Get Our Extension

Andrew Holleran

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Andrew Holleran
Holleran, 2007
Holleran, 2007
BornEric Garber
1944 (age 78–79)
Aruba
OccupationNovelist, essayist
EducationUniversity of Pennsylvania
Alma materHarvard University
Notable worksDancer from the Dance, Ground Zero,The Kingdom of Sand
Notable awardsFerro-Grumley Award
Bill Whitehead Award
Stonewall Book Award

Andrew Holleran is the pseudonym of Eric Garber (born 1944),[1] an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer, born on the island of Aruba. Most of his adult life has been spent in New York City, Washington, D.C., and a small town in Florida. He was a member of The Violet Quill, a gay writer's group that met in 1980 and 1981 and also included Robert Ferro, Edmund White and Felice Picano.[2][3] Following the success of his first novel Dancer from the Dance in 1978, he became a prominent author of post-Stonewall gay literature. Historically protective of his privacy, the author continues to use the pseudonym Andrew Holleran as a writer and public speaker.

Discover more about Andrew Holleran related topics

Novelist

Novelist

A novelist is an author or writer of novels, though often novelists also write in other genres of both fiction and non-fiction. Some novelists are professional novelists, thus make a living writing novels and other fiction, while others aspire to support themselves in this way or write as an avocation. Most novelists struggle to have their debut novel published, but once published they often continue to be published, although very few become literary celebrities, thus gaining prestige or a considerable income from their work.

Short story

Short story

A short story is a piece of prose fiction that can typically be read in a single sitting and focuses on a self-contained incident or series of linked incidents, with the intent of evoking a single effect or mood. The short story is one of the oldest types of literature and has existed in the form of legends, mythic tales, folk tales, fairy tales, tall tales, fables and anecdotes in various ancient communities around the world. The modern short story developed in the early 19th century.

Aruba

Aruba

Aruba, officially the Country of Aruba is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands physically located in the mid-south of the Caribbean Sea, about 29 kilometres (18 mi) north of the Venezuela peninsula of Paraguaná and 80 kilometres (50 mi) northwest of Curaçao. It measures 32 kilometres (20 mi) long from its northwestern to its southeastern end and 10 kilometres (6 mi) across at its widest point. Together with Bonaire and Curaçao, Aruba forms a group referred to as the ABC islands. Collectively, these and the other three Dutch substantial islands in the Caribbean are often called the Dutch Caribbean, of which Aruba has about one-third of the population. In 1986, it became a constituent country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and acquired the formal name the Country of Aruba.

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the United States both by population and by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, entertainment, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

The Violet Quill

The Violet Quill

The Violet Quill was a group of seven gay male writers that met in 1980 and 1981 in New York City to read from their writings to each other and to critique them. This group and the writers epitomize the years between the Stonewall Riots and the beginning of the AIDS pandemic.

Robert Ferro

Robert Ferro

Robert Ferro was an American novelist whose semi-autobiographical fiction explored the uneasy integration of homosexuality and traditional American upper middle class values.

Edmund White

Edmund White

Edmund Valentine White III is an American novelist, memoirist, playwright, biographer and an essayist on literary and social topics. Since 1999 he has been a professor at Princeton University. France made him Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 1993.

Felice Picano

Felice Picano

Felice Picano is an American writer, publisher, and critic who has encouraged the development of gay literature in the United States. His work is documented in many sources.

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance is a 1978 gay novel by Andrew Holleran about gay men in New York City and Fire Island.

Stonewall riots

Stonewall riots

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous protests by members of the gay community in response to a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Patrons of the Stonewall, other Village lesbian and gay bars, and neighborhood street people fought back when the police became violent. The riots are widely considered the watershed event that transformed the gay liberation movement and the twentieth-century fight for LGBT rights in the United States.

Gay

Gay

Gay is a term that primarily refers to a homosexual person or the trait of being homosexual. The term originally meant 'carefree', 'cheerful', or 'bright and showy'.

