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Almopia

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Almopia
Αλμωπία
Dimos Almopias Topo.png
Almopia is located in Greece
Almopia
Almopia
Location within the region
2011 Dimos Almopias.png
Coordinates: 40°58′N 22°03′E / 40.967°N 22.050°E / 40.967; 22.050Coordinates: 40°58′N 22°03′E / 40.967°N 22.050°E / 40.967; 22.050
CountryGreece
Administrative regionCentral Macedonia
Regional unitPella
Government
 • MayorChristos Batsis
Area
 • Municipality985.8 km2 (380.6 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)[1]
 • Municipality
27,556
 • Municipality density28/km2 (72/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+3 (EEST)

Almopia (Greek: Αλμωπία), or Enotia, also known in the Middle Ages as Moglena (Greek: Μογλενά, Macedonian and Bulgarian: Меглен or Мъглен), is a municipality and a former province (επαρχία) of the Pella regional unit in Macedonia, Greece. The seat of the municipality is the town Aridaia.[2] The municipality has an area of 985.817 km2.[3]

Discover more about Almopia related topics

Greek language

Greek language

Greek is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece, Cyprus, southern Italy, southern Albania, and other regions of the Balkans, the Black Sea coast, Asia Minor, and the Eastern Mediterranean. It has the longest documented history of any Indo-European language, spanning at least 3,400 years of written records. Its writing system is the Greek alphabet, which has been used for approximately 2,800 years; previously, Greek was recorded in writing systems such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin, Cyrillic, Armenian, Coptic, Gothic, and many other writing systems.

Macedonian language

Macedonian language

Macedonian is an Eastern South Slavic language. It is part of the Indo-European language family, and is one of the Slavic languages, which are part of a larger Balto-Slavic branch. Spoken as a first language by around two million people, it serves as the official language of North Macedonia. Most speakers can be found in the country and its diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia. Macedonian is also a recognized minority language in parts of Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Romania, and Serbia and it is spoken by emigrant communities predominantly in Australia, Canada and the United States.

Bulgarian language

Bulgarian language

Bulgarian is an Eastern South Slavic language spoken in Southeastern Europe, primarily in Bulgaria. It is the language of the Bulgarians.

Provinces of Greece

Provinces of Greece

The provinces of Greece were sub-divisions of some the country's prefectures. From 1887, the provinces were abolished as actual administrative units, but were retained for some state services, especially financial and educational services, as well as for electoral purposes. Before the Second World War, there were 139 provinces, and after the war, with the addition of the Dodecanese Islands, their number grew to 147. According to the Article 7 of the Code of Prefectural Self-Government, the provinces constituted a "particular administrative district" within the wider "administrative district" of the prefectures. The provinces were finally abolished after the 2006 local elections, in line with Law 2539/1997, as part of the wide-ranging administrative reform known as the "Kapodistrias Project", and replaced by enlarged municipalities (demoi).

Pella (regional unit)

Pella (regional unit)

Pella is one of the regional units of Greece, in the geographic region of Macedonia. It is part of the Region of Central Macedonia. It is named after the ancient city of Pella, the capital of ancient Macedonia and the birthplace of Alexander the Great. The capital of Pella is Edessa with a population of 19,036 inhabitants according to the census of 2011, while the largest town is Giannitsa. Other towns include Aridaia, Skydra, Arnissa and Krya Vrysi.

Macedonia (Greece)

Macedonia (Greece)

Macedonia is a geographic and former administrative region of Greece, in the southern Balkans. Macedonia is the largest and second-most-populous Greek geographic region, with a population of 2.36 million in 2020. It is highly mountainous, with most major urban centres such as Thessaloniki and Kavala being concentrated on its southern coastline. Together with Thrace, and sometimes also Thessaly and Epirus, it is part of Northern Greece. Greek Macedonia encompasses entirely the southern part of the wider region of Macedonia, making up 51% of the total area of that region. Additionally, it forms part of Greece's borders with three countries: Bulgaria to the northeast, North Macedonia to the north, and Albania to the northwest.

Greece

Greece

Greece, officially the Hellenic Republic, is a country in Southeast Europe. It is situated on the southern tip of the Balkan Peninsula, and is located at the crossroads of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Greece shares land borders with Albania to the northwest, North Macedonia and Bulgaria to the north, and Turkey to the northeast. The Aegean Sea lies to the east of the mainland, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Sea of Crete and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Greece has the longest coastline on the Mediterranean Basin, featuring thousands of islands. The country consists of nine traditional geographic regions, and has a population of approximately 10.4 million. Athens is the nation's capital and largest city, followed by Thessaloniki and Patras.

