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Ballincollig

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Ballincollig
Baile an Chollaigh
Town
Ballincollig Castle
Ballincollig Castle
Ballincollig is located in Ireland
Ballincollig
Ballincollig
Location in Ireland
Coordinates: 51°53′16.54″N 8°35′21.44″W / 51.8879278°N 8.5892889°W / 51.8879278; -8.5892889Coordinates: 51°53′16.54″N 8°35′21.44″W / 51.8879278°N 8.5892889°W / 51.8879278; -8.5892889
CountryIreland
ProvinceMunster
CountyCork
Government
 • TypeCork City Council
 • Dáil ÉireannCork North-West
 • European ParliamentSouth
Elevation
70 ft (20 m)
Population
 (2016)[1][2]
18,621
Time zoneUTC±0 (WET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (IST)
Eircode routing key
P31
Telephone area code+353(0)21
Irish Grid ReferenceW595708
Websiteballincollig.ie
Map of Ballincollig
Map of Ballincollig

Ballincollig (Irish: Baile an Chollaigh)[8] is a suburban town within the administrative area of Cork city in Ireland. It is located on the western side of Cork city, beside the River Lee on the R608 regional road. In 2016 it was the largest town in County Cork, at which time the Ballincollig Electoral Division had a population of 18,621 people.[1] It is located beyond the green belt from the suburbs of Bishopstown and Wilton. Historically home to the Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills which is now a Regional Park, the town has seen much growth in recent years as a satellite of Cork City. Ballincollig is within the Cork North-West Dáil constituency.

Main street Ballincollig
Main street Ballincollig

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Irish language

Irish language

Irish [ˈɡeːlʲɟə], also known as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family. Irish is indigenous to the island of Ireland and was the population's first language until the 19th century, when English gradually became dominant, particularly in the last decades of the century. Irish is still spoken as a first language in a small number of areas of certain counties such as Cork, Donegal, Galway, and Kerry, as well as smaller areas of counties Mayo, Meath, and Waterford. It is also spoken by a larger group of habitual but non-traditional speakers, mostly in urban areas where the majority are second-language speakers. Daily users in Ireland outside the education system number around 73,000 (1.5%), and the total number of persons who claimed they could speak Irish in April 2016 was 1,761,420, representing 39.8% of respondents.

Suburb

Suburb

A suburb is an area within a metropolitan area, which may include commercial and mixed-use, that is primarily a residential area. A suburb can exist either as part of a larger city/urban area or as a separate political entity. The name describes an area which is not as densely populated as an inner city, yet more densely populated than a rural area in the countryside. In many metropolitan areas, suburbs exist as separate residential communities within commuting distance of a city Suburbs can have their own political or legal jurisdiction, especially in the United States, but this is not always the case, especially in the United Kingdom, where most suburbs are located within the administrative boundaries of cities. In most English-speaking countries, suburban areas are defined in contrast to central or inner city areas, but in Australian English and South African English, suburb has become largely synonymous with what is called a "neighborhood" in other countries, and the term encompasses inner city areas.

Cork (city)

Cork (city)

Cork is the second largest city in Ireland and third largest city by population on the island of Ireland. It is located in the south-west of Ireland, in the province of Munster. Following an extension to the city's boundary in 2019, its population is over 222,000.

Republic of Ireland

Republic of Ireland

Ireland, also known as the Republic of Ireland, is a country in north-western Europe consisting of 26 of the 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, on the eastern side of the island. Around 2.1 million of the country's population of 5.13 million people resides in the Greater Dublin Area. The sovereign state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, St George's Channel to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east. It is a unitary, parliamentary republic. The legislature, the Oireachtas, consists of a lower house, Dáil Éireann; an upper house, Seanad Éireann; and an elected President who serves as the largely ceremonial head of state, but with some important powers and duties. The head of government is the Taoiseach, who is elected by the Dáil and appointed by the President; the Taoiseach in turn appoints other government ministers.

County Cork

County Cork

County Cork is the largest and the southernmost county of Ireland, named after the city of Cork, the state's second-largest city. It is in the province of Munster and the Southern Region. Its largest market towns are Mallow, Macroom, Midleton, and Skibbereen. As of 2022 the county had a population of 581,231, making it the third-most populous county in Ireland. Cork County Council is the local authority for the county, while Cork City Council governs the city of Cork and its environs. Notable Corkonians include Michael Collins, Jack Lynch, Roy Keane, Sonia O'Sullivan and Cillian Murphy.