Pseudonym

Pseudonym

A pseudonym or alias is a fictitious name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which differs from their original or true name (orthonym). This also differs from a new name that entirely or legally replaces an individual's own. Many pseudonym holders use pseudonyms because they wish to remain anonymous, but anonymity is difficult to achieve and often fraught with legal issues.

Early life, education, military service

Holleran was born and spent much of his childhood on the island of Aruba in the Dutch Caribbean, where his father worked for an oil company. He was raised a Catholic. When his father retired, the family moved to a Florida. After high school, he attended Harvard College, where he studied literature and American history. During his senior year, he met Peter Taylor, who taught creative writing. After graduating from Harvard with a BA in English in 1965, he followed Taylor to the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, in part to postpone "the horror of law school."[4][5][6][7][8]

At Iowa, where Holleran's teachers included Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. and José Donoso, he formed a long-lasting friendship with fellow student Robert Ferro. None of Holleran's writings from this period were ever published, but he did attain both an MA and an MFA from Iowa.[9] Then, after one year at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, which he found "a drag,"[10] in 1968 Holleran found himself "in the clutches of a Kafkaesque nightmare"[11] when he was drafted into the U.S. Army at the height of the Vietnam War. A "fluke of the computer system"[12] sent him not to Vietnam but to West Germany.[13] While in Germany he made his first sale of a short story, to The New Yorker.[14] It was also in Germany that he had his first experience of gay sex, which he recounted in a Christopher Street interview:

One night I was in an N.C.O. club with this mad queen from Boston…He got me drunk and put me on the train to Ludwigshafen and dragged me to my first gay bar. It was stunning…I had sex that night and came back to the post so depressed that I took a three-long-hour shower. I felt that I had violated myself…After that experience in Germany I went back into the closet for a year.[15]

Discover more about Early life, education, military service related topics

Aruba

Aruba

Aruba, officially the Country of Aruba is a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands physically located in the mid-south of the Caribbean Sea, about 29 kilometres (18 mi) north of the Venezuela peninsula of Paraguaná and 80 kilometres (50 mi) northwest of Curaçao. It measures 32 kilometres (20 mi) long from its northwestern to its southeastern end and 10 kilometres (6 mi) across at its widest point. Together with Bonaire and Curaçao, Aruba forms a group referred to as the ABC islands. Collectively, these and the other three Dutch substantial islands in the Caribbean are often called the Dutch Caribbean, of which Aruba has about one-third of the population. In 1986, it became a constituent country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, and acquired the formal name the Country of Aruba.

Dutch Caribbean

Dutch Caribbean

The Dutch Caribbean are the territories, colonies, and countries, former and current, of the Dutch Empire and the Kingdom of the Netherlands in the Caribbean Sea. They are in the north and south-west of the Lesser Antilles archipelago.

Harvard College

Harvard College

Harvard College is the undergraduate college of Harvard University, a private Ivy League research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard College is Harvard University's traditional undergraduate program, offering AB and SB degrees. It is highly selective, with fewer than four percent of applicants being offered admission as of 2022. Harvard College students participate in over 450 extracurricular organizations and nearly all live on campus. First-year students reside in or near Harvard Yard and upperclass students reside in other on-campus residential housing.

Peter Taylor (writer)

Peter Taylor (writer)

Matthew Hillsman Taylor, Jr., known professionally as Peter Taylor, was an American novelist, short story writer, and playwright. Born and raised in Tennessee and St. Louis, Missouri, he wrote frequently about the urban South in his stories and novels.

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Arts is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate program in the arts, or, in some cases, other disciplines. A Bachelor of Arts degree course is generally completed in three or four years, depending on the country and institution.Degree attainment typically takes four years in Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Brazil, Brunei, China, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, Georgia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Latvia, Lebanon, Lithuania, Mexico, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, Ukraine, the United States and Zambia. Degree attainment typically takes three years in Albania, Australia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Caribbean, Iceland, India, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Switzerland, the Canadian province of Quebec, the United Kingdom and most of the European Union. In Bangladesh, three-year BA (associates) courses are also available.

