier. John Relish was appointed manager on 22 June 2005.[99] The club narrowly missed out on promotion to the Conference South in the season 2005–06 season finishing second in the Southern League. Though, the subsequent year, they were promoted back to the sixth tier by winning the Southern League in 2006–07, finishing on 91 points.[100][101]

The club gain promotion to the National League in 2010
The club gain promotion to the National League in 2010

Bath then finished eighth in the Conference South during the 2007–08 season.[102][103] In October 2008, manager John Relish moved aside from managerial duties to concentrate on developing the Youth academy.[104] He was replaced by his former assistant Adie Britton. In 2009, the club beat League Two side Grimsby Town in the FA Cup first round, only to lose to Forest Green Rovers in the second round. On 9 May 2010, Bath reached the National League South play-off final, in which they played Woking. The club won 1–0 and returned to the fifth tier for the first time since 1997.[105][106] Bath finished tenth in the 2010–11 Football Conference, their highest finish since achieving seventh in the 1992–93 Football Conference.[107]

However, they had a poor season in 2011–12 and were relegated from the Conference.[108] Following the demotion, Bath's chairman at the time, Manda Rigby, held talks with manager Adie Britton on the future of the club, stating the team would; "return stronger with the experience."[109] Yet the chairman's promise to get back into the National League failed to materialize, with the club finishing in twelfth place in the 2012–13 season. Britton, subsequently stepped down from being the first team coach, and acquired the role of football director,[110] stating that he "aims to get Bath City back to where they belong."[111][112]

Britton was replaced by Australian manager, Lee Howells. The following season was an improvement, with the club finishing seventh on 66 points in 2013–14. However, for the following two years, they were poor again, finishing fourteenth on 53 points in both the 2014–15 and 2015–16 season. During this period, the club's home attendances also declined greatly, averaging as low as 500 during the 2014–15 season. From 2011 to 2016 home attendances were some of the lowest recorded in the club's entire history. What little success the club had during this period was in the 2014–15 season, reaching the semi-final of the FA Trophy, beating Bristol Rovers, on route to losing on penalties to eventual winners, North Ferriby United.[113][114] Howells was eventually sacked after a 4–1 defeat to Dartford, due to a run of low placed finishes.[115][116]

2017–present

Bath City away at fellow Somerset club Weston-super-Mare in 2017
Bath City away at fellow Somerset club Weston-super-Mare in 2017

On 5 October 2017, former player, Jerry Gill, was appointed first team manager.[117] The first season under Gill saw the club finish in ninth, the same as the previous 2016–17 season.[118] However, it was not until later that there was a noticeable improvement in the team's performances.[119] In the 2018–19 National League South season the club finished fifth, on 71 points, a feat that had not been accomplished since the 2009–10 promotion season. Subsequently, they entered play offs to compete for a place in the National League, but lost 3–1 to Wealdstone on the first May 2019.[120] The club climbed once spot higher up the table again in 2019–20, finishing fourth.[121] However, the team were beaten 2–1 by Dorking Wanderers in the play-off eliminator at Twerton Park.[122] Attendances also rose greatly, from the club averaging 612 in the 2016–17 season to 1,142 in the 2018–19 season. They also witnessed the highest league attendance in 40 years vs Torquay United, on 19 January 2019, with a crowd of 3,492. Bath won the game 3–2.[123][124]

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List of Bath City F.C. seasons

List of Bath City F.C. seasons

This is a list of seasons played by Bath City Football Club in English football, from the year they first turned competitive in 1908 in the Western League, to the present day.

Bath Cricket Club Ground

Bath Cricket Club Ground

Bath Cricket Club Ground is a cricket ground in Bath, Somerset. The first recorded match on the ground was in 1944, when Bath played London Counties. In 1960 and 1963, the ground held Somerset Second XI matches in the Minor Counties Championship.

Bathwick

Bathwick

Bathwick is an electoral ward in the City of Bath, England, on the opposite bank of the River Avon to the historic city centre.

Bristol Rovers F.C.

Bristol Rovers F.C.

Bristol Rovers Football Club are a professional football club in Bristol, England. They compete in League One, the third tier of the English football league system.

Clifton, Bristol

Clifton, Bristol

Clifton is both a suburb of Bristol, England, and the name of one of the city's thirty-five council wards. The Clifton ward also includes the areas of Cliftonwood and Hotwells. The eastern part of the suburb lies within the ward of Clifton Down.

Swindon Town F.C.

Swindon Town F.C.

Swindon Town Football Club is a professional football club based in Swindon, Wiltshire, England. The team currently competes in EFL League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system. The club has played home matches at the County Ground since 1896, which now boasts a capacity of 15,547. Known as the "Robins", their home colours are red and white. Hall of Fame inductee John Trollope played 770 league games for the club between 1960 and 1980, a professional record in English football.

Gloucester City A.F.C.

Gloucester City A.F.C.

Gloucester City Association Football Club is a semi-professional association football club based in Hempsted, Gloucester, England. The club is affiliated to the Gloucestershire County Football Association and, as of the 2021–22 season, plays in the National League North, at the sixth tier of the English football league system.

Bath Rugby

Bath Rugby

Bath Rugby is a professional rugby union club in Bath, Somerset, England. They play in Premiership Rugby, England's top division of rugby.

Bath Cricket Club

Bath Cricket Club

Bath Cricket Club is an English amateur cricket club based in the city of Bath, Somerset. The club was founded in 1859 and the Men's 1st XI compete in the West of England Premier League, which is an accredited ECB Premier League, the highest level for recreational club cricket in England and Wales. Bath Cricket Club currently run four Men's teams, and two Women's Teams. In 2003 Bath Cricket Club merged with Somerset Wanderers Women's cricket team. The Women's teams use the playing name of Bath Wanderers. The Women's 1st XI play in the National Women's Premier League - South Division. This is also the highest level for recreational clubs. Bath CC Men’s 1st XI won the ECB National Club Championship in 2021.

Bill Hyman

Bill Hyman

William Hyman, known as "Bill" or "Billy", played first-class cricket for Somerset from 1900 to 1914. He was born at Radstock, Somerset and died at Mount Charles, St Austell, Cornwall.

1910–11 Western Football League

1910–11 Western Football League

The 1910–11 season was the 19th in the history of the Western Football League.

1913–14 Western Football League

1913–14 Western Football League

The 1913–14 season was the 22nd in the history of the Western Football League.

