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Ashdon
Ashdon Windmill - geograph.org.uk - 1219346.jpg
Ashdon Windmill
Ashdon is located in Essex
Ashdon
Ashdon
Location within Essex
Population893 (2011)[1]
OS grid referenceTL584421
Civil parish
  • Ashdon
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townSaffron Walden
Postcode districtCB10
Dialling code01799
PoliceEssex
FireEssex
AmbulanceEast of England
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Essex
52°03′17″N 0°18′32″E / 52.054647°N 0.308823°E / 52.054647; 0.308823Coordinates: 52°03′17″N 0°18′32″E / 52.054647°N 0.308823°E / 52.054647; 0.308823
Village sign in Ashdon
Village sign in Ashdon

Ashdon, is a village and civil parish in Essex, England. It is about 4 miles (6 km) northeast of Saffron Walden and 23 miles (37 km) northwest from the county town of Chelmsford. The village is in the district of Uttlesford and the parliamentary constituency of Saffron Walden. The village has its own Parish Council.[2]

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Essex

Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west. There are three cities in Essex: Southend, Colchester and Chelmsford, in order of population. For the purposes of government statistics, Essex is placed in the East of England region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the ancient county. Next, the largest is the former postal county, followed by the ceremonial county, with the smallest being the administrative county—the area administered by the County Council, which excludes the two unitary authorities of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea. The ceremonial county occupies the eastern part of what was, during the Early Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Essex. As well as rural areas and urban areas, it forms part of the wider Home Counties of England.

Saffron Walden

Saffron Walden

Saffron Walden is a market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England, 12 miles (19 km) north of Bishop's Stortford, 15 miles (24 km) south of Cambridge and 43 miles (69 km) north of London. It retains a rural appearance and some buildings of the medieval period. The population was 15,504 at the 2011 census.

Chelmsford

Chelmsford

Chelmsford is a city in the City of Chelmsford district in the county of Essex, England. It is the county town of Essex and one of three cities in the county, along with Southend-on-Sea and Colchester. It is located 30 miles north-east of London at Charing Cross and 22 miles south-west of Colchester. The population of the urban area was 111,511 in the 2011 Census, while the wider district has 168,310.

Uttlesford

Uttlesford

Uttlesford is a local government district in Essex, England. Its council is based in the market town of Saffron Walden. At the 2011 Census, the population of the district was 79,443. Other notable settlements include Great Dunmow, Elmdon, Stebbing, Stansted Mountfitchet, Thaxted, Debden, Little Chesterford and Felstead among other settlements.

Saffron Walden (UK Parliament constituency)

Saffron Walden (UK Parliament constituency)

Saffron Walden is a constituency in Essex represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2017 by Kemi Badenoch, a Conservative.

Geography

The village is approximately 4 miles (6 km) northeast of the nearest town, Saffron Walden. It is on the River Bourn, a tributary to the River Granta, a tributary to the River Cam. The village is close to the Essex/Cambridgeshire county border.

According to the 2011 census the population of the parish was 893, up from 792 in 2001.[1][3] Apart from Ashdon village, the parish also includes Steventon End (52°03′47″N 0°19′55″E / 52.06306°N 0.33194°E / 52.06306; 0.33194) and Church End (52°03′01″N 0°18′10″E / 52.05028°N 0.30278°E / 52.05028; 0.30278).

The River Bourn has caused much flooding in recent years to the village of Ashdon in 2000 and 2001 saw heavy winds and rain flood it immensely. On 14 June 2007 the village fell victim to flash flooding when a month's rain fell in an hour causing heavy flooding. Historically, one tenth of Ashdon parish was woodland.[4] In 2018 work on the fitness equipment was completed. [5]

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Saffron Walden

Saffron Walden

Saffron Walden is a market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England, 12 miles (19 km) north of Bishop's Stortford, 15 miles (24 km) south of Cambridge and 43 miles (69 km) north of London. It retains a rural appearance and some buildings of the medieval period. The population was 15,504 at the 2011 census.

River Granta

River Granta

The River Granta is the name of two of the four tributaries of the River Cam, although both names are often used synonymously. The Granta starts near the village of Widdington in Essex, flowing north past Audley End House to merge with the other contributary Rhee, which is also commonly called River Cam, a mile south of Grantchester. From source to its confluence with the Rhee it is 41.7 kilometres (25.9 mi) in length.