Green belt

Green belt

A green belt is a policy and land-use zone designation used in land-use planning to retain areas of largely undeveloped, wild, or agricultural land surrounding or neighboring urban areas. Similar concepts are greenways or green wedges, which have a linear character and may run through an urban area instead of around it. In essence, a green belt is an invisible line designating a border around a certain area, preventing development of the area and allowing wildlife to return and be established.

Bishopstown

Bishopstown

Bishopstown is located in the civil parish of St. Finbar's, Barony of Cork, County Cork, Ireland. It is a southwestern suburb of Cork and is made-up of the townlands of Ballineaspigbeg and Ballineaspigmore. It is near the town of Ballincollig, a satellite of Cork City, and is home to a number of schools and colleges,

Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

The Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills was one of three Royal gunpowder mills that manufactured gunpowder for the British Government. Located in Ballincollig, Cork city, Ireland, largely in what is now the Ballincollig Regional Park, the powder mills were originally opened in 1794 as a private enterprise, before being taken over by the British Government during the Napoleonic Wars.

Cork North-West (Dáil constituency)

Cork North-West (Dáil constituency)

Cork North-West is a parliamentary constituency represented in Dáil Éireann, the lower house of the Irish parliament or Oireachtas. The constituency elects 3 deputies on the system of proportional representation by means of the single transferable vote (PR-STV).

History

Originally known as Maghmakeer as early as the 14th century, the town eventually came to be known after the Coll (or Cole) family who built Ballincollig Castle during the reign of Edward III, before selling it to the Barrett family in either 1468 or 1469.[9][10] The castle was taken from Andrew Barrett by rebels in 1641, but they were expelled by English Parliamentary forces under Murrough O'Brien, Earl Inchiquinn, in 1645. It was garrisoned for James II in 1689, during the Williamite war in Ireland, then remained unoccupied after his defeat, and fell into decay.

The Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills were opened in 1794 by Charles Henry Leslie, a prominent Cork businessman. Eleven years later, the mills were bought by the British, who were preparing for war with Napoleon, and the barracks were built to protect the supply of gunpowder. It was one of the largest gunpowder mills in the British Isles. In 1837, the mill employed several hundred workers, and by 1880, Ballincollig was one of the largest industrial establishments in Cork, with the mill employing many men and boys from the area.

With the closure of the Gunpowder Mills in the early 1900s, Ballincollig became little more than a small village on the road from Cork city to the larger market town of Macroom. The 3rd Royal Munster Fusiliers (Reserve) Battalion were stationed there during the Great War. Other Regiments stationed in the Barracks before it was decommissioned were 1st Field Artillery Regiment and 8th Field Artillery Regiment (FCÁ). The recently decommissioned Murphy Barracks was a major source of employment. In the 1970s, Ballincollig developed as much more of a satellite town, with many housing developments constructed around the old village, and housing people who worked in Cork city or its suburbs. This expansion continued through the late 80s and 90s. Consequently, the town's population has risen dramatically, particularly with the westward expansion of the town and Ballincollig grew to be largest town in the county.

In 2019, as part of the boundary expansion of Cork City, Ballincollig was brought within the administrative area of Cork City Council.[11]

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Ballincollig Castle

Ballincollig Castle

Ballincollig Castle is a Norman castle to the south of the town of Ballincollig, County Cork, Ireland built after the Norman invasion of Ireland. In its prime, the castle was inhabited by the Barrett family, who had control of the local area. The castle still stands today, albeit largely in ruin. The original keep still remains, as does most of the curtain wall and two towers.

Edward III of England

Edward III of England

Edward III, also known as Edward of Windsor before his accession, was King of England and Lord of Ireland from January 1327 until his death in 1377. He is noted for his military success and for restoring royal authority after the disastrous and unorthodox reign of his father, Edward II. Edward III transformed the Kingdom of England into one of the most formidable military powers in Europe. His fifty-year reign was one of the longest in English history, and saw vital developments in legislation and government, in particular the evolution of the English Parliament, as well as the ravages of the Black Death. He outlived his eldest son, Edward the Black Prince, and the throne passed to his grandson, Richard II.

Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin

Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin

Murrough MacDermod O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin and sixth Baron Inchiquin,, was an Irish nobleman and soldier, who came from one of the most powerful families in Munster. Known as "Murchadh na dTóiteán" he studied war in the Spanish service. He accompanied the Earl of Strafford into Leinster on the outbreak of the Irish Rebellion of 1641 and was appointed governor of Munster in 1642. He had some small success, but was hampered by lack of funds and he was outwitted the Irish leader, Viscount Muskerry, at Cappoquin and Lismore. His forces dispersed at the truce of 1643.

James II of England

James II of England

James II and VII was King of England and Ireland as James II, and King of Scotland as James VII from the death of his elder brother, Charles II, on 6 February 1685. He was deposed in the Glorious Revolution of 1688. He was the last Catholic monarch of England, Scotland, and Ireland. His reign is now remembered primarily for conflicts over religious tolerance, but it also involved struggles over the principles of absolutism and the divine right of kings. His deposition ended a century of political and civil strife in England by confirming the primacy of the English Parliament over the Crown.

Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

The Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills was one of three Royal gunpowder mills that manufactured gunpowder for the British Government. Located in Ballincollig, Cork city, Ireland, largely in what is now the Ballincollig Regional Park, the powder mills were originally opened in 1794 as a private enterprise, before being taken over by the British Government during the Napoleonic Wars.

Napoleonic Wars

Napoleonic Wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major global conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European states formed into various coalitions. It produced a period of French domination over most of continental Europe. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and the French Revolutionary Wars consisting of the War of the First Coalition (1792–1797) and the War of the Second Coalition (1798–1802). The Napoleonic Wars are often described as five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1803–1806), the Fourth (1806–1807), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813–1814), and the Seventh (1815) plus the Peninsular War (1807–1814) and the French invasion of Russia (1812).

British Isles

British Isles

The British Isles are a group of islands in the North Atlantic Ocean off the north-western coast of continental Europe, consisting of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Inner and Outer Hebrides, the Northern Isles, and over six thousand smaller islands. They have a total area of 315,159 km2 (121,684 sq mi) and a combined population of almost 72 million, and include two sovereign states, the Republic of Ireland, and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The Channel Islands, off the north coast of France, are sometimes taken to be part of the British Isles, even though they do not form part of the archipelago.

Royal Munster Fusiliers (Reserves)

Royal Munster Fusiliers (Reserves)

The Royal Munster Fusiliers held the 'home' Depot for their three Reserve Battalions at Ballymullen Barracks, Tralee, County Kerry, Ireland, where since 1881 most of the regiment's recruits enlisted in peacetime and received their first training before being assigned to regular battalions stationed around the UK and Ireland. Regular officers and N.C.O.s also provided instruction for part-time special reserve battalions during their annual training camps and other special courses during the year.

2019 Cork boundary change

2019 Cork boundary change

The boundary between Cork city and County Cork, under the local jurisdiction of Cork City Council and Cork County Council respectively, was changed in mid 2019 when the Local Government Act 2018 came into force after the 2019 local elections, with the city area quadrupling in size. Its implementation followed the Cork Local Government Review, a 2015 review by the Cork Local Government Committee which recommended merging the two councils into a single "super-council". The recommendation was unpopular within the city and in 2017, after a review, it was dropped in favour of extending the city boundary into territory of the county. This alternative was not approved by county council, which meant the Fine Gael-led government was obliged to pass an Act of the Oireachtas to effect it.

Religion

Two Catholic churches are located in the town. The modern 'Church of Christ Our Light' (designed by a local architectural firm) is located on the west side of the town, while the old 'Church of St Mary and St John' is located near the centre of the town, on Station Road.[12]

The Bible Baptist Church meets in the Westgate Foundation on the west end of town. The church is associated with the Cork Bible Institute and other Gospel ministries.[13]

Other religious groups including Hindus, Sikhs, and Greek Orthodox also have services at various locations in Ballincollig.

St. Mary's and St. John's Church as seen from Station Road
St. Mary's and St. John's Church as seen from Station Road

Demographics

As of the 2011 census, Ballincollig was 87% Catholic, 7% other religions, 5% no religion, with 1% not stated. Ethnically, the town is 83% white Irish, 10% other white, 3% black, 2% Asian, 1% other, and 1% not stated.[14]

Amenities

The amenities located in Ballincollig include a library, a multiplex cinema, playgrounds, shopping centres[15] and the Ballincollig Regional Park.