José Donoso

José Donoso

José Manuel Donoso Yáñez, known as José Donoso, was a Chilean writer, journalist and professor. He lived most of his life in Chile, although he spent many years in self-imposed exile in Mexico, the United States and Spain. Although he had left his country in the sixties for personal reasons, after 1973 he said his exile was also a form of protest against the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. He returned to Chile in 1981 and lived there until his death.

Robert Ferro

Robert Ferro

Robert Ferro was an American novelist whose semi-autobiographical fiction explored the uneasy integration of homosexuality and traditional American upper middle class values.

Master of Arts

Master of Arts

A Master of Arts is the holder of a master's degree awarded by universities in many countries. The degree is usually contrasted with that of Master of Science. Those admitted to the degree have typically studied subjects within the scope of the humanities and social sciences, such as history, literature, languages, linguistics, public administration, political science, communication studies, law or diplomacy; however, different universities have different conventions and may also offer the degree for fields typically considered within the natural sciences and mathematics. The degree can be conferred in respect of completing courses and passing examinations, research, or a combination of the two.

Master of Fine Arts

Master of Fine Arts

A Master of Fine Arts is a terminal degree in fine arts, including visual arts, creative writing, graphic design, photography, filmmaking, dance, theatre, other performing arts and in some cases, theatre management or arts administration. It is a graduate degree that typically requires two to three years of postgraduate study after a bachelor's degree, though the term of study varies by country or university. Coursework is primarily of an applied or performing nature, with the program often culminating in a thesis exhibition or performance. The first university to admit students to the degree of Master of Fine Arts was the University of Iowa in 1940.

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American weekly magazine featuring journalism, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. Founded as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric American culture, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews, its rigorous fact checking and copy editing, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street was a gay-oriented magazine published in New York City, New York, by Charles Ortleb. Known both for its serious discussion of issues within the gay community and its satire of anti-gay criticism, it was one of the two most widely read gay-issues publications in the United States. Christopher Street covered politics and culture and its aim was to become a gay equivalent of The New Yorker.

Ludwigshafen

Ludwigshafen

Ludwigshafen, officially Ludwigshafen am Rhein, is a city in the German state of Rhineland-Palatinate, on the river Rhine, opposite Mannheim. With Mannheim, Heidelberg, and the surrounding region, it forms the Rhine Neckar Area.

Move to New York City

Following his return to the United States after the army, he attended one additional semester of law school in Philadelphia, where by chance one night he discovered the gay part of town and developed a "case of 'Every Night Fever'" that "went on for four or five years. Bars seemed to be the most wonderful places on earth. I just had to walk into one to be in heaven. I would stand for hours. I was very shy and everyone seemed so glamorous."[16] After dropping out of law school and moving to New York City, his "fever" only intensified with his discovery of gay dance clubs and bathhouses and the gay scene at Cherry Grove and Fire Island Pines.[17] When not at a gym or out partying, dancing, and cruising for sex, he lived "in roach-infested apartments, working as a bartender, as a typist." He continued to write, thinking, after the appearance of his story in The New Yorker in 1971, that "they would publish me three times a year," but instead, "I had nothing published for seven years after that, until Dancer from the Dance," in 1978. "It's been a terrible struggle," he recalled.[18]

Dancer from the Dance, a critical and financial success, became a national bestseller and launched Holleran's career as a writer. His subsequent, increasingly autobiographical novels, short stories, and essays reflect his concerns as an aging gay man and track his movements between homes in New York City, Washington, D.C., and the small town in Florida where his parents retired and where he continues to live.

Discover more about Move to New York City related topics

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the United States both by population and by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, entertainment, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

Gay bathhouse

Gay bathhouse

A gay bathhouse, also known as a gay sauna or a gay steambath, is a public bath targeted towards gay and bisexual men. In gay slang, a bathhouse may be called just "the baths", "the sauna", or "the tubs". Historically they have been used for sexual activity.

