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Air Iceland Connect

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Air Iceland Connect
Air Iceland Connect.png
IATA ICAO Callsign
NY FXI FAXI
FoundedJune 3, 1937 (1937-06-03)
(as Flugfélag Akureyrar)
Ceased operationsMarch 16, 2021 (2021-03-16)
(folded into Icelandair)
HubsReykjavík Airport
Frequent-flyer programIcelandair Saga Club
Fleet size5
Destinations15
Parent companyIcelandair Group
HeadquartersReykjavík Airport
Reykjavík, Iceland
Key peopleÁrni Gunnarsson
Websiteairicelandconnect.is

Air Iceland Connect, formerly Flugfélag Íslands, was[1] a regional airline with its head office at Reykjavík Airport in Reykjavík, Iceland.[2] It operates scheduled services under the brand of its parent company, Icelandair, to domestic destinations across Iceland, Greenland and the Faroe Islands (operated by Atlantic Airways). Its main bases are Reykjavík Airport and Akureyri Airport.[3] It is a subsidiary of Icelandair Group[4][5] and merged with Icelandair in 2021, being fully absorbed into the parent company, while at the same time still operating flights under the name of its parent company.[1]

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Regional airline

Regional airline

A regional airline is a general classification of airline which typically operates scheduled passenger air service, using regional aircraft, between communities lacking sufficient demand or infrastructure to attract mainline flights. In North America, most regional airlines are classified as "fee-for-departure" carriers, operating their revenue flights as codeshare services contracted by one or more major airline partners. A number of regional airlines, particularly in during the 1960s and 1970s, were also known as commuter airlines and classified as such in the Official Airline Guide (OAG).

Reykjavík Airport

Reykjavík Airport

Reykjavík Airport is the main domestic airport serving Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland, located about two kilometres from the city centre.

Reykjavík

Reykjavík

Reykjavík is the capital and largest city of Iceland. It is located in southwestern Iceland, on the southern shore of Faxaflói bay. Its latitude is 64°08' N, making it the world's northernmost capital of a sovereign state. With a population of around 131,136, it is the centre of Iceland's cultural, economic, and governmental activity, and is a popular tourist destination.

Icelandair

Icelandair

Icelandair is the flag carrier airline of Iceland, with its corporate head office on the property of Reykjavík Airport in the capital city Reykjavik. It is part of the Icelandair Group and operates to destinations on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean from its main hub at Keflavík International Airport. The geographical position of Iceland is convenient for one-stop transatlantic flights, which is one pillar of the airline's business strategy, along with traffic to, from, and within the country.

Greenland

Greenland

Greenland is an island country in North America that is part of the Kingdom of Denmark. It is located between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Greenland is the world's largest island. It is one of three constituent countries that form the Kingdom of Denmark, along with Denmark and the Faroe Islands; the citizens of these countries are all citizens of Denmark and the European Union. Greenland's capital is Nuuk.

Faroe Islands

Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands, or simply the Faroes, are a North Atlantic archipelago island country and self-governing nation under the external sovereignty of the Kingdom of Denmark.

Atlantic Airways

Atlantic Airways

Atlantic Airways is the national airline of the Faroe Islands, operating domestic helicopter services and international passenger services as well as search and rescue responsibilities from its base at Vágar Airport, on the Faroese island of Vágar. Most of its pilots are members of the Faroese Pilot Association. Its 2021 revenue was 410.2mm DKK.

Akureyri Airport

Akureyri Airport

Akureyri Airport is a single-runway international airport in Akureyri, Iceland, 3 kilometres south of the town centre. Icelandair and Norlandair link the airport with several domestic locations.

Icelandair Group

Icelandair Group

Icelandair Group hf. is an Icelandic travel industry corporation, the owner and holding company of the airline Icelandair and several other travel industry companies in Iceland. The group's headquarters are at Reykjavík Airport in Reykjavík. The corporation is the largest in Iceland, with 125 billion ISK in revenue in 2013.

