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Argentina–Brazil football rivalry

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Brazil–Argentina football rivalry
Olymics final 2008.jpg
Both countries' U23 team met at the 2008 Summer Olympics
Other namesClásico del Atlántico or Clássico do Atlântico
LocationCONMEBOL
Teams Argentina
 Brazil
First meetingArgentina 3–0 Brazil
Friendly
20 September 1914[1]
Latest meetingArgentina 0–0 Brazil
2022 World Cup qualification
16 November 2021
Statistics
Meetings total109
Most winsBrazil (42)
Most player appearancesJavier Zanetti (16)
Top scorerPelé (8)
Largest victoryArgentina 6–1 Brazil
Roca Cup
5 March 1940

The Brazil-Argentina football rivalry (Spanish: Superclásico de las Américas; Portuguese: Superclássico das Américas) is a sports rivalry between the national football teams of the two countries and their respective sets of fans.[2] Games between the two teams, even those that are only friendly matches, are often marked by notable and controversial incidents. The rivalry has also been referred to as the "Battle of the Americas." FIFA has described it as the "essence of football rivalry".[3] CNN ranked it second on their top 10 list of international rivalries—only below the older England–Scotland football rivalry.[4]

Brazil-Argentina matches are often known for the high level of competitiveness and talent between the two teams.[5] Brazil and Argentina are the two teams with the highest average football Elo Rating calculated over the entire team history, with 1994 and 1984 points respectively.[6] Both are also routinely ranked among the top ten national teams in the world in both the FIFA World Rankings and the World Football Elo Ratings.[7] Both countries have produced players considered at the time the best in the world, such as Alfredo Di Stéfano, Diego Maradona and Lionel Messi for Argentina, and Pelé, Ronaldo and Ronaldinho for Brazil.[8]

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Portuguese language

Portuguese language

Portuguese is a western Romance language of the Indo-European language family, originating in the Iberian Peninsula of Europe. It is an official language of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Verde, Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau and São Tomé and Príncipe, while having co-official language status in East Timor, Equatorial Guinea, and Macau. A Portuguese-speaking person or nation is referred to as "Lusophone". As the result of expansion during colonial times, a cultural presence of Portuguese speakers is also found around the world. Portuguese is part of the Ibero-Romance group that evolved from several dialects of Vulgar Latin in the medieval Kingdom of Galicia and the County of Portugal, and has kept some Celtic phonology in its lexicon.

Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel the ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposition by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

Fan (person)

Fan (person)

A fan or fanatic, sometimes also termed an aficionado or enthusiast, is a person who exhibits strong interest or admiration for something or somebody, such as a celebrity, a sport, a sports team, a genre, a politician, a book, a movie, a video game or an entertainer. Collectively, the fans of a particular object or person constitute its fanbase or fandom. They may show their enthusiasm in a variety of ways, such as by promoting the object of their interest, being members of a related fan club, holding or participating in fan conventions or writing fan mail. They may also engage in creative activities such as creating fanzines, writing fan fiction, making memes or drawing fan art.

FIFA

FIFA

FIFA is the international governing body of association football, beach football and futsal. It was founded in 1904 to oversee international competition among the national associations of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. Headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, its membership now comprises 211 national associations. These national associations must each also be members of one of the six regional confederations into which the world is divided: CAF (Africa), AFC, UEFA (Europe), CONCACAF, OFC (Oceania) and CONMEBOL.

CNN

CNN

The Cable News Network (CNN) is a multinational cable news channel headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. Founded in 1980 by American media proprietor Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld as a 24-hour cable news channel, and presently owned by the Manhattan-based media conglomerate Warner Bros. Discovery, CNN was the first television channel to provide 24-hour news coverage and the first all-news television channel in the United States.

England–Scotland football rivalry

England–Scotland football rivalry

The England–Scotland football rivalry, between the England and Scotland national football teams, is the oldest international fixture in the world, first played in 1872 at Hamilton Crescent, Glasgow. Scottish nationalism has been a factor in the Scots' desire to defeat England above all other rivals, with Scottish sports journalists traditionally referring to the English as the "Auld Enemy".

Brazil national football team

Brazil national football team

The Brazil national football team, nicknamed Seleção Canarinho, represents Brazil in men's international football and is administered by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF), the governing body for football in Brazil. They have been a member of FIFA since 1923 and a member of CONMEBOL since 1916.

Argentina national football team

Argentina national football team

The Argentina national football team represents Argentina in men's international football and is administered by the Argentine Football Association, the governing body for football in Argentina.

Alfredo Di Stéfano

Alfredo Di Stéfano

Alfredo Stéfano Di Stéfano Laulhé was an Argentine-born professional footballer and coach who played as a forward, regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time. Nicknamed "Saeta rubia", he is best known for his achievements with Real Madrid, where he was instrumental in the club's domination of the European Cup and La Liga during the 1950s and 1960s. Along with Francisco Gento and José María Zárraga, he was one of only three players to play a part in all five European Cup victories, scoring goals in each of the five finals. Di Stéfano played international football mostly for Spain after moving to Madrid, but he also played for Argentina and Colombia.

Diego Maradona

Diego Maradona

Diego Armando Maradona was an Argentine professional football player and manager. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the sport, he was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the 20th Century award. Maradona's vision, passing, ball control, and dribbling skills were combined with his small stature, which gave him a low centre of gravity allowing him to manoeuvre better than most other players. His presence and leadership on the field had a great effect on his team's general performance, while he would often be singled out by the opposition. In addition to his creative abilities, he possessed an eye for goal and was known to be a free kick specialist. A precocious talent, Maradona was given the nickname "El Pibe de Oro", a name that stuck with him throughout his career. He also had a troubled off-field life and was banned in both 1991 and 1994 for abusing drugs.

Lionel Messi

Lionel Messi

Lionel Andrés Messi, also known as Leo Messi, is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a forward for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain and captains the Argentina national team. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Messi has won a record seven Ballon d'Or awards, a record six European Golden Shoes, and in 2020 was named to the Ballon d'Or Dream Team. Until leaving the club in 2021, he had spent his entire professional career with Barcelona, where he won a club-record 35 trophies, including ten La Liga titles, seven Copa del Rey titles and four UEFA Champions Leagues. A prolific goalscorer and creative playmaker, Messi holds the records for most goals in La Liga (474), most goals in a La Liga and European league season (50), most hat-tricks in La Liga (36) and the UEFA Champions League (8), and most assists in La Liga (192), a La Liga season (21) and the Copa América (17). He also holds the record for most international goals by a South American male (93). Messi has scored over 785 senior career goals for club and country, and has the most goals by a player for a single club (672).

Pelé

Pelé

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pelé, is a Brazilian former professional footballer who played as a forward. Regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, and labelled "the greatest" by FIFA, he was among the most successful and popular sports figures of the 20th century. In 1999, he was named Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee and was included in the Time list of the 100 most important people of the 20th century. In 2000, Pelé was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), and was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the Century. His 1,279 goals in 1,363 games, which includes friendlies, is recognised as a Guinness World Record.

History

The origins of the football rivalry between Argentina and Brazil can be traced to a time before football became so popular in both countries.[9] Today, few remember wars and other political confrontations between both countries, and only recall matches, victories, goals, and other sport-related incidents. Their rivalry is found in almost all sports, but a men's football match between Argentina and Brazil is one that neither side wants to lose, and often acquires more importance than the championship within which it takes place. To exemplify the intensity of this rivalry, one only needs to remember that after the 1946 incidents (see below), the two teams did not play against each other for ten years; either team would decline to play in a given cup so that they would never have to play against the neighboring country.

