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Ballyragget

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Ballyragget
Béal Átha Ragad
Town
The 15th century Ballyragget Castle overlooks the town
The 15th century Ballyragget Castle overlooks the town
Ballyragget is located in Ireland
Ballyragget
Ballyragget
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 52°47′00″N 7°20′00″W / 52.783333°N 7.333333°W / 52.783333; -7.333333Coordinates: 52°47′00″N 7°20′00″W / 52.783333°N 7.333333°W / 52.783333; -7.333333
CountryIreland
ProvinceLeinster
CountyCounty Kilkenny
Population
 (2016)[1]
1,082
Time zoneUTC+0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-1 (IST (WEST))

Ballyragget (Irish: Béal Átha Ragad, meaning 'Mouth of Ragget's Ford')[2] is a small town on the river Nore in the north of County Kilkenny in Ireland. Ballyragget is on the N77 18 km (11 mi) north of Kilkenny. As of the 2016 census, it had a population of 1,082 people.[1]

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Irish language

Irish language

Irish [ˈɡeːlʲɟə], also known as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family. Irish is indigenous to the island of Ireland and was the population's first language until the 19th century, when English gradually became dominant, particularly in the last decades of the century. Irish is still spoken as a first language in a small number of areas of certain counties such as Cork, Donegal, Galway, and Kerry, as well as smaller areas of counties Mayo, Meath, and Waterford. It is also spoken by a larger group of habitual but non-traditional speakers, mostly in urban areas where the majority are second-language speakers. Daily users in Ireland outside the education system number around 73,000 (1.5%), and the total number of persons who claimed they could speak Irish in April 2016 was 1,761,420, representing 39.8% of respondents.

River Nore

River Nore

The River Nore is one of the principal rivers in the South-East Region of Ireland. The 140-kilometre-long (87 mi) river drains approximately 2,530 square kilometres (977 sq mi) of Leinster and Munster, that encompasses parts of three counties. Along with the River Suir and River Barrow, it is one of the constituent rivers of the group known as the Three Sisters.

County Kilkenny

County Kilkenny

County Kilkenny is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the South-East Region. It is named after the city of Kilkenny. Kilkenny County Council is the local authority for the county. As of the 2022 census the population of the county was just over 100,000. The county was based on the historic Gaelic kingdom of Ossory (Osraighe), which was coterminous with the Diocese of Ossory.

Kilkenny

Kilkenny

Kilkenny is a city in County Kilkenny, Ireland. It is located in the South-East Region and in the province of Leinster. It is built on both banks of the River Nore. The 2016 census gave the total population of Kilkenny as 26,512.

2016 census of Ireland

2016 census of Ireland

The 2016 census of Ireland was held on Sunday, 24 April 2016. It was organised by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and reported a total population of 4,761,865, or a 3.8% increase since the prior 2011 census. This was the lowest recorded population growth rate since the 1991 census, with the decline in population growth rates attributed to both lower birth rates and lower net migration. The census results were released gradually between April and December 2017 in a series of reports organised either as summaries or in-depth results of specific themes, like age, ethnicity, or religion.

Toponymy

The name 'Ragget' is Anglo-Norman in origin, and denotes a once-prominent Norman landowner Richard le Ragget who held these lands in the early part of the 13th century.

Older names of the settlement include Donoughmore (or Donaghmore; Irish: Domhnach Mór "large church") and the even more ancient Tullabarry (Irish: Tualach Bare) - the name of a Celtic or possibly pre-Celtic tribe which held their seat in the vicinity. There is some debate as to the meaning of Donoughmore. The very first issue of the Journal of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society (January 1948), which has an article about Ballyragget and its environs, states a belief that Domhnach Mór means "big Sunday" and relates to the fact that thousands of people congregated at the now ruined church in Donoughmore for its opening on a Sunday and the name stuck.[3]

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Anglo-Normans

Anglo-Normans

The Anglo-Normans were the medieval ruling class in England, composed mainly of a combination of ethnic Normans, French, Anglo-Saxons, Flemings and Bretons, following the Norman conquest. A small number of Normans had earlier befriended future Anglo-Saxon king of England, Edward the Confessor, during his exile in his mother's homeland of Normandy in northern France. When he returned to England some of them went with him, and so there were Normans already settled in England prior to the conquest. Edward's successor, Harold Godwinson, was defeated by Duke William the Conqueror of Normandy at the Battle of Hastings, leading to William's accession to the English throne.