Cherry Grove, New York

Cherry Grove, New York

Cherry Grove is a hamlet in the Town of Brookhaven, Suffolk County, New York, United States. It is located on Fire Island, a barrier island separated from the southern side of Long Island by the Great South Bay. The hamlet has approximately 300 houses on 41 acres (170,000 m2), a summer seasonal population of 2,000 and a year-round population of 15.

Literary career

Dancer from the Dance (1978) takes place amid discotheques, gay bathhouses, fabulous parties, and seedy apartments in New York City and Fire Island. John Lahr in The New York Times called it

A meditation on ecstasy…constructed as a memoir of one very special member of this world: Malone, a paradigm of the romantic ideal…Malone becomes a circuit queen, but an aura of innocence not odium surrounds him. His delirium becomes a kind of saintliness; he gives love to the ugly as well as the beautiful…The Virgil who leads Malone through this inferno is an outrageous transvestite called Sutherland. Where Malone is beautiful, Sutherland is wise…And as we get to know this wonderful character, we see how his frivolity is a rebellion against the meaningless he finds around him.[19]

The same review included a caustic dismissal of Larry Kramer's novel Faggots, set in the same milieu of gay New York and Fire Island, calling it, "sentence for sentence, some of the worst writing I've encountered in a published manuscript…an embarrassing fiasco."[19] The two novels would continue to be linked and compared by readers and critics.[20]

The beach at Fire Island Pines, an important location in Dancer from the Dance.
The beach at Fire Island Pines, an important location in Dancer from the Dance.

Dancer from the Dance became a breakthrough bestseller and is regarded as a classic of gay literature,[4] enjoying a cult status in the gay community; William Johnson, program director of PEN America and former deputy director of Lambda Literary, calls Dancer from the Dance "our Catcher in the Rye, the book you read when you’re young."[21]

By 1981, Holleran was no longer living full-time in New York, though he kept a rent-controlled apartment on St. Mark's Place in the East Village.[22] His second novel, Nights in Aruba (1983), drew on his childhood in Aruba, his experience in the U.S. Army in Germany, his love-life and friendships in New York, and his ongoing relationships with his sister in Pennsylvania and his parents in Florida. The novel is not entirely autobiographical. One of the most vivid characters is "a tart-tongued older queen named Mister Friel"; Holleran says, "I took the greatest pleasure in the Friel sections, which were totally made up."[6] (Mister Friel reappears in the short story "The Hamburger Man" in In September, the Light Changes.)

Ground Zero (1988) presented a collection of Holleran's essays, originally published in Christopher Street, written as the AIDS epidemic struck New York and decimated its gay community. A quarter-century after its publication, Garth Greenwell in The New Yorker assessed it as "one of the most important books to emerge from the plague,"[23] and wrote:

The essays combine journalistic reportage in real time with an extraordinarily refined literary sensibility, and the conjunction is startling. As Holleran, along with the rest of gay New York, slowly realizes the scope of the catastrophe, the effect is something like reading F. Scott Fitzgerald’s notes on the apocalypse.[24]

His third novel, The Beauty of Men (1996), takes place in central Florida where the main character, a 47-year-old gay man, has gone to take care of his quadriplegic mother. Peter Parker in The New York Times found it "extremely well written, and in its muted way an altogether more impressive novel than Dancer From the Dance."[25] The novel received the 1996 Ferro-Grumley Award.[26]

In September, the Light Changes (1999) was a collection of short stories, most of them published for the first time. Peter Parker in The New York Times found the book "unflinching, provocative, witty and shrewd."[25]

After the death of his mother, for a number of years Holleran taught creative writing at American University in Washington, D.C. His grief at his mother's death in Florida, his observations on Washington and its gay residents, together with a meditation on the letters of Mary Todd Lincoln, inform his short novel Grief (2006), which received the 2007 Stonewall Book Award.[27] Also in 2007, Holleran received the Bill Whitehead Award for Lifetime Achievement from Publishing Triangle.[28]