A Brazilian defender threw the ball before Laguna reaches it, during the 1916 Copa América. Brazil wore a green and yellow striped jersey for that game

Since their first match in 1914, the national teams have played 105 matches counting friendlies, FIFA World Cup matches, and other official competitions (excluding matches between youth sides).

Even though there is a difference depending on whether the Argentine Football Association (AFA) or the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF) does the counting, the near-balance is not in dispute. According to FIFA, of the 105 matches played between both national teams, Argentina and Brazil hold 38 and 41 victories, respectively, with 26 draws. Argentina has 160 goals, while Brazil has 163. Only counting World Cup matches, Brazil is slightly ahead with two wins, one draw, and one loss, whereas in the Copa América matches, Argentina holds a comfortable lead with 14 victories, 8 draws, and 9 defeats. Of the 60 friendly matches, 25 went to Brazil, 20 to Argentina, and 16 were draws.

Both captains shake hands before playing a match at the 1923 Copa América

Since the first match between the two countries in 1914, Argentina dominated the early years with more than double the Brazilian victories. This is even when Brazil was world champion in 1958 and 1962. However, the 1970s proved to be dark times for Argentina, with seven defeats, four draws, and only one victory, although it should be mentioned that one of the draws came in the 1978 World Cup played in Argentina. The 0–0 draw helped Argentina reach their second World Cup final and their first World Cup title. In the 1978 World Cup, Brazil was left behind, playing for third place.

The highest scoring wins between these two nations were for Argentina 6–1 (at home in Buenos Aires, 1940) and 1–5 (away at Rio de Janeiro, 1939), for Brazil 6–2 (at home in Rio de Janeiro, 1945) and 1–4 (away at Buenos Aires, 1960).

The most important victory matches between these two nations were, for Argentina, the 2–0 match in the 1937 Copa América final,[10] the tie 0–0 in the 1978 World Cup that helped them to reach the final and their first World Cup title, the 1–0 victory over Brazil in the 1990 World Cup which eliminated Brazil from the World Cup in the Round of 16, and the 1–0 victory over Brazil in the 2021 Copa América Final, played in the Maracana Stadium.

For Brazil, the most important were two Copa America victories in the Copa America finals. The first, in Peru in 2004, saw Brazil win in a penalty shootout (4–2) after a (2–2) draw, and the second was a (3–0) win in the 2007 Copa América final played in Venezuela.[11] Another important victory for Brazil was the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup final, where the Brazilians defeated Argentina 4–1 in the decisive match.

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Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel the ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposition by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

1916 South American Championship

1916 South American Championship

The 1916 South American Championship was the first continental championship for national association football teams in South America. It was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 2 to 17 July during Argentina's Independence Centenary commemorations. The tournament was won by Uruguay, who drew with Argentina in the last match of the tournament at Racing Club Stadium.

Argentine Football Association

Argentine Football Association

The Argentine Football Association is the governing body of football in Argentina based in Buenos Aires. It organises the main divisions of Argentine league system, including domestic cups: Copa Argentina, Copa de la Liga Profesional and the Trofeo de Campeones de la Liga Profesional. The body also manages all the Argentina national teams, including the Senior, U-20, U-17, U-15, Olympic and women's squads. Secondly, it also organizes the women's, children, youth, futsal, and other local leagues.

Brazilian Football Confederation

Brazilian Football Confederation

The Brazilian Football Confederation is the governing body of football in Brazil. It was founded on Monday, 8 June 1914, as Federação Brasileira de Sports, and renamed Confederação Brasileira de Desportos in 1916. The football confederation, as known today, separated from other sports associations on 24 September 1979. Between 1914 and 1979 it was the governing body, or at least the international reference, for other olympic sports, such as tennis, athletics, handball, swimming and waterpolo. It currently has the most wins on FIFA world cups, with a total of five.

1923 South American Championship

1923 South American Championship

The seventh edition of the South American Championship was held in Montevideo, Uruguay from 29 October to 2 December 1923.

1978 FIFA World Cup

1978 FIFA World Cup

The 1978 FIFA World Cup was the 11th edition of the FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial international football world championship tournament among the men's senior national teams. It was held in Argentina between 1 and 25 June.

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires, officially the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, is the capital and primate city of Argentina. The city is located on the western shore of the Río de la Plata, on South America's southeastern coast. "Buenos Aires" can be translated as "fair winds" or "good airs", but the former was the meaning intended by the founders in the 16th century, by the use of the original name "Real de Nuestra Señora Santa María del Buen Ayre", named after the Madonna of Bonaria in Sardinia, Italy. Buenos Aires is classified as an alpha global city, according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) 2020 ranking.

1937 South American Championship

1937 South American Championship

The fourteenth edition of the South American Championship of football was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 27 December 1936 to 1 February 1937.

1990 FIFA World Cup

1990 FIFA World Cup

The 1990 FIFA World Cup was the 14th FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams. It was held from 8 June to 8 July 1990 in Italy, the second country to host the event for a second time. Teams representing 116 national football associations entered and qualification began in April 1988. 22 teams qualified from this process, along with host nation Italy and defending champions Argentina.

2021 Copa América Final

2021 Copa América Final

The 2021 Copa América Final was a football match to determine the winners of the 2021 Copa América. The match was the 47th final of the Copa América, a quadrennial tournament contested by the men's national teams of the member associations of CONMEBOL. The match was held at Estádio do Maracanã in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 10 July 2021.

2005 FIFA Confederations Cup

2005 FIFA Confederations Cup

The 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup football tournament was the seventh FIFA Confederations Cup. It was held in Germany between 15 June and 29 June 2005, as a prelude to the 2006 FIFA World Cup. The tournament was won by 2002 FIFA World Cup winners Brazil, who defeated Argentina 4–1 in the final at the Waldstadion in Frankfurt. The final was a rematch of the Copa América final also won by Brazil. It was Brazil's second win at the Confederations Cup.

Brazilians

Brazilians

Brazilians are the citizens of Brazil. A Brazilian can also be a person born abroad to a Brazilian parent or legal guardian as well as a person who acquired Brazilian citizenship. Brazil is a multiethnic society, which means that it is home to people of many ethnic origins, and there is no correlation between one's stock and their Brazilian identity.

Statistics

Major official titles comparison

Senior titles ARG BRA
FIFA World Cup
2
5
FIFA Confederations Cup
1
4
Copa América
15
9
Panamerican Championship
1
2
CONMEBOL–UEFA Cup of Champions
2
0
Total senior titles
21
20
Youth titles ARG BRA
Summer Olympics
2
2
Pan American Games
7
4
CONMEBOL Pre-Olympic Tournament
7
5
FIFA U-20 World Cup
6
5
FIFA U-17 World Cup
2
2
South American U-20 Championship
9
7
South American U-17 Championship
4
12
South American U-15 Championship
1
5
South American Games
2
0
Total youth titles
40
42
Grand total
53
70

Head-to-head

As of 16 November 2021
Tournament Matches played Argentina win Draw Brazil win Argentina goals Brazil goals
FIFA World Cup 4 1 1 2 3 5
FIFA Confederations Cup 1 0 0 1 1 4
Mundialito[2] 1 0 1 0 1 1
Copa América 34 16 8 10 53 40
FIFA World Cup qualification 9 2 3 4 9 15
Panamerican Championship 3 1 1 1 4 4
Total official matches 52 20 14 18 71 69
Roca Cup[12] 21 9 3 9 50 45
Superclásico de las Américas 8 3 1 4 5 8
Taça do Atlântico[note 1] 5 1 1 3 3 9
Copa ZH 35th Anniversary [note 2] 2 1 0 1 4 4
Copa Roberto Chery[15] 1 0 1 0 3 3
Copa Confraternidad[16] 1 0 0 1 0 2
Taça das Nações[17] 1 1 0 0 3 0
Australia Bicentenary Gold Cup[18] 1 0 1 0 0 0
Copa Centenario de la AFA [note 3] 1 0 1 0 1 1
Friendly matches 16 6 4 6 22 25
Grand total 109 40 26 43 162 166

Knockouts

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FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

FIFA Confederations Cup

FIFA Confederations Cup

The FIFA Confederations Cup was an international association football tournament for men's national teams, held every four years by FIFA. It was contested by the holders of each of the six continental championships, along with the current FIFA World Cup holder and the host nation, to bring the number of teams up to eight.