Crest and colours

The club are sometimes given the nickname; "The Stripes" simply in remembrance to their striped kit, as Bath have worn black and white throughout the majority of their history. They are also one of the few English clubs from the sixth tier and above to wear a black and white striped kit at home matches, the only other club's being, Grimsby Town, Notts County, Chorley and Newcastle United. Bath's initial crest was heavily based on the official coat of arms for the city of Bath.[125] The shield depicts the Borough Wall, the mineral springs and the River Avon, and the sword is that of St Paul, one of the Patron Saints of the Abbey, which is also the cities' parish church. The crest remained until the late 1980s, in which it was simplified heavily, the features within the city of bath shield were removed entirely, all that remained were 4 horizontal black stripes against a white background surrounding the silhouette of a Roman soldier. It was then changed again in 2000, as the club crest that the club uses today. The Roman soldier was removed, but the borough wall was re-added and the 4 stripes enlarged.

Kit suppliers and shirt sponsors

Period Kit Supplier Shirt sponsor (chest) Shirt sponsor (sleeve)
1985–1987 Umbro Avon Graphics No sponsor
1987–1988 Diners
1988–1989 Beazer Homes
1989–1990 Spall Rajani
1990–1992 Umbro Design Windows
1992–1993 Activity Bath Advertise
1993–1996 Vandanel
1996–1997 Bath Chronicle
1997–1998 ICiS
1998–2000 Vandanel
2000–2002 Branded Technic-Cal
2002–2003 Bentley Jennison
2003–2006 Erreà Bath Chronicle
2006–2007 John Crick
2007–2008 Sports Italia Tilley's Bistro
2008–2010 Joma SN Scaffolds
2010 Inter Payroll
2010–2014 Moore Stephens
2014–2015 Jako Tilley's Bistro
2015–2016 Erreà Midland Car Company
2016–2017 Sitec
2017–2018 Vass of Bath Ltd[126]
2018–2019 Bristol Airport[127] Bath Ales[128]
2019–2020 Bristol Sport
2020–2021[129] Erreà BWW Communications[130] J Reynolds (Western)[131]
2021–2022 Rocketmakers
2022–2023[132] The Belvoir Castle[133]

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National League South

National League South

The National League South, formerly Conference South, is one of the second divisions of the National League in England, immediately below the top division National League. Along with National League North, it is in the second level of the National League System, and is the sixth tier overall of the English football league system.

Grimsby Town F.C.

Grimsby Town F.C.

Grimsby Town Football Club is a professional football club based in Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, England, that competes in EFL League Two, the fourth tier of the English football league system, following the victory in the 2022 National League play-off Final. Nicknamed "the Mariners", the club was founded as Grimsby Pelham Football Club in 1878, changed its name to Grimsby Town a year later, and moved to its current stadium, Blundell Park, in 1898.

Notts County F.C.

Notts County F.C.

Notts County Football Club is a professional association football club based in Nottingham, England. The team participate in the National League, the fifth tier of the English football league system. Founded on 25 November 1862, it is the oldest professional association football club in the world and predates the Football Association itself. The club became one of the 12 founder members of the Football League in 1888. They are nicknamed the "Magpies" due to the black and white colour of their home strip, which inspired Italian club Juventus to adopt the colours for their kit in 1903. After playing at different home grounds during its first fifty years, including Trent Bridge, the club moved to Meadow Lane in 1910 and remains there. Notts County has a local rivalry with city neighbour Nottingham Forest, as well as with other nearby clubs such as Mansfield Town.

Chorley F.C.

Chorley F.C.

Chorley Football Club is a semi-professional football club based in Chorley, Lancashire, England. They currently compete in the National League North, the sixth tier of English football, and play their home matches at Victory Park. The club was founded as a rugby union club in 1875 but switched to football in 1883.

Newcastle United F.C.

Newcastle United F.C.

Newcastle United Football Club is an English professional football club based in Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear. The club competes in the Premier League, the highest level of the English football league system. The club was founded in 1892 by the merger of Newcastle East End and Newcastle West End. The team play their home matches at St James' Park in the centre of Newcastle. Following the Taylor Report's requirement that all Premier League clubs have all-seater stadiums, the ground was modified in the mid-1990s and currently has a capacity of 52,305.

Umbro

Umbro

Umbro is an English sports equipment manufacturer founded in 1924 in Wilmslow, Cheshire and based in Manchester. They specialise in football and rugby sportswear featuring their Double Diamond logo. Umbro products are marketed in over 100 countries.

Bath Chronicle

Bath Chronicle

The Bath Chronicle is a weekly newspaper, first published under various titles before 1760 in Bath, England. Prior to September 2007, it was published daily. The Bath Chronicle serves Bath, northern Somerset and west Wiltshire.

Erreà

Erreà

Erreà is an Italian sports equipment company supplier. Erreà was the first Italian sportswear company to be accredited with the Oeko-tex standard certification, which assures that garments textiles are free from harmful chemicals.

Joma

Joma

Joma is a Spanish sports clothing manufacturer that currently produces footwear and clothing for football, futsal, handball, basketball, volleyball, running, tennis, and padel. Its headquarters are located in Portillo de Toledo, Spain.

Jako

Jako

Jako AG is a German sportswear company based in the Hollenbach district of Mulfingen, Baden-Württemberg. The company was founded by Rudi Sprügel in 1989 in Stachenhausen. Jako provides kits for teams playing association football, handball, basketball, ice hockey and other sports.

Bristol Airport

Bristol Airport

Bristol Airport, at Lulsgate Bottom, on the northern slopes of the Mendip Hills, in North Somerset, is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol, England, and the surrounding area. It is 7 nautical miles southwest of Bristol city centre. Built on the site of a former RAF airfield, it opened in 1957 as Bristol (Lulsgate) Airport, replacing Bristol (Whitchurch) Airport as Bristol's municipal airport. From 1997 to 2010, it was known as Bristol International Airport. In 1997, a majority shareholding in the airport was sold to FirstGroup, and then in 2001 the airport was sold to a joint venture of Macquarie Bank and others. In September 2014, Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan bought out Macquarie to become the sole owner.

Bath Ales

Bath Ales

Bath Ales is a brewery located in the town of Warmley, South Gloucestershire, England; north-west of Bath and east of Bristol.