Aridaia

Aridaia

Aridaía is a town and a former municipality in the Pella regional unit, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Almopia, of which it is a municipal unit. It was the capital of the former Almopia eparchy. It is located in the northwest corner of the Pella regional unit, bordering the southern part of the North Macedonia and the northeast corner of the Florina regional unit. Its land area is 562.910 km2 (217.341 sq mi). The population of Aridaia proper is 7,057, while that of the entire municipal unit is 20,313. Its largest other towns are Prómachoi, Sosándra (1,078), Ápsalos (1,121), Loutráki (1,146), Polykárpi (1,049), Tsákoi (961), Voreinó (766), and Χifianí (767). The municipal unit is divided into 17 communities.

Name and history

Map of the Kingdom of Macedon with Almopia located in the central districts of the kingdom.
Map of the Kingdom of Macedon with Almopia located in the central districts of the kingdom.

The name Almopia (Ancient Greek: Ἀλμωπία, Almōpia) derives from the Almopes (Ἀλμῶπες), a Paeonian tribe that originally inhabited the area before being expelled from the region during the reign of Alexander I (r. 498–454 BC) when Almopia was incorporated into the ancient Macedonian kingdom.[4][5] The Almopes traced their descent to the eponymous mythological figure of Almops, son of the Greek God Poseidon and Helle.[6] The 2nd-century astronomer and geographer Claudius Ptolemy records three cities in the region in his Geography: Horma (Ὅρμα), Europos (Εὔρωπος) and Apsalos (Ἄψαλος).

In the early Byzantine period, the area was renamed to Enotia (Greek: Ενωτία) after a nearby fortress, probably in the vicinity of modern Notia. The name was revived between 1915 and 1927 for the Greek province as well.[7][8]

In the later Middle Ages, the area was known as Moglena (Greek: Μογλενά, Macedonian: Меглен, Bulgarian: Мъглен), from the Slavic word for "fog".[9] Until the early 11th century, Moglena was a province of the First Bulgarian Empire. Captured by the Byzantine emperor Basil II in 1015, it is attested as the seat of a bishopric in 1020, and as capital of its own theme in 1086. The area remained under Byzantine rule until the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade, when it was captured by Tsar Kaloyan of the Second Bulgarian Empire.[10] It was incorporate in the Serbian Empire by Stefan Dušan in 1346. Moglena was inhabited mainly by Megleno-Romanians and Slavic people. In Ottoman times, the region was also known by its Turkish name Karacova or Karadjova valley ("Black Valley", Greek: Καρατζόβα) or in Ottoman Turkish: كاراجاوا.

Until the Greco-Turkish War (1919–1922) and the population exchange between Greece and Turkey in 1924, Muslim Macedonian Slavs and Megleno-Romanians made up part of the population.[11]

Discover more about Name and history related topics

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander I of Macedon

Alexander I of Macedon, known with the title Philhellene, was the ruler of the ancient Kingdom of Macedon from c. 498 BC until his death in 454 BC. He was succeeded by his eldest son, Alcetas II.

Macedonia (ancient kingdom)

Macedonia (ancient kingdom)

Macedonia, also called Macedon, was an ancient kingdom on the periphery of Archaic and Classical Greece, and later the dominant state of Hellenistic Greece. The kingdom was founded and initially ruled by the royal Argead dynasty, which was followed by the Antipatrid and Antigonid dynasties. Home to the ancient Macedonians, the earliest kingdom was centered on the northeastern part of the Greek peninsula, and bordered by Epirus to the west, Paeonia to the north, Thrace to the east and Thessaly to the south.

Almops

Almops

Almops was, in Greek mythology, a giant son of the god Poseidon and the half-nymph Helle. He was the brother of Paeon.

Helle (mythology)

Helle (mythology)

Helle, or Ellie, sometimes also called Athamantis (Ἀθαμαντίς), was a character in Greek mythology who figured prominently in the story of Jason and the Argonauts.

Geography (Ptolemy)

Geography (Ptolemy)

The Geography, also known by its Latin names as the Geographia and the Cosmographia, is a gazetteer, an atlas, and a treatise on cartography, compiling the geographical knowledge of the 2nd-century Roman Empire. Originally written by Claudius Ptolemy in Greek at Alexandria around AD 150, the work was a revision of a now-lost atlas by Marinus of Tyre using additional Roman and Persian gazetteers and new principles. Its translation into Arabic in the 9th century and Latin in 1406 was highly influential on the geographical knowledge and cartographic traditions of the medieval Caliphate and Renaissance Europe.