Copa América

Copa América

The Copa América or CONMEBOL Copa América, known until 1975 as the South American Football Championship, is the top men's football tournament contested among national teams from South America. It is the oldest still-running continental football competition, as well as the third most watched in the world. The competition determines the champions of South America. Since the 1990s, teams from North America and Asia have also been invited to compete.

Panamerican Championship

Panamerican Championship

The Panamerican Championship was an international football tournament held by the Panamerican Football Confederation every four years with three editions held from 1952 through 1960.

CONMEBOL–UEFA Cup of Champions

CONMEBOL–UEFA Cup of Champions

The CONMEBOL–UEFA Cup of Champions, previously known officially as the European/South American Nations Cup and commonly as the Artemio Franchi Cup, is an official intercontinental football match organised by CONMEBOL and UEFA and contested by the winners of the Copa América and UEFA European Championship. Organised as a quadrennial one-off match, it is a national team equivalent to the defunct Intercontinental Cup between the club champions of Europe and South America. The competition was held twice, in 1985 and 1993, before being discontinued. It was relaunched starting in 2022, where it was branded as the Finalissima, after the signing of a memorandum of understanding between CONMEBOL and UEFA.

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics

Football at the Summer Olympics, referred to as the Olympic Football Tournament, has been included in every Summer Olympic Games as a men's competition sport, except 1896 and 1932. Women's football was added to the official program at the Atlanta 1996 Games.

Football at the Pan American Games

Football at the Pan American Games

Football (soccer) at the Pan American Games has been included in every Pan American Games as a men's competition sport, since the first edition of the multi-sports event in 1951. The competition is organized by the Pan American Sports Organization.

CONMEBOL Pre-Olympic Tournament

CONMEBOL Pre-Olympic Tournament

The CONMEBOL Preolímpico is an international association football event in the South America region organized by CONMEBOL. It is the qualification tournament for the football tournament at the Olympic Games.

FIFA U-20 World Cup

FIFA U-20 World Cup

The FIFA U-20 World Cup is the biennial football world championship tournament for FIFA members’ men's national teams with players under the age of 20. The competition has been staged every two years since the inaugural tournament in 1977 when it was hosted by Tunisia, under the tournament name of FIFA World Youth Championship until 2005. In 2007 the name was changed to its present form. The current title holder is Ukraine which won its first title at the 2019 tournament in Poland.

FIFA U-17 World Cup

FIFA U-17 World Cup

The FIFA U-17 World Cup, founded as the FIFA U-16 World Championship, later changed to U-17 in 1991 and to its current name in 2007, is the world championship of association football for male players under the age of 17 organized by Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). The current champion is Brazil, which won its fourth title at the 2019 tournament on home soil.

Football at the South American Games

Football at the South American Games

Football at the South American Games is the football tournament of the South American Games. Olympic/youth teams from South America have participated in it throughout its history.

FIFA World Cup qualification

FIFA World Cup qualification

The FIFA World Cup qualification is a competitive match that a national association football team takes in order to qualify for one of the available berths at the final tournament of the (men's) FIFA World Cup.

List of matches

Complete list of matches between both sides:

Note: Matches held before 1914 (when the Brazilian Football Confederation was established) are not recognized by FIFA so the International Federation considers that Brazilian squads formed until then were not official representatives of the country.

Before 1914, Argentina had toured Brazil twice, the first time in 1908,ref>Gazeta de Noticias, 23 June 1908 returning in 1912.[20]

Recognised matches

Unrecognised matches

List of matches played from 1908 to 1914 – before the CBF was established – between the Argentina national team and diverse representatives (named themselves "Brazil"), such as Liga Paulista and Liga Carioca combined, or clubs (Paulistano, SC Americano), among others. It is believed that in the first match held on 2 July 1908, Argentina wore the light blue and white shirt for the first time,[21] although other sources state that the shirt debuted in a Copa Newton match v Uruguay in September that year.[22] In 1913, a Liga Paulista team arrived in Argentina to play two friendly matches there.[21]

  1. ^ 1976 Taça do Atlântico matches also counted for the 1976 Roca Cup[13][12]
  2. ^ Organised by the Porto Alegre newspaper Zero Hora to celebrate its 35th. anniversary.[14]
  3. ^ Organised by the Argentine Football Association to celebrate its 100th. anniversary. Not to be confused with the homonymous Argentine national cup.[19]
  4. ^ This match was not of Brazil national team, but Rio de Janeiro state football team[23][24]

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Brazilian Football Confederation

Brazilian Football Confederation

The Brazilian Football Confederation is the governing body of football in Brazil. It was founded on Monday, 8 June 1914, as Federação Brasileira de Sports, and renamed Confederação Brasileira de Desportos in 1916. The football confederation, as known today, separated from other sports associations on 24 September 1979. Between 1914 and 1979 it was the governing body, or at least the international reference, for other olympic sports, such as tennis, athletics, handball, swimming and waterpolo. It currently has the most wins on FIFA world cups, with a total of five.

FIFA

FIFA

FIFA is the international governing body of association football, beach football and futsal. It was founded in 1904 to oversee international competition among the national associations of Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. Headquartered in Zürich, Switzerland, its membership now comprises 211 national associations. These national associations must each also be members of one of the six regional confederations into which the world is divided: CAF (Africa), AFC, UEFA (Europe), CONCACAF, OFC (Oceania) and CONMEBOL.

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires, officially the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, is the capital and primate city of Argentina. The city is located on the western shore of the Río de la Plata, on South America's southeastern coast. "Buenos Aires" can be translated as "fair winds" or "good airs", but the former was the meaning intended by the founders in the 16th century, by the use of the original name "Real de Nuestra Señora Santa María del Buen Ayre", named after the Madonna of Bonaria in Sardinia, Italy. Buenos Aires is classified as an alpha global city, according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) 2020 ranking.

Estadio G.E.B.A.

Estadio G.E.B.A.

The Estadio GEBA is a multi-use stadium in the Palermo neighbourhood in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Owned by Club Gimnasia y Esgrima, the stadium is located on the "Sede Jorge Newbery", one of the three facilities of the club. Its current capacity is 18,000 spectators.

1916 South American Championship

1916 South American Championship

The 1916 South American Championship was the first continental championship for national association football teams in South America. It was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 2 to 17 July during Argentina's Independence Centenary commemorations. The tournament was won by Uruguay, who drew with Argentina in the last match of the tournament at Racing Club Stadium.