In 2022, after a long hiatus, Holleran published the novel The Kingdom of Sand. The setting is again a small Florida town, and the narrator is again an aging gay man, living in the house where his late parents retired, keeping all their relics intact. He recounts his visits to an older gay man in town, who is approaching death. "Now, at almost 80 years of age," wrote Colm Tóibín in The New York Times, "he has produced a novel remarkable for its integrity, for its readiness to embrace difficult truths and for its complex way of paying homage to the passing of time."[29]

Holleran has been a prolific essayist throughout his career. (His essays and fiction are both so autobiographical and introspective that they sometimes seem indistinguishable.[30]) For many years he wrote regularly for the groundbreaking gay magazine Christopher Street.[31] More recently, he is a frequent contributor to The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide.[32]

Holleran is also known as a prolific writer of letters. A selection of his early correspondence with Robert Ferro was published in The Violet Quill Reader in 1994. Having earlier written to Ferro about his awed reaction to Proust's Remembrance of Things Past,[33] Holleran (not yet a published novelist) ends a letter from 1970 by writing:

Incidentally I have begun to think that novels may be mere excuses for publishing of letters; having read now Proust to his mother, Proust to Antoine Bibesco, John Addington Symonds to everyone, and who else…But novels are such work. There must be an easier way to have one's letters published.[34]

Discover more about Literary career related topics

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance is a 1978 gay novel by Andrew Holleran about gay men in New York City and Fire Island.

Gay bathhouse

Gay bathhouse

A gay bathhouse, also known as a gay sauna or a gay steambath, is a public bath targeted towards gay and bisexual men. In gay slang, a bathhouse may be called just "the baths", "the sauna", or "the tubs". Historically they have been used for sexual activity.

Fire Island

Fire Island

Fire Island is the large center island of the outer barrier islands parallel to the South Shore of Long Island, in the U.S. state of New York.

John Lahr

John Lahr

John Henry Lahr is an American theater critic and writer. From 1992 to 2013, he was a staff writer and the senior drama critic at The New Yorker. He has written more than twenty books related to theater. Lahr has been called "one of the greatest biographers writing today".

Larry Kramer

Larry Kramer

Laurence David Kramer was an American playwright, author, film producer, public health advocate, and gay rights activist. He began his career rewriting scripts while working for Columbia Pictures, which led him to London, where he worked with United Artists. There he wrote the screenplay for the film Women in Love (1969) and received an Academy Award nomination for his work.

Faggots (novel)

Faggots (novel)

Faggots is a 1978 novel by Larry Kramer. It is a satirical portrayal of 1970s New York's very visible gay community in a time before AIDS. The novel's portrayal of promiscuous sex and recreational drug use provoked controversy and was condemned by some elements within the gay community.

8th Street and St. Mark's Place

8th Street and St. Mark's Place

8th Street is a street in the New York City borough of Manhattan that runs from Sixth Avenue to Third Avenue, and also from Avenue B to Avenue D; its addresses switch from West to East as it crosses Fifth Avenue. Between Third Avenue and Avenue A, it is named St. Mark's Place, after the nearby St. Mark's Church in-the-Bowery on 10th Street at Second Avenue.

East Village, Manhattan

East Village, Manhattan

The East Village is a neighborhood on the East Side of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is roughly defined as the area east of the Bowery and Third Avenue, between 14th Street on the north and Houston Street on the south. The East Village contains three subsections: Alphabet City, in reference to the single-letter-named avenues that are located to the east of First Avenue; Little Ukraine, near Second Avenue and 6th and 7th Streets; and the Bowery, located around the street of the same name.

Ground Zero (book)

Ground Zero (book)

Ground Zero (1988) is a book of essays by Andrew Holleran. The title refers to a catastrophic disaster in Lower Manhattan, namely the havoc wrought by AIDS in the 1980s among gay men. Holleran's essays are by turns thoughtful, reflective, angry, frustrated, and mournful in the extreme. Particularly notable are the twin essays "Notes on Promiscuity" and "Notes on Celibacy," each of which is a collection of provocative aphorisms.