Horma (Almopia)

Horma (Almopia)

Horma was a town of Almopia in ancient Macedonia.

Europus (Almopia)

Europus (Almopia)

Europus or Europos was a town of Almopia in ancient Macedonia.

Notia

Notia

Nótia is a village in the Exaplatanos municipal unit of the Pella regional unit, Central Macedonia, Greece. Lying at an altitude of 595 metres in the Upper Karadjova Plain, it was for centuries the largest Megleno-Romanians village, and the only one with a regular market.

Middle Ages

Middle Ages

In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages or medieval period lasted approximately from the late 5th to the late 15th centuries, similar to the post-classical period of global history. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire and transitioned into the Renaissance and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages.

Macedonian language

Macedonian language

Macedonian is an Eastern South Slavic language. It is part of the Indo-European language family, and is one of the Slavic languages, which are part of a larger Balto-Slavic branch. Spoken as a first language by around two million people, it serves as the official language of North Macedonia. Most speakers can be found in the country and its diaspora, with a smaller number of speakers throughout the transnational region of Macedonia. Macedonian is also a recognized minority language in parts of Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Romania, and Serbia and it is spoken by emigrant communities predominantly in Australia, Canada and the United States.

Bulgarian language

Bulgarian language

Bulgarian is an Eastern South Slavic language spoken in Southeastern Europe, primarily in Bulgaria. It is the language of the Bulgarians.

First Bulgarian Empire

First Bulgarian Empire

The First Bulgarian Empire was a medieval Bulgar-Slavic and later Bulgarian state that existed in Southeastern Europe between the 7th and 11th centuries AD. It was founded in 680–681 after part of the Bulgars, led by Asparuh, moved south to the northeastern Balkans. There they secured Byzantine recognition of their right to settle south of the Danube by defeating – possibly with the help of local South Slavic tribes – the Byzantine army led by Constantine IV. During the 9th and 10th century, Bulgaria at the height of its power spread from the Danube Bend to the Black Sea and from the Dnieper River to the Adriatic Sea and became an important power in the region competing with the Byzantine Empire. It became the foremost cultural and spiritual centre of south Slavic Europe throughout most of the Middle Ages.

Municipality

The municipality Almopia was formed at the 2011 local government reform by the merger of the following 2 former municipalities, that became municipal units:[2]

Province

The province of Almopia (Επαρχία Αλμωπίας) was one of the three provinces of Pella Prefecture. Its territory corresponded with that of the current municipality of Almopia.[12] It was abolished in 2006.

Source: "Almopia", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Almopia.

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References
  1. ^ a b "Απογραφή Πληθυσμού - Κατοικιών 2011. ΜΟΝΙΜΟΣ Πληθυσμός" (in Greek). Hellenic Statistical Authority.
  2. ^ a b "ΦΕΚ A 87/2010, Kallikratis reform law text" (in Greek). Government Gazette.
  3. ^ "Population & housing census 2001 (incl. area and average elevation)" (PDF) (in Greek). National Statistical Service of Greece. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-09-21.
  4. ^ Thucydides, History of the Peloponnesian War, II.99
  5. ^ Roisman, Joseph; Worthington, Ian (2011-07-07). A Companion to Ancient Macedonia. John Wiley & Sons. p. 75. ISBN 978-1-4443-5163-7.
  6. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1867). "Almops". In William Smith (ed.). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. Vol. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. p. 132.
  7. ^ Agni K. Koliadymou (2006). Από την Αξό Καππαδοκίας στο Νομό Πέλλας: Προσφυγικές Διαδρομές (1890–1940) (PDF). Thessaloniki. p. 117.
  8. ^ ΦΕΚ 304/27-12-1927
  9. ^ Wolfgang Dahmen; Johannes Kramer (1986). "Das Meglenorumänische". Rumänistik in der Diskussion. Tübingen. p. 262. ISBN 3-87808-859-0.
  10. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander (1991). "Moglena". In Kazhdan, Alexander (ed.). The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. p. 1389. ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6.
  11. ^ Theodor Capidan, Meglenoromânii, istoria şi graiul lor Archived 2016-03-03 at the Wayback Machine, vol. I, București, 1925, p.5, 19, 21-22) https://docs.google.com/document/d/18Eh2Z9rLnJgEq9lq_sdheHYO3HbZAzveGYWEUSeakiE/edit?usp=drivesdk
  12. ^ "Detailed census results 1991" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-03. (39 MB) (in Greek and French)
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