The recreational park, Ballincollig Regional Park, includes the former gunpowder mill and measures approximately 135 acres (55 hectares), with 52 structures in varying stages of decay surviving from the gunpowder manufacturing process. The site is approximately 2.4 kilometres in length and the River Lee runs the northern length of the site. The site contains a system of canals used during the manufacturing process connecting all the process areas in a single flat system without locks. The canals are fed from the River Lee at the western end of the site. The park contains soccer pitches, a rugby pitch, walkways, a skateboard facility, and free-to-use outdoor fitness equipment - the latter installed on the park's western end in November 2011. As a result of a 2012 development plan, which outlined the future of the Regional Park by the Recreation & Amenity section of the local authority,[16] planning was approved for multi-use games areas and a children's playground. This work started December 2014 and is now completed. An eighty plot allotment scheme was also identified within the development plan,[16] and was opened in November 2013 at the Innishmore entrance to the Regional Park. A series of marked trails were laid-out in 2014, and consist of four looped walks, colour-coded according to length. The Military Trail begins at the Shopping Centre Square and continues to the Regional Park by a westerly route. Three other trails of varying lengths begin and end at the western end of the park at Inniscarra Bridge.[17]

Free-to-use outdoor fitness equipment in Ballincollig Regional Park
Free-to-use outdoor fitness equipment in Ballincollig Regional Park

There is also another playground near the Lidl on the western side of the town.

Ballincollig is home to several crèches, five primary schools, and two secondary schools. The two secondary schools in Ballincollig are Coláiste Choilm and Ballincollig Community School. Ballincollig Community School is located in West Ballincollig and is next to the 'Church of Christ Our Light'. Coláiste Choilm is located in East Ballincollig and is near a doctor's practice and the town centre of Ballincollig. Two of the primary schools, Scoil Eoin and Scoil Mhuire, are located in the town centre near St Mary's and St John's church.[18] Three of the primary schools, Scoil Barra, Gaelscoil Uí Ríordáin and Gaelscoil an Chaisleáin are located outside the centre. Several of the area's schools are Gaelscoileanna (Irish-speaking schools), providing for a large number of pupils who learn through the Irish language in the area.[19]

There are a number of shops along the main street, as well as a shopping center, Tesco and two Circle K refueling locations. In addition to restaurants and cafés, there are many take-away restaurants including traditional "chip shops", Chinese, Indian, halal, and others.

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Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills

The Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills was one of three Royal gunpowder mills that manufactured gunpowder for the British Government. Located in Ballincollig, Cork city, Ireland, largely in what is now the Ballincollig Regional Park, the powder mills were originally opened in 1794 as a private enterprise, before being taken over by the British Government during the Napoleonic Wars.

Outdoor gym

Outdoor gym

The outdoor gym is a gym built outside in a public park, with the all-weather construction of its exercise machines somewhat modeled on playground equipment. It is similar to the 1960s–1970s proliferation of fitness trails, which continue to be created particularly in the US and Europe. In some instances, trails used for fitness are referred to as outdoor gyms.

Secondary school

Secondary school

A secondary school describes an institution that provides secondary education and also usually includes the building where this takes place. Some secondary schools provide both lower secondary education and upper secondary education, i.e., both levels 2 and 3 of the ISCED scale, but these can also be provided in separate schools.

Colaiste Choilm

Colaiste Choilm

Coláiste Choilm is a mixed second-level school in Ballincollig in Cork, Ireland. The school was founded in 1987 to meet demand for second-level education in the rapidly growing satellite town of Ballincollig.

Gaelscoil

Gaelscoil

A Gaelscoil is an Irish language-medium school in Ireland: the term refers especially to Irish-medium schools outside the Irish-speaking regions or Gaeltacht. Over 50,000 students attend Gaelscoileanna at primary and second-level on the island of Ireland. A further over 13,000 students are receiving their primary and second level education through Irish in the Gaeltacht. Gaelscoileanna and Irish-medium schools in the Gaeltacht are supported and represented by Gaeloideachas and An Chomhairle um Oideachas Gaeltachta & Gaelscolaíochta or COGG in the Republic of Ireland and by Comhairle na Gaelscolaíochta in Northern Ireland.