Montevideo

Montevideo

Montevideo is the capital and largest city of Uruguay. According to the 2011 census, the city proper has a population of 1,319,108 in an area of 201 square kilometers (78 sq mi). Montevideo is situated on the southern coast of the country, on the northeastern bank of the Río de la Plata.

1917 South American Championship

1917 South American Championship

The 1917 South American Championship of Nations was the second edition of the continental tournament now known as the Copa América. It was held in Montevideo, Uruguay from 30 September to 14 October 1917. Hosts Uruguay retained the title after winning 1–0 over Argentina in the last match of the competition. Ángel Romano from Uruguay finished as the top scorer of the tournament with 4 goals.

Alberto Ohaco

Alberto Ohaco

Alberto Ohaco (1889-1950) was an Argentine footballer who played for Racing Club de Avellaneda. He won seven league titles and is considered to have been one of the greatest Argentine footballers of all time.

Estádio das Laranjeiras

Estádio das Laranjeiras

Estádio Manoel Schwartz, usually known as Estádio das Laranjeiras, is a historic football stadium in Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. The stadium holds 2,000 spectators. It was built in 1905 and is one of the oldest stadiums in Brazil. The stadium is owned by Fluminense Football Club.

1919 South American Championship

1919 South American Championship

The 1919 South American Championship of Nations was the third continental championship for South American national football teams. It was held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 11 to 29 May 1919.

Heitor (footballer, born 1898)

Heitor (footballer, born 1898)

Ettore Marcelino Dominguez, known as Heitor, was a Brazilian football player at the position of striker. He's Palmeiras' all time top scorer with 327 goals in 358 games.

Amílcar Barbuy

Amílcar Barbuy

Amílcar Barbuy was an Italian Brazilian football player and manager. A talented and well-rounded midfielder, he was known for his commanding presence, pinpoint tackling, ability to read the game, powerful kicks and great long passes and was one of the greatest players of Corinthians.

Pelé–Maradona rivalry

Diego Maradona and Pelé during a meeting arranged by Argentine magazine El Gráfico, April 1979
Diego Maradona and Pelé during a meeting arranged by Argentine magazine El Gráfico, April 1979

Among the elite group of players, football fans consider as contenders for the title, of the best player of all time, Brazil's Pelé and Argentina's Diego Maradona are probably the most famous, and generally, dominate polls on the subject. Some of their countrymen also feature regularly in such debates. The next most notable pair are perhaps Garrincha (Brazilian) and Alfredo Di Stéfano (Argentine). The most dominant figures from the two countries in the modern game are Neymar (Brazilian) and Lionel Messi (Argentine). Both Pelé and Maradona have declared Neymar and Messi their respective "successors".

Brazilian supporter with a fake coffin with the colors of the Argentine flag and the name "Maradona" in 2009
Brazilian supporter with a fake coffin with the colors of the Argentine flag and the name "Maradona" in 2009

However, the overriding discussion about which of Pelé and Maradona is the greater has proved to be never-ending. Even though most consider them the best players of their times, many consider the comparison between them useless, as they played during incomparable eras and in different leagues.[25] The debate between the pair has been described as "the rivalry of their countries in microcosm".[26]

Pelé was given the title "Athlete of the Century" by the International Olympic Committee.[27] In 1999, Time magazine named Pelé one of the 100 Most Important People of the 20th Century.[28] Also, he was elected Football Player of the Century, by France Football's Golden Ball Winners in 1999, Football Player of the Century, and South America Football Player of the Century, both by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), 1999. For his part, Maradona has been named Best Player of the 20th Century by the Globe Soccer Awards,[29] best soccer player in World Cup history both by The Times[30] and FourFourTwo,ref>"Archived copy". Archived from the original on 18 June 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) publication that also rewarded him as the "Best Football Player of All Time".ref>"FourFourTwo's 100 Greatest Footballers EVER: No.1, Diego Maradona". fourfourtwo.com. 25 November 2020. He was also elected as the "Greatest Athlete in History" by Corriere Dello Sport – Stadio.[31]

Argentine Lionel Messi and Brazilian Neymar, former teammates at Barcelona, have been described by Pelé and Maradona as their "successors"
Argentine Lionel Messi and Brazilian Neymar, former teammates at Barcelona, have been described by Pelé and Maradona as their "successors"

The controversy reached a climax during the FIFA century awards in 2000, in which Maradona was voted Player of the Century in an official internet poll, garnering 53.6% of the votes against 18.53% for Pelé. Shortly before the ceremony, FIFA unexpectedly decided to add a second award and appointed a "Football Family" committee composed of football journalists that gave to Pelé the title of 'best player of the century to make it a draw. This move was criticized in Argentina, that suspected Pelé was rewarded for his constant support of FIFA, in contrast to Maradona's frequent criticism.Cite error: A tag is missing the closing (see the help page).

In another internet poll that took place in 2002, Maradona received another award from FIFA, as one of his goals was selected as the World Cup Goal of the Century. One of Pelé's goals received third place, while Maradona had a second goal selected as fourth.[32]

Despite their frequent confrontations,[33] usually through quotations by the media, Pelé was the guest star of Maradona's TV show La Noche del 10 ("The Night of the #10"), where they had a friendly chat and played a bout of headers.[34] The two players also showed great respect for each other despite differences, such as when Pelé stated in 2018 that Maradona was better than Messi, or in 2019 when Maradona prayed for Pelé to recover after the Brazilian legend was admitted to hospital for health reasons.[35][36] When Maradona died on 25 November 2020, Pelé was among the major football figures to mourn Maradona's death.[37]

Famous players and football figures often give their opinion on the Maradona and Pelé rivalry, sometimes choosing one over the other.[38] Others prefer not to compare them, as they played at very different times.

Discover more about Pelé–Maradona rivalry related topics

Pelé

Pelé

Edson Arantes do Nascimento, known as Pelé, is a Brazilian former professional footballer who played as a forward. Regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, and labelled "the greatest" by FIFA, he was among the most successful and popular sports figures of the 20th century. In 1999, he was named Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee and was included in the Time list of the 100 most important people of the 20th century. In 2000, Pelé was voted World Player of the Century by the International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS), and was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the Century. His 1,279 goals in 1,363 games, which includes friendlies, is recognised as a Guinness World Record.

Diego Maradona

Diego Maradona

Diego Armando Maradona was an Argentine professional football player and manager. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the sport, he was one of the two joint winners of the FIFA Player of the 20th Century award. Maradona's vision, passing, ball control, and dribbling skills were combined with his small stature, which gave him a low centre of gravity allowing him to manoeuvre better than most other players. His presence and leadership on the field had a great effect on his team's general performance, while he would often be singled out by the opposition. In addition to his creative abilities, he possessed an eye for goal and was known to be a free kick specialist. A precocious talent, Maradona was given the nickname "El Pibe de Oro", a name that stuck with him throughout his career. He also had a troubled off-field life and was banned in both 1991 and 1994 for abusing drugs.

Garrincha

Garrincha

Manuel Francisco dos Santos, nicknamed Mané Garrincha, best known as simply Garrincha, was a Brazilian professional footballer who played as a right winger. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, and by some, the greatest dribbler ever.