Normans

Normans

The Normans were a population arising in the medieval Duchy of Normandy from the intermingling between Norse Viking settlers and indigenous West Franks and Gallo-Romans. The term is also used to denote emigrants from the duchy who conquered other territories such as England and Sicily. The Norse settlements in West Francia followed a series of raids on the French northern coast mainly from Denmark, although some also sailed from Norway and Sweden. These settlements were finally legitimized when Rollo, a Scandinavian Viking leader, agreed to swear fealty to King Charles III of West Francia following the siege of Chartres in 911. The intermingling in Normandy produced an ethnic and cultural "Norman" identity in the first half of the 10th century, an identity which continued to evolve over the centuries.

Human settlement

Human settlement

In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people live. The complexity of a settlement can range from a minuscule number of dwellings grouped together to the largest of cities with surrounding urbanized areas. Settlements may include hamlets, villages, towns and cities. A settlement may have known historical properties such as the date or era in which it was first settled, or first settled by particular people.

Irish language

Irish language

Irish [ˈɡeːlʲɟə], also known as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family. Irish is indigenous to the island of Ireland and was the population's first language until the 19th century, when English gradually became dominant, particularly in the last decades of the century. Irish is still spoken as a first language in a small number of areas of certain counties such as Cork, Donegal, Galway, and Kerry, as well as smaller areas of counties Mayo, Meath, and Waterford. It is also spoken by a larger group of habitual but non-traditional speakers, mostly in urban areas where the majority are second-language speakers. Daily users in Ireland outside the education system number around 73,000 (1.5%), and the total number of persons who claimed they could speak Irish in April 2016 was 1,761,420, representing 39.8% of respondents.

History

The settlement of Ballyragget originally formed at a fording-point on the River Nore at this location.[4] Originally named after the 13th century Anglo-Norman landowner Richard le Ragget, Ballyragget was later held by Mountgarret family.[4] The town is dominated by a large medieval keep (known as Ballyragget Castle) and its adjoining walls. This tower dates to the late 15th century, and contains a late 16th century inscribed stone which commemorates Edmund Butler, 2nd Viscount Mountgarret.[4]

Much of the town streetscape was laid out around the town's square in the mid-17th century.[4] A large mid 19th-century Catholic church sits on a rise overlooking the town's central square.[5]

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Ford (crossing)

Ford (crossing)

A ford is a shallow place with good footing where a river or stream may be crossed by wading, or inside a vehicle getting its wheels wet. A ford may occur naturally or be constructed. Fords may be impassable during high water. A low water crossing is a low bridge that allows crossing over a river or stream when water is low but may be treated as a ford when the river is high and water covers the crossing.

River Nore

River Nore

The River Nore is one of the principal rivers in the South-East Region of Ireland. The 140-kilometre-long (87 mi) river drains approximately 2,530 square kilometres (977 sq mi) of Leinster and Munster, that encompasses parts of three counties. Along with the River Suir and River Barrow, it is one of the constituent rivers of the group known as the Three Sisters.

Viscount Mountgarret

Viscount Mountgarret

Viscount Mountgarret is a title in the Peerage of Ireland.

Edmund Butler, 2nd Viscount Mountgarret

Edmund Butler, 2nd Viscount Mountgarret

Edmund Butler, 2nd Viscount Mountgarret, was the son of Richard Butler, 1st Viscount Mountgarret and Eleanor Butler.

Catholic Church

Catholic Church

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2019. As the world's oldest and largest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church consists of 24 sui iuris churches, including the Latin Church and 23 Eastern Catholic Churches, which comprise almost 3,500 dioceses and eparchies located around the world. The pope, who is the bishop of Rome, is the chief pastor of the church. The bishopric of Rome, known as the Holy See, is the central governing authority of the church. The administrative body of the Holy See, the Roman Curia, has its principal offices in Vatican City, a small enclave of the Italian city of Rome, of which the pope is head of state.

