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Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

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Anthropocene: The Human Epoch
Anthropocene - The Human Epoch (2018) Film Poster.jpg
Directed byJennifer Baichwal
Nicholas de Pencier
Edward Burtynsky
Narrated byAlicia Vikander
CinematographyNicholas de Pencier
Release dates
  • September 13, 2018 (2018-09-13) (TIFF)[1]
  • September 28, 2018 (2018-09-28)
Running time
87 minutes
CountryCanada
LanguageEnglish
Box office$753,488[2][3]

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is a 2018 Canadian documentary film made by Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de Pencier and Edward Burtynsky.[4] It explores the emerging concept of a geological epoch called the Anthropocene, defined by the impact of humanity on natural development.

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Documentary film

Documentary film

A documentary film or documentary is a non-fictional motion-picture intended to "document reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction, education or maintaining a historical record". Bill Nichols has characterized the documentary in terms of "a filmmaking practice, a cinematic tradition, and mode of audience reception [that remains] a practice without clear boundaries".

Jennifer Baichwal

Jennifer Baichwal

Jennifer Baichwal is a Canadian documentary filmmaker, writer and producer.

Nicholas de Pencier

Nicholas de Pencier

Nicholas de Pencier is a Canadian cinematographer and filmmaker. The spouse and professional partner of filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal in Mercury Films, he is the cinematographer and producer on most of her films as well as codirector of the films Long Time Running. and Anthropocene: The Human Epoch. He was also solo director of the 2016 documentary Black Code.

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky is a Canadian photographer and artist known for his large format photographs of industrial landscapes. His works depict locations from around the world that represent the increasing development of industrialization and its impacts on nature and the human existence. It is most often connected to the philosophical concept of the sublime, a trait established by the grand scale of the work he creates, though they are equally disturbing in the way they reveal the context of rapid industrialization.

Anthropocene

Anthropocene

The Anthropocene is a proposed geological epoch dating from the commencement of significant human impact on Earth's geology and ecosystems, including, but not limited to, anthropogenic climate change.

Details

"Anthropocene: The Human Epoch" is the third film in a series of collaborations between filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier with photographer Edward Burtynsky, following Manufactured Landscapes and Watermark. The film explores the emerging concept of a geological epoch called the Anthropocene, defined by the impact of humanity on natural development.[5] The documentary film is the centerpiece of the larger Anthropocene Project created as a collaboration between the three filmmakers. The project spans many mediums, and includes museum shows that opened at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery of Canada in September 2018,[5] the publication of two books, one centered on essays and the other on photographs, three augmented reality and virtual reality experiences, and three "Gigapixel Essays", hundreds of photos stitched together to form one massive photo. These other parts of the project are mostly representations of scenes from the film in more effective mediums, and all surround the same central theme of the film: Humans and our effect on the earth.[6] Anthropocene: The Human Epoch premiered at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF).[4]

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Jennifer Baichwal

Jennifer Baichwal

Jennifer Baichwal is a Canadian documentary filmmaker, writer and producer.

Nicholas de Pencier

Nicholas de Pencier

Nicholas de Pencier is a Canadian cinematographer and filmmaker. The spouse and professional partner of filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal in Mercury Films, he is the cinematographer and producer on most of her films as well as codirector of the films Long Time Running. and Anthropocene: The Human Epoch. He was also solo director of the 2016 documentary Black Code.

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky

Edward Burtynsky is a Canadian photographer and artist known for his large format photographs of industrial landscapes. His works depict locations from around the world that represent the increasing development of industrialization and its impacts on nature and the human existence. It is most often connected to the philosophical concept of the sublime, a trait established by the grand scale of the work he creates, though they are equally disturbing in the way they reveal the context of rapid industrialization.

Manufactured Landscapes

Manufactured Landscapes

Manufactured Landscapes is a 2006 feature-length documentary film about the industrial landscape photography of Edward Burtynsky. It was directed by Jennifer Baichwal and is distributed by Zeitgeist Films. It was the first of three documentary collaborations between Baichwall and Burtynsky, followed by Watermark in 2013 and Anthropocene: The Human Epoch in 2018.

Watermark (film)

Watermark (film)

Watermark is a 2012 Canadian documentary film by Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky. It concerns the history and use of water. Burtynsky was previously the subject of Baichwal's 2006 documentary, Manufactured Landscapes. The film features water use practices around the world, including multiple scenes in China and the United States, as well as segments shot in eight other countries. In China, the film chronicles the building of the Xiluodu Dam and flooding of its reservoir.

Anthropocene

Anthropocene

The Anthropocene is a proposed geological epoch dating from the commencement of significant human impact on Earth's geology and ecosystems, including, but not limited to, anthropogenic climate change.

Art Gallery of Ontario

Art Gallery of Ontario

The Art Gallery of Ontario is an art museum in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The museum is located in the Grange Park neighbourhood of downtown Toronto, on Dundas Street West between McCaul and Beverley streets just east of Chinatown and just west of Little Japan. The museum's building complex takes up 45,000 square metres (480,000 sq ft) of physical space, making it one of the largest art museums in North America and the second-largest art museum in Toronto after the Royal Ontario Museum. In addition to exhibition spaces, the museum also houses an artist-in-residence office and studio, dining facilities, event spaces, gift shop, library and archives, theatre and lecture hall, research centre, and a workshop.

National Gallery of Canada

National Gallery of Canada

The National Gallery of Canada, located in the capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, is Canada's national art museum. The museum's building takes up 46,621 square metres (501,820 sq ft), with 12,400 square metres (133,000 sq ft) of space used for exhibiting art. It is one of the largest art museums in North America by exhibition space.

