Get Our Extension

Astoria Boulevard station

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
 Astoria Blvd
 "N" train"W" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Astoria Blvd 2019 platforms.jpg
Southbound W train across the platform
Station statistics
AddressAstoria Boulevard & 31st Street
Astoria, NY 11102
BoroughQueens
LocaleAstoria
Coordinates40°46′12″N 73°55′05″W / 40.769979°N 73.918161°W / 40.769979; -73.918161Coordinates: 40°46′12″N 73°55′05″W / 40.769979°N 73.918161°W / 40.769979; -73.918161
DivisionB (BMT)[1]
LineBMT Astoria Line
Services   N all times (all times)
   W weekdays (weekdays)
TransitBus transport New York City Bus: Airport transportation M60 SBS to LaGuardia Airport
Bus transport MTA Bus: Q19
Bus transport Columbia Transportation: Queens-Riverdale Commuter Route
StructureElevated
Platforms2 island platforms
cross-platform interchange
Tracks3 (2 in regular service)
Other information
OpenedFebruary 1, 1917; 106 years ago (1917-02-01)[2]
ClosedMarch 17, 2019; 4 years ago (2019-03-17) (reconstruction)
RebuiltDecember 18, 2019; 3 years ago (2019-12-18)
AccessibleThis station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible
Opposite-
direction
transfer
Yes
Former/other namesAstoria Boulevard–Hoyt Avenue
Traffic
2019723,354[3]Decrease 82.9%
Rank391 out of 424[3]
Location
Astoria Boulevard station is located in New York City Subway
Astoria Boulevard station
Astoria Boulevard station is located in New York City
Astoria Boulevard station
Astoria Boulevard station is located in New York
Astoria Boulevard station
Track layout

Street map

Map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops weekdays only Stops weekdays only

The Astoria Boulevard station (also known as Astoria Boulevard–Hoyt Avenue station) is an express station on the BMT Astoria Line of the New York City Subway. Located on 31st Street between Astoria Boulevard and the Grand Central Parkway (Interstate 278) in Astoria, Queens, the station is served by the N train at all times, as well as by the W train on weekdays.

Discover more about Astoria Boulevard station related topics

Metro station

Metro station

A metro station or subway station is a train station for a rapid transit system, which as a whole is usually called a "metro" or "subway". A station provides a means for passengers to purchase tickets, board trains, and evacuate the system in the case of an emergency. In the United Kingdom, they are known as underground stations, most commonly used in reference to the London Underground.

BMT Astoria Line

BMT Astoria Line

The BMT Astoria Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway, serving the Queens neighborhood of Astoria. It runs south from Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria to 39th Avenue in Long Island City above 31st Street. It then turns west and serves Queensboro Plaza over Queens Plaza.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

Astoria Boulevard

Astoria Boulevard

Astoria Boulevard is an important east-west commercial street in Astoria and East Elmhurst, Queens, New York City. It runs from 1st Street at the East River to the World's Fair Marina on Flushing Bay, where it merges with Northern Boulevard. Just before the junction of the two boulevards, there is a large two lane ramp leading to the Whitestone Expressway. Most of the traffic on Astoria Boulevard heads toward this ramp, and then onto the Expressway.

Grand Central Parkway

Grand Central Parkway

The Grand Central Parkway (GCP) is a 14.61-mile (23.51 km) long parkway that stretches from the Triborough Bridge in New York City to Nassau County on Long Island. At the Queens–Nassau border, it becomes the Northern State Parkway, which runs across the northern part of Long Island through Nassau County and into Suffolk County, where it ends in Hauppauge. The westernmost stretch also carries a short stretch of Interstate 278 (I-278). The parkway runs through Queens and passes the Cross Island Parkway, Long Island Expressway, LaGuardia Airport and Citi Field, home of the New York Mets. The parkway is designated New York State Route 907M (NY 907M), an unsigned reference route. Despite its name, the Grand Central Parkway was not named after Grand Central Terminal.

