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Arne (daughter of Aeolus)

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In Greek mythology, Arne (/ˈɑːrn/; Ancient Greek: Ἄρνη), also called Melanippe[1] or Antiopa[2], was the daughter of Aeolus and Melanippe (also Hippe or Euippe), daughter of Chiron.[3]

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Greek mythology

Greek mythology

A major branch of classical mythology, Greek mythology is the body of myths originally told by the ancient Greeks, and a genre of Ancient Greek folklore. These stories concern the origin and nature of the world, the lives and activities of deities, heroes, and mythological creatures, and the origins and significance of the ancient Greeks' own cult and ritual practices. Modern scholars study the myths to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece, and to better understand the nature of myth-making itself.

Melanippe (daughter of Aeolus)

Melanippe (daughter of Aeolus)

In Greek mythology, Melanippe, also known as Arne or Antiopa, was the daughter of Aeolus and the precedent Melanippe. She was the mother by Poseidon, of the twins Aeolus (Hellen) and Boeotus.

Antiope (Greek myth)

Antiope (Greek myth)

In Greek mythology, Antiope or Antiopa may refer to the followingAntiope, daughter of King Belus of Egypt and possibly, Achiroe, naiad daughter of the river-god Nilus. She was the sister of Agenor II, Phineus, Aegyptus, Danaus, Cepheus and Ninus. By her uncle, King Agenor I of Tyre, Antiope became the mother of Cadmus and his siblings. In some accounts, this daughter of Belus was called Damno. Antiope, daughter of Aeolus, by whom Poseidon begot Boeotus and Hellen (Aeolus). She was also called Arne or Melanippe, in some accounts. Antiope, nymph of Pieria and the mother, by Pierus, of the Pierides, nine sisters who challenged the muses and, on their defeat, were turned into birds. Antiope, consort of Helios and possible mother of Aeetes and Aloeus. Antiope, sister of Hippolyte, kidnapped by Theseus during Heracles' ninth labour. Antiope, mother of Amphion by Zeus, associated with the mythology of Thebes, Greece. Antiope, also called Antioche, daughter of Pylon and wife of Eurytus. Antiope, a Thespian princess as one of the 50 daughters of King Thespius and Megamede or by one of his many wives. When Heracles hunted and ultimately slayed the Cithaeronian lion, Antiope with her other sisters, except for one, all laid with the hero in a night, a week or for 50 days as what their father strongly desired it to be. Antiope bore Heracles a son, Alopius. Antiope, wife of Laocoön.

Aeolus (son of Hellen)

Aeolus (son of Hellen)

In Greek mythology, Aeolus or Aiolos was the son of Hellen, the ruler of Aeolia, and the eponym of the Aeolians, one of the four main tribes of the Greeks. According to the mythographer Apollodorus, Aeolus was the father of seven sons: Cretheus, Sisyphus, Athamas, Salmoneus, Deion, Magnes, Perieres, and five daughters: Canace, Alcyone, Pisidice, Calyce, and Perimede. He was said to have killed his daughter Canace because she had committed incest with her brother Macareus. This Aeolus was sometimes confused with the Aeolus who was the ruler of the winds.

Melanippe

Melanippe

In Greek mythology, Melanippe referred to several different people:Melanippe, daughter of the Centaur Chiron. Also known as Hippe or Euippe. She bore a daughter to Aeolus, Melanippe or Arne. She escaped to Mount Pelion so that her father would not find out that she was pregnant, but, being searched for, she prayed to Artemis asking for assistance, and the goddess transformed her into a mare. Other accounts state that the transformation was a punishment for her having scorned Artemis, or for having divulged the secrets of gods. She was later placed among the stars. Melanippe, daughter of Aeolus and the precedent Melanippe. Melanippe, a Aetolian princess as the daughter of King Oeneus of Calydon and Althaea, daughter of King Thestius of Pleuron. As one of the Meleagrids, she was turned into a guinea fowl by Artemis after the death of her brother, Meleager. Melanippe, an Amazon, sister of Hippolyta, Penthesilea and Antiope, daughter of Ares. Heracles captured her and demanded Hippolyte's girdle in exchange for her freedom. Hippolyte complied and Heracles let her go. Some say that it was Melanippe whom Theseus abducted and married. Yet others relate that she was killed by Telamon. Melanippe, wife of Hippotes, son of Mimas, himself son of Aeolus, and the mother of another Aeolus. Melanippe, a nymph who married Itonus, son of Amphictyon. Melanippe, possible wife of King Chalcodon of Euboea and mother of Elephenor. Melanippe, an emendation for "Medippe" in Servius' commentaries on Aeneid.