Virtual reality

Virtual reality

Virtual reality (VR) is a simulated experience that employs pose tracking and 3D near-eye displays to give the user an immersive feel of a virtual world. Applications of virtual reality include entertainment, education and business. Other distinct types of VR-style technology include augmented reality and mixed reality, sometimes referred to as extended reality or XR, although definitions are currently changing due to the nascence of the industry.

2018 Toronto International Film Festival

2018 Toronto International Film Festival

The 43rd annual Toronto International Film Festival was held from September 6 to 16, 2018. In June 2018, the TIFF organizers announced a program to ensure that at least 20 percent of all film critics and journalists given press accreditation to the festival were members of underrepresented groups, such as women and people of color. The People's Choice Award was won by Green Book, directed by Peter Farrelly.

Awards

In December 2018, the Toronto International Film Festival named the film to its annual year-end Canada's Top Ten list.[7]

In January 2019, it was announced as the winner of the Rogers Best Canadian Film Award at the Toronto Film Critics Association Awards 2018.[8] The filmmakers gave the $100,000 prize money to the runners-up and to TIFF's Share Her Journey initiative, which supports women in film.[4]

Also in January 2019, the film received the Vancouver Film Critics Circle award for Best Canadian Documentary Film.[9]

The film won two Canadian Screen Awards at the 7th Canadian Screen Awards in 2019, for Best Feature Length Documentary and Best Cinematography in a Documentary (de Pencier).[10]

Discover more about Awards related topics

Toronto International Film Festival

Toronto International Film Festival

The Toronto International Film Festival is one of the largest publicly attended film festivals in the world, attracting over 480,000 people annually. Since its founding in 1976, TIFF has grown to become a permanent destination for film culture operating out of the TIFF Bell Lightbox, located in Downtown Toronto. TIFF's mission is "to transform the way people see the world through film".

Canada's Top Ten

Canada's Top Ten

Canada's Top Ten is an annual honour, compiled by the Toronto International Film Festival and announced in December each year to identify and promote the year's best Canadian films. The list was first introduced in 2001 as an initiative to help publicize Canadian films.

Rogers Best Canadian Film Award

Rogers Best Canadian Film Award

The Rogers Best Canadian Film Award is presented annually by the Toronto Film Critics Association to the film judged by the organization's members as the year's best Canadian film. In 2012, the cash prize accompanying the award was increased to $100,000, making it the largest arts award in Canada. Each year, two runners-up also receive $5,000. The award is funded and presented by Rogers Communications, which is a founding sponsor of the association's awards gala.

Toronto Film Critics Association Awards 2018

Toronto Film Critics Association Awards 2018

The 22nd Toronto Film Critics Association Awards, honoring the best in film for 2018, were awarded on December 9, 2018.

Vancouver Film Critics Circle

Vancouver Film Critics Circle

The Vancouver Film Critics Circle (VFCC) was founded in 2000 by David Spaner and Ian Caddell, in order to help promote Canadian films and the British Columbia Film and Television Industry. Its membership includes print, radio, on-line, and television critics, either based in Vancouver or with Vancouver outlets.

7th Canadian Screen Awards

7th Canadian Screen Awards

The 7th annual Canadian Screen Awards were held on March 31, 2019, to honour achievements in Canadian film, television, and digital media production in 2018.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Feature Length Documentary

Canadian Screen Award for Best Feature Length Documentary

The Academy of Canadian Cinema and Television presents an annual award for Best Feature Length Documentary. First presented in 1968 as part of the Canadian Film Awards, it became part of the Genie Awards in 1980 and the contemporary Canadian Screen Awards in 2013.

Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Documentary

Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Documentary

The Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography in a Documentary is an annual award, presented as part of the Canadian Screen Awards program to honour the year's best cinematography in a documentary film. It is presented separately from the Canadian Screen Award for Best Cinematography for feature films.

Reception

As of October 2021, the film holds an 87% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 38 reviews, with an average rating of 7.8/10. The website's critics consensus reads, "Anthropocene: The Human Epoch offers a sobering – and visually ravishing – look at the horrific ecological damage wrought by modern human civilization."[11] On Metacritic, the film has an average rating of 77/100, based on six reviews, indicating "generally favorable reviews."[12]

Source: "Anthropocene: The Human Epoch", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthropocene:_The_Human_Epoch.

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References
  1. ^ "TIFF Review: ‘Anthropocene: The Human Epoch’". Point of View, September 13, 2018.
  2. ^ "The Human Epoch (2019)". Box Office Mojo. IMDb. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  3. ^ "The Human Epoch (2019)". The Numbers. IMDb. Retrieved December 13, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c "TIFF's Canadian lineup has titles by Denys Arcand, Jennifer Baichwal". CityNews, August 1, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Burtynsky's Anthropocene coming to the AGO in September 2018". Now, November 15, 2017.
  6. ^ https://theanthropocene.org/
  7. ^ "TIFF's Canada's Top Ten list skews a lot younger this year". Now, December 5, 2018.
  8. ^ "'Anthropocene' named best Canadian feature by Toronto Film Critics Association". CityNews, January 8, 2019.
  9. ^ "Vancouver Film Critics Circle names Edge of the Knife top Canadian feature film". Toronto Star, January 8, 2019.
  10. ^ Charlie Smith, "Une Colonie, Anne with an E, and Cardinal: Blackfly Season all win big at Canadian Screen Awards". The Georgia Straight, March 31, 2019.
  11. ^ "Anthropocene: The Human Epoch (2018)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved October 10, 2021.
  12. ^ "Anthropocene: The Human Epoch". Metacritic. Retrieved June 27, 2020.
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