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Albatross (metaphor)

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The albatross visits the Mariner and his crew in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, illustrated in 1876 by Gustave Doré.
The albatross visits the Mariner and his crew in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, illustrated in 1876 by Gustave Doré.

The word albatross is sometimes used metaphorically to mean a psychological burden that feels like a curse.

It is an allusion to Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1798).[1]

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Metaphor

Metaphor

A metaphor is a figure of speech that, for rhetorical effect, directly refers to one thing by mentioning another. It may provide clarity or identify hidden similarities between two different ideas. Metaphors are often compared with other types of figurative language, such as antithesis, hyperbole, metonymy, and simile. One of the most commonly cited examples of a metaphor in English literature comes from the "All the world's a stage" monologue from As You Like It:

Allusion

Allusion

Allusion is a figure of speech, in which an object or circumstance from unrelated context is referred to covertly or indirectly. It is left to the audience to make the direct connection. Where the connection is directly and explicitly stated by the author, it is instead usually termed a reference. In the arts, a literary allusion puts the alluded text in a new context under which it assumes new meanings and denotations. It is not possible to predetermine the nature of all the new meanings and inter-textual patterns that an allusion will generate. Literary allusion is closely related to parody and pastiche, which are also "text-linking" literary devices.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge was an English poet, literary critic, philosopher, and theologian who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He also shared volumes and collaborated with Charles Lamb, Robert Southey, and Charles Lloyd. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on William Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking cultures. Coleridge coined many familiar words and phrases, including "suspension of disbelief". He had a major influence on Ralph Waldo Emerson and American transcendentalism.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is the longest major poem by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, written in 1797–1798 and published in 1798 in the first edition of Lyrical Ballads. Some modern editions use a revised version printed in 1817 that featured a gloss. Along with other poems in Lyrical Ballads, it is often considered a signal shift to modern poetry and the beginning of British Romantic literature.

Overview

In the poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, an albatross follows a ship setting out to sea, which is considered a sign of good luck. However, the titular mariner shoots the albatross with a crossbow, an act that will curse the ship and cause it to suffer terrible mishaps. Unable to speak due to lack of water, the ship's crew let the mariner know through their glances that they blame him for their plight and they tie the bird around his neck as a sign of his guilt. From this arose the image of an albatross around the neck as metaphor for a burden that is difficult to escape.

This sense is catalogued in the Oxford English Dictionary from 1883, but it seems only to have entered general usage in the 1960s.

In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Robert Walton mentions the poem by name and says of an upcoming journey that "I shall kill no albatross", clearly a reference to the poem by Shelley's close acquaintance, Coleridge. Frankenstein was first published in 1818, long before the term was introduced into the Oxford Dictionary.

Charles Baudelaire's collection of poems Les Fleurs du mal contains a poem entitled "L'Albatros" (1857) about men on ships who catch the albatrosses for sport. In the final stanza, he goes on to compare the poets to the birds — exiled from the skies and then weighed down by their giant wings, till death.

Herman Melville's Moby-Dick alludes to Coleridge's albatross.[2]

In his poem Snake, published in Birds, Beasts and Flowers, D. H. Lawrence mentions the albatross in Ancient Mariner.

See The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in popular culture.

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The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner is the longest major poem by the English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, written in 1797–1798 and published in 1798 in the first edition of Lyrical Ballads. Some modern editions use a revised version printed in 1817 that featured a gloss. Along with other poems in Lyrical Ballads, it is often considered a signal shift to modern poetry and the beginning of British Romantic literature.

Albatross

Albatross

Albatrosses, of the biological family Diomedeidae, are large seabirds related to the procellariids, storm petrels, and diving petrels in the order Procellariiformes. They range widely in the Southern Ocean and the North Pacific. They are absent from the North Atlantic, although fossil remains show they once occurred there and occasional vagrants are found. Albatrosses are among the largest of flying birds, and species of the genus Diomedea have the longest wingspans of any extant birds, reaching up to 3.7 m (12 ft). The albatrosses are usually regarded as falling into four genera, but disagreement exists over the number of species.

Oxford English Dictionary

Oxford English Dictionary

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is the principal historical dictionary of the English language, published by Oxford University Press (OUP). It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.

Mary Shelley

Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was an English novelist who wrote the Gothic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818), which is considered an early example of science fiction and one of her best-known works. She also edited and promoted the works of her husband, the Romantic poet and philosopher Percy Bysshe Shelley. Her father was the political philosopher William Godwin and her mother was the philosopher and women's rights advocate Mary Wollstonecraft.

Frankenstein

Frankenstein

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is an 1818 novel written by English author Mary Shelley. Frankenstein tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Shelley started writing the story when she was 18, and the first edition was published anonymously in London on 1 January 1818, when she was 20. Her name first appeared in the second edition, which was published in Paris in 1821.

Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire

Charles Pierre Baudelaire was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic and translator. His poems exhibit mastery in the handling of rhyme and rhythm, contain an exoticism inherited from Romantics, but are based on observations of real life.

Les Fleurs du mal

Les Fleurs du mal

Les Fleurs du mal is a volume of French poetry by Charles Baudelaire.

L'albatros (poem)

L'albatros (poem)

L'Albatros, is a poem by decadent French poet Charles Baudelaire.

Herman Melville

Herman Melville

Herman Melville was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period. Among his best-known works are Moby-Dick (1851); Typee (1846), a romanticized account of his experiences in Polynesia; and Billy Budd, Sailor, a posthumously published novella. Although his reputation was not high at the time of his death, the 1919 centennial of his birth was the starting point of a Melville revival, and Moby-Dick grew to be considered one of the great American novels.