History

Air Iceland Connect can trace its history to 1937. On 3 June that year Flugfélag Akureyrar was established; the airline changed its name to Flugfélag Íslands on 13 March 1940, the third airline to bear this name. The first Flugfélag Íslands was founded on 22 March 1919 and dissolved the following year. A second airline of the same name was founded on 1 May 1928 and operated until 1931.[6] In 1973, Flugfélag Íslands and Loftleiðir merged under the name Flugleiðir hf. Its domestic division was called Flugleiðir while its transatlantic division was called Icelandair.[6]

In Akureyri, Tryggvi Helgason founded the airline Norðurflug; it was incorporated on 1 May 1995 as Flugfélag Norðurlands. Subsequently, in 1997, Norðurlands merged with Flugleiðir's domestic operation under the name Flugfélag Íslands.[6]

Air Iceland Connect Dash 8-200 at Nuuk Airport
Air Iceland Connect Dash 8-200 at Nuuk Airport

In late 2011, Flugfélag Íslands acquired two Bombardier Dash 8-200 aircraft for delivery in early 2012. Upon delivery of these aircraft, the airline sold its only Dash 8–100 series aircraft. It previously operated ATR 42 aircraft, wet leased from Islandsflug, from 2000 to 2003.[7] A fleet of three Bombardier Dash 8-Q400 aircraft replaced the airline's five Fokker 50 aircraft in 2015–16. Services using the new aircraft included routes to Aberdeen which started in March 2016, and Belfast which began in June 2017, both flown out of Keflavík International Airport.

In May 2017, Flugfélag Íslands announced it had rebranded as Air Iceland Connect. Árni Gunnarsson, managing director of Air Iceland Connect, stated that the name change would help distinguish themselves from Icelandair and signify the airline's connection to Icelandic and international destinations.[8] Dropping the Icelandic name resulted in complaints about the attack on the Icelandic language.[9]

In February 2018, Air Iceland Connect announced a strategy change by focusing on regional destinations. Therefore, flights to the United Kingdom had been cut by 14 May 2018 and the Bombardier Dash 8 Q400s will be phased out.[10]

On 9 March 2021, Icelandair Group announced that Air Iceland Connect is to merge its sales operations with Icelandair by uniting domestic and international services from 16 March 2021 and continuing the current flight operations under the Icelandair brand.[5][1] The company Air Iceland Connect continues to operate domestic flights under its own legal responsibility but using the Icelandair brand.

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Icelandair

Icelandair

Icelandair is the flag carrier airline of Iceland, with its corporate head office on the property of Reykjavík Airport in the capital city Reykjavik. It is part of the Icelandair Group and operates to destinations on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean from its main hub at Keflavík International Airport. The geographical position of Iceland is convenient for one-stop transatlantic flights, which is one pillar of the airline's business strategy, along with traffic to, from, and within the country.

Akureyri

Akureyri

Akureyri is a town in northern Iceland. It is Iceland's fifth-largest municipality, after Reykjavík, Hafnarfjörður, Reykjanesbær and Kópavogur, and the largest town outside Iceland's more populated southwest corner.

Nuuk Airport

Nuuk Airport

Nuuk Airport (Greenlandic: Mittarfik Nuuk; Danish: Godthåb Lufthavn; is an airport serving Nuuk, the capital of Greenland. The airport is a technical base and focus city for Air Greenland, the flag carrier airline of Greenland, linking the capital with several towns in western and south-western part of the country, including the airline hub at Kangerlussuaq Airport. With connections to Iceland, Nuuk Airport is also one of six international airports in Greenland but serves only destinations within Greenland and Iceland. International connections are made with flights to either Keflavík International Airport in Iceland or Kangerlussuaq Airport.

ATR 42

ATR 42

The ATR 42 is a regional airliner produced by Franco-Italian manufacturer ATR, with final assembly in Toulouse, France. On 4 November 1981, the aircraft was launched with ATR, as a joint venture between French Aérospatiale and Aeritalia . The ATR 42-300 performed its maiden flight on 16 August 1984 and type certification was granted during September 1985. Launch customer Air Littoral operated its first revenue-earning flight in December of that year.

