Get Our Extension

Ajas Pasha

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Ajas-bey
Ajaz-beg
Bremen, Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek, ms. Or. 9, fol. 79r.jpg
Ajas Pasha
Sanjak-bey of Bosnia
In office
1470–1474
MonarchMehmed II
Preceded byIsa-beg Isaković
Succeeded bySinan-beg
In office
1477–1478
MonarchMehmed II
Preceded byBali-beg Malkočević
Succeeded bySkender Pasha
In office
1483–1484
MonarchBayezid II
Preceded byJahja-beg
Succeeded byMehmed-beg Ishaković
Sanjak-bey of Herzegovina
In office
1478–1480
In office
1481–1483
MonarchBayezid II
Personal details
Born?
Died1486
Anatolia, Ottoman Empire
Occupationgovernor
Military service
Allegiance Ottoman Empire
RankPasha

Ajas Pasha (? - Anatolia, 1486) was a Bosnian sanjak-bey and later pasha in Ottoman service.[1]

Discover more about Ajas Pasha related topics

Anatolia

Anatolia

Anatolia, historically known as Asia Minor, is a large peninsula in Western Asia and is the western-most extension of continental Asia. The land mass of Anatolia constitutes most of the territory of contemporary Turkey. Geographically, the Anatolian region is bounded by the Turkish Straits to the north-west, the Black Sea to the north, the Armenian Highlands to the east, the Mediterranean Sea to the south, and the Aegean Sea to the west. Topographically, the Sea of Marmara connects the Black Sea with the Aegean Sea through the Bosporus strait and the Dardanelles strait, and separates Anatolia from Thrace in the Balkan peninsula of Southeastern Europe.

Sanjak-bey

Sanjak-bey

Sanjak-bey, sanjaq-bey or -beg was the title given in the Ottoman Empire to a bey appointed to the military and administrative command of a district, hence the equivalent Arabic title of amir liwa He was answerable to a superior wāli or another provincial governor. In a few cases the sanjak-bey was himself directly answerable to Istanbul.

Pasha

Pasha

Pasha was a higher rank in the Ottoman political and military system, typically granted to governors, generals, dignitaries, and others. As an honorary title, Pasha, in one of its various ranks, is similar to a British peerage or knighthood, and was also one of the highest titles in the 20th-century Kingdom of Egypt. The title was also used in Morocco in the 20th century, where it denoted a regional official or governor of a district.

Ottoman Empire

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire, historically and colloquially the Turkish Empire, was an empire that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Turkoman tribal leader Osman I. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe and, with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the conquest of Constantinople in 1453 by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Career

He was sanjak-bey of Bosnia, referred to as the Lord of the King's land, from 1470 to 1475, 1477 to 1478 and in 1483, and ruled sanjak-bey of Herzegovina, also referred to as Herzegovina's Krajisnik or Duke of the Herzeg's land, from 1478 to 1480 and 1481 to 1483. In 1472 he raided Croatian littoral, Istria and Friuli region.[1] In November 1481 he besieged Herceg Novi, and on 14th December of 1481 he captured the city after Vlatko Hercegović gave up defending it and agreed surrender.[2] For this he was awarded title of pasha.[3]

Discover more about Career related topics

Sanjak of Bosnia

Sanjak of Bosnia

Sanjak of Bosnia was one of the sanjaks of the Ottoman Empire established in 1463 when the lands conquered from the Bosnian Kingdom were transformed into a sanjak and Isa-Beg Isaković was appointed its first sanjakbey. In the period between 1463 and 1580 it was part of the Rumelia Eyalet. After the Bosnia Eyalet was established in 1580 the Bosnian Sanjak became its central province. Between 1864 and the Austro-Hungarian occupation of Bosnia in 1878 it was part of the Bosnia Vilayet that succeeded the Eyalet of Bosnia following administrative reforms in 1864 known as the "Vilayet Law". Although Bosnia Vilayet was officially still part of the Ottoman Empire until 1908 the Bosnian Sanjak ceased to exist in 1878.

Sanjak of Herzegovina

Sanjak of Herzegovina

The Sanjak of Herzegovina was an Ottoman administrative unit established in 1470. The seat was in Foča until 1572 when it was moved to Taşlıca (Pljevlja). The sanjak was initially part of the Eyalet of Rumelia but was administrated into the Eyalet of Bosnia following its establishment in 1580.

Croatian Littoral

Croatian Littoral

Croatian Littoral is a historical name for the region of Croatia comprising mostly the coastal areas between traditional Dalmatia to the south, Mountainous Croatia to the north, Istria and the Kvarner Gulf of the Adriatic Sea to the west. The term "Croatian Littoral" developed in the 18th and 19th centuries, reflecting the complex development of Croatia in historical and geographical terms.

Istria

Istria

Istria is the largest peninsula within the Adriatic Sea. The peninsula is located at the head of the Adriatic between the Gulf of Trieste and the Kvarner Gulf. It is shared by three countries: Croatia, Slovenia, and Italy. Croatia encapsulates most of the Istrian peninsula with its Istria County.

Friuli Venezia Giulia

Friuli Venezia Giulia

Friuli-Venezia Giulia is one of the 20 regions of Italy and one of five autonomous regions with special statute. The regional capital is Trieste on the Gulf of Trieste, a very shallow bay of the Adriatic Sea.