Interstate 278

Interstate 278

Interstate 278 (I-278) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in New Jersey and New York in the United States. The road runs 35.62 miles (57.32 km) from US Route 1/9 (US 1/9) in Linden, New Jersey, northeast to the Bruckner Interchange in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The majority of I-278 is in New York City, where it serves as a partial beltway and passes through all five of the city's boroughs. I-278 follows several freeways, including the Union Freeway in Union County, New Jersey; the Staten Island Expressway (SIE) across Staten Island; the Gowanus Expressway in southern Brooklyn; the Brooklyn–Queens Expressway (BQE) across northern Brooklyn and Queens; a small part of the Grand Central Parkway in Queens; and a part of the Bruckner Expressway in the Bronx. I-278 also crosses multiple bridges, including the Goethals, Verrazzano-Narrows, Kosciuszko, and Robert F. Kennedy bridges.

Astoria, Queens

Astoria, Queens

Astoria is a neighborhood in the western portion of the New York City borough of Queens. Astoria is bounded by the East River and is adjacent to three other Queens neighborhoods: Long Island City to the southwest, Sunnyside to the southeast, and Woodside to the east. As of 2019, Astoria has an estimated population of 95,446.

N (New York City Subway service)

N (New York City Subway service)

The N Broadway Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet," is colored yellow, since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

W (New York City Subway service)

W (New York City Subway service)

The W Broadway Local is a rapid transit service of the New York City Subway's B Division. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored yellow since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

History

Staircase shelter on southbound platform before 2019 renovation
Staircase shelter on southbound platform before 2019 renovation
View of station from RFK Bridge
View of station from RFK Bridge

Early history

This station, originally known as Hoyt Avenue, opened on February 1, 1917, along with the rest of the Astoria Line, which was originally part of the IRT, as a spur off the IRT Queensboro Line, now the IRT Flushing Line. Trains ran between Grand Central and Astoria.[2][4] On July 23, 1917, the Queensboro Bridge spur of the elevated IRT Second Avenue Line opened. At that time, all elevated trains to Queensboro Plaza used the Astoria Line while all subway trains used the Corona Line, though this was later changed with trains alternating between branches.[4][5] This station started to be served by BMT shuttles using elevated cars on April 8, 1923.[6]

In December 1923, the Queens Chamber of Commerce petitioned the New York State Transit Commission to add the name "Astoria Avenue" to station signage. The petition was approved by the Chief of the Transit Bureau.[7] Later, enclosed waiting rooms were added to the platforms of this station and the Ditmars Boulevard station. They opened on January 17, 1925.[8]

In 1931, preparation began for the construction of the Grand Central Parkway and the approaches to the Triborough Bridge. The station's original sidewalk entrances were located on the northern corners of the intersection of Hoyt Avenue and 31st Street.[9] However since these stairs fell within the condemned area in the way of the future road underpass, they were removed and replaced with stairs on the southern corners.[10] To compensate for this change, unpaid pedestrian overpasses were constructed connecting the station's mezzanine, the relocated stairs, and new stairs to the street under the north side of the station.[11]

The city government took over the BMT's operations on June 1, 1940,[12][13] and the IRT's operations on June 12, 1940.[14][15] On October 17, 1949, the Astoria Line became BMT-only as the tracks at Queensboro Plaza were consolidated and the platforms on the Astoria Line were shaved back to allow through BMT trains to operate on it. Service was initially provided by the Brighton Local (BMT 1) weekdays and the Broadway - Fourth Avenue Local (BMT 2) at all times.[16]

The platforms at this station, along with six others on the Astoria Line, were lengthened to 610 feet (190 m) to accommodate ten-car trains in 1950.[17]: 23  The project cost $863,000. Signals on the line had to be modified to take into account the platform extensions.[18]: 633, 729 