Fokker 50

Fokker 50

The Fokker 50 is a turboprop-powered airliner, designed as an improved version of the successful Fokker F27 Friendship. The Fokker 60 is a stretched freighter version of the Fokker 50. Both aircraft were manufactured and supported by Dutch aircraft manufacturer Fokker.

Aberdeen

Aberdeen

Aberdeen is a city in North East Scotland, and is the third most populous city in the country. Aberdeen is one of Scotland's 32 local government council areas, and has a 2020 population estimate of 198,590 for the city of Aberdeen, and 227,560 for the local council area making it the United Kingdom's 39th most populous built-up area. The city is 93 mi (150 km) northeast of Edinburgh and 398 mi (641 km) north of London, and is the northernmost major city in the United Kingdom. Aberdeen has a long, sandy coastline and features an oceanic climate, with cool summers and mild, rainy winters.

Belfast

Belfast

Belfast is the capital and largest city of Northern Ireland, standing on the banks of the River Lagan on the east coast. It is the 12th-largest city in the United Kingdom and the second-largest in Ireland. It had a population of 345,418 in 2021.

Keflavík International Airport

Keflavík International Airport

Keflavík Airport, also known as Reykjavík–Keflavík Airport, is the largest airport in Iceland and the country's main hub for international transportation. The airport is 1.7 nautical miles west of Keflavík and 50 km (30 mi) southwest of Reykjavík. The airport has three runways, two of which are in use, and the airport area is about 25 km2 (10 sq mi). Most international journeys to or from Iceland pass through this airport.

Icelandair Group

Icelandair Group

Icelandair Group hf. is an Icelandic travel industry corporation, the owner and holding company of the airline Icelandair and several other travel industry companies in Iceland. The group's headquarters are at Reykjavík Airport in Reykjavík. The corporation is the largest in Iceland, with 125 billion ISK in revenue in 2013.

Destinations

An Air Iceland Connect aircraft is taxiing at Reykjavík Airport
An Air Iceland Connect aircraft is taxiing at Reykjavík Airport

Air Iceland Connect operated to the following destinations under its own name, before its operations were integrated with Icelandair's in March 2021.

Country City Airport Notes
Greenland Ilulissat Ilulissat Airport Seasonal
Kulusuk Kulusuk Airport
Narsarsuaq Narsarsuaq Airport Seasonal
Nuuk Nuuk Airport
Iceland Akureyri Akureyri Airport
Egilsstaðir Egilsstaðir Airport
Ísafjörður Ísafjörður Airport
Reykjavík Keflavík International Airport
Reykjavík Airport Base
United Kingdom Aberdeen Aberdeen Airport Terminated
Belfast George Best Belfast City Airport Terminated

Codeshare agreements

Air Iceland Connect had codeshare agreements on flights to the Faroe Islands operated by Atlantic Airways, as well as on services to Grímsey, Thorshofn, Vopnafjörður and Nerlerit Inaat Airport operated by Norlandair.

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Icelandair

Icelandair

Icelandair is the flag carrier airline of Iceland, with its corporate head office on the property of Reykjavík Airport in the capital city Reykjavik. It is part of the Icelandair Group and operates to destinations on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean from its main hub at Keflavík International Airport. The geographical position of Iceland is convenient for one-stop transatlantic flights, which is one pillar of the airline's business strategy, along with traffic to, from, and within the country.

Greenland

Greenland

Greenland is an island country in North America that is part of the Kingdom of Denmark. It is located between the Arctic and Atlantic oceans, east of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. Greenland is the world's largest island. It is one of three constituent countries that form the Kingdom of Denmark, along with Denmark and the Faroe Islands; the citizens of these countries are all citizens of Denmark and the European Union. Greenland's capital is Nuuk.