Geography

The River Nore flows beside the town, which nestles in a wide alluvial valley between the Attanagh Plateau and several hills to the east, including 'Knockmannon' and 'The Balla boys'. The Nore passes by one of the most significant ancient sites in North Kilkenny 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) south of Ballyragget at Rathbeagh. The statistical Ballyragget Geographical Area is recorded by the CSO as containing 26.67 square kilometres (10.30 sq mi).

To the north lies the town of Durrow in County Laois, to the south the River Nore flows on towards Kilkenny City.

The town is located in the townland of the same name which is in the civil parish of Donoghmore in the ancient barony of Fassadinin.[6]

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River Nore

River Nore

The River Nore is one of the principal rivers in the South-East Region of Ireland. The 140-kilometre-long (87 mi) river drains approximately 2,530 square kilometres (977 sq mi) of Leinster and Munster, that encompasses parts of three counties. Along with the River Suir and River Barrow, it is one of the constituent rivers of the group known as the Three Sisters.

Rathbeagh

Rathbeagh

Rathbeagh is a hill on the River Nore in the parish of Lisdowney Parish near Ballyragget, County Kilkenny, Ireland. According to Irish tradition, the Rath is the burial place of Heremon, son of the Celtic Taoiseach Milesius.

Durrow, County Laois

Durrow, County Laois

Durrow is a village located in south-east County Laois, Ireland. Bypassed by the M8 motorway on 28 May 2010, the village is located on the R639 road at its junction with the N77. The River Erkina flows through Durrow and joins the River Nore about 1.5 km east of the village.

County Laois

County Laois

County Laois is a county in Ireland. It is part of the Eastern and Midland Region and in the province of Leinster. It was known as Queen's County from 1556 to 1922. The modern county takes its name from Loígis, a medieval kingdom. Historically, it has also been known as County Leix.

Kilkenny

Kilkenny

Kilkenny is a city in County Kilkenny, Ireland. It is located in the South-East Region and in the province of Leinster. It is built on both banks of the River Nore. The 2016 census gave the total population of Kilkenny as 26,512.

Townland

Townland

A townland is a small geographical division of land, historically and currently used in Ireland and in the Western Isles in Scotland, typically covering 100–500 acres (40–202 ha). The townland system is of Gaelic origin, pre-dating the Norman invasion, and most have names of Irish origin. However, some townland names and boundaries come from Norman manors, plantation divisions, or later creations of the Ordnance Survey. The total number of inhabited townlands in Ireland was 60,679 in 1911. The total number recognised by the Irish Place Names database as of 2014 was 61,098, including uninhabited townlands, mainly small islands.

Civil parishes in Ireland

Civil parishes in Ireland

Civil parishes are units of territory in the island of Ireland that have their origins in old Gaelic territorial divisions. They were adopted by the Anglo-Norman Lordship of Ireland and then by the Elizabethan Kingdom of Ireland, and were formalised as land divisions at the time of the Plantations of Ireland. They no longer correspond to the boundaries of Roman Catholic or Church of Ireland parishes, which are generally larger. Their use as administrative units was gradually replaced by Poor Law Divisions in the 19th century, although they were not formally abolished. Today they are still sometimes used for legal purposes, such as to locate property in deeds of property registered between 1833 and 1946.

Barony (Ireland)

Barony (Ireland)

In Ireland, a barony is a historical subdivision of a county, analogous to the hundreds into which the counties of England were divided. Baronies were created during the Tudor reconquest of Ireland, replacing the earlier cantreds formed after the original Norman invasion. Some early baronies were later subdivided into half baronies with the same standing as full baronies.

Fassadinin

Fassadinin

Fassadinin, sometimes written Fassadining, is a barony in the north of County Kilkenny, Ireland. It is one of 12 baronies in County Kilkenny. The size of the barony is 276.2 square kilometres (106.6 sq mi). There are 19 civil parishes in Fassadinin. The chief town today is Castlecomer. The N78 Kilkenny/Athy road bisects the barony. Fassadinin is currently administered by Kilkenny County Council.

Demographics

Central Statistics Office reports indicate that Ballyragget's population increased by over 30% in the 20 years between the 1996 census and the 2016 census of Ireland, from 803 to 1,082 inhabitants.[1][7]

The electoral division which surrounds the town had a population of 1,451 in the 2006 census.