Notable incidents

The Astoria Boulevard station's mezzanine sits above an access point to a major truck route, Interstate 278. Accordingly, there have been incidents involving vehicles striking the structure. On the evening of March 27, 1991, a truck struck the bottom of the station and severely damaged a transverse girder, part of which supported the center express track. The affected track was taken out of service for two days until repairs were made to the structure.[19]

Several years later, on the morning of May 1, 1998, a backhoe working underneath the station (not performing New York City Transit-related work) struck the mezzanine, ripping out three support beams while damaging four more and creating a large hole in the floor. There were no injuries, but trains bypassed the station at restricted speed. Cleanup work began immediately and by noon, the slow speed restriction was removed. By 3:00 p.m., a temporary wooden floor was installed. Less than eight hours from the time of the first response, the station was back in full service. Permanent repairs were made overnight.[20]

Reconstruction and accessibility improvements

As part of the 2015–2019 MTA Capital Program, the station received funding for reconstruction to make it compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990.[21][22][23] A contract for the reconstruction was awarded in June 2018, and substantial completion was projected for November 2020.[24] In September 2018, work began adding four elevators; two connect the street and mezzanine, and two more connect the mezzanine with the platforms. In order to construct the street elevators, the station mezzanine was demolished and rebuilt. The new mezzanine was raised to reduce strikes by trucks driving underneath.[25] The station was fully closed for nine months on March 17, 2019 to allow the mezzanine to be replaced[26][27] and was reopened on December 18, 2019, while elevator construction and installation was still underway.[28][29] On July 24, 2020, the elevators were placed into operation, making the station ADA accessible.[30]

In January 2023, it was announced that to further improve accessibility, wide-aisle fare gates will be installed at this station and at four others across the city.[31]: 54  The Metropolitan Transportation Authority plans to work with Cubic to design a gate that will accommodate both the MetroCard and OMNY payment systems, and allow easier station access for passengers with large items such as strollers, mobility devices, and luggage.[32]

Discover more about History related topics

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

IRT Flushing Line

IRT Flushing Line

The IRT Flushing Line is a rapid transit route of the New York City Subway system, named for its eastern terminal in Flushing, Queens. It is operated as part of the A Division. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), a private operator, had constructed the section of the line from Flushing, Queens, to Times Square, Manhattan between 1915 and 1928. A western extension was opened to Hudson Yards in western Manhattan in 2015, and the line now stretches from Flushing to Chelsea, Manhattan. It carries trains of the 7 local service, as well as the express <7> during rush hours in the peak direction. It is the only currently operational IRT line to serve Queens.

Elevated railway

Elevated railway

An elevated railway or elevated train is a rapid transit railway with the tracks above street level on a viaduct or other elevated structure. The railway may be broad-gauge, standard-gauge or narrow-gauge railway, light rail, monorail, or a suspension railway. Elevated railways are normally found in urban areas where there would otherwise be multiple level crossings. Usually, the tracks of elevated railways that run on steel viaducts can be seen from street level.

IRT Second Avenue Line

IRT Second Avenue Line

The IRT Second Avenue Line, also known as the Second Avenue Elevated or Second Avenue El, was an elevated railway in Manhattan, New York City, United States, from 1878 to 1942. It was operated by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company until 1940, when the city took over the IRT. Service north of the 57th Street station ended on June 11, 1940; the rest of the line closed on June 13, 1942.

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) was an urban transit holding company, based in Brooklyn, New York City, United States, and incorporated in 1923. The system was sold to the city in 1940. Today, together with the IND subway system, it forms the B Division of the modern New York City Subway.

Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard station

Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard station

The Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard station, is the northern terminal station on the BMT Astoria Line of the New York City Subway. Located above 31st Street between 23rd Avenue and Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria and Ditmars, Queens, it is served by the N train at all times and the W train on weekdays.