Moby-Dick

Moby-Dick

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is an 1851 novel by American writer Herman Melville. The book is the sailor Ishmael's narrative of the maniacal quest of Ahab, captain of the whaling ship Pequod, for vengeance against Moby Dick, the giant white sperm whale that crippled him on the ship's previous voyage. A contribution to the literature of the American Renaissance, Moby-Dick was published to mixed reviews, was a commercial failure, and was out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891. Its reputation as a "Great American Novel" was established only in the 20th century, after the 1919 centennial of its author's birth. William Faulkner said he wished he had written the book himself, and D. H. Lawrence called it "one of the strangest and most wonderful books in the world" and "the greatest book of the sea ever written". Its opening sentence, "Call me Ishmael", is among world literature's most famous.

Birds, Beasts and Flowers

Birds, Beasts and Flowers

Birds, Beasts and Flowers is a collection of poetry by the English author D. H. Lawrence, first published in 1923. These poems include some of Lawrence's finest reflections on the 'otherness' of the non-human world.

D. H. Lawrence

D. H. Lawrence

David Herbert Lawrence was an English writer, novelist, poet and essayist. His works reflect on modernity, industrialization, sexuality, emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct. His best-known novels—Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love, and Lady Chatterley's Lover— were the subject of censorship trials.

Film

  • In the 1939 film The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, Professor Moriarty (George Zucco) baits Holmes by mailing him a drawing of a man with an albatross hung around his neck.
  • In the 1940 film The Sea Hawk starring Errol Flynn, Albatross is the name of Captain Thorpe's pirate ship.
  • In the 1979 film The Fog by John Carpenter, a radio-station promo is possessed by ghostly forces to speak out and the word albatross is used to tell of the curse on Antonio Bay.
  • In the 1987 film Hot Pursuit starring John Cusack, Robert Loggia, and Wendy Gazelle, Albatross is the name of "Mac" MacClaren's sailboat.
  • In the 1996 Ridley Scott film White Squall, a fictionalized account of the Ocean Academy's ship Albatross, the ship's captain Christopher Sheldon makes mention of the albatross being a very good omen which "embodied the spirits of lost sailors". "Only bad luck if you kill one," he added.
  • In the 2003 film Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, as the wind picks up and the ship finally breaks out of the doldrums, an albatross is spotted following the ship. When an attempt is made to shoot the bird, the ship's doctor is shot instead.
  • In the 2005 Joss Whedon film Serenity, Malcolm Reynolds, the captain of Serenity defends the notion that River Tam is an albatross to the crew and later to the Operative. He says that the albatross was good luck until "some idiot killed it". When Malcolm is speaking, he then adds to Inara, "Yes, I've read a poem. Try not to faint" in a reference to the Coleridge poem. At the end of the film, he calls River "Little Albatross".
  • The 2011 film Albatross, by Niall MacCormick.
  • In the 2014 film Against the Sun, Gene shoots an albatross, which they eat. Chief Dixon is notably upset about this, saying, "I can't believe you shot an albatross."

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Basil Rathbone

Basil Rathbone

Philip St. John Basil Rathbone MC was a South African-born English actor. He rose to prominence in the United Kingdom as a Shakespearean stage actor and went on to appear in more than 70 films, primarily costume dramas, swashbucklers, and, occasionally, horror films.

Nigel Bruce

Nigel Bruce

William Nigel Ernle Bruce was a British character actor on stage and screen. He was best known for his portrayal of Dr. Watson in a series of films and in the radio series The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Bruce is also remembered for his roles in the Alfred Hitchcock films Rebecca and Suspicion, as well as the Charlie Chaplin film Limelight.

George Zucco

George Zucco

George Zucco was an English character actor who appeared in plays and 96 films, mostly American-made, during a career spanning over two decades, from the 1920s to 1951. In his films, he often played a suave villain, a member of nobility, or a mad doctor.

Errol Flynn

Errol Flynn

Errol Leslie Thomson Flynn was an Australian-American actor who achieved worldwide fame during the Golden Age of Hollywood. He was known for his romantic swashbuckler roles, frequent partnerships with Olivia de Havilland, and reputation for his womanising and hedonistic personal life. His most notable roles include the eponymous hero in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), which was later named by the American Film Institute as the 18th greatest hero in American film history, the lead role in Captain Blood (1935), Major Geoffrey Vickers in The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), and the hero in a number of Westerns such as Dodge City (1939), Santa Fe Trail (1940), and San Antonio (1945).

John Carpenter

John Carpenter

John Howard Carpenter is an American filmmaker, actor, and composer. Although he has worked in various film genres, he is most commonly associated with horror, action, and science fiction films of the 1970s and 1980s. He is generally recognized as one of the greatest masters of the horror genre. At the 2019 Cannes Film Festival, the French Directors' Guild gave him the Golden Coach Award, lauding him as "a creative genius of raw, fantastic, and spectacular emotions".

Hot Pursuit (1987 film)

Hot Pursuit (1987 film)

Hot Pursuit is a 1987 American action comedy film directed by Steven Lisberger, written by Lisberger and Steven Carabatsos, and starring John Cusack, Robert Loggia, Wendy Gazelle, and Jerry Stiller.

John Cusack

John Cusack

John Paul Cusack is an American actor, producer, screenwriter and political activist. He is a son of filmmaker Dick Cusack, and his older sisters are actresses Joan and Ann Cusack.

Ridley Scott

Ridley Scott

Sir Ridley Scott is an English film director and producer. Best known for directing films in the science fiction and historical drama genres, his work is known for its atmospheric and highly concentrated visual style. Scott has received many accolades throughout his career, including the BAFTA Fellowship for lifetime achievement from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts in 2018. In 2003, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II for services to the British film industry. He was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2007, and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2011.

