Get Our Extension

Alan Janes

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Alan Janes
Alan Janes photograph.jpg
Born (1951-05-16) May 16, 1951 (age 71)
NationalityEnglish
OccupationWriter, producer
Known forMusical theatre

Alan Janes (born 16 May 1951) is an English writer and producer who has worked in TV, film, radio and theatre. His musical Buddy – The Buddy Holly Story (widely credited with being the first of the so-called 'jukebox musicals'),ran for over 14 years and almost 6,000 performances in London's West End, and has been on tour in the UK for 17 years.[1][2] Buddy has also played Broadway, five US national tours, eight years in Germany, three years in Australia and New Zealand, and other productions around the world,[3] leading to the show being billed as "The World's Most Successful Rock 'n' Roll Musical".[4][5]

Discover more about Alan Janes related topics

Jukebox musical

Jukebox musical

A jukebox musical is a stage musical or musical film in which a majority of the songs are well-known popular music songs, rather than original music.

London

London

London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom, with a population of just under 9 million. It stands on the River Thames in south-east England at the head of a 50-mile (80 km) estuary down to the North Sea, and has been a major settlement for two millennia. The City of London, its ancient core and financial centre, was founded by the Romans as Londinium and retains its medieval boundaries. The City of Westminster, to the west of the City of London, has for centuries hosted the national government and parliament. Since the 19th century, the name "London" has also referred to the metropolis around this core, historically split between the counties of Middlesex, Essex, Surrey, Kent, and Hertfordshire, which largely comprises Greater London, governed by the Greater London Authority.

West End theatre

West End theatre

West End theatre is mainstream professional theatre staged in the large theatres in and near the West End of London. Along with New York City's Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre in the English-speaking world. Seeing a West End show is a common tourist activity in London. Famous screen actors, British and international alike, frequently appear on the London stage.

Broadway theatre

Broadway theatre

Broadway theatre, or Broadway, are the theatrical performances presented in the 41 professional theatres, each with 500 or more seats, located in the Theater District and the Lincoln Center along Broadway, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. Broadway and London's West End together represent the highest commercial level of live theater in the English-speaking world.

Career

Following his first Z-Cars episode, "Two Wise Monkeys",[6] Janes contributed further episodes to the series, "Bit Of Business", and "Fat Freddy B.A.".[7] He then moved with producer Ron Craddock to write the first episodes of the ground-breaking and hard-hitting hospital drama Angels.[8]

Janes continued to write while working at the BBC Television Script Unit, and contributed many further episodes for Angels. He also wrote original plays and classic series adaptations for BBC Radio, including Lady Chatterley's Lover by DH Lawrence, Our Man In Havana and Brighton Rock by Graham Greene, Plain Murder by CS Forester and Lord Raingo by Arnold Bennett.[9][1]

In the latter half of the 1970s, Janes joined the writing team for the soap opera Emmerdale, and in 1979 was invited by BBC head of children's programmes Anna Home[10] to work with writer Phil Redmond and producer Colin Cant on the expansion of Grange Hill from its initial run to an 18 episode continuing series. He stayed writing for Grange Hill for a total of four series.

In the early 1980s, Janes devised and wrote the children's series Jockey School for BBC1[11] and wrote three films under the generic title of Prisoners Of Conscience for BBC2, about Vladimir Bukovsky, William Beausire, and Nelson Mandela.[12]

This period saw Janes write for the TV series Minder and pen a film for David Putnam, Winter Flight, directed by Roy Battersby, and a film adaptation with Jim Henson's Creature Shop of George Orwell's Animal Farm, directed by John Stephenson.[13]

Buddy

A late-night fan based conversation in a London bar in 1988 with the theatrical agent Laurie Mansfield about the rock 'n' roller Buddy Holly, led Janes to develop and write Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story, which opened at London's Victoria Palace Theatre on 12 October 1989.[14][2] Referred to as the first of the "jukebox musicals",[15] Buddy ran in London's West End for over 14 years, playing for 5,822 performances.[16][17]

Janes took over the producing of the show himself in 2004, and Buddy has toured in the UK for 17 years. It has also played on Broadway, five national US tours, Canada, Sweden, South Africa, Japan, New Zealand, Australia, Germany, Holland, Singapore, Finland, Austria and Denmark.[18][19][20] Janes was nominated for an Olivier Award for Best Musical,[21] and internationally, Buddy has received 29 nominations and awards.[22]