Hippe

Hippe

In Greek mythology, Hippe, also known as Melanippe or Euippe, was the daughter of the Centaur Chiron and Chariclo. She was seduced by, and bore a daughter, Melanippe or Arne, to Aeolus, and was ashamed to tell her father. Artemis took pity on her and, according to one account, turned her into the constellation Pegasus originally called the Horse.

Euippe

Euippe

Euippe or Evippe is the name of eight women in Greek mythology:Euippe, a daughter of Danaus and the naiad Polyxo. She married Imbrus, son of Aegyptus and Caliadne. Euippe, another daughter of Danaus, this time by an Ethiopian woman. She married either Argius, son of Aegyptus and a Phoenician woman, or Agenor, son of Aegyptus. Euippe, another name for Hippe, daughter of Chiron. Euippe of Paionia, the mother, by Pierus, of the Pierides, nine sisters who challenged the Muses and, on their defeat, were turned into magpies. Euippe. She bore Odysseus a son, Euryalus, who was later mistakenly slain by his father. Euippe, daughter of Leucon. She bore Andreus a son, Eteocles, king of Orchomenus. Euippe, daughter of Daunus, the king of a people in Italy. She was loved by Alaenus, half-brother of Diomedes. Euippe, mother of Meriones by Molus. Hyginus referred to her by a different name, which survives in a corrupt form, *Melphis.

Chiron

Chiron

In Greek mythology, Chiron was held to be the superlative centaur amongst his brethren since he was called the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs".

Mythology

Arne was born as a foal as her mother had been transformed into a horse as a disguise, but was returned to the human form and renamed Arne. According to John Tzetzes, Arne was the nurse of the young Poseidon, who denied knowing where he was when Cronus came searching for him.[4] Aeolus entrusted her to the care of one Desmontes. However, Poseidon fathered Aeolus and Boeotus[5] with her while he was in the form of a bull. Enraged, Desmontes entombed and blinded her and placed her twin sons on Mount Pelion. She was later rescued by her sons and married king Metapontus of Icaria, and Poseidon restored her vision.[6][3]

Through Boeotus, she was the ancestress of the Boeotians.[6] A city named after her was recorded in the Iliad's Catalogue of Ships which has been tentatively identified with the ruins of Gla.

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John Tzetzes

John Tzetzes

John Tzetzes was a Byzantine poet and grammarian who is known to have lived at Constantinople in the 12th century.

Poseidon

Poseidon

Poseidon was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth, god of the sea, storms, earthquakes and horses. In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes. He also had the cult title "earth shaker". In the myths of isolated Arcadia he is related with Demeter and Persephone and he was venerated as a horse, however, it seems that he was originally a god of the waters. He is often regarded as the tamer or father of horses, and with a strike of his trident, he created springs which are related to the word horse. His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

Cronus

Cronus

In Ancient Greek religion and mythology, Cronus, Cronos, or Kronos was the leader and youngest of the first generation of Titans, the divine descendants of the primordial Gaia and Uranus. He overthrew his father and ruled during the mythological Golden Age, until he was overthrown by his own son Zeus and imprisoned in Tartarus. According to Plato, however, the deities Phorcys, Cronus, and Rhea were the eldest children of Oceanus and Tethys.