Albatross (1920 schooner)

Albatross (1920 schooner)

Albatross, originally named Albatros, later Alk, was a sailing ship that became famous when she sank in 1961 with a group of American teenagers on board. The events were the basis for the highly fictionalized 1996 film White Squall.

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World is a 2003 American epic period war-drama film co-written, produced and directed by Peter Weir, set during the Napoleonic Wars. The film's plot and characters are adapted from three novels in author Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey–Maturin series, which includes 20 completed novels of Jack Aubrey's naval career. The film stars Russell Crowe as Aubrey, captain in the Royal Navy, and Paul Bettany as Dr. Stephen Maturin, the ship's surgeon. This is the second onscreen collaboration for Crowe and Bettany, both of whom previously co-starred in 2001’s A Beautiful Mind.

Joss Whedon

Joss Whedon

Joseph Hill Whedon is an American filmmaker, composer, and comic book writer. He is the founder of Mutant Enemy Productions, co-founder of Bellwether Pictures, and is best known as the creator of several television series: the supernatural drama Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997–2003) and its spinoff Angel (1999–2004), the short-lived space Western Firefly (2002), the Internet musical miniseries Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog (2008), the science fiction drama Dollhouse (2009–2010), the Marvel Cinematic Universe series Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (2013–2020), and the science fiction drama The Nevers (2021).

Malcolm Reynolds

Malcolm Reynolds

Malcolm "Mal" Reynolds is a fictional character and the protagonist of the Firefly franchise. Mal is played by actor Nathan Fillion in the 2002 TV series Firefly and the 2005 film Serenity. In the series, Mal is a former Browncoat sergeant and the captain of the "Firefly-class" spaceship Serenity. The character was named #18 in TV Guide's Greatest Sci-Fi Legends list in 2004.

Music

  • In music journalism, the term albatross is sometimes used metaphorically to describe the mixed blessing and curse of a song that becomes so popular it overshadows the rest of the artist's work.
  • Rime of the Ancient Mariner is one of the tracks on the fifth Iron Maiden album Powerslave, 1984.

Musical

  • The musical Thoroughly Modern Millie refers to the albatross in a song called "Forget About the Boy".
  • The musical Kinky Boots refers to the albatross in a song called "Not My Father's Son".

Songs

(alphabetized by artist)

Song and album titles including "Albatross"

  • The band Attalus has a song called "Albatross".
  • The metalcore band Anterrabae has a song titled "An Albatross Around the Neck".
  • The band Alesana has a song called "Heavy Hangs The Albatross".
  • Swedish DJ AronChupa has a song titled "I'm an Albatraoz" which contrasts the attributed personalities of a mouse and an albatross as an allegory of personal growth and female empowerment.
  • South Korean boy group B.A.P have a song titled "Albatross" on their 5th EP Carnival.
  • Bert Weedon has a song called "Albatross".
  • The band Besnard Lakes has a song called "Albatross".
  • The Canadian rock band Big Wreck has an album titled Albatross containing the lead single also titled "Albatross".
  • The band Brave Saint Saturn has a song titled "Albatross".
  • The post-hardcore band Chiodos has a song titled "We Swam From Albatross, The Day We Lost Kailey Cost".
  • The band The Classic Crime has an album titled Albatross.
  • The band Clutch refers to an "Albatross on your neck" in the song "(In The Wake of) The Swollen Goat" on the Blast Tyrant album.
  • Corrosion Of Conformity refers to the albatross in the song "Albatross".
  • The mathcore band Converge has a song called "Albatross", in the album Petitioning the Empty Sky.
  • The band Fleetwood Mac has a song entitled "Albatross".
  • The band Floater has a song titled "Albatross".
  • The band Foals have a song titled "Albatross". Using the metaphor "You've got an albatross around your neck"
  • The band Foxing has an album called "The Albatross". And reference the word albatross on the songs "Bloodhound", and "Tom Bley".
  • Gorillaz refers to the albatross in the song "Hip Albatross", as a metaphor for the burden of the undead.
  • Judy Collins uses albatross as a metaphor in the song, "Albatross" in 1967.
  • The UK Dark Wave band Lebanon Hanover has a song entitled "Albatross", from the album Why Not Just Be Solo (2012). The lyrics of the song use the bird as metaphor.
  • Peruvian singer-songwriter Natasha Luna has a song called "Waltz for an Albatross", inspired by Baudelaire's poem.[3]
  • Mt. St. Helens Vietnam Band has a song called "Albatross, Albatross, Albatross".
  • Sarah Blasko has a song called "Albatross" on the 2006 album What the Sea Wants, the Sea Will Have.
  • The band Slowdive has a song entitled "Albatross".
  • The band Skylark has a song entitled "Albatross".
  • The band Wild Beasts has a song entitled "Albatross".
  • Madeon played a song entitled "Albatross" as part of his Pixel Empire tour, as well as during his DJ sets.
  • Port Blue has an album entitled The Albatross EP
  • Rapper Chester Watson released a song referencing the poem called "Dead Albatross" in his album Past Cloaks.
  • The Sweden indie-pop band Sambassadeur has a song titled "Albatross" from their albums "European .