Stadiums

Early grounds

Bath played their most early matches at the North Parade Ground in Bathwick across from the City Centre. The ground was shared with the cricket club, most likely due to the fact that members of Bath Cricket Club were involved in the formation of the club in 1889. The ground mainly hosted friendlies with Bath and other local teams.[134] However, their time at Bathwick was short spent, as they moved to Lambridge in 1890.[135]

1900–1919: Belvoir Castle

Bath City at the Belvoir Ground taken at Twerton in 1913
Bath City at the Belvoir Ground taken at Twerton in 1913
City fans watching the match in 1914 at the Belvoir Castle Ground
City fans watching the match in 1914 at the Belvoir Castle Ground

In 1900, the club settled in Twerton at the Belvoir Castle Ground.[136] From 1900 to 1908 the club played friendlies with other local clubs. In 1908, there was a talk of Bath Rugby sharing the ground, though the talks never materialised.[137] Notable achievements at the Ground included; finishing third in the Western League in 1911,[138] and then second in 1914.[29] In 1910 the ground was purchased by the Midland Railway Company by Mr Stothert and Pitt, it was later stated that the ground would be "absolutely unsuitable for football" in a few years time, with the Railway Company planning to build a train track on the very land that the stadium occupied.[139] In 1919, a large meeting was arranged at the Bath Guildhall to find a suitable replacement, the Recreation Ground was considered an option.[140]


1919–1932: Lambridge

Bath city at Lambridge 1919
Bath city at Lambridge 1919

After almost a decade of uncertainty of what the club's next ground was going to be, following the purchase by the Midland Railway Company in 1910, Mr Hopkins, the club's secretary at the time, found a viable replacement for Belvoir.[141][142] Thus, in 1919, the club moved away from Twerton back to the east side of the city in Lambridge.[143] In 1921 Bath were accepted into the Southern League Western Section, the top tier of non-League football. Here, under manager, Ted Davis, they had one of the most successful periods in the club's history, as the southern league West at the time acted as the fourth tier, being only one division below the Football League Third Division. Not only did the club play some of the highest division football in their history during this period, the club won the title in the 1929–30 season and also won the Somerset Premier Cup twice, in the 1928–29 and the 1931–32 season. In the last season at Lambridge the club came third in the league and also reached the FA Cup third round, but were knocked out by Crystal Palace.[144]

1932–present: Twerton Park

Twerton Park hosting the 2009 Conference South Play-off final
Twerton Park hosting the 2009 Conference South Play-off final

Twerton Park became the club's home ground in 1932. The club continued the success of the latter years at Lambridge by winning the Southern League Western title in their first season at Twerton in the 1932–33 season. In 1935, roofing was added to the Popular Side.[145] In 1946, Twerton Park was described as "rivalling any stadium in the west of England."[146] A record attendance of 18,020 was recorded in 1960 versus Brighton & Hove Albion in the third round of the FA Cup.[147][148] Up until the late 1980s, the ground had a capacity of 20,000.[149] Between 1986 and 1996, Bath City shared Twerton Park with Bristol Rovers. In 1990 the Grandstand was heavily damaged by Bristol City Hooligans, who were later convicted of arson.[150][151] Rovers notably played Liverpool in the FA cup on 5 February 1992.[152] It has also hosted Team Bath, who were a full-time professional team playing in the Conference South until their resignation at the end of the 2008–09 season.[153] In 2021, the stadium was ranked the 75th best in Britain by FourFourTwo, ahead of the likes of, Charlton Athletic's The Valley, the Swansea.com stadium and Bristol City's Ashton Gate.[154] The ground currently has a reduced ground capacity of 3,528 from 8,800 due to safety regulations with a seating capacity of 1,006.[155]

View of Twerton Park from Innox Park
View of Twerton Park from Innox Park

On 21 August 2008, Bath City's chairman Geoff Todd stated that "the club held talks with Bath Rugby over a possible ground share at the Rec" meaning in the future, Bath City could move to the Recreation Ground, though fans were opposed to the move.[156][157] At the end of the 2011–12 season the club offered the naming rights to Twerton Park for just £50.[158] The offer drew 167 entries from as far afield as the US, Australia, Norway and Singapore which raised £3,850 for the club. Businesses made up 58 of the entries with only a handful of the remaining personalised entries being deemed unsuitable. The winning entry drawn at random was The Mayday Trust, a charitable organisation that helps to rehome vulnerable people.[159]

The club released plans to redevelop the ground and local area, containing a new grandstand, 3G pitch and housing in a bid to secure the immediate financial future of the club.[160][161][162] In March 2020, the plans were rejected.[163][164] In August 2020, it was announced that Bristol City Women would play the majority of home games at Twerton Park during the 2020–21 FA Women's Super League season.[165][166]

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Bath Cricket Club Ground

Bath Cricket Club Ground

Bath Cricket Club Ground is a cricket ground in Bath, Somerset. The first recorded match on the ground was in 1944, when Bath played London Counties. In 1960 and 1963, the ground held Somerset Second XI matches in the Minor Counties Championship.

Bathwick

Bathwick

Bathwick is an electoral ward in the City of Bath, England, on the opposite bank of the River Avon to the historic city centre.

Bath, Somerset

Bath, Somerset

Bath is a city in the Bath and North East Somerset unitary area in the county of Somerset, England, known for and named after its Roman-built baths. At the 2021 Census, the population was 101,557. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) southeast of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site in 1987, and was later added to the transnational World Heritage Site known as the "Great Spa Towns of Europe" in 2021. Bath is also the largest city and settlement in Somerset.

Bath Cricket Club

Bath Cricket Club

Bath Cricket Club is an English amateur cricket club based in the city of Bath, Somerset. The club was founded in 1859 and the Men's 1st XI compete in the West of England Premier League, which is an accredited ECB Premier League, the highest level for recreational club cricket in England and Wales. Bath Cricket Club currently run four Men's teams, and two Women's Teams. In 2003 Bath Cricket Club merged with Somerset Wanderers Women's cricket team. The Women's teams use the playing name of Bath Wanderers. The Women's 1st XI play in the National Women's Premier League - South Division. This is also the highest level for recreational clubs. Bath CC Men’s 1st XI won the ECB National Club Championship in 2021.

Bath Rugby

Bath Rugby

Bath Rugby is a professional rugby union club in Bath, Somerset, England. They play in Premiership Rugby, England's top division of rugby.

Guildhall, Bath

Guildhall, Bath

Guildhall is an 18th-century municipal building in central Bath, Somerset, England. It is a Grade I listed building.