River Cam

River Cam

The River Cam is the main river flowing through Cambridge in eastern England. After leaving Cambridge, it flows north and east before joining the River Great Ouse to the south of Ely, at Pope's Corner. The total distance from Cambridge to the sea is about 40 mi (64 km) and is navigable for punts, small boats, and rowing craft. The Great Ouse also connects to England's canal system via the Middle Level Navigations and the River Nene. In total, the Cam runs for around 69 kilometres (43 mi) from its furthest source to its confluence with the Great Ouse.

Essex

Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west. There are three cities in Essex: Southend, Colchester and Chelmsford, in order of population. For the purposes of government statistics, Essex is placed in the East of England region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the ancient county. Next, the largest is the former postal county, followed by the ceremonial county, with the smallest being the administrative county—the area administered by the County Council, which excludes the two unitary authorities of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea. The ceremonial county occupies the eastern part of what was, during the Early Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Essex. As well as rural areas and urban areas, it forms part of the wider Home Counties of England.

Cambridgeshire

Cambridgeshire

Cambridgeshire is a county in the East of England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the north-east, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. The city of Cambridge is the county town. Following the Local Government Act 1972 restructuring, modern Cambridgeshire was formed in 1974 through the amalgamation of two administrative counties: Cambridgeshire and Isle of Ely, comprising the historic county of Cambridgeshire ; and Huntingdon and Peterborough, comprising the historic county of Huntingdonshire and the Soke of Peterborough, historically part of Northamptonshire. Cambridgeshire contains most of the region known as Silicon Fen.

History

Ashdon has been cited as a potential location [note 1] for a significant battle in 1016, known as the Battle of Assundun.[4][6][7] This was a key milestone in the creation of a united England, whereby the Danish King Canute (or Cnut) defeated the English King Edmund II. After the battle King Edmund II ceded England (except Wessex) to Canute.[6] During the summer and autumn of 2016 the Ashdon and Hadstock Millennium Group organised events to mark the event.[8] On 10 September 2016 Waltons Park hosted a re-enactment of the battle which was organised by Ashdon Parish Council, Hadstock village and Saffron Walden Museum, and involved 80 actors[9][10] In addition to the battle, former archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams came to Hadstock church to deliver a commemorative service.[11]

All of the Bartlow Hills were entirely in Ashdon Parish, Essex when the boundary between Cambridgeshire and Essex ran from Steventon End to the River Granta, then along the Granta westwards to Linton, as shown on Ordnance Survey maps including those dated 1805, 1838 and 1882. There is evidence to suggest former vineyards were in operation near to the church.[4] During the reign of Henry VIII the village rector served as a royal chaplain and even officiated his marriage to Anne Boleyn. [12]

As a rural settlement, farming has been a major aspect of village life. So after many years of reduced pay, the farmers formed unions and in 1914, partook in the first agricultural strike.[13][14] Not only were workers unhappy over pay conditions, which at 13 shillings a week among the lowest paid in the country (just ahead of Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire),[15][16] but also the dismissal of workers who had joined the Helions Bumpstead National Agricultural & Rural Workers Union branch, which had formed one year previously.[16][17] The strikers used the grounds of The Fox (a former pub) to organise protests and host concerts.[4] In addition to the concerts villages organised processions of flags and banners, as well as torch glowings at night.[16] During the strike 70 police officers were drafted in and resulted in 8 workers being sentenced to a month imprisonment in Cambridge, for refusing to pay fines.[13][16][17] Initially the workers demanded 16 shillings and for reduced working hours with a half day on Saturday[15] but settled for 15 shillings and £8 for harvest work, bringing the dispute to a close a day before the outbreak of World War I.[16]

Ashdon Halt was a stop (from 1911 to 1964)[17] on the closed Saffron Walden Railway near Church End. The halt was only opened after a long campaign by the village.[18]

Elizabeth Everitt is commemorated both in the church and on the war memorial who died rescuing an American pilot in 1944. She was posthumously awarded the Albert Medal (then the highest civilian award now replaced with the George Cross). [19]

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Battle of Assandun

Battle of Assandun

The Battle of Assandun was fought between Danish and English armies on 18 October 1016. There is disagreement whether Assandun may be Ashdon near Saffron Walden in north Essex, England, or, as long supposed and better evidenced, Ashingdon near Rochford in south-east Essex. It ended in victory for the Danes, led by King Cnut, who triumphed over the English army led by King Edmund Ironside. The battle was the conclusion to the Danish conquest of England.