Herceg Novi

Herceg Novi

Herceg Novi is a coastal town in Montenegro located at the Western entrance to the Bay of Kotor and at the foot of Mount Orjen. It is the administrative center of the Herceg Novi Municipality with around 33,000 inhabitants. Herceg Novi was known as Castelnuovo between 1482 and 1797, when it was part of the Ottoman Empire and the Albania Veneta of the Republic of Venice. It was a Catholic bishopric and remains a Latin titular see as Novi. Herceg Novi has had a turbulent past, despite being one of the youngest settlements on the Adriatic. A history of varied occupations has created a blend of diverse and picturesque architectural style in the city.

Vlatko Hercegović

Vlatko Hercegović

Vlatko Hercegović, was the second and the last Herzog of Saint Sava, succeeding his father Stjepan Vukčić in 1466.

Achievements

He played a key role in the development of Visoko from a Bosnian medieval type of town[4] to Ottoman styled urban organization. He legalized his vakf in 1477 hammam, shops, mekteb, water supply system, bridge on river Bosna, shadirvan, medrese and Nakshbandi tekija[5] which he built in Visoko. He personally commissioned the building of all these structures and architecture.

Discover more about Achievements related topics

Visoko

Visoko

Visoko is a city located in the Zenica-Doboj Canton of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina. As of 2013, the municipality had a population of 39,938 inhabitants with 11,205 living in Visoko town. Located between Zenica and Sarajevo, Visoko lies where the river Fojnica joins the Bosna.

Ottoman Empire

Ottoman Empire

The Ottoman Empire, historically and colloquially the Turkish Empire, was an empire that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia, and Northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Turkoman tribal leader Osman I. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe and, with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the conquest of Constantinople in 1453 by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Hammam

Hammam

A hammam or Turkish bath is a type of steam bath or a place of public bathing associated with the Islamic world. It is a prominent feature in the culture of the Muslim world and was inherited from the model of the Roman thermae. Muslim bathhouses or hammams were historically found across the Middle East, North Africa, al-Andalus, Central Asia, the Indian subcontinent, and in Southeastern Europe under Ottoman rule. A variation on the Muslim bathhouse, the Victorian Turkish bath, became popular as a form of therapy, a method of cleansing, and a place for relaxation during the Victorian era, rapidly spreading through the British Empire, the United States of America, and Western Europe.

Water supply network

Water supply network

A water supply network or water supply system is a system of engineered hydrologic and hydraulic components that provide water supply. A water supply system typically includes the following:A drainage basin A raw water collection point where the water accumulates, such as a lake, a river, or groundwater from an underground aquifer. Raw water may be transferred using uncovered ground-level aqueducts, covered tunnels, or underground water pipes to water purification facilities. Water purification facilities. Treated water is transferred using water pipes. Water storage facilities such as reservoirs, water tanks, or water towers. Smaller water systems may store the water in cisterns or pressure vessels. Tall buildings may also need to store water locally in pressure vessels in order for the water to reach the upper floors. Additional water pressurizing components such as pumping stations may need to be situated at the outlet of underground or aboveground reservoirs or cisterns. A pipe network for distribution of water to consumers and other usage points Connections to the sewers are generally found downstream of the water consumers, but the sewer system is considered to be a separate system, rather than part of the water supply system.

Bridge

Bridge

A bridge is a structure built to span a physical obstacle without blocking the way underneath. It is constructed for the purpose of providing passage over the obstacle, which is usually something that is otherwise difficult or impossible to cross. There are many different designs of bridges, each serving a particular purpose and applicable to different situations. Designs of bridges vary depending on factors such as the function of the bridge, the nature of the terrain where the bridge is constructed and anchored, and the material used to make it, and the funds available to build it.

Bosna (river)

Bosna (river)

The Bosna is the third longest river in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and is considered one of the country's three major internal rivers, along with the Neretva and the Vrbas. The other three major rivers of Bosnia and Herzegovina are the Una, to the northwest; the Sava, to the north, and the Drina, to the east. This river is the namesake of Bosnia. The river Bosna flows for 282 kilometers (175 mi).

Shadirvan

Shadirvan

A shadirvan is a type of fountain that is usually built in the courtyard or near the entrance of mosques, caravanserais, khanqahs, and madrasas, with the main purpose of providing water for drinking or ritual ablutions to several people at the same time, but also as decorative visual or sound elements.

Khanqah

Khanqah

A khanqah or khangah, also known as a ribat (رباط), is a building designed specifically for gatherings of a Sufi brotherhood or tariqa and is a place for spiritual practice and religious education. The khanqah is typically a large structure with a central hall and smaller rooms on either side. Traditionally, the kahnqah was state-sponsored housing for Sufis. Their primary function is to provide them with a space to practice social lives of asceticism. Buildings intended for public services, such as hospitals, kitchens, and lodging, are often attached to them. Khanqahs were funded by Ayyubid sultans in Syria, Zangid sultans in Egypt, and Delhi sultans in India in return for Sufi support of their regimes.

Source: "Ajas Pasha", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajas_Pasha.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ a b "Ajas-paša - Hrvatska enciklopedija". www.enciklopedija.hr (in Croatian). Leksikografski zavod Miroslav Krleža. Retrieved 10 May 2021.
  2. ^ Ćirković, Sima M. (1964). "Chepter 7: Slom Bosanske države; Part 3: Pad Bosne". Istorija srednjovekovne bosanske države (in Serbian). Srpska književna zadruga. pp. 340, 341. Retrieved 21 March 2021.
  3. ^ "Ajas-paša - Proleksis enciklopedija". proleksis.lzmk.hr. Retrieved 2019-05-07.
  4. ^ Šabanović, „Dvije najstarije vakufname u Bosni“, 35.
  5. ^ Vakufnama Isa-bega Ishakovića (1462.) Vakufnama Ajas-bega (1477.) Vakufnama Hadži-Mustafe Čekrekčije (1526.)


The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.