Irish language

Irish language

Irish [ˈɡeːlʲɟə], also known as Gaelic, is a Goidelic language of the Insular Celtic branch of the Celtic language family, which is a part of the Indo-European language family. Irish is indigenous to the island of Ireland and was the population's first language until the 19th century, when English gradually became dominant, particularly in the last decades of the century. Irish is still spoken as a first language in a small number of areas of certain counties such as Cork, Donegal, Galway, and Kerry, as well as smaller areas of counties Mayo, Meath, and Waterford. It is also spoken by a larger group of habitual but non-traditional speakers, mostly in urban areas where the majority are second-language speakers. Daily users in Ireland outside the education system number around 73,000 (1.5%), and the total number of persons who claimed they could speak Irish in April 2016 was 1,761,420, representing 39.8% of respondents.

Places of interest

The Ballincollig Royal Gunpowder Mills is located on the north side of the town next to the River Lee. Some buildings in the Gunpowder Mills are now in disrepair but the area is still open to walkers in the Regional Park. The park is popular with locals and features a playground, skate-park, fairy-walk and many walking trails. The park has been extended westward in recent years to the River Lee Walk at the Fionn Laoi housing estate.

The grave of Rory Gallagher is located at St Oliver's Cemetery just outside Ballincollig. His headstone is a replica of an award he received in 1972 for International Guitarist of The Year.

The Coolroe Lime Kiln is an example of the historic quarrying in the Coolroe area of the town.

Shops

Large retailers in Ballincollig include Dunnes Stores, Lidl, Maxol, Tesco, two Aldi and two Supervalu outlets. Castle West Shopping Centre has a number of smaller outlets such as Specsavers. A weekly farmers market is also held at the shopping centre.

Transport & communications

History

The Cork to Macroom rail line served Station House (at the south end of Station Road).

Ballincollig railway station was opened on 12 May 1866, closed to passenger traffic on 1 July 1935, closed to goods traffic on 10 March 1947 and finally closed altogether on 1 December 1953.[20]

Public transport

Ballincollig is served by a number of Bus Éireann bus routes. These include route 220 (to Carrigaline, via UCC, Cork City Centre, and Douglas), route 220X, (similar route via the Lee Fields rather than Bishopstown), and route 233 (Cork City Centre to Macroom via Ballincollig).

A number of proposals, such as the 'Project Ireland 2040' transport plan, include a potential feasibility study into a possible suburban light rail project in the area connecting Ballincollig to Mahon point via UCC and Cork City Centre.[21][22]

Road

Ballincollig was situated on the N22 from Cork to Tralee. A bypass around the town was opened in September 2004, which resulted in reduced journey times from Cork to Killarney on the N22 and reduced traffic volumes through the town centre. The N40 starts on the eastern side of the town that continues as the Cork southern bypass. The N40 and N22 both share exit 1.

The former alignment of the N22 is now the R608 regional road which goes through the town centre.

Air

The nearest airport is Cork Airport which is about 14 km away.

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Cork and Macroom Direct Railway

Cork and Macroom Direct Railway

The Cork and Macroom Direct Railway (CMDR) was an Irish gauge railway in Ireland which ran the 24 miles (39 km) from Cork to Macroom.

Ballincollig railway station

Ballincollig railway station

Ballincollig railway station was on the Cork and Macroom Direct Railway in County Cork, Ireland.

Bus Éireann

Bus Éireann

Bus Éireann is a state-owned bus and coach operator providing services throughout Ireland, with the exception of Dublin and the Greater Dublin Area, where bus services are provided by sister company Dublin Bus. It is a subsidiary of Córas Iompair Éireann (CIÉ). The company's primary hub is Busáras, Central Bus Station, located in Store Street, Central Dublin.

Carrigaline

Carrigaline

Carrigaline is a town and civil parish in County Cork, Ireland, situated on the River Owenabue. Located about 14 kilometres (8.7 mi) south of Cork city, and with a population of 15,770 people, it is one of the largest commuter towns of the city. The R611 regional road passes through the town, and it is just off the N28 national primary route to Ringaskiddy. Carrigaline grew rapidly in the late 20th century, from a village of a few hundred people into a thriving commuter town although some locals still refer to it as "the village". The town is one of the key gateways to west Cork, especially for those who arrive by ferry from France. Carrigaline is within the Cork South-Central Dáil constituency.