Edmund Ironside

Edmund Ironside

Edmund Ironside was King of the English from 23 April to 30 November 1016. He was the son of King Æthelred the Unready and his first wife, Ælfgifu of York. Edmund's reign was marred by a war he had inherited from his father; his cognomen "Ironside" was given to him "because of his valour" in resisting the Danish invasion led by Cnut the Great.

Hadstock

Hadstock

Hadstock is a village in Essex, England, about 6 miles (10 km) from Saffron Walden. It is on the county boundary with Cambridgeshire and about 9 miles (14 km) from Cambridge. The 2001 Census recorded a parish population of 320, increasing to 332 at the 2011 Census.

Archbishop of Canterbury

Archbishop of Canterbury

The archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop and a principal leader of the Church of England, the ceremonial head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.

Bartlow Hills

Bartlow Hills

Bartlow Hills is a Roman tumuli cemetery in Bartlow, Cambridgeshire, England. The site was in Essex until a boundary alteration in 1990. Four of the original seven tumuli or barrows remain; the largest three are accessible to the public, the northernmost and smallest is on private property and is not easily visible. The remnants of two more are visible as low mounds west of the three largest barrows. The tallest barrow is 15 metres (50 ft) high, and is the largest Roman barrow north of the Alps. The barrows date from the 1st or 2nd centuries CE.

Essex

Essex

Essex is a county in the East of England. One of the home counties, it borders Suffolk and Cambridgeshire to the north, the North Sea to the east, Hertfordshire to the west, Kent across the estuary of the River Thames to the south, and Greater London to the south and south-west. There are three cities in Essex: Southend, Colchester and Chelmsford, in order of population. For the purposes of government statistics, Essex is placed in the East of England region. There are four definitions of the extent of Essex, the widest being the ancient county. Next, the largest is the former postal county, followed by the ceremonial county, with the smallest being the administrative county—the area administered by the County Council, which excludes the two unitary authorities of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea. The ceremonial county occupies the eastern part of what was, during the Early Middle Ages, the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Essex. As well as rural areas and urban areas, it forms part of the wider Home Counties of England.

Cambridgeshire

Cambridgeshire

Cambridgeshire is a county in the East of England, bordering Lincolnshire to the north, Norfolk to the north-east, Suffolk to the east, Essex and Hertfordshire to the south, and Bedfordshire and Northamptonshire to the west. The city of Cambridge is the county town. Following the Local Government Act 1972 restructuring, modern Cambridgeshire was formed in 1974 through the amalgamation of two administrative counties: Cambridgeshire and Isle of Ely, comprising the historic county of Cambridgeshire ; and Huntingdon and Peterborough, comprising the historic county of Huntingdonshire and the Soke of Peterborough, historically part of Northamptonshire. Cambridgeshire contains most of the region known as Silicon Fen.

Henry VIII

Henry VIII

Henry VIII was King of England from 22 April 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry is best known for his six marriages, and for his efforts to have his first marriage annulled. His disagreement with Pope Clement VII about such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated by the pope. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy" as he invested heavily in the navy and increased its size from a few to more than 50 ships, and established the Navy Board.

Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536, as the second wife of King Henry VIII. The circumstances of her marriage and of her execution by beheading for treason and other charges made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that marked the start of the English Reformation. Anne was the daughter of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Howard, and was educated in the Netherlands and France, largely as a maid of honour to Queen Claude of France. Anne returned to England in early 1522, to marry her Irish cousin James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond; the marriage plans were broken off, and instead she secured a post at court as maid of honour to Henry VIII's wife, Catherine of Aragon.

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire

Buckinghamshire, abbreviated Bucks, is a ceremonial county in South East England that borders Greater London to the south-east, Berkshire to the south, Oxfordshire to the west, Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire to the north-east and Hertfordshire to the east.

Helions Bumpstead

Helions Bumpstead

Helions Bumpstead is a small village in Essex located near Haverhill and the Suffolk and Cambridgeshire borders. It is 2 miles from Steeple Bumpstead. Helions Bumpstead has "the greens"; Pale Green, Wiggens Green, and Drapers Green. There are four roads into and out of the village, they are; Mill Road, Water Lane, Sages End Road and Camps Road. The centre of the village is marked by the crossroads and village green. There is also a meadow with a pond in the centre of the village.