Lyrical and other references

  • Aaron Lewis in the song "Lost and Lonely" sings about "I'm an albatross hanging around my own neck".
  • Aesop Rock references the albatross on the song "Dorks"
  • The band Alter Bridge references wearing an albatross around one's neck in the song "Wouldn't You Rather" from the album Walk the Sky.
  • The band Badflower references the albatross in the song "Animal".
  • The band Bastille references the albatross in the song "The Weight of Living Pt. 1".
  • American singer/songwriter Carolyne Mas has a song titled "King of the U-Turn" that uses an albatross as a metaphor.
  • The rock band Chevelle uses albatross as a metaphor in the song "Face to the Floor".
  • Demon Hunter uses albatross as a metaphor in the song "Cross to Bear".
  • The band Erra uses albatross as a metaphor in the song "Dreamwalkers".
  • The band Flogging Molly uses reference to the wearing of the albatross in their song "Rebels of the Sacred Heart".
  • The band God Street Wine in the song "Epiphany".
  • In Graham Parker and The Rumour's B-side single Mercury Poisoning, the song opens with "No more pretending now, the albatross is dying in its nest".
  • The indie rock band Guided By Voices reference wearing an albatross around the neck on the song "Peep-Hole" from the album Bee Thousand.
  • The heavy metal band Iron Maiden references the albatross in their song "Rime of the Ancient Mariner", which is based on the poem of the same title by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.
  • Jeff Williams' song "Bad Luck Charm" contains the line "I'm a cursed black cat, I'm an albatross, I'm a mirror broken, Sad to say, I'm your bad luck charm".
  • Josh Ritter refers to a lingering albatross in his song "Monster Ballad". The characters are lost in the desert after having been lost at sea.
  • The Anglo-Dutch experimental rock band The Legendary Pink Dots references an albatross in the song "Twilight Hour", a song with strong reference itself to the poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner.
  • The Little River Band has a song called "Cool Change", which contains the line: "Albatross and the Whale are my brother".
  • Christian Emocore band mewithoutYou references the albatross in their song "Bear's Vision of St. Agnes".
  • Nightwish refers to albatross in their song "The Islander".
  • Owl City refers to the albatross in the song "Hello Seattle".
  • Pink Floyd refers to the albatross in the song "Echoes".
  • In "Albatross", the first track on Public Image Limited's 1979 album Metal Box, the cryptic reference to "Getting rid of the Albatross" is repeated throughout the song.
  • Rhett Miller's song "This Is What I Do" references everyone having "an Albatross".
  • The song "Morter" from Canadian electronic group Skinny Puppy's 1996 album The Process alludes to the albatross as a burden of truth.
  • The band Starset references the albatross in their song, "Diving Bell," with the lyrics, "the albatross crash-lands."
  • The band Stornoway refers to the albatross in the song "Knock Me on the Head".
  • The band Weezer refers to "a boy and a girl Albatross around their necks" in the song "Wind in our Sails" off Weezer (The White Album).
  • Get Cape Wear Cape Fly refers to the albatross in the song "Waiting for the Monster to Drown".
  • Alternative musician St. Vincent references "the albatross smouldering on my shoulder" in her song "Teenage Talk".

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Attalus (band)

Attalus (band)

Attalus is an American Christian rock band from Raleigh, North Carolina. The band started making music in 2010, with members, lead vocalist and keyboardist, Seth Davey, guitarist and background vocalist, Evan King, drummer, Adam King, bassist and background vocalist, Chris Sierra, and guitarist, John Sierra. The band released one extended play, The Greater Tide, independently, in 2010. Their next release, an album, Post Tenebras Lux, was released independently, in 2011. They released, another extended play, Brighter Side, in 2012. The subsequent album, also released independently, Gospel Hymns, Vol. 1, came out in 2013. They signed with Facedown Records, where they released, Into the Sea, a studio album, in 2015. This album was their breakthrough release upon the Billboard charts, where it placed on the Christian Albums chart. They released a message on facebook detailing their daily problems and the possibly permanent ending of Attalus.

Anterrabae

Anterrabae

Anterrabae was an American metalcore/hardcore punk band from Long Island, New York, United States. Their first album, Shakedown Tonight, was released in March 2004. Their second studio album, And Our Heart Beat in Our Fingertips, Without Reason came out in June 2006. In the beginning of 2008, they announced two shows with former singer Neal Carter on April 11, 2008, in Connecticut, and 13, in New Jersey. Anterrabae played their final show at Traxx in Long Island, New York on December 22, 2008, with original vocalist Neal Carter; until two reunion shows at the Amityville Music Hall on May 24 and 25, 2014.

Alesana

Alesana

Alesana is an American post-hardcore band from Raleigh, North Carolina. The group was founded by Shawn Milke, Dennis Lee and Patrick Thompson during the fall of 2004, and is currently signed to Revival Recordings and Artery Recordings. Alesana has collectively released three EPs and five full-length studio albums.

AronChupa

AronChupa

Aron Michael Ekberg, better known by his stage name AronChupa, is a Swedish singer, record producer, songwriter, artist and DJ. His 2014 song "I'm an Albatraoz" reached number 1 on the Swedish Singles Chart and in Denmark, and top 10 in many charts across Europe. It also reached number 25 in the UK and number 10 in the US dance charts. His younger sister, Nora Ekberg, better known professionally as Little Sis Nora, provided the vocals for the track and starred in the music video, but never appeared as featured artist on the track. The music video has surpassed 1.35 billion views on YouTube.

B.A.P (South Korean band)

B.A.P (South Korean band)

B.A.P was a South Korean boy band formed in 2012 under TS Entertainment.

Carnival (B.A.P EP)

Carnival (B.A.P EP)

Carnival is the fifth extended play by the South Korean boy group B.A.P. It was released on February 22, 2016 by TS Entertainment and distributed by LOEN Entertainment. It features the lead single "Feel So Good". It peaked at #2 on the Gaon Music Chart.