The majority of residents in Ballyragget are nominally Roman Catholic, although there are minority Protestant and non-religious populations.[1]

The Square, Ballyragget
The Square, Ballyragget

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Central Statistics Office (Ireland)

Central Statistics Office (Ireland)

The Central Statistics Office is the statistical agency responsible for the gathering of "information relating to economic, social and general activities and conditions" in Ireland, in particular the National Census which is held every five years. The office is answerable to the Taoiseach and has its main offices in Cork.The Director General of the CSO is Pádraig Dalton.

2016 census of Ireland

2016 census of Ireland

The 2016 census of Ireland was held on Sunday, 24 April 2016. It was organised by the Central Statistics Office (CSO) and reported a total population of 4,761,865, or a 3.8% increase since the prior 2011 census. This was the lowest recorded population growth rate since the 1991 census, with the decline in population growth rates attributed to both lower birth rates and lower net migration. The census results were released gradually between April and December 2017 in a series of reports organised either as summaries or in-depth results of specific themes, like age, ethnicity, or religion.

Electoral division (Ireland)

Electoral division (Ireland)

An electoral division is a legally defined administrative area in the Republic of Ireland, generally comprising multiple townlands, and formerly a subdivision of urban and rural districts. Until 1996, EDs were known as district electoral divisions in the 29 county council areas and wards in the five county boroughs. Until 1972, DEDs also existed in Northern Ireland. The predecessor poor law electoral divisions were introduced throughout the island of Ireland in the 1830s. The divisions were used as local-government electoral areas until 1919 in what is now the Republic and until 1972 in Northern Ireland.

Economy

Agriculture and the agri-food industry are the largest employers, with the large Glanbia factory across the river dominating the town's industry for the past forty years. The plant at Ballyragget is the largest multi-purpose integrated dairy plant in Europe, and Glanbia plc can trace its roots to the Avonmore co-operative founded in Ballyragget in the 1960s.

A percentage of the area's residents commute to work (or education) some distance from the town.[1]

Politics

At national level, Ballyragget, as part of the Carlow–Kilkenny constituency, is represented by five Teachtaí Dála in Dáil Éireann.

At a local level, the town is within the administrative area of Kilkenny County Council.[8]

Ballyragget is also a local electoral area of County Kilkenny and includes the electoral divisions of Attanagh, Balleen, Ballyconra, Ballyragget, Baunmore, Castlecomer, Clogh, Clogharinka, Clomantagh, Coolcraheen, Freshford, Galmoy, Glashare, Johnstown, Kilkieran, Kilmacar, Lisdowney, Moneenroe, Mothell, Muckalee, Odagh, Rathbeagh, Rathcoole, Rathealy, Tiscoffin, Tubbridbrittain and Urlingford.[9]

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Carlow–Kilkenny (Dáil constituency)

Carlow–Kilkenny (Dáil constituency)

Carlow–Kilkenny is a parliamentary constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Irish parliament or Oireachtas. The constituency elects 5 deputies on the system of proportional representation by means of the single transferable vote (PR-STV).

Teachta Dála

Teachta Dála

A Teachta Dála, abbreviated as TD, is a member of Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Oireachtas. It is the equivalent of terms such as Member of Parliament (MP) or Member of Congress used in other countries. The official translation of the term is "Deputy to the Dáil", although a more literal translation is "Assembly Delegate".

Dáil Éireann

Dáil Éireann

Dáil Éireann is the lower house, and principal chamber, of the Oireachtas, which also includes the President of Ireland and Seanad Éireann. It consists of 160 members, each known as a Teachta Dála. TDs represent 39 constituencies and are directly elected for terms not exceeding five years, on the system of proportional representation by means of the single transferable vote (PR-STV). Its powers are similar to those of lower houses under many other bicameral parliamentary systems and it is by far the dominant branch of the Oireachtas. Subject to the limits imposed by the Constitution of Ireland, it has power to pass any law it wishes, and to nominate and remove the Taoiseach. Since 1922, it has met in Leinster House in Dublin.