Cambridge

Cambridge

Cambridge is a university city and the county town in Cambridgeshire, England. It is located on the River Cam approximately 55 miles (89 km) north of London. As of the 2021 United Kingdom census, the population of Cambridge was 145,700. Cambridge became an important trading centre during the Roman and Viking ages, and there is archaeological evidence of settlement in the area as early as the Bronze Age. The first town charters were granted in the 12th century, although modern city status was not officially conferred until 1951.

Present day

Ashdon Primary School, a non-denominational, built in the Victorian Age, for 4–11 year olds is located in the village and has approximately 90 students and had Iain Dale, a Conservative Blogger.[20] Following an initiative to boost student numbers in 2014,[21] the school was still under capacity 4 years later.[22]

In 2013, Ashdon Forest School became the first fully outdoor pre-school to be assessed by Ofsted; it achieved a 2, or "Good" rating.[23][24]

In 2014, Hideout Leather, an Ashdon clothing manufacturer, was approached to design jackets for Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation.[25]

The village suffers from speeding, in 2018 over 1,000 vehicles were caught travelling at over 36mph in a 30mph zone, as such efforts were made to implement a 20mph speed limit.[5] However, 18 people picked up 18 bags full of litter (on average 1 bag per person).[5] The WI celebrated its centenary in 2018. [26]

By 2019, all the (27) historic streetlights were modernised. [27]

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Iain Dale

Iain Dale

Iain Campbell Dale is a British broadcaster, author and political commentator, and a former publisher and book retailer. He has been a blogger since 2002. In 2005, he became the first openly gay Conservative candidate to contest a parliamentary election. He was the publisher of the magazine Total Politics between 2008 and 2012, and the managing director of Biteback Publishing until May 2018. Since September 2010, he has hosted a regular discussion show on the radio station LBC. He was named Radio Presenter of the Year at the Arqiva Commercial Radio Awards in both 2013 and 2016.

Ofsted

Ofsted

The Office for Standards in Education, Children's Services and Skills (Ofsted) is a non-ministerial department of His Majesty's government, reporting to Parliament. Ofsted is responsible for inspecting a range of educational institutions, including state schools and some independent schools, in England. It also inspects childcare, adoption and fostering agencies and initial teacher training, and regulates a range of early years and children's social care services.

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation is a 2015 American action spy film written and directed by Christopher McQuarrie from a story by McQuarrie and Drew Pearce. It is the sequel to Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol (2011) and is the fifth installment in the Mission: Impossible film series. The film stars Tom Cruise, Jeremy Renner, Simon Pegg, Ving Rhames, Rebecca Ferguson, Sean Harris, and Alec Baldwin. In Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, Ethan Hunt (Cruise) and his team are on the run from the Central Intelligence Agency following the dissolution of the Impossible Missions Force (IMF) and must go to war with the Syndicate, an international black ops terrorist organization composed of rogue government agents from all over the world.

Women's Institute

Women's Institute

The Women's Institute (WI) is a community-based organisation for women in the United Kingdom, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand. The movement was founded in Stoney Creek, Ontario, Canada, by Erland and Janet Lee with Adelaide Hoodless being the first speaker in 1897. It was based on the British concept of Women's Guilds, created by Rev Archibald Charteris in 1887 and originally confined to the Church of Scotland. From Canada the organisation spread back to the motherland, throughout the British Empire and Commonwealth, and thence to other countries. Many WIs belong to the Associated Country Women of the World organization.

Governance

An electoral ward in the same name exists. The district ward contains the "Parishes of Ashdon, Hadstock and Sewards End together with the Little Walden ward of Saffron Walden parish."[28] This ward had a population of 1,736 at the 2011 census.[29]

Sport

The village has a cricket team that play at Waltons Park.[30] However, since 2017 the club has not played in a Saturday league. [31] There is also a football team Ashdon United and a cycling club Ashdon Velo .[2] It has hosted numerous cycle events in recent years, including the 2010 Regional Championships.[32]

Places

There is a windmill on the hill, Bragg's Mill, which has recently been renovated; it is one of the few remaining post mills in Essex. Historically the mill had a brewery and to celebrate the legacy of the mill an Ashdon Amber ale was brewed by Roughacre Brewery in neighbouring Castle Camps.[33] The restored windmill was opened on 23 September 2006 by Patricia Herrmann OBE, Vice Chairman of the Essex Environment Trust.[34] There is also a village museum with information on local history.