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street was a gay-oriented magazine published in New York City, New York, by Charles Ortleb. Known both for its serious discussion of issues within the gay community and its satire of anti-gay criticism, it was one of the two most widely read gay-issues publications in the United States. Christopher Street covered politics and culture and its aim was to become a gay equivalent of The New Yorker.

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell is an American novelist, poet, literary critic, and educator. He has published the novella Mitko (2011) and the novels What Belongs to You (2016) and Cleanness (2020). He has also published stories in The Paris Review and A Public Space and writes criticism for The New Yorker and The Atlantic.

F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald

Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. He is best known for his novels depicting the flamboyance and excess of the Jazz Age—a term he popularized. During his lifetime, he published four novels, four story collections, and 164 short stories. Although he achieved temporary popular success and fortune in the 1920s, Fitzgerald received critical acclaim only after his death and is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century.

Influences

Holleran has called The Great Gatsby "my favorite book."[35] In a 1983 interview, when asked "Who are your models as a writer?", Holleran replied,

Scott Fitzgerald. I think Gatsby is just it for language and the beauty of the prose, and Tender Is the Night. And I love Proust. But he's the dangerous one. He's so overwhelming, so immense, so brilliant on so many levels that that book is stultifying in a way. It stands like this enormous mountain, and you can't go up it. You have to go around it."[6]

Recalling Dancer from the Dance, with its "twilit languor and ambered nostalgia," Garth Greenwell in The New Yorker noted that "Holleran’s clearest influences are Fitzgerald and Proust."[23] Edmund White wrote that Dancer "accomplished for the 1970s what The Great Gatsby achieved for the 1920s—the glamorization of a decade and a culture."[36]

Tony Kushner also links Holleran and Fitzgerald:

Fitzgerald is also a writer about loss; there's this sense with both [Holleran and Fitzgerald] of people inhabiting something that's already disappeared. One of the first things I remember about Dancer from the Dance is that it lands on the notion that all of us are self-invented people, and that behind that is a difficult and somewhat concealed past, as if in coming out there’s a reverse closeting that's very Fitzgeraldian."[21]

Discover more about Influences related topics

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby is a 1925 novel by American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. Set in the Jazz Age on Long Island, near New York City, the novel depicts first-person narrator Nick Carraway's interactions with mysterious millionaire Jay Gatsby and Gatsby's obsession to reunite with his former lover, Daisy Buchanan.

Tender Is the Night

Tender Is the Night

Tender Is the Night is the fourth and final novel completed by American writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. Set in French Riviera during the twilight of the Jazz Age, the 1934 novel chronicles the rise and fall of Dick Diver, a promising young psychiatrist, and his wife, Nicole, who is one of his patients. The story mirrors events in the lives of the author and his wife Zelda Fitzgerald as Dick starts his descent into alcoholism and Nicole descends into mental illness.

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell

Garth Greenwell is an American novelist, poet, literary critic, and educator. He has published the novella Mitko (2011) and the novels What Belongs to You (2016) and Cleanness (2020). He has also published stories in The Paris Review and A Public Space and writes criticism for The New Yorker and The Atlantic.

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American weekly magazine featuring journalism, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. Founded as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric American culture, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews, its rigorous fact checking and copy editing, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.

Tony Kushner

Tony Kushner

Anthony Robert Kushner is an American author, playwright, and screenwriter. Lauded for his work on stage, he is most known for his seminal work Angels in America, which earned a Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award. At the turn of the 21st Century he became known for his numerous film collaborations with Steven Spielberg. Kushner made his Broadway debut in 1993 with both Angels in America: Millennium Approaches and Angels in America: Perestroika. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama and the Tony Award for Best Play. He then adapted the acclaimed 2003 miniseries directed by Mike Nichols for which Kushner received a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series or Movie. He received the National Medal of Arts from President Barack Obama in 2013.