Janes co-wrote and produced the soul musical 125th Street, which played at the Shaftesbury Theatre during 2002-03. He also co-wrote and produced the hit West End musical Jailhouse Rock (based on the songs of Elvis Presley), at the Piccadilly Theatre during 2004 to 2005.[23][24]

Channel 4

1980-81 saw the planning of Britain's newest channel, Channel 4, and Janes became one of the first of the new breed of independent producers when he was commissioned by Mike Bolland, Commissioning Editor for Entertainment, and Jeremy Isaacs, Chief Executive, to develop, write and produce a new hard hitting comedy/drama reflecting the effects of Thatcher's Britain on young people in the East End of London;[25] it became the 12 episode series Prospects, which was filmed during 1984-85 in London's docklands, aired on Channel 4 in 1986 and repeated on ITV in 1987.[26][27][28]

Further producer credits for Janes at Channel 4 included 14 episodes over two series of the sitcom Rude Health starring John Wells and the television films Rotten Apples,[29] It's Only Rock 'n' Roll,[30] The End[31] and Positively Negative.[32]

Discover more about Career related topics

Angels (TV series)

Angels (TV series)

Angels is a British television seasonal drama series dealing with the subject of student nurses and was broadcast by the BBC between 1975 and 1983 and was once described as the "Z-Cars of nursing".

BBC Television

BBC Television

BBC Television is a service of the BBC. The corporation has operated public television services in the United Kingdom under the terms of a royal charter since 1927. It produced television programmes from its own studios from 1932, although the start of its regular service of television broadcasts is dated to 2 November 1936.

BBC Radio

BBC Radio

BBC Radio is an operational business division and service of the British Broadcasting Corporation. The service provides national radio stations covering the majority of musical genres, as well as local radio stations covering local news, affairs and interests. It also oversees online audio content.

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover is the last novel by English author D. H. Lawrence, which was first published privately in 1928, in Italy, and in 1929, in France. An unexpurgated edition was not published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960, when it was the subject of a watershed obscenity trial against the publisher Penguin Books, which won the case and quickly sold three million copies. The book was also banned for obscenity in the United States, Canada, Australia, India and Japan. The book soon became notorious for its story of the physical relationship between a working-class man and an upper-class woman, its explicit descriptions of sex and its use of then-unprintable four-letter words.

Brighton Rock (novel)

Brighton Rock (novel)

Brighton Rock is a novel by Graham Greene, published in 1938 and later adapted for film and theatre. The novel is a murder thriller set in 1930s Brighton. The first of Greene's works to explore Catholic themes and moral issues, its treatment of class privilege and the problem of evil is paradoxical and ambivalent.

Graham Greene

Graham Greene

Henry Graham Greene was an English writer and journalist regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers. He was shortlisted for the Nobel Prize in Literature several times. Through 67 years of writing, which included over 25 novels, he explored the conflicting moral and political issues of the modern world. He was awarded the 1968 Shakespeare Prize and the 1981 Jerusalem Prize.

Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett

Enoch Arnold Bennett was an English author, best known as a novelist. He wrote prolifically: between the 1890s and the 1930s he completed 34 novels, seven volumes of short stories, 13 plays, and a daily journal totalling more than a million words. He wrote articles and stories for more than 100 newspapers and periodicals, worked in and briefly ran the Ministry of Information in the First World War, and wrote for the cinema in the 1920s. The sales of his books were substantial, and he was the most financially successful British author of his day.

Emmerdale

Emmerdale

Emmerdale is a British soap opera that is broadcast on ITV1. The show is set in Emmerdale, a fictional village in the Yorkshire Dales. Created by Kevin Laffan, Emmerdale Farm was first broadcast on 16 October 1972. Interior scenes have been filmed at the Leeds Studios since its inception. Exterior scenes were first filmed in Arncliffe in Littondale, and the series may have taken its name from Amerdale, an ancient name of Littondale. Exterior scenes were later shot at Esholt, but are now shot at a purpose-built set on the Harewood estate. The programme is broadcast in every ITV region.