There are three religious centres in the village. These are two churches, All Saints' Church and Ashdon Baptist Church and the Buddhist retreat at Marpa House.[2] Ashdon Baptist Church has been in the village since 1809.[35] The parish church of All Saints dates from the 13th century, with later alterations.[36] A church bell is believed to be over 500 years old and in 1969 were restored after 90 years of absence. [12] [4] Marpa House Buddhist retreat was established in 1973 and is run by the Dharma Trust and practices the Karma Kagyu tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.[37] Businesses include a haunted pub (The Rose and Crown which was frequented by Cromwell),[38] as well as many farms.

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Bragg's Mill, Ashdon

Bragg's Mill, Ashdon

Bragg's Mill, William Bragg's Mill, Bartlow Hamlet Mill or Stevington End Mill is a grade II listed post mill at Ashdon, Essex, England which has been restored.

Post mill

Post mill

The post mill is the earliest type of European windmill. Its defining feature is that the whole body of the mill that houses the machinery is mounted on a single vertical post, around which it can be turned to bring the sails into the wind. All post mills have an arm projecting from them on the side opposite the sails and reaching down to near ground level. With some, as at Saxtead Green, the arm carries a fantail to turn the mill automatically. With the others the arm serves to rotate the mill into the wind by hand.

Castle Camps (village)

Castle Camps (village)

Castle Camps is a village and civil parish in the South Cambridgeshire district, in the county of Cambridgeshire, England. It is 15 miles (24 km) south-east of Cambridge and near to the borders of Suffolk and Essex and to the town of Haverhill. The population of the parish was 684 at the 2011 Census.

Order of the British Empire

Order of the British Empire

The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the civil service. It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female. There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of the order.

Karma Kagyu

Karma Kagyu

Karma Kagyu, or Kamtsang Kagyu, is a widely practiced and probably the second-largest lineage within the Kagyu school, one of the four major schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The lineage has long-standing monasteries in Tibet, China, Russia, Mongolia, India, Nepal and Bhutan, with current centres in over 60 countries. The spiritual head of the Karma Kagyu is the Gyalwa Karmapa; the 2nd through 10th Karmapas were principal spiritual advisors to successive emperors of China. The Karma Kagyu are sometimes called the "Black Hat" lamas, in reference to the Black Crown worn by the Karmapa.

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism

Tibetan Buddhism is the form of Buddhism practiced in Tibet and Bhutan, where it is the dominant religion. It is also in majority regions surrounding the Himalayas ,in much of Central Asia, in the Southern Siberian regions such as Tuva, and in Mongolia.

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell

Oliver Cromwell was an English politician and military officer who is widely regarded as one of the most important statesmen in English history. He came to prominence during the 1639 to 1651 Wars of the Three Kingdoms, first as a senior commander in the Parliamentarian army and then as a politician. A leading advocate of the execution of Charles I in January 1649, which led to the establishment of the Republican Commonwealth of England, Scotland and Ireland, he ruled as Lord Protector from December 1653 until his death in September 1658. Cromwell nevertheless remains a deeply controversial figure in both Britain and Ireland, due to his use of the military to first acquire, then retain political power, and the brutality of his 1649 Irish campaign.

Source: "Ashdon", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ashdon.

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Notes

1 There is dispute over whether battle occurred in North West Essex, in the area around Ashdon, or in South East Essex, in the area around Ashingdon (near Rochford).