Bert Weedon

Bert Weedon

Herbert Maurice William Weedon, OBE was an English guitarist whose style of playing was popular and influential during the 1950s and 1960s. He was the first British guitarist to have a hit record in the UK Singles Chart, in 1959, and his best-selling tutorial guides, Play in a Day, were a major influence on many leading British musicians, such as Eric Clapton, Brian May and Paul McCartney. He was awarded an OBE in 2001 for his "services to music".

Big Wreck

Big Wreck

Big Wreck are a Canadian-American rock band formed by Ian Thornley and Brian Doherty in Boston, Massachusetts in 1994. The band was rounded out with David Henning and Forrest Williams. They disbanded in 2002 and Ian Thornley pursued a solo career with his own band Thornley. In 2010, Ian Thornley and Brian Doherty reunited for a cross-Canada tour, playing both Big Wreck and Thornley songs. In 2012, under the name Big Wreck, the band released their third studio album, Albatross. The band has since released the albums Ghosts in 2014, Grace Street in 2017, ...But For the Sun in 2019, and are currently releasing three EPs that will be put together to make their seventh full-length album Big Wreck 7. It is expected to be fully released by 2023.

Albatross (Big Wreck album)

Albatross (Big Wreck album)

Albatross is the third studio album by Canadian rock band Big Wreck. It is the band's first album since their 2001 release The Pleasure and the Greed, and the first without original members Dave Henning and Forrest Williams. The album was released on March 6, 2012.

Albatross (Big Wreck song)

Albatross (Big Wreck song)

"Albatross" is the lead single and title track from Big Wreck's 2012 album, Albatross. It is Big Wreck's first single released after reuniting in 2010 and their first single release since 2002. A 16-second preview clip of the song was released on October 24, 2011. The song was first streamed in its entirety on the Thornley/Big Wreck website on November 17, 2011, and was officially released digitally on November 21. The song held the No. 1 position on the Billboard Canadian Rock chart for six weeks straight. In 2012, the song won the CASBY Award for "Favourite New Single".

Brave Saint Saturn

Brave Saint Saturn

Brave Saint Saturn is a Christian rock band formed in Denver, Colorado in 1999. The band is a side-project of members of Five Iron Frenzy started by Reese Roper. The band calls their music style "astro-rock", although Roper has stated that this "doesn't mean anything". The trilogy of albums are meant to artfully represent early life, adversity, and death.

Blast Tyrant

Blast Tyrant

Blast Tyrant is the sixth full-length studio album by American rock band Clutch and was released March 23, 2004, but has since had a reissue on May 10, 2011. It was the first release with DRT Entertainment by the band.

Television

  • In Season 2 Episode 18 of Route 66 (TV series) entitled "How much a pound is albatross?", the guest character Vicki (played by Julie Newmar) refers to her effort to evade a burden of grief: "I left a trail of buried albatross from coast to coast."
  • In Young Justice Outsiders Season 3 episode 25 Forager as Fred Bugg (with two Gs) says that his glamor stone has become an albatross around his neck.
  • In Season 2, episode 22 on the Season Finale of Riverdale Alice Cooper says to her daughter Polly “We all have our Albatrosses Polly” speaking of visiting her husband, convicted murderer Hal Cooper in prison.
  • In season 1, episode 18 of Miami Vice, Detective Switek calls his colleague, Detective Zito, an albatross, after he blows up their undercover operation: "We blew it, Lieutenant, because I'm teamed up with an albatross".
  • In the UK show Knowing Me Knowing You with Alan Partridge, Alan Partridge requests the audience to desist responding to his catchphrase "aha!" stating, "can we stop that now? It's becoming a bit of an albatross".
  • In Showtime's Weeds, the main character Nancy refers to another character as, "[an] albatross: my own personal cinder block." Season five episode five.
  • In the HBO series Deadwood, a character refers to the debt owed to blacks because of slavery as an "albatross around the white man's neck." Episode 304.
  • In the TNT series Memphis Beat, a character refers to family as "an albatross around the neck of a great man" (Episode 107).
  • In The New Adventures of Flipper, episode 417 "Mystery Ship", an abandoned boat, a yawl, is discovered with no one aboard. She is named The Albatross. She isn't registered and doesn't appear in any databases. She appears to be sea worthy, but strange accidents occur. Eventually, the couple who salvaged her argue over whether to keep her or not. Upon further search of the boat, a boat builder's plaque is found. The Albatross was built by a boat builder who went out of business in the late 1930s. This discovery leads to a newspaper article about a murder aboard the boat, the Sweet Charlotte. Apparently over time anyone coming in contact with her has bad luck. She has gone from being named the Sweet Charlotte to The Albatross.
  • In a flash-back scene of The Sopranos episode "Down Neck", Tony's father ("Johnny Boy") says of his wife, Livia, "You're like an albacore around my neck!"—an obvious malapropism.
  • In season 7, episode 11 of the series The X-Files, entitled "Closure", Special Agent Fox Mulder discovers a child's handprints embedded in cement in front of a house in the base housing area of what appears to be a decommissioned U.S. Air Force base. The prints are presumably made by his sister, Samantha, after her abduction when she was eight years old. The house where he finds the handprints—and later a diary, also presumably Samantha's--is located on Albatross St.; possibly a reference to how Fox's quest to find information about the whereabouts of his missing sister has been his albatross since she was taken from him.
  • In Season 2, episode 8 of the series Ed, Jim (Molly Hudson's romantic interest) refers to her old car 'Sadie' that she buys back after selling (due to emotional attachment), as a 'Metal Albatross', due to its failure to function, and the fact that they have to push it all the way to her house after buying it back.
  • In episode 209 of the show Aqua Teen Hunger Force Master Shake states, "We got us a super star, and we've got two albacores that are hanging around my neck." Frylock responds, "It's albatrosses". Master Shake states this to show frustration to his two roommates in response to losing, again, at a bar trivia game.
  • In Season 5, episode 21 of Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Sgt. Carter calls Gomer an albatross because he messed up a marine exercise, and is told to go back to the base. When Gomer asks how he'll get back, Carter sarcastically replies,"You can fly, Pyle. You're an albatross, remember?!"
  • In season 4 of the HBO series Boardwalk Empire, Nucky Thompson lives in a seaside motel named "The Albatross"; a metaphor for the mental burden his character suffers.
  • In season 4, episode 4 of Orange Is The New Black Alex tells Red she is sorry for sharing 'This Albatross of a secret' with her.
  • The famous BBC TV comedy series Monty Python's Flying Circus broadcast a sketch called "Intermission" in Episode 13 of series 1 on 11 January 1970. Although only 40 seconds long, this sketch is one of the most memorable and remembered. In it a man, played by John Cleese, is dressed as an ice-cream girl in a film theatre, although instead of the regular movie snacks she is selling a dead albatross. A man (Terry Jones) approaches her and asks for two choc ices. The girl aggressively makes clear she only sells an albatross and continues shouting to draw attention to her merchandise, while the potential customer keeps asking questions about the product, like "What flavour is it?" and "Do you get wafers with it?". Finally the man buys two albatrosses for nine pence each. The salesgirl then shouts she is selling "gannet on a stick." Later during the episode, several other characters in other sketches shout "Albatross" for seemingly no reason at all.
  • In an episode of Stir Crazy, Harry and Skip refer to Crawford (whom they've sighted through their binoculars) as "the man whose albatross we've been wearing."
  • In season 7, episode 4 (“Kuwait”) of Blacklist, Harold confronts Raymond Reddington in a cemetery with a gravestone of Daniel Hutton, a man Harold served with overseas and believed to have been shot and killed in Kuwait in 1989. Harold asks Reddington if he knew the whole time that Hutton had not been dead and actually had been a POW all this time. Reddington claims that “I gave that flash drive to you so you could put the whole incident behind you, not carry it like an albatross around your neck.”