Grand Central Parkway

Grand Central Parkway

The Grand Central Parkway (GCP) is a 14.61-mile (23.51 km) long parkway that stretches from the Triborough Bridge in New York City to Nassau County on Long Island. At the Queens–Nassau border, it becomes the Northern State Parkway, which runs across the northern part of Long Island through Nassau County and into Suffolk County, where it ends in Hauppauge. The westernmost stretch also carries a short stretch of Interstate 278 (I-278). The parkway runs through Queens and passes the Cross Island Parkway, Long Island Expressway, LaGuardia Airport and Citi Field, home of the New York Mets. The parkway is designated New York State Route 907M (NY 907M), an unsigned reference route. Despite its name, the Grand Central Parkway was not named after Grand Central Terminal.

Interstate 278

Interstate 278

Interstate 278 (I-278) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in New Jersey and New York in the United States. The road runs 35.62 miles (57.32 km) from US Route 1/9 (US 1/9) in Linden, New Jersey, northeast to the Bruckner Interchange in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The majority of I-278 is in New York City, where it serves as a partial beltway and passes through all five of the city's boroughs. I-278 follows several freeways, including the Union Freeway in Union County, New Jersey; the Staten Island Expressway (SIE) across Staten Island; the Gowanus Expressway in southern Brooklyn; the Brooklyn–Queens Expressway (BQE) across northern Brooklyn and Queens; a small part of the Grand Central Parkway in Queens; and a part of the Bruckner Expressway in the Bronx. I-278 also crosses multiple bridges, including the Goethals, Verrazzano-Narrows, Kosciuszko, and Robert F. Kennedy bridges.

Backhoe

Backhoe

A backhoe—also called rear actor or back actor—is a type of excavating equipment, or digger, consisting of a digging bucket on the end of a two-part articulated arm. It is typically mounted on the back of a tractor or front loader, the latter forming a "backhoe loader". The section of the arm closest to the vehicle is known as the boom, while the section that carries the bucket is known as the dipper, both terms derived from steam shovels. The boom is generally attached to the vehicle through a pivot known as the king-post, which allows the arm to pivot left and right, usually through a total of 180 to 200 degrees.

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 or ADA is a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on disability. It affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal, and later sexual orientation and gender identity. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority

Metropolitan Transportation Authority

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) is a public benefit corporation responsible for public transportation in the New York City metropolitan area of the U.S. state of New York. The MTA is the largest public transit authority in the United States, serving 12 counties in Downstate New York, along with two counties in southwestern Connecticut under contract to the Connecticut Department of Transportation, carrying over 11 million passengers on an average weekday systemwide, and over 850,000 vehicles on its seven toll bridges and two tunnels per weekday.

Cubic Corporation

Cubic Corporation

Cubic Corporation is a global public transportation and defense corporation. It operates two business segments: Cubic Transportation Systems (CTS) and Cubic Mission and Performance Solutions (CMPS).

Station layout

P
Platforms
Southbound local "N" train toward Coney Island (30th Avenue)
"W" train toward Whitehall Street–South Ferry (weekdays) (30th Avenue)
Island platform, doors will open on the left Disabled access
Peak-direction express No regular service
(No service: Queensboro Plaza southbound or Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard northbound)
Island platform, doors will open on the left Disabled access
Northbound local "N" train ("W" train weekdays) toward Astoria–Ditmars Boulevard (Terminus)
M Mezzanine to entrances/exits, station agent, MetroCard vending machines
Disabled access Elevators at southeast corner of Hoyt Avenue South and 31st Street, and northwest corner of Hoyt Avenue North and 31st Street
G Street Level Entrances/Exits
Newly commissioned artwork from MTA Arts & Design by MacArthur Fellow Jeffrey Gibson. The glass artwork is called I AM A RAINBOW TOO.
Newly commissioned artwork from MTA Arts & Design by MacArthur Fellow Jeffrey Gibson. The glass artwork is called I AM A RAINBOW TOO.

The elevated station has three tracks and two island platforms. The center track is not used in revenue service, but it had been used regularly as recently as 2002.[33]

The station has wooden canopies with transite and wooden mezzanines. The northbound platform's benches are surrounded by low windscreen on three sides. The southbound platform bears the tertiary name of Columbus Square, for a small park containing a statue of Columbus by Angelo Racioppi immediately east of the southeastern stair of the station. It also has an enclosed waiting area.