University College Cork

University College Cork

University College Cork – National University of Ireland, Cork (UCC) is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland, and located in Cork.

Cork (city)

Cork (city)

Cork is the second largest city in Ireland and third largest city by population on the island of Ireland. It is located in the south-west of Ireland, in the province of Munster. Following an extension to the city's boundary in 2019, its population is over 222,000.

Lee Fields

Lee Fields

Elmer Lee Fields is an American soul singer, sometimes nicknamed "Little JB" for his physical and vocal resemblance with James Brown. He has worked with Kool and the Gang, Hip Huggers, O.V. Wright, Darrell Banks, and Little Royal. Fields has also worked with musicians such as B.B. King, Clarence Carter, Dr. John, Tyrone Davis, Johnny Taylor, Denise LaSalle, Bobby Blue Bland, Betty Wright, The Manhattans, Little Milton and Bobby Womack. He recorded his first single in 1969 and is still active. His recent work is with The Expressions, including the albums Faithful Man (2012), Special Night (2017), and It Rains Love (2019).

Macroom

Macroom

Macroom is a market town in County Cork, Ireland, located in the valley of the River Sullane, halfway between Cork city and Killarney. Its population has grown and receded over the centuries as it went through periods of war, famine and workhouses, forced emigration and intermittent prosperity. The 2011 census gave an urban population of 3,879 people, while the 2016 census recorded 3,765 people.

N22 road (Ireland)

N22 road (Ireland)

The N22 road is a national primary road in Ireland which goes through counties Kerry and Cork, from Tralee in the west through Killarney, Macroom and Ballincollig to Cork City in the east.

Tralee

Tralee

Tralee is the county town of County Kerry in the south-west of Ireland. The town is on the northern side of the neck of the Dingle Peninsula, and is the largest town in County Kerry. The town's population was 23,691 as of the 2016 census, thus making it the eighth largest town, and 14th largest urban settlement, in Ireland. Tralee is well known for the Rose of Tralee International Festival, which has been held annually in August since 1959.

Killarney

Killarney

Killarney is a town in County Kerry, southwestern Ireland. The town is on the northeastern shore of Lough Leane, part of Killarney National Park, and is home to St Mary's Cathedral, Ross Castle, Muckross House and Abbey, the Lakes of Killarney, MacGillycuddy's Reeks, Purple Mountain, Mangerton Mountain, Paps Mountain, the Gap of Dunloe and Torc Waterfall. Its natural heritage, history and location on the Ring of Kerry make Killarney a popular tourist destination.

Cork Airport

Cork Airport

Cork Airport is the second-largest of the three principal international airports in Ireland, after Dublin and ahead of Shannon. It is located in Cork City, 6.5 km (4.0 mi) south of the city centre in an area known as Farmers Cross. In 2018, Cork Airport handled 2,392,821, growing by 8.3% to 2,585,466 passengers as of 2019 and representing a fourth consecutive year of growth. Aviation was severely impacted by the COVID-19 global pandemic in 2020 and passenger numbers at Cork Airport fell to 530,000, a decline of 80%.

Clubs and sport

Notable sports clubs in the town include: Ballincollig GAA Club and Ballincollig RFC. Mycro Sportsgear, which manufactures equipment for hurling, is based in Ballincollig.[23]

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Ballincollig GAA

Ballincollig GAA

Ballincollig GAA is a Gaelic football and hurling club based in the town of Ballincollig, County Cork, Ireland. The club is affiliated with the Cork GAA board and plays in the Muskerry divisional competitions. In 2009, the club will participate in the Cork Senior Football Championship and the Cork Intermediate Hurling Championship.

Ballincollig RFC

Ballincollig RFC

Ballincollig RFC is a rugby union club based in the town of Ballincollig, in County Cork. The club was founded in 1978, and home games have been played at Tanner Park since the 1993 season.

Mycro Sportsgear

Mycro Sportsgear

Mycro Sportsgear is a manufacturer and retailer of helmets and sliotars (balls) and other equipment used in the game of hurling. It was founded in the mid-1980s, and is based in Ballincollig in Ireland. As of 2010, when new Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) rules made the wearing of helmets compulsory, Mycro Sportsgear was one of three manufacturers with helmets meeting the expected standard. Later, the company made the first helmet to pass the National Standards Authority of Ireland IS 355 safety standard for hurling helmets.