Alfredo Di Stéfano

Alfredo Di Stéfano

Alfredo Stéfano Di Stéfano Laulhé was an Argentine-born professional footballer and coach who played as a forward, regarded as one of the greatest footballers of all time. Nicknamed "Saeta rubia", he is best known for his achievements with Real Madrid, where he was instrumental in the club's domination of the European Cup and La Liga during the 1950s and 1960s. Along with Francisco Gento and José María Zárraga, he was one of only three players to play a part in all five European Cup victories, scoring goals in each of the five finals. Di Stéfano played international football mostly for Spain after moving to Madrid, but he also played for Argentina and Colombia.

Neymar

Neymar

Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior, known as Neymar, is a Brazilian professional footballer who plays as a forward for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain and the Brazil national team. A prolific goalscorer and renowned playmaker, he is regarded as one of the best players in the world. Neymar has scored at least 100 goals for three different clubs, making him one of three players to achieve this.

Lionel Messi

Lionel Messi

Lionel Andrés Messi, also known as Leo Messi, is an Argentine professional footballer who plays as a forward for Ligue 1 club Paris Saint-Germain and captains the Argentina national team. Widely regarded as one of the greatest players of all time, Messi has won a record seven Ballon d'Or awards, a record six European Golden Shoes, and in 2020 was named to the Ballon d'Or Dream Team. Until leaving the club in 2021, he had spent his entire professional career with Barcelona, where he won a club-record 35 trophies, including ten La Liga titles, seven Copa del Rey titles and four UEFA Champions Leagues. A prolific goalscorer and creative playmaker, Messi holds the records for most goals in La Liga (474), most goals in a La Liga and European league season (50), most hat-tricks in La Liga (36) and the UEFA Champions League (8), and most assists in La Liga (192), a La Liga season (21) and the Copa América (17). He also holds the record for most international goals by a South American male (93). Messi has scored over 785 senior career goals for club and country, and has the most goals by a player for a single club (672).

International Olympic Committee

International Olympic Committee

The International Olympic Committee is a non-governmental sports organisation based in Lausanne, Switzerland. It is constituted in the form of an association under the Swiss Civil Code. Founded by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas in 1894, it is the authority responsible for organising the modern Olympic Games.

International Federation of Football History & Statistics

International Federation of Football History & Statistics

The International Federation of Football History & Statistics (IFFHS) is an organisation that chronicles the history and records of association football. It was founded in 1984 by Alfredo Pöge in Leipzig. The IFFHS was based in Abu Dhabi for some time but, in 2010, relocated to Bonn, Germany, and then in 2014 to Zürich.

Globe Soccer Awards

Globe Soccer Awards

The Globe Soccer Awards are football awards organised by the European Club Association (ECA) in conjunction with the European Association of Player's Agents (EFAA) and delivered by the organisation Globe Soccer. The award ceremony is held in the city of Dubai in the United Arab Emirates, which brings together the main representatives of the world of football, the League of the United Arab Emirates, major world clubs and their managers, encouraging an exchange of views on the world of football as a major goal, alongside transfer-related issues and the football market.

FIFA World Cup

FIFA World Cup

The FIFA World Cup, often simply called the World Cup, is an international association football competition contested by the senior men's national teams of the members of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association, the sport's global governing body. The championship has been awarded every four years since the inaugural tournament in 1930, except in 1942 and 1946 when it was not held because of the Second World War. The reigning champions are France, who won their second title at the 2018 tournament in Russia.

FourFourTwo

FourFourTwo

FourFourTwo is a football magazine published by Future. Issued monthly, it published its 300th edition in May 2019. It takes its name from the football formation of the same name, 4-4-2.

FC Barcelona

FC Barcelona

Futbol Club Barcelona, commonly referred to as Barcelona and colloquially known as Barça, is a professional football club based in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, that competes in La Liga, the top flight of Spanish football.

Incidents and historical matches

1925 Copa América

Carlos Nascimento and Argentine Juan Bianchi jumping for the ball at the 1925 South American final
Carlos Nascimento and Argentine Juan Bianchi jumping for the ball at the 1925 South American final

For the 1925 Copa América, Argentina and Brazil played the final match at Sportivo Barracas Stadium, on Christmas Day. The unusual date was not an obstacle to drawing a crowd of more than 30,000 people. In a crowded stadium, the match started in a tense atmosphere: at 27 minutes Lagarto intercepted a back pass by Ludovico Bidoglio and passed the ball to Arthur Friedenreich, who beat Américo Tesoriere with a strong shot. It was 1-0 for the Brazilians. Three minutes later, Nilo scored the second for the canarinha. The crowd was astonished, because if the Brazilian lead was maintained, a new match had to be played to determinate the champion.

Before completing the first half, a dangerous counterattack by the visitors was stopped by Ramón Muttis with a strong foul on Friedenreich, who in turn, reacted with a kick. The Argentine responded with a punch at the Brazilian's face, and the incident unleashed a buzz among several players and also with some spectators who invaded the pitch. The game was suspended, and only resumed - without a sending-off - after a hug between Friedenreich and Muttis that sealed a truce. However, the incident made a dent in the Brazilian players and the match changed course: at the end of the first half Antonio Cerrotti reduced the deficit and opened the road to recovery. The equaliser came ten minutes into the second half through Manuel Seoane. The match ended tied 2–2, and Argentina won its second Copa America in history in a rugged match against Brazil. The incidents did not go unnoticed in Brazil and some local newspapers referred to the game as "The Barracas' War".[39] Because of this match, Argentina and Brazil did not play-officially again for 11 years.

1937 Copa América final

Cardeal (left) and Celestino Martínez during the 1937 match
Cardeal (left) and Celestino Martínez during the 1937 match

In the 1937 South American Championship (currently Copa América), the rivalry between both teams was already something of national pride. There were verbal confrontations between both parties, and Argentine fans often taunted the Brazilians by calling them macaquitos and making monkey sounds.[40] The final match, held in Buenos Aires, was played between the two sides and was goalless after 90 minutes. In extra time, Argentina scored two goals. Questioning one of the goals and fearful for their own safety, the Brazilian players decided to leave the stadium before the match was officially finished. The Brazilian press has since called this match "jogo da vergonha" ("the shame game").[41] Argentina won, 2–0, and was South American champion again.

1939 Copa Roca

Argentine goalkeeper Sebastián Gualco injured in the second match of 1939 Copa Roca
Argentine goalkeeper Sebastián Gualco injured in the second match of 1939 Copa Roca

The 1939 edition of Roca Cup was the longest in history, having been defined after four matches. The first two games were held in Estádio São Januário in Rio de Janeiro. The first one, held in January, ended 5–1 to Argentina.[42]

A second match was held only one week later, with the Brazilian team seeking revenge for the previous defeat. The match was vibrating; first Brazil went ahead 1–0, then Argentina recovered to lead 1–2, and Brazil then drew level at 2–2. Shortly before the end of the match the referee, the same as in the previous match, gave a penalty to Brazil. Furious, Argentina player Arcadio López verbally attacked the referee and had to be escorted out of the pitch by police. The Argentine team, enraged by the actions of the referee and the police, left the pitch. The penalty that gave Brazil the 3–2 victory was scored without a goalkeeper, because the entire Argentine team had already walked off the pitch.[41]

As both teams had won one match each, a third game was scheduled to be played at Parque Antarctica in São Paulo. The match ended 2–2 after extra time therefore a fourth and final match was held in the same venue and was won by Argentina 3–0, which finally won the trophy.

1945–1946 incidents

The 1946 South American championship final, won by Argentina
The 1946 South American championship final, won by Argentina

In the 1945 Copa Roca match that Brazil won 6–2, young Brazilian Ademir de Menezes fractured Argentine José Battagliero's leg.[43] Though it seemed to be only an unfortunate accident, the game was played roughly and sometimes violently.