References
  1. ^ a b "Civil Parish population 2011". Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  2. ^ a b c "Uttlesford Information regarding Ashdon". www.uttlesford.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  3. ^ "Civil Parish population 2001". Retrieved 12 December 2016.
  4. ^ a b c d e "Ashdon Village Walk". www.recordinguttlesfordhistory.org.uk. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  5. ^ a b c Player, Phillip (2018). "News from the Parish Council". Ashdon Village Magazine (Winter): 7.
  6. ^ a b "Battle Of Assandun: One Of The Great Battles In English History". Ancient Pages. 11 April 2016. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  7. ^ "A thousand years later, villagers will come together to remember battle which led to Danish conquest of England". Gazette. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  8. ^ ASHDON AND HADSTOCK MILLENNIUM GROUP. "ASHDON AND HADSTOCK MILLENNIUM GROUP PRESS RELEASE THE BATTLE OF ASSANDUN – 1000 YEARS ON! ESSEX VILLAGES CELEBRATE FAMOUS BATTLE *EXCITING SUMMER AND AUTUMN EVENTS*".
  9. ^ O’Gorman, Violet. "Hundreds turn out to enjoy Battle of Assandun re-enactment". Saffron Walden Reporter. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  10. ^ "Ashdon fights for 1000 year celebration". Haverhill Echo. 16 September 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2018.
  11. ^ Berry, Franki. "Dr Rowan Williams, former Archbishop of Canterbury, came to Hadstock to commemorate the 1000 year anniversary of the Battle of Assandun". Saffron Walden Reporter. Retrieved 11 December 2018.
  12. ^ a b Lester, Mat (2018). "Friends of All Saints Church, Ashdon; Open Day,". Ashdon Village Magazine (Winter): 14.
  13. ^ a b "Ashdon Parish Council | A Brief History of Ashdon Parish". www.ashdonparish.co.uk. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  14. ^ "Rural Radicalism Conference". History Workshop. 17 May 2016. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  15. ^ a b "Country Standard: Essex Agricultural Labourers". Country Standard. 25 April 2007. Retrieved 23 December 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d e Aylmer, P (2013). Walking in Essex: 25 day walks and a cross-country route. Milnthorpe, Cumbria: Cicerone. p. 112. ISBN 978-1-85284-697-8.
  17. ^ a b c "Ashdon Conservation Area Appraisal and Management Proposals, Approved January 2013" (PDF). www.uttlesford.gov.uk. Retrieved 5 December 2018.
  18. ^ "Ashdon Halt". Pocket Book. 10 April 2013. Retrieved 12 December 2018.
  19. ^ Green, David (2020). "8th May 1945 - 75 Years on". Ashdon Village Magazine (Summer): 14–15.
  20. ^ "Ashdon Primary School". www.ofsted.gov.uk. Archived from the original on 10 October 2007. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  21. ^ Cooke, Phoebe. "Village schools open for business, says group of 12 Uttlesford headteachers in open letter". Saffron Walden Reporter. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  22. ^ Rolfe, H. (2018, Winter). Howard Rolfe District Councillor. The Ashdon Village Magazine, (121), 33.
  23. ^ Barkham, Patrick (9 December 2014). "Forest schools: fires, trees and mud pies". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 9 December 2018.
  24. ^ Ward, Lucy (13 May 2014). "How can teachers introduce forest school principles to their curriculum?". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 9 December 2018.
  25. ^ "Ashdon company tailors for Hollywood stars with Mission: Impossible leathers". Haverhill Echo. 8 August 2015. Retrieved 12 December 2018.
  26. ^ "100 Years of the W.I.!". Ashdon Village Magazine (Winter): 15. 2018.
  27. ^ Player, Philip (2019). "News from the Parish Council". Ashdon Village Magazine (Spring): 15.
  28. ^ "Uttlesford District Council - Uttlesford District Wards and Representation". www.uttlesford.gov.uk. Retrieved 12 December 2018.
  29. ^ "Ward population 2011". Retrieved 25 September 2015.
  30. ^ "Ashdon - No Ordinary Village". www.beechesnursery.co.uk. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  31. ^ "Ashdon Cricket Club". Ashdon Village Magazine (Spring): 16. 2019.
  32. ^ Muir, Fergus. "Lyons roars to amazing fourth title". East Anglian Daily Times. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  33. ^ Arnold, E.; Curtis, N.; Hardy, A.; How, D.; & Wilson, B. (2018, Winter). Ashdon Windmill Trust. The Ashdon Village Magazine, (121), 32
  34. ^ "Restoration Update". Ashdon Windmill Trust Limited website. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  35. ^ "Ashdon Baptist Church". Archived from the original on 25 July 2009. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  36. ^ "All Saints". The Swan Family and Ashdon in Essex. Archived from the original on 30 September 2006. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  37. ^ "Welcome". www.marpahouse.org.uk. Archived from the original on 5 February 2007. Retrieved 23 January 2007.
  38. ^ "Ashdon Parish Council | Landmarks". www.ashdonparish.co.uk. Retrieved 5 January 2019.
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