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Ab Asturica Burdigalam

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Via XXXIV, Ab Asturica Burdigalam
Ab Asturica Burdigala.svg
LocationRoman provinces of Hispania and Aquitania, from Asturica Augusta (Astorga) to Burdigala (Bordeaux)
TypeRoman road
History
BuilderRoman Empire

Ab Asturica Burdigalam (numbered as Via XXXIV on the Antonine Itinerary) was a Roman road that linked the towns of Asturica Augusta (modern Astorga) in Gallaecia and Burdigala (modern Bordeaux) in Aquitania.[1]

The Antonine Itinerary mentions that it ran through Pallantia (Palencia), the pass of Vindeleia, Veleia, Pompaelo (Pamplona), Iturissa ( Identified by some as Aurizberri/Espinal,[2] and others as Burguete – Auritz[3]) and the Summo Pyreneo (Roncevaux pass), among other places.[4]

In medieval times it would be largely replaced by the Way of St. James that, while coincident in some parts with the Roman road, it goes further south between Pamplona and Astorga.

This route was probably followed by the Vandals, Alans and Suebi when they invaded Hispania in the 5th century, and with certainty by Charlemagne and other less famed Frankish expeditions against Pamplona. The Basque section of the road was still in use when Napoleon invaded Spain between 1808 and 1814 and was known for a time as the "Route of Napoleon".

Discover more about Ab Asturica Burdigalam related topics

Antonine Itinerary

Antonine Itinerary

The Antonine Itinerary is a famous itinerarium, a register of the stations and distances along various roads. Seemingly based on official documents, possibly from a survey carried out under Augustus, it describes the roads of the Roman Empire. Owing to the scarcity of other extant records of this type, it is a valuable historical record.

Astorga, Spain

Astorga, Spain

Astorga is a municipality and city of Spain located in the central area of the province of León, in the autonomous community of Castilla y León, 43 kilometres (27 mi) southwest of the provincial capital. It is located in the transit between the Páramo Leonés and the mountains of León and acts as the backbone of the comarcas of Maragatería, La Cepeda and the Ribera del Órbigo. The city is the head of one of the most extensive and oldest dioceses of Spain, whose jurisdiction covers half of the province of León and part of Ourense and Zamora. It is also head of the judicial party number 5 of the province of León.

Gallaecia

Gallaecia

Gallaecia, also known as Hispania Gallaecia, was the name of a Roman province in the north-west of Hispania, approximately present-day Galicia, northern Portugal, Asturias and Leon and the later Kingdom of Gallaecia. The Roman cities included the port Cale (Porto), the governing centers Bracara Augusta (Braga), Lucus Augusti (Lugo) and Asturica Augusta (Astorga) and their administrative areas Conventus bracarensis, Conventus lucensis and Conventus asturicensis.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux

Bordeaux is a port city on the river Garonne in the Gironde department, Southwestern France. It is the capital of the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region, as well as the prefecture of the Gironde department. Its inhabitants are called "Bordelais" (masculine) or "Bordelaises" (feminine). The term "Bordelais" may also refer to the city and its surrounding region.

Novempopulania

Novempopulania

Novempopulania was one of the provinces created by Diocletian out of Gallia Aquitania, which was also called Aquitania Tertia.

Iruña-Veleia

Iruña-Veleia

Veleia was a Roman town in Hispania, now located in the Basque Autonomous Community, Spain. The site is located in the municipality of Iruña de Oca, 10 kilometers west of Vitoria. The town was an important station on the Roman road ab Asturica Burdigalam that ran parallel to the coast of the Bay of Biscay. At its apogee, the city could have been inhabited by some five to ten thousand people, and apparently went through different cycles of prosperity and decline into the Early Middle Ages until it was finally abandoned.

Iturissa

Iturissa

Iturissa was a Roman town in north-west Spain in the province of Hispania Tarraconensis, now the province and autonomous community of Navarre. Iturissa was mentioned by Ptolemy in the second century as "a town of the Vascones."

Espinal, Navarre

Espinal, Navarre

Espinal is a Spanish town and council in the municipality of Erro in the Chartered (Foral) Community of Navarre. It is located in Merindad de Sangüesa, in the Auñamendi region. Its population in 2014 was 243 inhabitants. The town is located on the French way of the Camino de Santiago.

Burguete – Auritz

Burguete – Auritz

Burguete (Castilian) or Auritz (Basque) is a town and municipality located in the province and autonomous community of Navarre, northern Spain.

Alans

Alans

The Alans were an ancient and medieval Iranian nomadic pastoral people of the North Caucasus – generally regarded as part of the Sarmatians, and possibly related to the Massagetae. Modern historians have connected the Alans with the Central Asian Yancai of Chinese sources and with the Aorsi of Roman sources. Having migrated westwards and becoming dominant among the Sarmatians on the Pontic–Caspian steppe, the Alans are mentioned by Roman sources in the 1st century CE. At that time they had settled the region north of the Black Sea and frequently raided the Parthian Empire and the Caucasian provinces of the Roman Empire. From 215–250 CE the Goths broke their power on the Pontic Steppe.

Hispania

Hispania

Hispania was the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula and its provinces. Under the Roman Republic, Hispania was divided into two provinces: Hispania Citerior and Hispania Ulterior. During the Principate, Hispania Ulterior was divided into two new provinces, Baetica and Lusitania, while Hispania Citerior was renamed Hispania Tarraconensis. Subsequently, the western part of Tarraconensis was split off, first as Hispania Nova, later renamed "Callaecia". From Diocletian's Tetrarchy onwards, the south of the remainder of Tarraconensis was again split off as Carthaginensis, and all of the mainland Hispanic provinces, along with the Balearic Islands and the North African province of Mauretania Tingitana, were later grouped into a civil diocese headed by a vicarius. The name Hispania was also used in the period of Visigothic rule.

Charlemagne

Charlemagne

Charlemagne or Charles the Great, a member of the Carolingian dynasty, was King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and the first Emperor of the Romans from 800. Charlemagne succeeded in uniting the majority of western and central Europe and was the first recognized emperor to rule from western Europe after the fall of the Western Roman Empire around three centuries earlier. The expanded Frankish state that Charlemagne founded was the Carolingian Empire. He was canonized by Antipope Paschal III—an act later treated as invalid—and he is now regarded by some as beatified in the Catholic Church.

Source: "Ab Asturica Burdigalam", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ab_Asturica_Burdigalam.

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References
  1. ^ José Manuel Roldán Hervás (1971). Iter ab emerita astvricam. El camino de la plata. Universidad de Salamanca. pp. 106–. ISBN 978-84-7800-884-1.
  2. ^ "ITURISSA". Gran Enciclopedia de Navarra (in Spanish). Retrieved Nov 22, 2020.
  3. ^ Orovio, Ignacio (Feb 17, 2019). "Una ciudad romana en Roncesvalles". La Vanguardia. Retrieved Nov 23, 2020.
  4. ^ A. Blázquez, Nuevo estudio sobre el "Itinerario" de Antonino


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