A few months later, the 1946 South American Championship final again involved Argentina and Brazil. There was widespread media coverage, and the conviction that it would be a rough match. Twenty-eight minutes after the beginning, when both teams went for a free ball, Brazilian Jair Rosa Pinto fractured Argentine captain José Salomón's tibia and fibula. General disorder ensued, with Argentine and Brazilian players fighting on the pitch with the police. The public invaded the pitch and both teams had to go to the dressing rooms. After order was restored the game continued, and Argentina won the match 2–0. Salomón never recovered completely nor played professional football after the incident.[44]

1974 World Cup

It would be the first ever meeting between Brazil and Argentina in the FIFA World Cup. Defending champions Brazil faced Argentina in West Germany's Niedersachsenstadion in Hanover in the second round as both were placed in Group A. Brazil won it by 2–1 via goals from Rivelino and Jairzinho whereas Brindisi scored the only goal for Argentina.[45]

1978 World Cup

Argentina and Brazil teams before playing their match at the 1978 World Cup
Argentina and Brazil teams before playing their match at the 1978 World Cup

The Group B of the second round was essentially a battle between Argentina and Brazil, and it was resolved in controversial circumstances. In the first round of group games, Brazil beat Peru 3–0 while Argentina saw off Poland 2–0. Brazil and Argentina then played out a tense and violent goalless draw – also known as "A Batalha de Rosário" ("The Battle of Rosario"), so both teams went into the last round of matches with three points. Argentina had an advantage that their match against Peru kicked off several hours after Brazil's match with Poland.

Brazil won their match 3–1, so Argentina could know that they had to beat Peru by four clear goals to go through to the final. Argentina managed it with what some saw as a suspicious degree of ease. Trailing 2–0 at half-time, Peru simply collapsed in the second half, and Argentina eventually won 6–0. Rumours suggested that Peru might have been somehow illicitly induced not to try too hard (especially because the Peruvian goalkeeper, Ramón Quiroga, was born in Argentina); but nothing could be proved, and Argentina met the Netherlands in the final.

Brazil, denied a final place by Argentina's 6–0 win over Peru, took third place from an enterprising Italy side and were dubbed "moral champions" by coach Cláudio Coutinho, because they did not win the tournament but did not lose a single match either.

1982 World Cup

Group C, a "group of death" with Brazil, Argentina and Italy, that World Cup history was made. In the opener, Italy prevailed 2–1 over Argentina. Argentina now needed a win over Brazil on the second day, but they were no match, as the Brazilians' attacking game, characterised by nimble, one-touch passing on-the-run, eclipsed the reigning world champions. The final score of 3–1 – Argentina only scoring in the last minute – could have been much higher had Brazil centre-forward Serginho not wasted a series of near-certain scoring opportunities. Frustrated because of the poor refereeing and the imminent loss, Diego Maradona kicked Brazilian player Batista and received a straight red card.

1990 World Cup (The "holy water" scandal)

Two views of the goal scored by Claudio Caniggia that allowed Argentina to beat Brazil at the 1990 World Cup
Two views of the goal scored by Claudio Caniggia that allowed Argentina to beat Brazil at the 1990 World Cup
Two views of the goal scored by Claudio Caniggia that allowed Argentina to beat Brazil at the 1990 World Cup

The last time both teams met in a World Cup match was in 1990, which featured Argentina defeating Brazil 1–0 with a goal from Claudio Caniggia after a pass from Diego Maradona. The end of the match was controversial, however, with Brazilian player Branco accusing the Argentina training staff of giving him a bottle of water laced with tranquillizers while they were tending to an injured player. Years later, Maradona admitted the truth on an Argentine television show, saying that Branco had been given "holy water". The Argentine Football Association and the team coach of the time, Carlos Bilardo, denied that the "holy water" incident ever took place,[46][47] though prior to the previous denial Bilardo said of Branco's allegation: "I'm not saying it didn't happen."[48]

1991 Copa América match

Argentina defeated Brazil 3–2 in Santiago in the first match of the final pool. Five players were sent off: Claudio Caniggia and Mazinho after tangling in the 31st minute; Carlos Enrique and Márcio Santos for another fight in the 61st minute, with one player leaving on a stretcher; and Careca Bianchezi in the 80th minute, two minutes after coming on as a substitute.[49]

1993 Copa América match

Argentina and Brazil finished 1–1 at the quarterfinal match, played in Guayaquil. Brazil started winning the game, but Leonardo Rodríguez drew with the head after a corner kick at the second part. In penalties, Los Gauchos defeated 5–4 and advanced to the quarter-finals. Argentina finally won the Copa América title after defeating Mexico in the final.

1995 Copa América match

Held in Uruguay, the two nations met at the quarter-finals stage on 17 July 1995. The Brazilian Túlio became famous for scoring a late equalizer five minutes from time after controlling the ball with his left arm. Despite the obvious foul, the referee, Alberto Tejada Noriega of Peru, claimed he did not see the incident and the goal therefore stood. The game finished with a 2–2 draw and Brazil went on to win on penalties. The Argentine media labeled the incident as the "hand of the devil",[50] a reference to the controversial goal scored by Diego Maradona in the 1986 World Cup against England.

2004 Copa América Final

Argentina was winning 2–1, but in a spectacular turn of events, Adriano scored a goal in the last minute of the match, taking the match to penalties, where Brazil won with Júlio César stopping an impossible shot from Andrés D'Alessandro. Brazil was playing with its second-string team and this victory could be considered an underdog one.

2005 Confederations Cup Final

Argentina and Brazil clash at the final of the 2005 Confederations Cup.
Argentina and Brazil clash at the final of the 2005 Confederations Cup.

In 2005, Brazil and Argentina participated in the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup. Brazil entered the competition as the reigning World Cup champions at the time. Since Brazil had also won the Copa América the previous year, however, Copa runners-up Argentina was allowed to participate in the tournament to take up the vacated berth. In the semi-finals, Brazil eliminated host nation Germany, while Argentina eliminated Mexico. This competition was the first time the two rivals would meet in a final game of a tournament sponsored by FIFA. In a surprising turn of events, the Brazilian team won the game easily, thrashing the Argentines 4–1. Adriano scored twice for Brazil, along with Kaká and Ronaldinho, while Pablo Aimar scored Argentina's only goal.

2007 Copa América Final

Brazil defeated Argentina 3–0 in Maracaibo, Venezuela, at the final. The goals scored were by Júlio Baptista, an own goal by Roberto Ayala, and by Dani Alves.

2008 Summer Olympics – Beijing

Juan Román Riquelme scores Argentina's third and final goal against Brazil at Beijing 2008, following Sergio Agüero's brace.
Juan Román Riquelme scores Argentina's third and final goal against Brazil at Beijing 2008, following Sergio Agüero's brace.

Defending champions Argentina and Brazil met on 19 August in the semifinal game of the Summer Olympics. The game, billed as a tête-à-tête between Lionel Messi and Ronaldinho, Barcelona teammates, was in the end a hard-fought clash between two historic rivals, marred by numerous fouls and two ejections for Brazil. Argentina convincingly won with a score of 3–0, and went on to beat Nigeria 1–0 in the final, being the first in obtaining two consecutive gold medals in football in 40 years and the third overall after the Olympic teams of the United Kingdom and Uruguay. Brazil eventually won the gold medal at the Olympics themselves playing at home in 2016.