Hurling

Hurling

Hurling is an outdoor team game of ancient Gaelic Irish origin, played by men. One of Ireland's native Gaelic games, it shares a number of features with Gaelic football, such as the field and goals, the number of players and much terminology. The same game played by women is called camogie, which shares a common Gaelic root.

Notable people

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Samantha Barry

Samantha Barry

Samantha Barry is the current editor-in-chief for Glamour magazine.

Horace de Vere Cole

Horace de Vere Cole

William Horace de Vere Cole was an eccentric prankster born in Ballincollig, County Cork, Ireland. His most famous prank was the Dreadnought hoax where he and several others in blackface, pretending to be an Abyssinian prince and his entourage, were given a tour of the Royal Navy ship HMS Dreadnought.

Dreadnought hoax

Dreadnought hoax

The Dreadnought hoax was a prank pulled by Horace de Vere Cole in 1910. Cole tricked the Royal Navy into showing their flagship, the battleship HMS Dreadnought, to a fake delegation of Abyssinian royals. The hoax drew attention in Britain to the emergence of the Bloomsbury Group, among whom some of Cole's collaborators numbered. The hoax was a repeat of a similar impersonation which Cole and Adrian Stephen had organised while they were students at Cambridge in 1905.

James Cronin (rugby union)

James Cronin (rugby union)

James Cronin is an Irish rugby union player, currently playing for Leicester Tigers in England's Premiership Rugby, he previously represented his native province of Munster in the URC and French club Biarritz in the Top 14. He plays as a prop and represented Highfield in the All-Ireland League.

Colin Healy

Colin Healy

Colin Healy is a former midfield footballer from Ireland. He has been manager of Cork City F.C. since late 2020.

Paddy Healy

Paddy Healy

Paddy Healy was an Irish hurler and Gaelic footballer. His league and championship career with the Cork senior teams as a dual player lasted ten years from 1943 until 1953.

Paddy Kelly (Cork footballer)

Paddy Kelly (Cork footballer)

Patrick "Paddy" Kelly is an Irish Gaelic footballer. His league and championship career at senior level with the Cork county team spanned nine seasons from 2008 to 2016.

Mick Mannock

Mick Mannock

Edward Corringham "Mick" Mannock was a British flying ace in the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force during the First World War. Mannock was a pioneer of fighter aircraft tactics in aerial warfare. At the time of his death he had amassed 61 aerial victories, making him the fifth highest scoring pilot of the war. Mannock was among the most decorated men in the British Armed Forces. He was honoured with the Military Cross twice, was one of the rare three-time recipients of the Distinguished Service Order, and was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Victoria Cross

Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest and most prestigious award of the British honours system. It is awarded for valour "in the presence of the enemy" to members of the British Armed Forces and may be awarded posthumously. It was previously awarded by countries of the Commonwealth of Nations, most of which have established their own honours systems and no longer recommend British honours. It may be awarded to a person of any military rank in any service and to civilians under military command. No civilian has received the award since 1879. Since the first awards were presented by Queen Victoria in 1857, two-thirds of all awards have been personally presented by the British monarch. The investitures are usually held at Buckingham Palace.

John Miskella

John Miskella

John Miskella is an Irish former sportsperson. He played Gaelic football with the Ballincollig club and with the Cork senior inter-county team.

Sanita Pušpure

Sanita Pušpure

Sanita Pušpure is a Latvian-born Irish professional rower. She was a back-to-back world champion in the women's single scull winning her title at the 2018 World Rowing Championships in Plovdiv and defending it at the 2019 World Rowing Championships in Ottensheim. She initially competed for Latvia at a junior level, but she moved to Ireland in 2006 and began competing for her adopted country in 2010, before gaining full Irish nationality in 2011. She was selected as the sole rowing competitor for Ireland at the 2012 Summer Olympics, where she did not win a medal. In May 2016, she qualified for the Women's single sculls at the 2016 Summer Olympics. Sanita is now head coach of UCC Rowing Club in Cork, Ireland.

Source: "Ballincollig", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballincollig.

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See also
References
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