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Julie Newmar

Julie Newmar

Julie Newmar is an American actress, dancer, and singer, known for a variety of stage, screen, and television roles. She is also a writer, lingerie designer, and real-estate mogul. She won the Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her role as Katrin Sveg in the 1958 Broadway production of The Marriage-Go-Round and reprised the role in the 1961 film version. In the 1960s, she starred for two seasons as Catwoman in the television series Batman (1966–1967). Her other stage credits include the Ziegfeld Follies in 1956, Lola in Damn Yankees! in 1961, and Irma in Irma la Douce in 1965 in regional productions.

Miami Vice

Miami Vice

Miami Vice is an American crime drama television series created by Anthony Yerkovich and produced by Michael Mann for NBC. The series stars Don Johnson as James "Sonny" Crockett and Philip Michael Thomas as Ricardo "Rico" Tubbs, two Metro-Dade Police Department detectives working undercover in Miami. The series ran for five seasons on NBC from 1984 to 1989. The USA Network began airing reruns in 1988 and broadcast an originally unaired episode during its syndication run of the series on January 25, 1990.

Knowing Me Knowing You with Alan Partridge (TV series)

Knowing Me Knowing You with Alan Partridge (TV series)

Knowing Me, Knowing You with Alan Partridge is a BBC Television comedy series of six episodes, and a Christmas special Knowing Me, Knowing Yule on 29 December 1995. It is named after the song "Knowing Me, Knowing You" by ABBA, a rendition of which was used as the show's title music. Steve Coogan plays the incompetent but self-satisfied Norwich-based talk show host Alan Partridge, who often insults his guests and humiliates himself in the process. Alan was a spin-off character from the spoof radio show On the Hour. Knowing Me, Knowing You was written by Coogan, Armando Iannucci and Patrick Marber, with contributions from the regular supporting cast of Doon Mackichan, Rebecca Front and David Schneider, who played Alan's weekly guests. Steve Brown provided the show's music and arrangements, and also appeared as Glenn Ponder, the man in charge of the house band.

Alan Partridge

Alan Partridge

Alan Gordon Partridge is a comedy character portrayed by the English actor Steve Coogan. A parody of British television personalities, Partridge is a tactless and inept broadcaster with an inflated sense of celebrity. Since his debut in 1991, he has appeared in media including radio and television series, books, podcasts and a feature film.

Deadwood (TV series)

Deadwood (TV series)

Deadwood is an American Western television series that aired on the premium cable network HBO from March 21, 2004, to August 27, 2006, spanning three seasons and 36 episodes. The series is set in the 1870s in Deadwood, South Dakota, before and after the area's annexation by the Dakota Territory, and charts Deadwood's growth from camp to town. The show was created, produced, and largely written by David Milch. Deadwood features a large ensemble cast headed by Timothy Olyphant and Ian McShane, playing the real-life Deadwood residents Seth Bullock and Al Swearengen, respectively. Many other historical figures appear as characters, including George Crook, Wyatt Earp, E. B. Farnum, George Hearst, Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane, Sol Star, A. W. Merrick, Jack McCall, and Charlie Utter. The plot lines involving these characters include historical truths as well as substantial fictional elements. Milch used actual diaries and newspapers from 1870s Deadwood residents as reference points for characters, events, and the look and feel of the show.