Ilulissat

Ilulissat

Ilulissat, formerly Jakobshavn or Jacobshaven, is the municipal seat and largest town of the Avannaata municipality in western Greenland, located approximately 350 km (220 mi) north of the Arctic Circle. With the population of 4,670 as of 2020, it is the third-largest city in Greenland, after Nuuk and Sisimiut. The city is home to almost as many sled-dogs as people.

Ilulissat Airport

Ilulissat Airport

Ilulissat Airport ; is a minor international airport serving Ilulissat, Greenland, the entire Disko Bay Region, the North and West Greenland. It is the 59th largest airport in the Nordic countries with 83,000 passengers in 2012 and is the second airport built in Greenland for civilian travel partially funded by the EU Structural Funds and Cohesion Fund. It is the third-busiest airport in Greenland, and one of the busiest for international travel in Greenland.

Kulusuk

Kulusuk

Kulusuk, formerly Kap Dan, is a settlement in the Sermersooq municipality in southeastern Greenland, located on an island of the same name. The settlement population of 241 includes many Danes choosing to live there due to the airport. In the Kalaallisut language, the name of the village means "Chest of a Black Guillemot".

Kulusuk Airport

Kulusuk Airport

Kulusuk Airport is an airport in Kulusuk, a settlement on an island of the same name off the shore of the North Atlantic in the Sermersooq municipality in southeastern Greenland.

Iceland

Iceland

Iceland is a Nordic island country in the North Atlantic Ocean and in the Arctic Ocean. Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in Europe. Iceland's capital and largest city is Reykjavík, which is home to over 65% of the population. Iceland is the biggest part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge that rises above sea level, and its central volcanic plateau is erupting almost constantly. The interior consists of a plateau characterised by sand and lava fields, mountains, and glaciers, and many glacial rivers flow to the sea through the lowlands. Iceland is warmed by the Gulf Stream and has a temperate climate, despite a high latitude just outside the Arctic Circle. Its high latitude and marine influence keep summers chilly, and most of its islands have a polar climate.

Akureyri

Akureyri

Akureyri is a town in northern Iceland. It is Iceland's fifth-largest municipality, after Reykjavík, Hafnarfjörður, Reykjanesbær and Kópavogur, and the largest town outside Iceland's more populated southwest corner.

Akureyri Airport

Akureyri Airport

Akureyri Airport is a single-runway international airport in Akureyri, Iceland, 3 kilometres south of the town centre. Icelandair and Norlandair link the airport with several domestic locations.

Egilsstaðir

Egilsstaðir

Egilsstaðir is a town in east Iceland on the banks of the Lagarfljót river.

Egilsstaðir Airport

Egilsstaðir Airport

Egilsstaðir Airport is a single-runway international airport in Egilsstaðir, Iceland. The main carrier is Icelandair with flights to Reykjavík. The airport has several car rental options available, such as Höldur/Europcar, Hertz and Avis/Budget. Egilsstaðir also serves as a diversion airport for Keflavik International Airport located 415 kilometers southwest of Egilstaðir.

Keflavík International Airport

Keflavík International Airport

Keflavík Airport, also known as Reykjavík–Keflavík Airport, is the largest airport in Iceland and the country's main hub for international transportation. The airport is 1.7 nautical miles west of Keflavík and 50 km (30 mi) southwest of Reykjavík. The airport has three runways, two of which are in use, and the airport area is about 25 km2 (10 sq mi). Most international journeys to or from Iceland pass through this airport.