Football League Third Division

Football League Third Division

The Football League Third Division was the third tier of the English football league system in 1920–21 and again from 1958 until 1992. When the FA Premier League was formed, the division become the fourth tier level. In 2004, following the formation of the Football League Championship, the division was renamed Football League Two.

1929–30 Southern Football League

1929–30 Southern Football League

The 1929–30 season was the 32nd in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Aldershot Town won the Eastern Division and Bath City won the Western Division. Aldershot were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off 4–2.

1928–29 Southern Football League

1928–29 Southern Football League

The 1928–29 season was the 31st in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Kettering Town won the Eastern Division and Plymouth Argyle reserves won the Western Division. Plymouth reserves were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off at Kettering 4-2.

1931–32 Southern Football League

1931–32 Southern Football League

The 1931–32 season was the 34th in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Dartford won the Eastern Division for the second successive season, whilst newly elected Yeovil & Petters United won the Western Division. Dartford were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off 2–1.

1932–33 FA Cup

1932–33 FA Cup

The 1932–33 FA Cup was the 58th season of the world's oldest football cup competition, the Football Association Challenge Cup, commonly known as the FA Cup. Everton won the competition for the second time, beating Manchester City 3–0 in the final at Wembley.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace Football Club is a professional football club based in Selhurst in the Borough of Croydon, South London, England, who compete in the Premier League, the highest level of English football. Although formally created as a professional outfit in 1905, the club's origins can be traced as far back as 1861, when an amateur Crystal Palace football team was established at the Crystal Palace Exhibition building. This has led to claims by the club that Crystal Palace should be recognised as the oldest professional football club in the world, after historians discovered a lineage through the Crystal Palace Company. Both the amateur and professional clubs played inside the grounds of the Palace, with the professional club using the FA Cup Final stadium for its home games until 1915, when they were forced to leave due to the outbreak of the First World War. In 1924, they moved to their current home at Selhurst Park.

Support

Bath City supporters in 2017
Bath City supporters in 2017

Historically, Bath were one of the best supported clubs in non-league football, particularly in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s. With attendances reaching the mid to late ten thousands in some FA Cup ties.[167][168][58] However, attendances declined immensely in the 1970s, 80s and 90s, with no average home gate making it over 1,400 mark besides the 1977-78 season (with an average of 1,600).[169] Albeit, the decline in attendances was notable through out the entirety of English football during this period as they were some of the foremost decades of Football hooliganism, particularly the 1980s.[170][171]

Due to the club's poor performances on the field in the late 1990s to 2010s, with subsequent relegations, attendances declined further. Being as low as 500 on average in the 2014–15 season, the lowest recorded average attendance in the club's entire history. As a result, in 2015, a fan development group dedicated to raising average home attendances to 1000 called "1000BC" was put in place.[172][173] The development was undoubtedly successful with attendances having averaged over 1000 for the past three seasons.[174][175]

Twerton Park, The Popular Side in 2010
Twerton Park, The Popular Side in 2010

For the current 2022–23 season Twerton Park was ranked number one by non league fans for atmosphere in the national league south.[176][177] The South Terrace, historically known as the "Popular Side" opposite the Grand Stand is home to the club's most vocal support.[178] Supporters are known for singing "Drink Up Thy Cider" by The Wurzels, a tribute to the Somerset's famous cider brewing industry.[179] The song is often played at Twerton Park after the team wins, particularly a big game.

In the 1960s and 1970s, the club's mascot was simply known as "mascot man", who dressed in black and white top hat and tails whilst twirling a large black and white umbrella and ringing a handbell.[180] In more recent years, (since the 2010–11 season), the club mascot has been Bladud the Pig, named after the legendary king of the Britons who is said to have founded the city of Bath and kept a herd of pigs. At the club's home games, he can frequently be seen waving to the crowd, performing press-ups and entertaining younger supporters. In 2019, Bladud the Pig won the Mascot South West Grand National.[181]

Though close in proximity, EFL League One side Bristol Rovers are not considered rivals, having never competed against Bath in the league, and have formed friendly relations with the Romans, largely due to Rovers playing at Twerton from 1986 to 1996.[182] In addition to Bristol Rovers, Bath have formed a strong tie with Italian side Calcio Lecco.[183] The clubs played against each other in the 1977 Anglo-Italian Cup Final, with the Italian side triumphing. This did not sour relations, with fans of both sides celebrating the 40th anniversary of the game in 2017 with a supporters match held in Lecco's Stadio Rigamonti-Ceppi ground.[184][185]

Rivalries

Historically, Bath's mains rivals were fellow Somerset club Yeovil Town.[186][187] Bath also shared a lesser rivalry with Weymouth.[188] The rivalry with Yeovil stemmed from location and league position, with Yeovil and Bath having played in the top tier of non-League football for the majority of their history.[189] Tensions between Bath and Yeovil were said to be strongest in the 1960s and 1990s, with the two clubs playing each other over 250 times.[190] From the 1910s to the late 1990s Bath and Yeovil consistently occupied the same league.[191]

The first game for which the grandstand at Twerton Park officially opened was an FA Cup-tie on November 12, 1932. Yeovil, at the time, were said to be much “much reviled” in Bath over the years. 5,345 watched Yeovil beat Bath 4-2. The paper reported that the crowd were ‘strangely silent’, with City fans stating “Losing to Yeovil always hurt”. [192] However, since the turn of the century, Yeovil and Bath moved in opposite directions across the English football pyramid, with the two clubs being as many as five divisions apart from one another during the 2013–14 season. Yeovil were promoted to the EFL Championship in 2013, and played second-tier football for the first time in their history during the 2013–14 season, at the same time, Bath were struggling in the sixth tier. Whilst Yeovil were having one of the best periods in their history, Bath were having one their worst, thus, local animosity between Bath and Yeovil dissipated.[190]

The relegation of Weymouth from the National League in 2019 means that both Weymouth and Bath now participate in the National League South as of the 2022–23 season, the last time being the 2009–10 season. Yeovil Town's decline since 2014 means that as of the 2022–23 season Bath currently sit just one tier below.[193]

In more recent years, Bath have shared a less fierce derby with Chippenham Town both based on location and league position rather than historical feud, with both clubs competing in the National League South as of the 2022–23 season.[194][195]

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FA Cup

FA Cup

The Football Association Challenge Cup, more commonly known as the FA Cup, is an annual knockout football competition in men's domestic English football. First played during the 1871–72 season, it is the oldest national football competition in the world. It is organised by and named after The Football Association. Since 2015, it has been known as The Emirates FA Cup after its headline sponsor. A concurrent Women's FA Cup has been held since 1970.