Exits

There are four exits to the station: two to either northern corner of Hoyt Avenue North and 31st Street (via overpass), and two to either southern corner of Hoyt Avenue South and 31st Street.[34] The stair to the northwest corner of Hoyt Avenue North and 31st Street was demolished and reconstructed to run parallel to Hoyt Avenue instead of 31st Street; the stair's original orientation was replaced with an elevator.[35]

From the station's platforms, the Hell Gate Bridge and Hell Gate Line viaduct to the north, the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge to the west, and the Grand Central Parkway/Interstate 278 and Hoyt Avenue underneath are visible. The mezzanine has separate turnstile banks from each side with crossunders from the platform stairs.

Discover more about Station layout related topics

N (New York City Subway service)

N (New York City Subway service)

The N Broadway Express is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet," is colored yellow, since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue station

Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue station

The Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue station is a New York City Subway terminal in Coney Island, Brooklyn. It is the railroad-south terminus for the D, F, N, and Q trains at all times and for the train during rush hours in the peak direction.

W (New York City Subway service)

W (New York City Subway service)

The W Broadway Local is a rapid transit service of the New York City Subway's B Division. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored yellow since it uses the BMT Broadway Line in Manhattan.

Island platform

Island platform

An island platform is a station layout arrangement where a single platform is positioned between two tracks within a railway station, tram stop or transitway interchange. Island platforms are popular on twin-track routes due to pragmatic and cost reasons. They are also useful within larger stations where local and express services for the same direction of travel can be provided from opposite sides of the same platform thereby simplifying transfers between the two tracks. An alternative arrangement is to position side platforms on either side of the tracks. The historical use of island platforms depends greatly upon the location. In the United Kingdom the use of island platforms is relatively common when the railway line is in a cutting or raised on an embankment, as this makes it easier to provide access to the platform without walking across the tracks.

Accessibility

Accessibility

Accessibility is the design of products, devices, services, vehicles, or environments so as to be usable by people with disabilities. The concept of accessible design and practice of accessible development ensures both "direct access" and "indirect access" meaning compatibility with a person's assistive technology.

Transite

Transite

Transite originated as a brand that Johns Manville, an American company, created in 1929 for a line of asbestos-cement products, including boards and pipes. In time it became a generic term for other companies' similar asbestos-cement products, and later an even more generic term for a hard, fireproof composite material, fibre cement boards, typically used in wall construction. It can also be found in insulation, siding, roof gutters, and cement wallboard. The more prevalent transite found in wall construction and roofing tiles for example, will last anywhere from 50 years to over 100 years.

Hell Gate Bridge

Hell Gate Bridge

The Hell Gate Bridge, originally the New York Connecting Railroad Bridge or the East River Arch Bridge, is a 1,017-foot (310 m) steel through arch railroad bridge in New York City. Originally built for four tracks, the bridge currently carries two tracks of Amtrak's Northeast Corridor and one freight track across the Hell Gate, a strait of the East River, between Astoria in Queens and Randalls and Wards Islands in Manhattan.