Fleet

Air Iceland Connect De Havilland Canada Dash 8
Air Iceland Connect De Havilland Canada Dash 8

As of December 2020, the Air Iceland Connect fleet consisted of the following aircraft, all of which now operate the same flights under the Icelandair brand:[11]

Air Iceland Connect fleet
Aircraft In service Orders Passengers Notes
Bombardier Q200 3 37
Bombardier Q400 2 74
Total 5

Among the destinations, most in Greenland and some in Iceland have runways less than 1,100 metres (3,600 ft) in length. The Q200 is the only aircraft type possessed by Air Iceland Connect compatible with such runways. Its retired fleet includes Fokker 50s.[12][13]

Accidents and incidents

  • On 14 April 1942, Flugfélag Íslands Smyrill crashed shortly after takeoff from Reykjavík Airport, killing merchant and former athlete Axel Kristjánsson and an officer from the British occupation force in Iceland, while injuring two others.[14][15]
  • On 29 May 1947, a Flugfélag Íslands Douglas DC-3 with registration TF-ISI crashed at Héðinsfjörður, Iceland, in bad weather, killing all 25 on board. As of 2018 this is the worst aircraft accident to occur in Iceland.[16]
  • On 26 September 1970, Flugfélag Íslands Flight 704, a Fokker F27 Friendship, with registration TF-FIL, crashed into the mountains of Mykines in the Faroe Islands, in heavy fog, killing the Icelandic captain and 7 Faroese passengers.[17][18] 26 passenger and crew survived the crash. Three passengers, who escaped with minor injuries, hiked for an hour down the mountain to the village of Mykines, alerting authorities. The majority of the villagers went up the mountain to aid the injured.[19]
  • On 18 June 1980, Flugleiðir's Fokker F27 Friendship, with 19 people on board,[20] made an emergency landing on Keflavík Airport[21] after its landing gear failed to come down on its approach to Vestmannaeyjar. The pilots managed to lower two of the plane's three landing gears and successfully land the plane in Keflavík with minimal damage to the plane.[22][23][24]
  • On 20 March 1982, the left engine of Flugleiðir's Fokker F27 Friendship, with registration TL-FLM, blew up during takeoff from Ísafjörður Airport, at the altitude of 490 feet. The pilots managed to put out the fire but could not lower the left landing gear due to the damage it sustained in the explosion. Instead of trying to land on the narrow Ísafjörður airport with only two wheels down, the captain decided to fly about 230 km to the much larger Keflavík Airport to attempt an emergency landing there. Despite the front part of the engine almost breaking of in the explosion, the plane managed to land in Keflavík with minimal additional damage to the plane. All 25 people on board survived without injuries.[25][26][27][28]
  • On 11 March 1986, the pilots of a Flugleiðir Fokker F27 Friendship, with registration TL-FLO, aborted takeoff from Reykjavík Airport after hearing unusual noise coming from the plane but were unable to stop it before it reached the end of the runway due to wet conditions. The plane went off the end of the runway, hit a concrete ditch which resulted in the front landing gear breaking off, went through a fence at the edge of the runway and came to a halt on the middle of the Suðurgata, a busy traffic street, barely missing a large oil truck that had just passed by.[29] All 45 people on board escaped without injuries.[30][31][32]
  • On 8 July 1986, a privately owned single engine Socata Rallye Tampico crashed during takeoff from Reykjavík Airport, slid into Flugleiðir's Fokker F27 Friendship, with registration TF-FLM, and caught fire. The Fokker was deboarding at the time and a stewardess managed to push three passengers out of the way just before the Tampico hit. The flight engineer of the Fokker had grabbed a fire extinguisher when he saw the plane crash and managed to contain the fire before another employee of Flugleiðir came with a second extinguisher and helped him put the fire out before it could reach the fuel gushing out of the damaged airplane. All four people on board the small plane were pulled out with minor injuries.[33]
  • On 4 March 2011, a de Havilland Canada Dash 8-100 registered TF-JMB was hit by a microburst while landing at Nuuk Airport in Greenland. It touched down hard and the right main landing gear collapsed. The aircraft veered off the runway, tearing the nose landing gear off. The 31 people on board were unharmed, however, the aircraft was written off.[34][35]

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Reykjavík Airport

Reykjavík Airport

Reykjavík Airport is the main domestic airport serving Reykjavík, the capital of Iceland, located about two kilometres from the city centre.

Axel Kristjánsson

Axel Kristjánsson

Axel Kristjánsson was an Icelandic athlete and merchant. A well known athlete in Iceland, he was part of a group selected to showcase Glíma at the 1912 Summer Olympics.