Football hooliganism

Football hooliganism

Football hooliganism, also known as soccer hooliganism, football rioting or soccer rioting, constitutes violence and other destructive behaviours perpetrated by spectators at association football events. Football hooliganism normally involves conflict between gangs, in English known as football firms, formed to intimidate and attack supporters of other teams. Other English-language terms commonly used in connection with hooligan firms include "army", "boys", "bods", "casuals", and "crew". Certain clubs have long-standing rivalries with other clubs and hooliganism associated with matches between them is likely to be more severe.

2014–15 National League 2 South

2014–15 National League 2 South

The 2014–15 National League 2 South is the sixth season of the fourth tier (south) of the English domestic rugby union competitions since the professionalised format of the second division was introduced. New teams to the division include Worthing Raiders, Dorking and Old Elthamians and Lydney. The league system is 4 points for a win, 2 points for a draw and additional bonus points being awarded for scoring 4 or more tries and/or losing within 7 points of the victorious team. In terms of promotion the league champions would go straight up into National League 1 while the runners up would have a one-game playoff against the runners up from National League 2 North for the final promotion place.

2022–23 National League South

2022–23 National League South

The 2022–23 National League South season, known as the Vanarama National League South for sponsorship reasons, will be the eighth season under English football's new title of the National League, the twentieth season consisting of three divisions, and the forty-fourth season overall.

Somerset

Somerset

Somerset is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary and the Bristol Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales. Its traditional border with Gloucestershire is the River Avon. Somerset is currently formed of six council areas, of which two are unitary authorities, until the four second-tier district councils are merged on 1 April 2023, after which the county will comprise three unitary authorities. Its county town is Taunton.

Bladud

Bladud

Bladud or Blaiddyd is a legendary king of the Britons, although there is no historical evidence for his existence. He is first mentioned in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, which describes him as the son of King Rud Hud Hudibras, and the tenth ruler in line from the first king, Brutus, saying Bladud was contemporaneous with the biblical prophet Elijah.

Bath, Somerset

Bath, Somerset

Bath is a city in the Bath and North East Somerset unitary area in the county of Somerset, England, known for and named after its Roman-built baths. At the 2021 Census, the population was 101,557. Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London and 11 miles (18 km) southeast of Bristol. The city became a World Heritage Site in 1987, and was later added to the transnational World Heritage Site known as the "Great Spa Towns of Europe" in 2021. Bath is also the largest city and settlement in Somerset.

EFL League One

EFL League One

The English Football League One is the second-highest division of the English Football League and the third tier overall in the entire English football league system.

Anglo-Italian Cup

Anglo-Italian Cup

The Anglo-Italian Cup is a defunct European football competition.

Stadio Rigamonti-Ceppi

Stadio Rigamonti-Ceppi

Stadio Rigamonti-Ceppi is a multi-use stadium in Lecco, Italy. It is currently used mostly for football matches and is the home ground of Calcio Lecco 1912. The stadium holds 4,997 people.

Non-League football

Non-League football

Non-League football describes football leagues played outside the top leagues of a country. Usually, it describes leagues which are not fully professional. The term is primarily used for football in England, where it is specifically used to describe all football played at levels below those of the Premier League and the three divisions of the English Football League. Currently, a non-League team would be any club playing in the National League or below that level. Typically, non-League clubs are either semi-professional or amateur in status, although the majority of clubs in the National League are fully professional, some of which are former EFL clubs who have suffered relegation.

EFL Championship

EFL Championship

The English Football League Championship is the highest division of the English Football League (EFL) and second-highest overall in the English football league system, after the Premier League. The league is contested by 24 clubs.

Records and statistics

The record appearance maker is Dave Mogg, who made 515 appearances in all competitions.[196] Charlie Fleming is the club's top goal scorer with 216 goals. William Hyman, Martin Paul, Paul Randall have all scored over 100 goals for the club. The highest goals scored by a single player in a season was Paul Randall in the 1989-90 season.

The highest transfer fee received by the club is £80,000 for Jason Dodd, paid by Southampton in 1989, and the highest fee paid by Bath is £16,000 for Micky Tanner signed from Bristol City in 1988.

The club's record attendance is 18,020 against Brighton & Hove Albion in the third round of the FA Cup.

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List of Bath City F.C. records and statistics

List of Bath City F.C. records and statistics

Bath City Football Club is a semi-professional Football Club based in Bath, Somerset, England. The club is affiliated with the Somerset FA and currently competes in the National League South. The club have played their home matches at Twerton Park since 1932.

Charlie Fleming

Charlie Fleming

Charles Fleming was a Scottish footballer who played for Blairhall Colliery, East Fife, Sunderland and the Scotland national team. Fleming was nicknamed 'Cannonball Charlie' for his shooting ability.

Martin Paul

Martin Paul

Martin Paul is an English former professional footballer.

Paul Randall

Paul Randall

Paul Randall is an English footballer who played in the English Football League for Bristol Rovers and Stoke City.

Transfer (association football)

Transfer (association football)

In professional football, a transfer is the action taken whenever a player under contract moves between clubs. It refers to the transferring of a player's registration from one association football club to another. In general, the players can only be transferred during a transfer window and according to the rules set by a governing body. A negotiated transfer fee is agreed financial compensation paid from an interested club, to the club that possesses the player's exclusive contracted playing rights. When a player moves from one club to another, their old contract is terminated whilst the player and their new destination club will both negotiate on new contract terms. As such, the transfer fee functions as financial compensation for the early mutually agreed termination of the contract of a professional football player. Transfer fees are contingent on the player’s current football abilities, future potential, duration of the existing contract, amount of future salary owed and the willingness of clubs to agree on an economic equilibrium through supply and demand.

Jason Dodd

Jason Dodd

Jason Robert Dodd is an English football coach and former professional footballer.

Southampton F.C.

Southampton F.C.

Southampton Football Club is an English professional football club based in Southampton, Hampshire, which competes in the Premier League. Their home ground since 2001 has been St Mary's Stadium, before which they were based at The Dell. The club play in red and white shirts. They have been nicknamed "The Saints" because of the club's beginnings as a church football team at St Mary's Church. Southampton share a long-standing South Coast derby rivalry with Portsmouth, in part due to geographic proximity and both cities' respective maritime histories.

Bristol City F.C.

Bristol City F.C.