Memphis Beat

Memphis Beat

Memphis Beat is an American crime comedy-drama television series created by Joshua Harto and Liz W. Garcia that aired on TNT from June 22, 2010 to August 16, 2011, with a total of 20 episodes spanning two seasons. It was produced by Smokehouse Productions, in association with Warner Horizon Television.

Down Neck

Down Neck

"Down Neck" is the seventh episode of the HBO original series The Sopranos. It was written by Robin Green and Mitchell Burgess, and directed by Lorraine Senna Ferrara. The episode was the only one in the series directed by a woman. It aired on February 21, 1999.

Livia Soprano

Livia Soprano

Livia Soprano, played by Nancy Marchand, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. She is the mother of Tony Soprano. A young Livia, played by Laila Robins and later by Laurie J. Williams, is sometimes seen in flashbacks. Series creator David Chase has stated that the main inspiration for the character was his own mother. Vera Farmiga portrays a young Livia Soprano in the 2021 prequel film, The Many Saints of Newark.

Malapropism

Malapropism

A malapropism is the mistaken use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound, resulting in a nonsensical, sometimes humorous utterance. An example is the statement attributed to baseball player Yogi Berra, regarding switchhitters, "He hits from both sides of the plate. He's amphibious." Malapropisms often occur as errors in natural speech and are sometimes the subject of media attention, especially when made by politicians or other prominent individuals. Philosopher Donald Davidson has said that malapropisms show the complex process through which the brain translates thoughts into language.

Closure (The X-Files)

Closure (The X-Files)

"Closure" is the eleventh episode of the seventh season of the science fiction television series The X-Files, and the 150th episode overall. It was directed by Kim Manners and written by series creator Chris Carter and Frank Spotnitz. The installment explores the series' overarching mythology and is the conclusion of a two-part episode revolving around the final revelation of what really happened to Fox Mulder's sister, Samantha. Originally aired by the Fox network on February 13, 2000, "Closure" received a Nielsen rating of 9.1 and was seen by 15.35 million viewers. The episode received mostly positive reviews from critics; many felt that the final reveal was emotional and powerful, although some were unhappy with the resolution.

Fox Mulder

Fox Mulder

Fox William Mulder is a fictional FBI Special Agent and one of the two protagonists of the Fox science fiction-supernatural television series The X-Files, played by David Duchovny. Mulder's peers dismiss his many theories on extraterrestrial or paranormal activity as a conspiracist however his skeptical but supportive partner Dana Scully often finds them to be unexpectedly correct. He and Scully work in the X-Files office, concerned with unsolved FBI cases that are often revealed to be supernatural or extraterrestrial in nature. Mulder was a main character for the first seven seasons, but was limited to a recurring character for the following two seasons. He returns as a main character for the tenth and eleventh seasons.

Ed (TV series)

Ed (TV series)

Ed is an American comedy-drama television series that was co-produced by David Letterman's Worldwide Pants Incorporated, NBC Productions and Viacom Productions that aired on NBC from October 8, 2000, to February 6, 2004. The hour-long comedy drama starred Tom Cavanagh as Ed Stevens, Julie Bowen as his love interest Carol Vessey, Josh Randall as his friend Dr. Mike Burton, Jana Marie Hupp as Mike's wife Nancy, Lesley Boone as their friend Molly Hudson, and Justin Long as awkward high-school student Warren Cheswick. Other supporting cast members included Michael Genadry and Ginnifer Goodwin as Warren's friends Mark and Diane, and Michael Ian Black, Mike Starr, Rachel Cronin, and (later) Daryl Mitchell as the employees of Ed's bowling alley. Long term guest stars included John Slattery as Dennis Martino and Sabrina Lloyd as Frankie Hector. The show was created by executive producers Jon Beckerman and Rob Burnett. David Letterman is also credited as one of the show's executive producers.

Books

  • The cover art for Michael Spivak's A Comprehensive Introduction to Differential Geometry, Vol.2, is a painting by the author featuring a sailing ship beneath a dark stormy sky, full of dead jesters and a single living jester having three albatrosses hanging from ropes around his neck, respectively labeled "Cartan", "Riemann", and "Gauss".
  • The character of Prince Albatross in Wings of Fire Legends: Darkstalker has magic and is greatly valued by his tribe for his abilities. However, his powers make him suddenly lose his soul and murder almost the entire SeaWing royal family.

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Michael Spivak

Michael Spivak

Michael David Spivak was an American mathematician specializing in differential geometry, an expositor of mathematics, and the founder of Publish-or-Perish Press. Spivak was the author of the five-volume A Comprehensive Introduction to Differential Geometry.

Sailing ship

Sailing ship

A sailing ship is a sea-going vessel that uses sails mounted on masts to harness the power of wind and propel the vessel. There is a variety of sail plans that propel sailing ships, employing square-rigged or fore-and-aft sails. Some ships carry square sails on each mast—the brig and full-rigged ship, said to be "ship-rigged" when there are three or more masts. Others carry only fore-and-aft sails on each mast, for instance some schooners. Still others employ a combination of square and fore-and-aft sails, including the barque, barquentine, and brigantine.

Jester

Jester

A jester, court jester, fool or joker was a member of the household of a nobleman or a monarch employed to entertain guests during the medieval and Renaissance eras. Jesters were also itinerant performers who entertained common folk at fairs and town markets, and the discipline continues into the modern day, where jesters perform at historical-themed events.

Élie Cartan

Élie Cartan

Élie Joseph Cartan was an influential French mathematician who did fundamental work in the theory of Lie groups, differential systems, and differential geometry. He also made significant contributions to general relativity and indirectly to quantum mechanics. He is widely regarded as one of the greatest mathematicians of the twentieth century.