Kilkenny County Council

Kilkenny County Council

Kilkenny County Council is the authority responsible for local government in County Kilkenny, Ireland. As a county council, it is governed by the Local Government Act 2001. The council is responsible for housing and community, roads and transportation, urban planning and development, amenity and culture, and environment. The council has 24 elected members. Elections are held every five years and are by single transferable vote. The head of the council has the title of Cathaoirleach (Chairperson). The county administration is headed by a Chief Executive, Colette Byrne. The county town is Kilkenny city.

Local electoral area

Local electoral area

A local electoral area is an electoral area for elections to local authorities in Ireland. All elections use the single transferable vote. The Republic of Ireland is divided into 166 LEAs, with an average population of 28,700 and average area of 423.3 square kilometres (163.4 sq mi). The boundaries of LEAs are defined by statutory instrument, usually based lower-level units called electoral divisions (EDs), with a total of 3,440 EDs in the state.

Electoral division (Ireland)

Electoral division (Ireland)

An electoral division is a legally defined administrative area in the Republic of Ireland, generally comprising multiple townlands, and formerly a subdivision of urban and rural districts. Until 1996, EDs were known as district electoral divisions in the 29 county council areas and wards in the five county boroughs. Until 1972, DEDs also existed in Northern Ireland. The predecessor poor law electoral divisions were introduced throughout the island of Ireland in the 1830s. The divisions were used as local-government electoral areas until 1919 in what is now the Republic and until 1972 in Northern Ireland.

People

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Mabel Cahill

Mabel Cahill

Mabel Esmonde Cahill was an Irish female tennis player, active in the late 19th century, and was the first foreign woman to win a major tennis tournament when she won the 1891 US National Championships.

Tennis

Tennis

Tennis is a racket sport that is played either individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to manoeuvre the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball validly will not gain a point, while the opposite player will.

Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary

Patrick Neary was Financial Regulator at the time of Ireland's financial crash. At a public appearance before the country's Banking Inquiry in 2015, he admitted it was a mistake to print golf balls featuring the Regulator's logo. He also confirmed he told Taoiseach Brian Cowen, that all the country's banks were solvent on the night of 29 September 2008, when those same banks were guaranteed by the country's politicians. Economist David McWilliams has described Neary as "the worst financial regulator the world has ever seen."

Financial Regulator

Financial Regulator

The Financial Regulator, officially the Irish Financial Services Regulatory Authority, was the single regulator of all financial institutions in Ireland from May 2003 until October 2010 and was a "constituent part" of the Central Bank of Ireland. It was re-unified with the Central Bank of Ireland on 1 October 2010 and its board structure was replaced by a new Central Bank of Ireland Commission.

Anglo Irish Bank

Anglo Irish Bank

Anglo Irish Bank was an Irish bank headquartered in Dublin from 1964 to 2011. It began to wind down after nationalisation in 2009. In July 2011 Anglo Irish merged with the Irish Nationwide Building Society, forming a new company named the Irish Bank Resolution Corporation. Michael Noonan, the Minister for Finance stated that the name change was important in order to remove "the negative international references associated with the appalling failings of both institutions and their previous managements".

Source: "Ballyragget", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballyragget.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d e "Sapmap Area - Settlements - Ballyragget". Census 2016. Central Statistics Office. April 2016. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  2. ^ "Béal Átha Ragad / Ballyragget". logainm.ie. Irish Placenames Commission. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Old Kilkenny Review". Journal of the Kilkenny Archaeological Society (1). January 1948.
  4. ^ a b c d Ballyragget Local Area Plan 2004 (PDF). kilkennycoco.ie (Report). Kilkenny County Council. p. 2.
  5. ^ "Saint Patrick's Catholic Church, Ballyragget, County Kilkenny (1842)". buildingsofireland.ie. National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  6. ^ "Townland of Ballyragget (Béal Átha Ragad)". Irish Placenames Commission. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  7. ^ "Ballyragget (Ireland) Census Town". citypopulation.de. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Ballyragget Local Area Plan". kilkennycoco.ie. Kilkenny County Council. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  9. ^ "County of Kilkenny Local Electoral Areas Order 2008". Act of the Oireachtas. Retrieved 14 January 2020.
  10. ^ O'Callaghan, Eoin. "The Mystery and Tragedy of Mabel Cahill". The 42. Retrieved 13 November 2019.
  11. ^ "Eyes on watchdog". Irish Independent. 16 August 2008.
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