BBC Children's and Education

BBC Children's and Education

BBC Children's and Education is the BBC division responsible for media content for children in the UK. Since the launch of specially dedicated television channels in 2002, the services have been marketed under two brands. CBBC is aimed at children and teenagers aged between 7 and 17 with CBeebies offering content for younger viewers. Unlike CBeebies, the CBBC brand pre-dates the launch of these channels and before 2002, CBBC was also the brand name used for all of the BBC's children's programmes. CBBC broadcasts from 7:00am to 7:00pm and CBeebies broadcasts from 6:00am to 7:00pm, respectively timesharing with BBC Three and BBC Four. The brands also have dedicated websites, social media channels and over-the-top media services on BBC iPlayer.

Anna Home

Anna Home

Anna Margaret Home is an English television producer and executive who worked for most of her career at the BBC.

Colin Cant

Colin Cant

Colin Cant is a British television director, producer and scenic designer, best known for his work for the children's department of BBC Television from the 1970s to the 1990s. After beginning his career as a designer, he moved to directing and worked on many BBC children's series. He was involved for several years as both a director and producer on the long-running school-based drama series Grange Hill. He remained active in television into the 21st century, directing for the ITV soap opera Coronation Street in 2005.

Grange Hill

Grange Hill

Grange Hill is a British children's television drama series, originally produced by the BBC and portraying life in a typical comprehensive school. The show began its run on 8 February 1978 on BBC1, and was one of the longest-running programmes on British television when it ended on 15 September 2008 after 31 series. It was created by Phil Redmond, who is also responsible for the Channel 4 dramas Brookside and Hollyoaks; other notable production team members down the years have included producer Colin Cant and script editor Anthony Minghella.

Works

TV, Film, Radio, Theatre
  • 1973 – "Two Wise Monkeys" (Z-CarsBBC)
  • 1974 – "Bit Of Business" (Z-Cars – BBC)
  • 1974 – "Nights" (Angels – BBC)
  • 1975 – "Accident" (Angels – BBC)
  • 1975 – "Decisions" (Angels – BBC)
  • 1975 – When The Ticking Stops (Original play – BBC)
  • 1977 – Joseph Dreamer (Original play – BBC)
  • 1977 – Twice Shy (Original play – BBC)
  • 1977 – "Casualties" (Angels – BBC)
  • 1978 – "Fat Freddie B.A." (Z Cars – BBC)
  • 1979 – Brighton Rock by Graham Greene (six-part dramatisation – BBC)
  • 1979 – Grange Hill (four episodes – BBC)
  • 1979 – Angels (four episodes – BBC)
  • 1979 – Emmerdale (six episodes – ITV)
  • 1980 – Lady Chatterley's Lover by DH Lawrence (four part dramatisation – BBC)
  • 1980 – Lord Raingo by Arnold Bennett (four-part dramatisation – BBC)
  • 1980 – Grange Hill (four episodes – BBC)
  • 1980 – Emmerdale (six episodes – ITV)
  • 1981 – Our Man In Havana by Graham Greene (four-part dramatisation – BBC)
  • 1981 – Plain Murder by CS Forester (three part dramatisation – BBC)
  • 1981 – Grange Hill (seven episodes – BBC)
  • 1981 – Emmerdale (six episodes – ITV)
  • 1981 – Prisoners Of Conscience: Vladimir Bukovsky (film - BBC)
  • 1982 – Prisoners Of Conscience: William Beausire (film - BBC)
  • 1982 – Prisoners Of Conscience: Nelson Mandela (film - BBC)
  • 1982 – Grange Hill (five episodes – BBC)
  • 1983 – Jockey School (six episode original series – BBC)
  • 1983 – Emmerdale (six episodes – ITV)
  • 1984 – Winter Flight (feature film – Enigma/Goldcrest/Film Four)
  • 1984 – Minder: "Hypnotising Rita" (Euston Films/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "The P To S Day" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Partners In Brine" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Uncle Harry's System" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Dirty Weekend" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Rodent Engineers" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Standing On Your Own One Foot" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Subterranean Pig Sick Blues" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Frying Tonight" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Four Men In A Boat" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Follow The Yellow Brick Lane" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Running All The Way Part One" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1986 – Prospects: "Running All The Way Part Two" (Euston Films for Channel 4/ITV)
  • 1987 – Rude Health (I) – producer (seven episode situation comedy for Channel 4)
  • 1988 – Rude Health (II) – producer (seven episode situation comedy for Channel 4)
  • 1989 – Rotten Apples – producer (original film for Channel 4)
  • 1989 – It's Only Rock 'n' Roll; The End; Positively Negative. Producer (three short films for Channel 4)
  • 1989 – Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story (Victoria Palace Theatre)
  • 1999 – Animal Farm (adapted from the original novel by George Orwell for Hallmark Films)
  • 2002 – 125th Street (co-writer/producer, Shaftesbury Theatre)
  • 2004 – Jailhouse Rock The Musical (co-writer/producer, Piccadilly Theatre)