Recurring themes and elements

In 2022, looking back over Holleran's 44-year career, Garth Greenwell in The New Yorker noted that, after the "uniquely novelistic" Dancer from the Dance, Holleran's subsequent books

can most profitably be read as a sustained study of one man's life. Though the protagonists are sometimes granted different names…the major facts of their biographies are largely constant, and shared with their author: a devout Catholic childhood on a Caribbean island; military service and initiation into gay life in Heidelberg; young adulthood in New York, where the thrill of sexual freedom competed with anxiety about possibly wasting one's life; then a mostly closeted small-town existence, caring for a disabled parent, and crushing grief after that parent's death. Incidents, scenes, even lines of dialogue drift between the books, and certain events take on a totemic force: a roommate's suicide; a father calling out after suffering a stroke; a mother asking her adult son if he is gay and the son's panicked denial.[23]

A notable exception to this assessment is In September, the Light Changes (1999), in which many of the short stories are less essayistic and autobiographical, and more traditionally fictional and in the vein of Dancer from the Dance than Holleran's subsequent novels.

Critical reception

In a positive review of Holleran's Grief in The New York Times, Caryn James wrote that "Holleran's earlier novels can seem so determined to speak for their disenfranchised gay characters that the works become inaccessible to anyone else, like looking through a window at someone else's world."[37]

Reacting to James, Larry Kramer took the critical establishment to task, calling Holleran

the best gay writer we have today…Every one of his books is a gem. If he were straight, his reputation would be immense. The beauty of his language, the empathy for his characters and the world he writes about, are unsurpassed by any other gay writing of our time…He is our Fitzgerald and Hemingway but for one thing: He writes better than both of them…When we fall into the hands of book critics at The Times, we are amazed at their lack of understanding and empathy of what we are trying to do and say. It is quite amazing how fervent and omnipresent is the homophobia that never-endingly remains the norm for gay writers in their book reviews.[38]

Asked by New York Magazine to name her "favorite underrated book of the past ten years," Daphne Merkin cited Grief, and, like Kramer, said that Holleran's work is under-appreciated:

This slim but singularly affecting novel put in an appearance to conditional praise last June and, to my knowledge, sank thereafter without a trace. A meditation on personal loss and the loss of erotic/romantic possibilities for aging homosexual men (and by implication aging everyones) it's bone-spare but plangent with meaning—the kind of novel that would be immediately hailed if it were written by a laconic European writer.[39]

Explicitly acknowledging Kramer's complaint from 2015, with the publication of The Kingdom of Sand in 2022 Joshua Barone in The New York Times wrote a lengthy profile and appreciation of Holleran, accompanied by photographs of the novelist in the natural habitat of his small town in Florida.[21]

Discover more about Critical reception related topics

Works

Fiction

Nonfiction

Discover more about Works related topics

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American weekly magazine featuring journalism, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. Founded as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric American culture, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews, its rigorous fact checking and copy editing, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance

Dancer from the Dance is a 1978 gay novel by Andrew Holleran about gay men in New York City and Fire Island.

The Beauty of Men

The Beauty of Men

The Beauty of Men is a 1996 novel by Andrew Holleran, about Lark, a 47-year-old single gay man, who has moved to Florida to help care for his mother, who became paralyzed after a fall.

Grief (novel)

Grief (novel)

Grief is a novel by American author Andrew Holleran, published in 2006. The novel takes place in Washington D.C., following the personal journey of a middle-aged, gay man dealing with the death of his mother. The novel received the 2007 Stonewall Book Award.

Granta

Granta

Granta is a literary magazine and publisher in the United Kingdom whose mission centres on its "belief in the power and urgency of the story, both in fiction and non-fiction, and the story’s supreme ability to describe, illuminate and make real." In 2007, The Observer stated: "In its blend of memoirs and photojournalism, and in its championing of contemporary realist fiction, Granta has its face pressed firmly against the window, determined to witness the world."