Source: "Astoria Boulevard station", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 22nd), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astoria_Boulevard_station.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). Vol. 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ a b "First Train Runs On Elevated Line to Astoria Section". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. February 1, 1917. Retrieved June 29, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Annual report. 1916-1917. New York: Interborough Rapid Transit Company. 1917.
  5. ^ "Subway Link Over Queensboro Bridge". The New York Times. July 22, 1917. p. 31. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  6. ^ "Additional Subway Service to Borough of Queens". The New York Times. April 8, 1923. p. RE1. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  7. ^ New York State Transit Commission (1923). Proceedings of the Transit Commission, State of New York - Volume 3. p. 1348.
  8. ^ New York Board of Transportation (1925). Proceedings - Volume 2. p. 98.
  9. ^ "Tri Boro Bridge building for condemnation Astoria Long Island lot 2nd Avenue and Hoyt Avenue 2929". NYC Department of Records & Information Services. June 11, 1931. Retrieved February 3, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "Astoria Boulevard at 33rd Street". NYC Department of Records & Information Services. March 9, 1942. Retrieved February 3, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ New York State Transit Commission (1937). Annual Report. p. 61.
  12. ^ "B.M.T. Lines Pass to City Ownership; $175,000,000 Deal Completed at City Hall Ceremony-- Mayor 'Motorman No. 1'". The New York Times. June 2, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved May 14, 2022.
  13. ^ "City Takes Over B. M. T. System; Mayor Skippers Midnight Train". New York Herald Tribune. June 2, 1940. p. 1. ProQuest 1243059209.
  14. ^ "City Transit Unity Is Now a Reality; Title to I.R.T. Lines Passes to Municipality, Ending 19-Year Campaign". The New York Times. June 13, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved May 14, 2022.
  15. ^ "Transit Unification Completed As City Takes Over I. R. T. Lines: Systems Come Under Single Control After Efforts Begun in 1921; Mayor Is Jubilant at City Hall Ceremony Recalling 1904 Celebration". New York Herald Tribune. June 13, 1940. p. 25. ProQuest 1248134780.
  16. ^ "Direct Subway Runs to Flushing, Astoria". The New York Times. October 15, 1949. p. 17. Retrieved December 18, 2011.
  17. ^ Association, General Contractors (1950). Bulletin.
  18. ^ Transportation, New York (N Y. ) Board of (1950). Proceedings ...
  19. ^ Henry, Russell; Gilmore, John; Transit Cooperative Research Program (1997). Inspection Policy and Procedures for Rail Transit Tunnels and Underground Structures. National Academy Press. p. 90. ISBN 9780309060172.
  20. ^ Mbugua, Martin; Rutenberg, James (May 2, 1998). "Backhoe Cripples El". Daily News. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  21. ^ "MTA Capital Program 2015-2019: Renew. Enhance. Expand" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. October 28, 2015. p. 61. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  22. ^ "Funding For Subway Station ADA-Accessibility Approved". www.mta.info. April 26, 2018. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  23. ^ "MTA 2017 Preliminary Budget July Financial Plan 2017 –2020 Volume 2" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  24. ^ "Capital Program Oversight Committee Meeting November 2018" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 13, 2018. p. 90. Retrieved November 10, 2018.
  25. ^ Griffin, Allie (December 19, 2019). "Astoria Boulevard Station Reopens Amid Continuing Work". Astoria Post. Retrieved February 3, 2023.
  26. ^ "MTA New York City Transit to Bring Elevators to Astoria Blvd Station". www.mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 18, 2018.
  27. ^ mtainfo, Rebuilding The Astoria Line, archived from the original on December 21, 2021, retrieved January 30, 2019
  28. ^ "Astoria Boulevard subway station in Queens reopens after 9-month renovation". ABC7 New York. December 19, 2019. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  29. ^ Kaufman, Maya (December 19, 2019). "Astoria Boulevard N/W Subway Station Reopens". Astoria-Long Island City, NY Patch. Retrieved December 20, 2019.
  30. ^ Griffin, Allie (July 24, 2020). "New Elevators at the Astoria Boulevard Station Open". Astoria Post. Retrieved July 24, 2020.
  31. ^ "Extending Transit's Reach: MTA's Strategic Action Plan to Promote Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Micromobility Access to MTA Facilities". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 2023. Retrieved February 4, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  32. ^ "Accessible Wide Fare Gates". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 29, 2021. Retrieved February 4, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  33. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  34. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Astoria" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  35. ^ "Astoria Blvd Station Stair Closure for ADA Elevator – OANA". OANA - Old Astoria Neighborhood Association. November 3, 2018. Retrieved November 4, 2018.
External links

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.