Sources:[33][34][29][30][31][32]

Discover more about Works related topics

Z-Cars

Z-Cars

Z-Cars or Z Cars is a British television police procedural series centred on the work of mobile uniformed police in the fictional town of Newtown, based on Kirkby, near Liverpool. Produced by the BBC, it debuted in January 1962 and ran until September 1978.

BBC Television

BBC Television

BBC Television is a service of the BBC. The corporation has operated public television services in the United Kingdom under the terms of a royal charter since 1927. It produced television programmes from its own studios from 1932, although the start of its regular service of television broadcasts is dated to 2 November 1936.

Brighton Rock (novel)

Brighton Rock (novel)

Brighton Rock is a novel by Graham Greene, published in 1938 and later adapted for film and theatre. The novel is a murder thriller set in 1930s Brighton. The first of Greene's works to explore Catholic themes and moral issues, its treatment of class privilege and the problem of evil is paradoxical and ambivalent.

Graham Greene

Graham Greene

Henry Graham Greene was an English writer and journalist regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers. He was shortlisted for the Nobel Prize in Literature several times. Through 67 years of writing, which included over 25 novels, he explored the conflicting moral and political issues of the modern world. He was awarded the 1968 Shakespeare Prize and the 1981 Jerusalem Prize.

Grange Hill

Grange Hill

Grange Hill is a British children's television drama series, originally produced by the BBC and portraying life in a typical comprehensive school. The show began its run on 8 February 1978 on BBC1, and was one of the longest-running programmes on British television when it ended on 15 September 2008 after 31 series. It was created by Phil Redmond, who is also responsible for the Channel 4 dramas Brookside and Hollyoaks; other notable production team members down the years have included producer Colin Cant and script editor Anthony Minghella.

Emmerdale

Emmerdale

Emmerdale is a British soap opera that is broadcast on ITV1. The show is set in Emmerdale, a fictional village in the Yorkshire Dales. Created by Kevin Laffan, Emmerdale Farm was first broadcast on 16 October 1972. Interior scenes have been filmed at the Leeds Studios since its inception. Exterior scenes were first filmed in Arncliffe in Littondale, and the series may have taken its name from Amerdale, an ancient name of Littondale. Exterior scenes were later shot at Esholt, but are now shot at a purpose-built set on the Harewood estate. The programme is broadcast in every ITV region.

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover

Lady Chatterley's Lover is the last novel by English author D. H. Lawrence, which was first published privately in 1928, in Italy, and in 1929, in France. An unexpurgated edition was not published openly in the United Kingdom until 1960, when it was the subject of a watershed obscenity trial against the publisher Penguin Books, which won the case and quickly sold three million copies. The book was also banned for obscenity in the United States, Canada, Australia, India and Japan. The book soon became notorious for its story of the physical relationship between a working-class man and an upper-class woman, its explicit descriptions of sex and its use of then-unprintable four-letter words.

Arnold Bennett

Arnold Bennett

Enoch Arnold Bennett was an English author, best known as a novelist. He wrote prolifically: between the 1890s and the 1930s he completed 34 novels, seven volumes of short stories, 13 plays, and a daily journal totalling more than a million words. He wrote articles and stories for more than 100 newspapers and periodicals, worked in and briefly ran the Ministry of Information in the First World War, and wrote for the cinema in the 1920s. The sales of his books were substantial, and he was the most financially successful British author of his day.