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street (magazine)

Christopher Street was a gay-oriented magazine published in New York City, New York, by Charles Ortleb. Known both for its serious discussion of issues within the gay community and its satire of anti-gay criticism, it was one of the two most widely read gay-issues publications in the United States. Christopher Street covered politics and culture and its aim was to become a gay equivalent of The New Yorker.

Ground Zero (book)

Ground Zero (book)

Ground Zero (1988) is a book of essays by Andrew Holleran. The title refers to a catastrophic disaster in Lower Manhattan, namely the havoc wrought by AIDS in the 1980s among gay men. Holleran's essays are by turns thoughtful, reflective, angry, frustrated, and mournful in the extreme. Particularly notable are the twin essays "Notes on Promiscuity" and "Notes on Celibacy," each of which is a collection of provocative aphorisms.

Source: "Andrew Holleran", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Holleran.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ Goldstein (2006) erroneously gives his birth year as 1943.
  2. ^ Bergman, p. xi.
  3. ^ White (1991): Edmund White remembers the group meeting from 1979 to 1983.
  4. ^ a b Goldstein (2006).
  5. ^ Mahtani (2006).
  6. ^ a b c Don Shewey (1983). "Andrew Holleran: Ransacking the City of Love". www.donshewey.com. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  7. ^ Ortleb, p. 54.
  8. ^ Holleran (2012).
  9. ^ Bergman, pp. 11-12.
  10. ^ Bergman, p. 14.
  11. ^ Bergman, p. 14.
  12. ^ Bergman, p. 15.
  13. ^ His army experience would later be fictionalized in a section of his autobiographical novel Nights in Aruba and in the short story "Sleeping Soldiers," published in The Violet Quill Reader.
  14. ^ Bergman, p. 18; "The Holy Family," about a Christmas gathering, appeared in the January 2, 1971, issue of The New Yorker.
  15. ^ Ortleb, p 54.
  16. ^ Ortleb, p. 54; "Every Night Fever" is a pun on the then-current movie Saturday Night Fever.
  17. ^ Bergman, p. 401: Holleran recalls, "I spent those years going to Fire Island as often as I could, visiting the Eagle's Nest, the Everard, and whatever dance club happened to be the one that winter."
  18. ^ Ortleb, pp. 54-55.
  19. ^ a b Lahr (1979).
  20. ^ For more recent comparisons of Dancer from the Dance and Faggots, see Greenwell (2022) and Barone (2022).
  21. ^ a b c Barone (2022).
  22. ^ Bergman, p. 405: Holleran recalls, "I'd not been in New York since 1981 for any length of time…"
  23. ^ a b c Greenwell (2022).
  24. ^ Greenwell (2020).
  25. ^ a b Parker (1999).
  26. ^ "The Ferro-Grumley Award". ferrogrumley.org. Retrieved January 24, 2023.
  27. ^ "ALA | Holleran, Bechdel win 2007 Stonewall Book awards". www.ala.org. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  28. ^ "The 2007 Triangle Awards | White Crane Institute". White Crane Institute. May 8, 2007. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  29. ^ Tóibín (2022).
  30. ^ Greenwell (2022): "Holleran’s novels, always full of exposition, have become increasingly essayistic."
  31. ^ Many of these essays can be accessed online at archive.org.
  32. ^ A list of Holleran's essays for the periodical can be accessed online at glreview.org.
  33. ^ Bergman, p. 18.
  34. ^ Bergman, p. 26.
  35. ^ Morton, Paul (March 2007). "Bookslut | An Interview with Andrew Holleran". www.bookslut.com. Archived from the original on 9 June 2018. Retrieved 28 March 2018.
  36. ^ White, quoted by Parker (1999).
  37. ^ James (2006).
  38. ^ Kramer (2015).
  39. ^ Merkin, quoted by Kramer (2015).
  40. ^ Despite its inclusion in this fiction anthology, Holleran himself calls "Nipples" an essay, not a short story.
Sources
External links

By Andrew Holleran

About Andrew Holleran

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.