Bristol City Football Club is a professional football club based in Bristol, England, which compete in the EFL Championship, the second tier of English football. They have played their home games at Ashton Gate since moving from St John's Lane in 1904. The club's home colours are red and white, and their nickname is The Robins—a robin featured on the club's badge from 1976 to 1994 and from 2019 onwards. Their main rivals are Bristol Rovers, with whom they contest the Bristol derby, and Cardiff City, with whom they contest the cross-border Severnside derby.

Brighton & Hove Albion F.C.

Brighton & Hove Albion F.C.

Brighton & Hove Albion Football Club, commonly referred to simply as Brighton, is an English professional football club based in the city of Brighton and Hove. They compete in the Premier League, the top tier of the English football league system. The club's home ground is the 31,800-capacity Falmer Stadium in Falmer, north east of Brighton.

FA Cup

FA Cup

The Football Association Challenge Cup, more commonly known as the FA Cup, is an annual knockout football competition in men's domestic English football. First played during the 1871–72 season, it is the oldest national football competition in the world. It is organised by and named after The Football Association. Since 2015, it has been known as The Emirates FA Cup after its headline sponsor. A concurrent Women's FA Cup has been held since 1970.

Current ownership

Community ownership

Eric Cantona at Twerton Park in 2009, in support of the club adopting a community ownership model.
Eric Cantona at Twerton Park in 2009, in support of the club adopting a community ownership model.

In the summer of 2015, "Big Bath City Bid" was launched by filmmaker and Bath fan Ken Loach, in aim to convert Bath City into a community-owned, ‘one member one vote’ club, and to clear the club of its debts.[197][198] That year, the Bid fell short of the £750,000 target set by the majority shareholders. Albeit, in September 2016, the appeal achieved the £300,000 target, and thus began its reformation to a community-owned asset.[199] The scheme received backing from around the world, including support from ex-Manchester Utd footballer, Eric Cantona.[200][201] On 5 May 2017, the club completed its transition to community ownership. The major shareholder is the “Bath City Supporters Society Ltd” with 54.6%.[202][203] However, the figures, for May 2018, showed the club operating at a loss of approximately £137,000.

Since 2017, the club has also begun altering the way it operates and has tried tapping into new revenue streams. However, the club continues to face financial difficulties; with debts totalling almost £1 million in 2018, all of which need to be repaid by 2022 at the latest.[204]

Nick Blofeld, stated; "Despite the community buy-out the Club still has substantial debts to clear and is running at an on-going loss, so we must create sustainable income streams if we are to remain at Twerton Park for long-term.[205][206] We have generated some more revenue from non-football activities, but this is limited by our current facilities, which are very dated and are no longer fit-for-purpose. We are all committed to making sure the club remains part of the Twerton community, which is why we have teamed up with Greenacre Capital to pursue plans for a partial redevelopment.[207] "But if these proposals do not happen we would not be able to improve the club's business model sufficiently to clear its debts. In this scenario we might have to sell the entire site and look for a new ground elsewhere, probably outside of the city."[208]

On 16 March 2020, the National League Board announced the suspension of all National League football until at least 3 April, due to the rapidly developing COVID-19 pandemic.[209] On 31 March, the suspension was extended indefinitely[210] and, on 22 April, all remaining league matches were cancelled.[211][212][121] Supporters donated £53,025[213] to help stopple the extra costs of participating in the playoffs.

In the 2021–22 season, the club established a livestreaming service, enabling supporters to remotely watch games played at Twerton Park.[214] On 22 January 2021, with increasing uncertainty about continued financial support for non-League member clubs, the National League Board announced that the National League South would be halted immediately for a two-week period.[215]

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Eric Cantona

Eric Cantona

Eric Daniel Pierre Cantona is a French actor, director, producer, and former professional footballer. Often regarded as one of the greatest players of his generation, Cantona is credited as having made Manchester United a dominant force in English football in the 1990s, and has legendary status at the club. A large, physically strong, hard-working, and tenacious player, Cantona combined technical skill and creativity with power and goalscoring ability. Widely occupied as a deep-lying forward, he was also capable of playing as a centre-forward, as an out-and-out striker, as an attacking midfielder, or as a central midfielder on occasion.

Twerton Park

Twerton Park

Twerton Park is a football stadium in the Twerton suburb of Bath, England. The stadium is named after the surrounding area, Twerton. The stadium has a physical capacity of 8,884, 1,066 of which are seats. It has been the home of Bath City F.C. since 1932. From 1986 to 1996 Bristol Rovers played at the ground following their departure from Eastville. From 2020 the ground also became the home stadium for Bristol City Women.

Ken Loach

Ken Loach

Kenneth Charles Loach is a British film director and screenwriter. His socially critical directing style and socialist ideals are evident in his film treatment of social issues such as poverty, homelessness, and labour rights.

Nick Blofeld

Nick Blofeld

Nick Blofeld was Managing Director of Epsom Downs Racecourse between 2007 and 2009, Chief Executive of Bath Rugby between 2009 and 2014 and is currently Group Chief Operations Officer of Bath Rugby and its associated companies, Farleigh Properties Limited and Arena 365 Limited. He is a trustee of the Bath Rugby Foundation. He is also the current Chairman of Bath City.

Twerton

Twerton

Twerton is a suburb of the city of Bath, Somerset, England, situated to the west of the city, and home to the city's football club, Bath City.

National League System

National League System

The National League System comprises the six levels of the English football league system immediately below the level of the English Football League. It comes under the jurisdiction of The Football Association. The National League System has a hierarchical format with promotion and relegation between leagues at different levels. For details of leagues above and below the National League System, see the English football league system.

COVID-19 pandemic

COVID-19 pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic, also known as the coronavirus pandemic, is an ongoing global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The novel virus was first identified in an outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December 2019. Attempts to contain it there failed, allowing the virus to spread to other areas of Asia and later worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern on 30 January 2020, and a pandemic on 11 March 2020. As of 1 February 2023, the pandemic had caused more than 670 million cases and 6.83 million confirmed deaths, making it one of the deadliest in history.

2021–22 National League

2021–22 National League

The 2021–22 National League season, known as the Vanarama National League for sponsorship reasons, was the seventh season as English football's National League, the nineteenth season consisting of three divisions, and the forty-third season overall.

Livestreaming

Livestreaming

Livestreaming is streaming media simultaneously recorded and broadcast in real-time over the internet. It is often referred to simply as streaming. Non-live media such as video-on-demand, vlogs, and YouTube videos are technically streamed, but not live-streamed.