Douglas DC-3

Douglas DC-3

The Douglas DC-3 is a propeller-driven airliner manufactured by Douglas Aircraft Company, which had a lasting effect on the airline industry in the 1930s to 1940s and World War II. It was developed as a larger, improved 14-bed sleeper version of the Douglas DC-2. It is a low-wing metal monoplane with conventional landing gear, powered by two radial piston engines of 1,000–1,200 hp (750–890 kW). The DC-3 has a cruising speed of 207 mph (333 km/h), a capacity of 21 to 32 passengers or 6,000 lbs (2,700 kg) of cargo, and a range of 1,500 mi (2,400 km), and can operate from short runways.

1947 Héðinsfjörður air crash

1947 Héðinsfjörður air crash

On 29 May 1947, a Douglas DC-3 aircraft of Flugfélag Íslands crashed on Hestfjall on the west side of Héðinsfjörður, a fjord in northern Iceland. All 25 people on board were killed. It is the deadliest air accident in Iceland.

Icelandair Flugfélag Islands Flight 704

Icelandair Flugfélag Islands Flight 704

Flugfélag Íslands Flight 704 was an aircraft accident involving the controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) of a Fokker F27 Friendship on the island of Mykines in Faroe Islands, on 26 September 1970 at 10:56. The Flugfélag Íslands aircraft was on its way to Vágar Airport, making a pass over Mykines before crashing into the highest peak of the island. Of the 34 passenger and crew on board, 8 died in the crash. The captain and 7 passengers, all seated on the left side of the plane, were killed. 26 passengers and crew survived, some with serious injuries. Three passengers hiked for an hour to reach Mykines village to alert the authorities. Most of the villagers went up the mountain to aid the survivors before the arrival of the Danish patrol vessel F348 Hvidbjørnen.

Fokker F27 Friendship

Fokker F27 Friendship

The Fokker F27 Friendship is a turboprop airliner developed and manufactured by the Dutch aircraft manufacturer Fokker. It is the most numerous post-war aircraft manufactured in the Netherlands; the F27 was also one of the most successful European airliners of its era.

Faroe Islands

Faroe Islands

The Faroe Islands, or simply the Faroes, are a North Atlantic archipelago island country and self-governing nation under the external sovereignty of the Kingdom of Denmark.

Mykines, Mykines

Mykines, Mykines

Mykines village ; Danish: Myggenæs) is the only settlement on Mykines Island, the westernmost of the Faroe Islands. It is a little coastal village with bright houses with turf roofs, with an old turf-roofed stone Church dating from 1878, and a small stream flowing through the village.

Vestmannaeyjar

Vestmannaeyjar

Vestmannaeyjar is a municipality and archipelago off the south coast of Iceland.

Ísafjörður Airport

Ísafjörður Airport

Ísafjörður Airport is an airport serving Ísafjörður, a town in the Westfjords region in northwestern Iceland.

Source: "Air Iceland Connect", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Iceland_Connect.