Wings of Fire (novel series)

Wings of Fire (novel series)

Wings of Fire is a series of children's epic dragon fantasy novels written by author Tui T. Sutherland and published by Scholastic Inc. Over 14 million copies of the books have been sold and it has been on the New York Times bestseller list for more than 122 weeks. It has also been translated into over ten languages.

Video games

  • In the fantasy MMORPG RuneScape, This Albatross, known formerly as The Scourge, is the flagship of the infamous pirate lord Rabid Jack. Jack used the ship as his main offensive centre when he attacked Mos Le'Harmless in an effort to gain complete control over the Eastern Sea. When this failed, Jack renamed his ship "This Albatross", which he said would be a curse upon pirates forever. Although the ship was likely destroyed after the latter Battle of Mos Le'Harmless, recent activity suggests the ship may have been revived along with its thought-dead (now seemingly undead) captain.
  • In the 2013 video game BioShock Infinite, the vigor (potion) "Undertow" is advertised by the vigor dispenser machine with the words "Ancient mariner, let the vigor Undertow disperse the hated albatross".
  • In the 2010 video game, Alpha Protocol an intelligence agency named "G22" is led by a man under the alias of Albatross, who has the habit of encountering you by chance and often, depending on the players actions, offers valuable information which serves to reinforce the name.
  • In the 2009 text-based browser game, Fallen London, the player character can dream of shooting an albatross and the consequences that come from it.
  • In the 2004 video game Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines, Camarilla Prince Sebastian Lacroix expresses to the player the burden of his position as Prince of L.A. and his worry over the consequences of calling a blood hunt upon Anarch leader - Nines Rodriguez - "The folly of leadership is knowing that no matter what you do, behind your back, there's hundreds certain that their own solution is the sounder one and that your decision was the by-product of a whimsical dart toss. I pronounce the blast sentence, and I soak the critical fallout. I make the decisions no-one else will. Leadership...I wear the albatross and the bullseye."[4]
  • Unreal Tournament 2004 featured a map called "DM-1on1-Albatross"
  • In the 1981 video game Ulysses and the Golden Fleece, an albatross drops a bag filled with golden gems onto a boat.
  • Hearthstone Descent of Dragons expansion has a card named "Bad Luck Albatross", clearly referring to the poem as when it is killed, it dilutes the opponent deck with two bad draws.

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RuneScape

RuneScape

RuneScape is a fantasy massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) developed and published by Jagex, released in January 2001. RuneScape was originally a browser game built with the Java programming language; it was largely replaced by a standalone C++ client in 2016. The game has had over 300 million accounts created and was recognised by the Guinness World Records as the largest and most-updated free MMORPG.

BioShock Infinite

BioShock Infinite

BioShock Infinite is a first-person shooter video game developed by Irrational Games and published by 2K Games. The third installment in the BioShock series, Infinite was released worldwide for the PlayStation 3, Windows, Xbox 360, and OS X platforms in 2013. The game is set in the year 1912 and follows its protagonist, Booker DeWitt, who is sent to the airborne city of Columbia to retrieve a young woman held captive, named Elizabeth. Booker rescues Elizabeth and the two become involved in a class war between the nativist Founders that rule Columbia and the rebel Vox Populi representing the city's underclass. Elizabeth possesses the ability to manipulate "Tears" in the space-time continuum that ravage Columbia, and Booker and Elizabeth discover she is central to the city's dark secrets. The player controls Booker Dewitt throughout the game, fighting enemies and scavenging supplies, while the computer-controlled Elizabeth provides assistance.

Alpha Protocol

Alpha Protocol

Alpha Protocol is a 2010 action role-playing game developed by Obsidian Entertainment and published by Sega. The player assumes control of agent Michael Thorton, a new recruit at a clandestine United States agency called Alpha Protocol, which is given unlimited resources to conduct covert operations on behalf of the government. Thorton becomes a rogue agent and must unravel an international conspiracy to stop a war. Throughout the game, players must make many choices that affect the narrative. Played from a third-person perspective, players can confront enemies using firearms, gadgets, martial arts and stealth. The game features extensive customization and a dialogue stance system that allows players to select dialogues based on three different tones.

Fallen London

Fallen London

Fallen London, originally Echo Bazaar, is a browser-based interactive narrative game developed by Failbetter Games and set in "Fallen London", an alternative Victorian London with gothic overtones. The franchise subsequently expanded to other games, including Sunless Sea and its sequel Sunless Skies.

Ulysses and the Golden Fleece

Ulysses and the Golden Fleece

Ulysses and the Golden Fleece is a graphic adventure game released in 1981 for the Apple II. It was created by Bob Davis and Ken Williams. With a graphic at the top of the game screen, the player navigates the game via a two-word command parser. The game was ported to the Atari 8-bit family, Commodore 64, and IBM PC.

Hearthstone

Hearthstone

Hearthstone is a free-to-play online digital collectible card game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment. Originally subtitled Heroes of Warcraft, Hearthstone builds upon the existing lore of the Warcraft series by using the same elements, characters, and relics. It was first released for Microsoft Windows and macOS in March 2014, with ports for iOS and Android releasing later that year. The game features cross-platform play, allowing players on any supported device to compete with one another, restricted only by geographical region account limits.

Source: "Albatross (metaphor)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albatross_(metaphor).

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References
  1. ^ "An albatross around one's neck". The Phrase Finder. Retrieved 27 December 2011.
  2. ^ Moby-Dick by Herman Melville. Internet Archive. 1892. p. 180. albatross.
  3. ^ Waltz for an Albatross video on YouTube
  4. ^ Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines

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