Aeolus (son of Poseidon)

Aeolus (son of Poseidon)

In Greek mythology, Aeolus was a son of Poseidon by Arne, daughter of Aeolus. He had a twin brother named Boeotus.

Boeotus (son of Poseidon)

Boeotus (son of Poseidon)

In Greek mythology, Boeotus was the eponym of Boeotia in Greece. Poseidon fathered both Aeolus and Boeotus with Arne (Melanippe). It was then through Boeotus that Arne became the ancestress of the Boeotians. In some traditions, Boeotus is the father of Ogyges.

Bull

Bull

A bull is an intact adult male of the species Bos taurus (cattle). More muscular and aggressive than the females of the same species, bulls have long been an important symbol in many religions, including for sacrifices. These animals play a significant role in beef ranching, dairy farming, and a variety of sporting and cultural activities, including bullfighting and bull riding. Their use in herd maintenance is part of their monetary value.

Pelion

Pelion

Pelion or Pelium is a mountain at the southeastern part of Thessaly in northern Greece, forming a hook-like peninsula between the Pagasetic Gulf and the Aegean Sea. Its highest summit, Pourianos Stavros, is 1,624 metres (5,328 ft) amsl. The Greek National Road 38 (GR-38) runs through the southern portion of the peninsula and GR-38A runs through the middle.

Icaria

Icaria

Icaria, also spelled Ikaria, is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, 10 nautical miles (19 km) southwest of Samos. According to tradition, it derives its name from Icarus, the son of Daedalus in Greek mythology, who was believed to have fallen into the sea nearby.

Boeotia

Boeotia

Boeotia, sometimes Latinized as Boiotia or Beotia, formerly known as Cadmeis, is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the region of Central Greece. Its capital is Livadeia, and its largest city is Thebes.

Iliad

Iliad

The Iliad is one of two major ancient Greek epic poems attributed to Homer. It is one of the oldest extant works of literature still widely read by modern audiences. As with the Odyssey, the poem is divided into 24 books and contains 15,693 lines in its most widely accepted version, and was written in dactylic hexameter. Set towards the end of the Trojan War, a ten-year siege of the city of Troy by a coalition of Mycenaean Greek states, the poem depicts significant events in the siege's final weeks. In particular, it depicts a fierce quarrel between King Agamemnon and a celebrated warrior, Achilles. It is a central part of the Epic Cycle. The Iliad is often regarded as the first substantial piece of European literature.

Catalogue of Ships

Catalogue of Ships

The Catalogue of Ships is an epic catalogue in Book 2 of Homer's Iliad (2.494–759), which lists the contingents of the Achaean army that sailed to Troy. The catalogue gives the names of the leaders of each contingent, lists the settlements in the kingdom represented by the contingent, sometimes with a descriptive epithet that fills out a half-verse or articulates the flow of names and parentage and place, and gives the number of ships required to transport the men to Troy, offering further differentiations of weightiness. A similar, though shorter, Catalogue of the Trojans and their allies follows (2.816–877). A similar catalogue appears in the Pseudo-Apollodoran Bibliotheca.

Gla

Gla

Gla, also called Glas (Γλας), was an important fortified site of the Mycenaean civilization, located in Boeotia, mainland Greece. Despite its impressive size, more than ten times larger than contemporary Athens or Tiryns, Gla is not mentioned in the Iliad.

Source: "Arne (daughter of Aeolus)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arne_(daughter_of_Aeolus).

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See also
Notes
  1. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 186
  2. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 157
  3. ^ a b Diodorus Siculus, 4.67.3–5
  4. ^ Tzetzes ad Lycophron, 644
  5. ^ Scholia on Homer, Iliad B, 494, p. 80, 43 ed. Bekk. as cited in Hellanicus' Boeotica
  6. ^ a b Graves, R (1955). "The Sons of Hellen". Greek Myths. London: Penguin. pp. 158–59. ISBN 0-14-001026-2.
References


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