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References
  1. ^ a b c businesstraveller.com - Air Iceland Connect merges with Icelandair brand 12 March 2021
  2. ^ Home. Air Iceland Connect. Retrieved on 13 February 2011. "Air Iceland - Reykjavik airport - 101 Reykjavik"
  3. ^ "Directory: World Airlines". Flight International. 2007-03-27. p. 58.
  4. ^ "Air Iceland Connect". airicelandconnect.is. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Air Iceland Connect to disappear". RÚV (in Icelandic). 2021-03-09. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  6. ^ a b c "Flugsagan". flugsafn.is (in Icelandic). Icelandic Air Museum. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  7. ^ "Air Iceland fleet list". planespotters.net. Retrieved July 19, 2014.
  8. ^ "Air Iceland rebrands as Air Iceland Connect". ch-aviation.com. Retrieved May 26, 2017.
  9. ^ "New English name for domestic flight company in Iceland faces criticism". Iceland Monitor. 26 May 2017.
  10. ^ ch-aviation.com - Air Iceland Connect to cut fleet, quit UK 16 February 2018
  11. ^ "Global Airline Guide 2019 (Part One)". Airliner World. October 2019: 15.
  12. ^ Milla Ósk Magnúsdóttir (21 April 2017). "Sögu Fokker vélanna hjá FÍ lýkur". RÚV (in Icelandic). Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  13. ^ Birgir Þór Harðarson (21 April 2017). "Flugfélagið selur allar Fokker-vélarnar". Kjarninn (in Icelandic). Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  14. ^ "Flugvélin "Smyrill hrapar til jarðar". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 15 April 1942. p. 3. Retrieved 26 May 2022 – via Tímarit.is. open access
  15. ^ ""Smyrill" hrapar til jarðar og eyðileggst". Vísir (in Icelandic). 15 April 1942. p. 2. Retrieved 26 May 2022 – via Tímarit.is. open access
  16. ^ Accident description for Flugfélag Íslands Douglas C-47A-25-DK (DC-3) TF-ISI, 29 May 1947 at the Aviation Safety Network
  17. ^ "Átta létust í flugslysinu í Færeyjum". Tíminn (in Icelandic). 29 September 1970. pp. 1, 3. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  18. ^ "Flugstjórinn og sjö farþegar létu lífið". Þjóðviljinn (in Icelandic). 29 September 1970. pp. 1, 9. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  19. ^ "Sex Íslendingar meðal 34 um borð". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 27 September 1970. p. 1. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  20. ^ "Mikil gleði þegar hættan var liðin hjá". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 19 June 1980. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  21. ^ "Magalending í Keflavík". Tíminn (in Icelandic). 19 June 1980. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  22. ^ "Meistaraleg nauðlending". Þjóðviljinn (in Icelandic). 19 June 1980. p. 1. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  23. ^ "Hugsunin var öll hjá börnunum mínum". Vísir (in Icelandic). 19 June 1980. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  24. ^ "Snilldarleg nauðlending Fokkersins". Dagblaðið (in Icelandic). 19 June 1980. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  25. ^ "Hreyfillinn sprakk í aðeins 150 metra hæð". Dagblaðið Vísir (in Icelandic). 22 March 1982. pp. 1, 2, 4, 5, 48. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  26. ^ "Giftusamleg björgun". Þjóðviljinn (in Icelandic). 23 March 1982. pp. 1, 16. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  27. ^ Gísli Einarsson; Edda Sif Pálsdóttir (5 April 2018). "Man eftir bragðinu af samlokunni". RÚV (in Icelandic). Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  28. ^ "Ég bjóst við meiri látum í nauðlendingunni". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 23 March 1982. pp. 20, 21, 48. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  29. ^ "Olíubíll rétt slapp undan flugvélinni". Dagblaðið Vísir (in Icelandic). 11 March 1986. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  30. ^ "Flugstjórinn heyrði hávaða og ákvað að hætta við flugtak". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 11 March 1986. pp. 1, 2, 30, 31, 52. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  31. ^ "Rann út á Suðurgötu". Þjóðviljinn (in Icelandic). 11 March 1986. pp. 1, 7. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  32. ^ "Rann stjórnlaust fram af brautinni". Tíminn (in Icelandic). 11 March 1986. pp. 1, 3. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  33. ^ "Flugvirki er talinn hafa forðað stórslysi er hann slökkti eld með snarræði". Morgunblaðið (in Icelandic). 9 July 1986. pp. 29, 48. Retrieved 2 January 2019.
  34. ^ "Íslensk vél brotlenti á flugvellinum í Nuuk - allir farþegar ómeiddir" [Icelandic aircraft crashed at the airport in Nuuk - all passengers unharmed] (in Icelandic). 365. 4 March 2011.
  35. ^ Accident description for Flugfélag Íslands de Havilland Canada DHC-8-106 TF-JMB, 4 March 2011 at the Aviation Safety Network
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