Players

First-team squad

As of 15 October 2022[216][217][218]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK England ENG Joe Wright (on loan from Millwall)
2 DF England ENG Joe Raynes (vice-captain)
3 DF Wales WAL Danny Greenslade
4 DF England ENG Jordan Dyer
5 DF England ENG Jack Batten
6 DF England ENG Kieran Parselle (captain)
7 FW England ENG Alex Fletcher
8 MF England ENG Dan Hayfield
9 FW England ENG Cody Cooke
10 MF England ENG Tom Smith
No. Pos. Nation Player
11 MF England ENG Elliott Frear
13 GK England ENG Ryan Clarke
14 MF England ENG Chris Lines
15 MF England ENG Luke Spokes
16 MF England ENG Rex Mannings
17 FW England ENG Scott Wilson
18 MF England ENG James Morton (on loan from Bristol City)
GK England ENG Max Harris (on loan from Cheltenham Town)

Former players

Player records

Club captains

The following table shows players who have previously been selected to be club captain.[219][220] The table is in chronological order and begins from 1984 onwards:

Name Period
England Dave Palmer 1984–1990
England Chris Banks 1991–1994
England Ian Hedges 1994–1996
England Nicky Brooks 1996–1998
Scotland Colin Tower 1999–2002
England Gary Thorne 2003–2004
England Steve Jones 2003–2004
England Bobby Ford 2004–2005
England Jim Rollo 2005–2010
England Lewis Hogg 2010–2011
England Gethin Jones 2011–2013
England Andy Gallinagh 2013–2016
England Frankie Artus 2016–2017
Grenada Anthony Straker 2017–2019
England Ryan Clarke 2019–2022
England Kieran Parselle 2022–
Stan Mortensen statue outside of Blackpool's stadium
Stan Mortensen statue outside of Blackpool's stadium

Notable former players

Bath City have a long list of notable former players. During The Second World War, Stan Mortensen relocated to the south and played for the Romans 45 times, scoring 27 in the process. Notable players in recent times include the likes of; Bobby Zamora[221] and Paul Evans.[222] Notable players that have played over 100 times for the club include; Tony Book,[223] Paul Bodin,[224] Alan Skirton,[225] Ian MacFarlane[226] and Charlie Fleming.[227]

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FIFA eligibility rules

FIFA eligibility rules

As the governing body of association football, FIFA is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent. FIFA has used its authority to overturn results of competitive international matches that feature ineligible players.

Goalkeeper (association football)

Goalkeeper (association football)

The goal-keeper is a position in association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's main role is to stop the opposing team from scoring. This is accomplished by having the goalkeeper move into the trajectory of the ball to either catch it or direct it further from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are allowed to use their hands, giving them the sole rights on the field to handle the ball. The goalkeeper is indicated by wearing a different coloured kit from their teammates and opposition.

The Football Association

The Football Association

The Football Association is the governing body of association football in England and the Crown Dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man. Formed in 1863, it is the oldest football association in the world and is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the amateur and professional game in its territory.

Millwall F.C.

Millwall F.C.

Millwall Football Club is a professional football club in Bermondsey, South East London, England. They compete in the EFL Championship, the second tier of English football. Founded as Millwall Rovers in 1885, the club has retained its name despite having last played in the Millwall area of the Isle of Dogs in 1910. From then until 1993, the club played at what is now called The Old Den in New Cross, before moving to its current home stadium nearby, called The Den. The traditional club crest is a lion rampant, referred to in the team's nickname 'The Lions'. Millwall's traditional kit consists of dark blue shirts, white shorts, and blue socks.

Defender (association football)

Defender (association football)

In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield position whose primary role is to stop attacks during the game and prevent the opposition from scoring.

Captain (association football)

Captain (association football)

The team captain of an association football team, sometimes known as the skipper, is a team member chosen to be the on-pitch leader of the team; they are often one of the older or more experienced members of the squad, or a player that can heavily influence a game or has good leadership qualities. The team captain is usually identified by the wearing of an armband.

Football Association of Wales

Football Association of Wales

The Football Association of Wales is the governing body of association football and futsal in Wales, and controls the Wales national football team, its corresponding women's team, as well as the Wales national futsal team. It is a member of FIFA, UEFA and the IFAB.

Jordan Dyer

Jordan Dyer

Jordan Paul Dyer is an English professional footballer who plays as a defender for National League South club Bath City.

Kieran Parselle

Kieran Parselle

Kieran Richard Ferguson Parselle is an English professional soccer player who currently plays as a defender for Bath City.

Forward (association football)

Forward (association football)

Forwards are outfield positions in an association football team who play the furthest up the pitch and are therefore most responsible for scoring goals as well as assisting them. As with any attacking player, the role of the forward relies heavily on being able to create space for attack.

Club officials

The current manager is Jerry Gill, who was appointed in October 2017.[228] Gill previously played for the club between 1990 and 1996, making over 200 appearances.[229]

Coaching and medical staff

As of 22 June 2022[230]
Position Name
Manager England Jerry Gill[231]
Assistant Manager England Andy Watts[232]
Physiotherapist England Lee Williams[233]
Sports Scientist England Aaron Hopkinson[234]
Goalkeeping Coach England Steve Book[235]
Sports Therapist England Sarah Carr[236]
Sports Masseur England Omar El Bezra[237]
Scout England Mike Ford[238]
Kit Manager England Simon Jenkins[239]

Board of directors

As of 17 November 2022[230]
Position Name
Chairman England Nick Blofeld[240]
Football Chairman England Paul Williams[241]
Community Director England Joy Saunders[242]
Sales & Marketing Director England Jon Bickley[243]
Commercial Director England Matthew Falk[244]
Director of Operations England Shane Morgan[245]
Director England Andrew Pierce[246]
Director England John Reynolds[247]