Our Man in Havana

Our Man in Havana

Our Man in Havana (1958) is a novel set in Cuba by the British author Graham Greene. He makes fun of intelligence services, especially the British MI6, and their willingness to believe reports from their local informants. The book predates the Cuban Missile Crisis, but certain aspects of the plot, notably the role of missile installations, appear to anticipate the events of 1962.

C. S. Forester

C. S. Forester

Cecil Louis Troughton Smith, known by his pen name Cecil Scott "C. S." Forester, was an English novelist known for writing tales of naval warfare, such as the 12-book Horatio Hornblower series depicting a Royal Navy officer during the Napoleonic wars. The Hornblower novels A Ship of the Line and Flying Colours were jointly awarded the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction in 1938. His other works include The African Queen and The Good Shepherd.

Winter Flight

Winter Flight

Winter Flight is a 1984 British TV movie directed by Roy Battersby, and starring Reece Dinsdale, Nicola Cowper and Sean Bean.

Goldcrest Films

Goldcrest Films

Goldcrest Films is an award-winning independent British distribution, production, post production, and finance company. Operating from London and New York, Goldcrest is a privately owned integrated filmed entertainment company.

Source: "Alan Janes", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Janes.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b Spencer, Charles. "That'll be the day that I had a great time". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Alan Janes – Broadway Cast & Staff". Internet Broadway Database. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  3. ^ ""Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story" On Stage One Time Only - February 2- At The Lakeland Center - Theatre Maven". The Ledger. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Events happening in February". Highlands Today. 31 January 2016. Archived from the original on 17 September 2016. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  5. ^ "BUDDY: The Buddy Holly Story". KTVT. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  6. ^ Bennett, Rodney (4 March 1974). "Two Wise Monkeys". IMDb. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Alan Janes". TV.com. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  8. ^ "Angles". www.oocities.org. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  9. ^ "Mucke und mehr - Fun+Events - Buddy - Das Musical". www.mucke-und-mehr.de. Archived from the original on 6 November 2016. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  10. ^ Handford, Richard (8 April 1980). "Episode #1.569". IMDb. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  11. ^ "Jockey School - BBC One London - 13 October 1982 - BBC Genome". BBC Online. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  12. ^ "Prisoners of Conscience - BBC Two England - 2 October 1981 - BBC Genome". BBC Two. Retrieved 10 October 2017.
  13. ^ "Blurring Fact And Fiction". The Herald (Glasgow). 5 October 1981. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  14. ^ O'Brien, Larry. "BWW Review: BUDDY - THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY at Theatre By The Sea". BroadwayWorld. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  15. ^ "Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story - California Musical Theatre". California Musical Theatre. 20 November 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  16. ^ "Aisle Say (San Francisco) : BUDDY: THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY". Aisle Say. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  17. ^ "Buddy the Musical London theatre stage show". www.thisistheatre.com. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  18. ^ "Buddy - The Buddy Holly Story". The Muny. Archived from the original on 14 September 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  19. ^ "Buddy Announces 2015 New Zealand Tour". www.buddythemusical.com. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  20. ^ "Buddy raves on at Grand Opera House as Holly musical returns to York next March". The Press (York). Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  21. ^ "Musical of the Year". Olivier Award. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  22. ^ Eiss, Harry (18 September 2013). The Mythology of Dance. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. p. 154. ISBN 9781443852883. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  23. ^ Gardner, Lyn (16 September 2002). "125th Street". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  24. ^ "125th Street, Shaftesbury Theatre, London". The Independent. 18 September 2002. Archived from the original on 2016-09-16. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  25. ^ "Curious British Telly: Prospects". Curious British Telly. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  26. ^ Sedazzari, Matteo. "Prospects - A Classic Cult TV Show Reviewed". Zani.co.uk. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  27. ^ "Prospects - The Complete Series". UKRarities. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  28. ^ "Prospects on IMDb". IMDb. 19 February 1986. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  29. ^ a b "Rotten Apples (1989)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 12 October 2017.
  30. ^ a b "It's only Rock 'n' Roll (1990)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  31. ^ a b "The End (1990)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  32. ^ a b "Positively Negative (1990)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  33. ^ "Alan Janes on IMDb". IMDb. Retrieved 1 September 2016.
  34. ^ "Alan Janes Theatre Credits". www.broadwayworld.com. Retrieved 12 October 2017.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.