2019 Copa América

Brazil and Argentina met at the semifinal of the 2019 Copa América, which was hosted in Brazil. Brazil defeated Argentina 2–0 with goals by Gabriel Jesus and Firmino. Argentina eventually placed third and Brazil went on to win their 9th Copa América title.[51]

2021 Copa América Final

The 2021 Copa América was originally scheduled to be jointly held in Colombia and Argentina in 2020, but it was postponed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Colombia and Argentina were removed as hosts due to social unrest in Colombia and the COVID-19 pandemic in Argentina. Brazil was chosen to host the tournament. In the final, Argentina defeated Brazil 1–0 with the only goal by Ángel Di María at the Maracanã Stadium to win their 15th Copa América title.[52]

Discover more about Incidents and historical matches related topics

1925 South American Championship

1925 South American Championship

The ninth South American Championship was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 29 November to 25 December 1925.

Estadio Sportivo Barracas

Estadio Sportivo Barracas

Estadio Sportivo Barracas was a football stadium in Buenos Aires, Argentina, property of Club Sportivo Barracas. The stadium was one of the most important venues in Argentina, used for football and rugby union matches. It held 37,000 spectators.

Ludovico Bidoglio

Ludovico Bidoglio

Ludovico Bidoglio, sometimes nicknamed Vico was an Argentine football player, and one of Boca Juniors' idols during the 1920s. His position on the field was right back.

Arthur Friedenreich

Arthur Friedenreich

Arthur Friedenreich was a Brazilian professional footballer who played as a forward. He was nicknamed The Tiger or The Original "Black" Pearl, and was arguably the sport's first outstanding mixed-race player. He played when Brazilian football was still amateur, which lasted until 1933. He is occasionally identified as one of the all-time top scorers in football history, although this is highly disputed.

Américo Tesoriere

Américo Tesoriere

Américo Miguel Tesoriere, sometimes nicknamed Mérico, was an Argentine football goalkeeper who spent most of his career in Boca Juniors, where he became an early idol and remaining as a legend of the club. Tesoriere is also regarded as one of the best Argentine goalkeepers ever.

1937 South American Championship Final

1937 South American Championship Final

The 1937 South American Championship Final was the final match to determine the winner of the 1937 South American Championship, the 14th edition of this continental competition. It was held on February 1, 1937, in San Lorenzo de Almagro's venue, Estadio Gasómetro of Buenos Aires. Because of the heat, most of the matches were played at night while other games were played at daytime (being held in River Plate's venue, Estadio Alvear y Tagle.

1937 South American Championship

1937 South American Championship

The fourteenth edition of the South American Championship of football was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 27 December 1936 to 1 February 1937.

Copa América

Copa América

The Copa América or CONMEBOL Copa América, known until 1975 as the South American Football Championship, is the top men's football tournament contested among national teams from South America. It is the oldest still-running continental football competition, as well as the third most watched in the world. The competition determines the champions of South America. Since the 1990s, teams from North America and Asia have also been invited to compete.

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires, officially the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, is the capital and primate city of Argentina. The city is located on the western shore of the Río de la Plata, on South America's southeastern coast. "Buenos Aires" can be translated as "fair winds" or "good airs", but the former was the meaning intended by the founders in the 16th century, by the use of the original name "Real de Nuestra Señora Santa María del Buen Ayre", named after the Madonna of Bonaria in Sardinia, Italy. Buenos Aires is classified as an alpha global city, according to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC) 2020 ranking.

Estádio São Januário

Estádio São Januário

Estádio Vasco da Gama, also known as Estádio São Januário, owing to its location on a street of the same name, is the home ground of Club de Regatas Vasco da Gama. Its facade is listed by the National Historical and Artistic Heritage.

Ademir de Menezes

Ademir de Menezes

Ademir Marques de Menezes was a Brazilian footballer, regarded as one of the best forwards in football history. His prominent underbite earned him the nickname "Queixada", which means "jaw". He was also the top goalscorer in the 1950 FIFA World Cup.

1946 South American Championship

1946 South American Championship

The nineteenth edition of the South American Championship in football was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 12 January to 10 February. This tournament, an extra edition with no trophy handed to the winners, is considered official by CONMEBOL.

Club level official titles comparison

Note: Only official competitions (organised by CONMEBOL and/or other continental confederations) are included

Competition Arg. Bra.
FIFA Club World Cup
0
4
Intercontinental Cup[note 1]
9
6
Copa Libertadores
25
22
Copa Sudamericana
9
5
Copa CONMEBOL [note 1]
3
5
Copa Mercosur [note 1]
1
3
Supercopa Libertadores [note 1]
6
3
Recopa Sudamericana
10
12
Copa Interamericana [note 1]
7
0
Copa de Oro [note 1]
1
2
Copa Master de Supercopa [note 1]
1
1
Copa Master de CONMEBOL [note 1]
0
1
Intercontinental Champions' Supercup [note 1]
0
1
Suruga Bank Cup
3
2
Total
75
68
Note
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i Defunct competition.[53]

Copa Libertadores de America

In the history of this tournament, played since 1960, only twice has a Brazilian team captured a title on Argentine soil. In 1963, Brazilian side Santos defeated the most popular Argentine club, Boca Juniors, and in 2017, when Grêmio defeated Club Atlético Lanús . However, the same Argentine club team, Boca Juniors, has celebrated three of its six titles on Brazilian soil, defeating Palmeiras in 2000, Santos in 2003 and Grêmio in 2007. The two greatest Argentine and Brazilian players that have ever played this sport had at one point played in these same two clubs: Pelé for Santos while Diego Maradona had done the same for Boca Juniors. It has been reported that in all three of Boca Juniors' victories on Brazilian soil, Boca's players were not allowed to properly sleep in their hotel rooms the night before their final matches because of the chaos and noise created by Brazilian fans outside the hotel rooms, who attempted to disrupt the Argentine players from performing to their best of their abilities the following day.

In the international arena, the most successful Argentine clubs are Boca Juniors (six Libertadores and three Intercontinental Cups), Independiente (seven Libertadores and two Intercontinental Cups), Estudiantes de La Plata (four Libertadores and one Intercontinental Cup), River Plate (four Libertadores and one Intercontinental Cup), Vélez Sársfield (one Libertadores and one Intercontinental), San Lorenzo (one Libertadores, one Copa Mercosur and one Copa Sudamericana), Argentinos Juniors (one Libertadores) and Racing Club (one Libertadores and one Intercontinental Cup).

The most successful Brazilian clubs are São Paulo (three Libertadores, one FIFA Club World Cup and two Intercontinental Cups), Santos (three Libertadores and two Intercontinental Cups), Grêmio (three Libertadores and one Intercontinental Cup), Palmeiras (three Libertadores, one Copa Mercosur and one Recopa Sudamericana), Internacional (two Libertadores and one FIFA Club World Cup), Cruzeiro (two Libertadores), Corinthians (one Libertadores and two FIFA Club World Cups), Flamengo, (two Libertadores, one Copa Mercosur, one Copa de Oro, one Recopa and one Intercontinental Cup), Vasco da Gama (one Libertadores, one South American Championship of Champions and one Copa Mercosur) AND Atlético Mineiro (one Libertadores and two Copa Conmebol).

Discover more about Club level official titles comparison related topics

CONMEBOL

CONMEBOL

The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of soccer in South America and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member soccer associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

Copa Libertadores

Copa Libertadores

The CONMEBOL Libertadores, also known as the Copa Libertadores de América, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 1960. It is the highest level of competition in South American club football. The tournament is named after the Libertadores, the leaders of the Latin American wars of independence, so a literal translation of its former name into English is "America's Liberators Cup".