Managerial history

From 1907 onwards, caretaker managers are not included

Years Manager
1907–1909 England Ben Hargett
1909–1921 England Charles Pinker
1921–1925 England Billy Tout
1925–1927 England Charles Pinker
1927–1938 England Ted Davis
1938–1939 Scotland Alex Raisbeck
1939–1947 England Ted Davis
1947–1950 England Vic Woodley
1950–1956 England Eddie Hapgood
1956–1957 Republic of Ireland Paddy Sloan
1957–1961 England Bob Hewison
1961–1963 England Arthur Cole
1963–1964 England Malcolm Allison
1964–1967 Wales Ivor Powell
1967–1971 England Arnold Rodgers
1971–1973 England Dave Burnside
1973–1975 England Bert Head
1975–1976 England Jack Smith
1976–1979 Wales Brian Godfrey
1979–1980 England Bob Boyd
1980–1982 England Stuart Taylor
1982–1988 England Bobby Jones
1988–1989 England Les Alderman
1989–1991 England George Rooney
1991–1996 England Tony Ricketts
1996–1998 England Steve Millard
1998–2001 Wales Paul Bodin
2001–2003 England Alan Pridham
2003–2005 England Gary Owers
2005–2008 England John Relish
2008–2012 England Adie Britton
2012–2016 Australia Lee Howells
2016–2017 England Gary Owers
2017– England Jerry Gill

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Jerry Gill

Jerry Gill

Jeremy Morley "Jerry" Gill is an English former professional footballer who is currently manager of National League South club Bath City. Despite his late entry into the professional game – he made his debut in the Football League at the age of 27 – and a career-threatening injury sustained five years later, Gill played more than 250 Football League matches, for Birmingham City, Northampton Town and Cheltenham Town, and was still playing in Football League One, the third tier of English football, three weeks after his 38th birthday. He usually played at right-back, but could play elsewhere in defence or in midfield. His various managers viewed his strengths to be his professional approach to the game and the enthusiasm and whole-hearted determination he shows on the field.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Steve Book

Steve Book

Steven Kim Book is an English former professional football goalkeeper who is currently employed as the goalkeeping coach at Cheltenham Town.

Nick Blofeld

Nick Blofeld

Nick Blofeld was Managing Director of Epsom Downs Racecourse between 2007 and 2009, Chief Executive of Bath Rugby between 2009 and 2014 and is currently Group Chief Operations Officer of Bath Rugby and its associated companies, Farleigh Properties Limited and Arena 365 Limited. He is a trustee of the Bath Rugby Foundation. He is also the current Chairman of Bath City.

Honours

In terms of the significance and prestige of trophies won, Bath are the second most successful club that currently play in the National League South, after Kent club, Dartford. Bath's first competitive trophy was The Somerset Premier Cup in 1929. In 1930, the club won its first League title, The Southern League Western Section, (acting as the fourth division at the time). In terms of the grandeur and number of trophies won, Bath's most successful decade was the 1930s, in which the club won two league titles and three Somerset cups.

In total, Bath have won two Southern League Western Section titles – 1929–30, 1930–33, two Southern League titles – 1959–60, 1977–78, one Southern Football League title – 2006–07, one Southern League Cup, one non league championship trophy, one Football League North1943–44 and twenty two Somerset Premier Cups. In total Bath have won four ‘major’ non-League trophies, and twenty seven overall.[35]

Domestic

League

Cups

European

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List of Bath City F.C. seasons

List of Bath City F.C. seasons

This is a list of seasons played by Bath City Football Club in English football, from the year they first turned competitive in 1908 in the Western League, to the present day.

National League South

National League South

The National League South, formerly Conference South, is one of the second divisions of the National League in England, immediately below the top division National League. Along with National League North, it is in the second level of the National League System, and is the sixth tier overall of the English football league system.

Kent

Kent

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west, and Essex to the north across the estuary of the River Thames; it faces the French department of Pas-de-Calais across the Strait of Dover. The county town is Maidstone. It is the fifth most populous county in England, the most populous non-Metropolitan county and the most populous of the home counties.

Dartford F.C.

Dartford F.C.

Dartford Football Club is a semi-professional association football club based in Dartford, Kent, England. As of the 2021–22 season, the club participates in the National League South, the sixth tier of English football.

1929–30 in English football

1929–30 in English football

The 1929–30 season was the 55th season of competitive football in England.

1932–33 in English football

1932–33 in English football

The 1932–33 season was the 58th season of competitive football in England. For the second time in three seasons, Arsenal were crowned league champions, building on a start of just one defeat in the first fourteen games. They clinched the crown with a 3–1 win at Chelsea in April 1933. Meanwhile, Stoke City ended their nine-year wait for top flight promotion by attaining First Division status after winning an impressive 56 points over the campaign. Hull City and Brentford were also promoted. Everton won their second FA Cup defeating Manchester City 3–0 in the final. Lower league Walsall provided the surprise by knocking out Arsenal in an earlier round.

1959–60 in English football

1959–60 in English football

The 1959–60 season was the 80th season of competitive football in England.

1977–78 in English football

1977–78 in English football

The 1977–78 season was the 98th season of competitive football in England.

2006–07 in English football

2006–07 in English football

The 2006–07 season was the 127th season of competitive association football in England.

Football League North and South

Football League North and South

The Football League North and Football League South divisions of the Football League were created temporarily for the League to continue through the Second World War while limiting the amount of movement that was required by teams. The leagues started in 1940; however there was only one full season, in 1945–46. Previous seasons were, in a sense, bit-part leagues with clubs only playing teams that were generally local. An example of this is that in the 1942 Football League North Leeds United played Middlesbrough, Gateshead, Newcastle United, Doncaster Rovers, Sunderland, Bradford Park Avenue, York City, Halifax Town and Huddersfield Town, which they played Home and Away in succession.

1943–44 in English football

1943–44 in English football

The 1943–44 season was the fifth season of special wartime football in England during the Second World War.

1929–30 Southern Football League

1929–30 Southern Football League

The 1929–30 season was the 32nd in the history of the Southern League. The league consisted of Eastern and Western Divisions. Aldershot Town won the Eastern Division and Bath City won the Western Division. Aldershot were declared Southern League champions after winning a championship play-off 4–2.

Source: "Bath City F.C.", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_City_F.C..

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See also
Affiliated clubs
Notes
  1. ^ From 1920 to 1958, the top division of non-League football was The Southern League; though not formally recognised as a single tier, the league acted as the fourth tier being only one division below the Football League Third Division, however automatic promotion from non-League to The Football League was not put in place until 1987.
  2. ^ In 1958, The Football League Fourth Division was created, as a result, the Southern league was essentially moved down a tier, from hosting level four to levels five and six. From 1958 to 1980, the top/best division of non-League football was indeed the Southern league, which was the fifth tier being only one division below the Football League Fourth Division, though automatic promotion from non-League to The Football League was not put in place until 1987.
  3. ^ Between 1939 and 1945, all competitive football in England was cancelled, however a temporary war time league was formed, named the; Football League North and South Division which Bath won in 1944.
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