Copa Sudamericana

Copa Sudamericana

The CONMEBOL Sudamericana, named as Copa Sudamericana, is an annual international club football competition organized by CONMEBOL since 2002. It is the second-most prestigious club competition in South American football. CONCACAF clubs were invited between 2004 and 2008. The CONMEBOL Sudamericana began in 2002, replacing the separate competitions Copa Merconorte and Copa Mercosur by a single competition. Since its introduction, the competition has been a pure elimination tournament with the number of rounds and teams varying from year to year.

Copa CONMEBOL

Copa CONMEBOL

The Copa CONMEBOL was an annual football cup competition organized by CONMEBOL between 1992 and 1999 for South American football clubs. During its time of existence, it was a very prestigious South American club football contest, similar to the UEFA Cup. Clubs qualified for the competition based on their performance in their national leagues and cup competitions. Teams that were not able to qualify for the Copa Libertadores would play in this tournament. The tournament was played as a knockout cup. The tournament ended in 1999, following the expansion of the Copa Libertadores to 32 teams. The Copa Mercosur and Copa Merconorte, which both started in 1998, replaced the Copa CONMEBOL; both cups would later be merged in the current Copa Sudamericana.

Copa Mercosur

Copa Mercosur

The Copa Mercosur was a football competition played from 1998 to 2001 by the traditional top clubs from Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay and Chile. The competition was created by CONMEBOL to generate TV money to the participating teams, but it went beyond and ended up, together with the Copa Merconorte, as natural replacement to the CONMEBOL Cup. These two, Copa Merconorte and Copa Mercosur, were replaced in 2002 by the Copa Sudamericana.

Copa Interamericana

Copa Interamericana

The Copa Interamericana was an annual club football competition organized by the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) and Confederación Sudamericana de Fútbol (CONMEBOL) since 1969. It was discontinued in 1998 after CONCACAF clubs, particularly those from Mexico, began participating in CONMEBOL competitions. The Interamerican Cup was founded as a result of the refusal from CONMEBOL and the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) of allowing CONCACAF clubs, as well as those from other confederations, to participate in the European/South American Cup, later known as the Toyota Cup and informally called the Intercontinental Cup.

Copa de Oro

Copa de Oro

The Copa de Oro, or Copa de Oro Nicolás Leoz, was a football cup winners' cup competition contested on 3 occasions by the most recent winners of all CONMEBOL continental competitions. These included champions of the Copa Libertadores, Supercopa Sudamericana, Copa CONMEBOL, Supercopa Masters and Copa Masters CONMEBOL. The Recopa Sudamericana champions did not participate. The cup is one of the many continental club competitions that have been organized by CONMEBOL. The first competition was held in 1993 featuring the 4 major continental champions of the previous season whilst the second competition in 1995 two continental champions declined to play leaving only two participants to play. In the final edition in 1996, all the continental champions accepted the invitation to play. Boca Juniors, Cruzeiro and Flamengo were the only winners of the tournament with one title each. Brazil became the most successful nation of the competition with two victories.

Copa Master de Supercopa

Copa Master de Supercopa

The Copa Master de Supercopa was a football competition contested by clubs that had previously won the Supercopa Libertadores. It was organized by CONMEBOL and only played in 1992 and 1995. A third edition was scheduled to be played in 1998 but the lack of sponsors delayed the event and eventually was cancelled

Copa Master de CONMEBOL

Copa Master de CONMEBOL

The Copa Masters CONMEBOL was a football club competition contested by the 4 past winners of the Copa CONMEBOL at the time. The cup is one of the many inter-South American club competitions that have been organized by CONMEBOL.

1960 Copa Libertadores

1960 Copa Libertadores

The 1960 Copa de Campeones de América was the first season of the Copa CONMEBOL Libertadores, CONMEBOL's premier club tournament. Seven association's clubs entered the first competition, with three not sending a representative. The first match of the tournament was played between Uruguayan side Peñarol and Bolivian side Jorge Wilstermann on April 19 in Montevideo, Uruguay.

Boca Juniors

Boca Juniors

Club Atlético Boca Juniors is an Argentine sports club headquartered in La Boca, a neighbourhood of Buenos Aires. The club is mostly known for its professional football team which, since its promotion in 1913, has always played in the Argentine Primera División. The team has won 73 official titles, the most by any Argentine club. National titles won by Boca Juniors include 35 Primera División championships, and 16 domestic cups. Boca Juniors also owns an honorary title awarded by the Argentine Football Association for their successful tour of Europe in 1925.

Club Atlético Lanús

Club Atlético Lanús

Club Atlético Lanús is an Argentine sports club from the Lanús district of Greater Buenos Aires. Founded in 1915, the club's main sports are football and basketball. In both sports, Lanús plays in Argentina's top divisions: Primera División (football) and Liga Nacional de Básquet (basketball). Domestic football major titles won by the club include two Primera División championships, the Copa Bicentenario and one Supercopa Argentina. At international level, Lanús has won one Copa CONMEBOL, and one Copa Sudamericana.

Women's football

The women's national sides representing Argentina and Brazil play at the 2014 Copa América Femenina.
The women's national sides representing Argentina and Brazil play at the 2014 Copa América Femenina.

The Brazil women's national team is a successful women's football team, though not as successful as the men's counterpart. It was runner-up in the FIFA Women's World Cup of 2007, and won a silver medal at the Olympic games in 2004 and 2008. In comparison, Argentina does not have a professional (or even semi-professional) women's football league; the members of the Argentina women's national football team are all amateur players despite their clubs often being affiliated with prominent men's professional clubs. Although the two teams usually have to battle for the top qualification spots for CONMEBOL when the World Cup qualification comes around, this rivalry does not provide the passion that men's matches encounter yet.

Brazil won every game of the Sudamericano Femenino against Argentina until the 2006 edition, when Argentina finally beat them 2–0 in the final group stage, awarding Argentina the championship. Argentina did not participate in the 1991 South American competition and was second to Brazil in the following three tournaments. Beginning with the 2003 edition, both champion and runner-up qualified for the World Cup. As Argentina has not been past the group stages in the World Cup, the two teams have not met in the Olympic Football Tournament yet.

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2014 Copa América Femenina

2014 Copa América Femenina

The 2014 Copa América Femenina was the seventh edition of the Copa América Femenina, an association football competition for women's national teams in South America affiliated with CONMEBOL. The tournament was played between 11–28 September 2014 in Ecuador.

Brazil women's national football team

Brazil women's national football team

The Brazil women's national football team represents Brazil in international women's football and is run by the Brazilian Football Confederation (CBF). It has participated in eight editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup, finishing as runner-up in 2007, and seven editions of the Copa América Femenina.

Women's association football

Women's association football

Women's association football, more commonly known simply as women's football or women's soccer, is a team sport of association football when played by women only. It is played at the professional level in multiple countries and 176 national teams participate internationally. The history of women's football has seen competitions being launched at both the national and international levels.

FIFA Women's World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international association football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years and one year after the men's FIFA World Cup since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. Under the tournament's current format, national teams vie for 31 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 32nd slot. The tournament, called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

CONMEBOL

CONMEBOL

The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of soccer in South America and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member soccer associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

Source: "Argentina–Brazil football rivalry", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentina–Brazil_football_rivalry.

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