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Aalamul Quran

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Aalamul Quran
Cover of Aalamul Quran.jpg
1998 version
AuthorAbdul Majid Daryabadi
Original titleاعلام القرآن
CountryIndia
LanguageUrdu
SubjectQuranic studies
GenreGeography
PublisherSidq-i-Jadid Book Agency
Publication date
1959
Media typeHardcover
Pages208
OCLC156905255
297.1227

Aalamul Quran (Urdu: اعلام القرآن) is a book written by Indian scholar Abdul Majid Daryabadi on Science of Geography in the Quran. Published in 1959 by Sidq-i-Jadid Book Agency, Lucknow, comprising 208 pages, the book is an alphabetically arranged comprehensive dictionary of Quranic Personalities, whether human, angelic or diabolic mentioned in the Quran explicitly or implicitly.[1] Thus, it is a book on the human geography of the Quran: both individual and tribal geography is furnished. The book introduces to 158 personalities. It is a unique work on this genre. Along with Tafseer-e-Majidi written both in Urdu & English, Daryabadi has authored another book entitled Jugrafiyah Qurani which elaborates physical geography employed in the Quran.[2]

Discover more about Aalamul Quran related topics

Indian people

Indian people

Indians or Indian people are the citizens and nationals of India. In 2022, the population of India stood at over 1.4 billion people, making it the world's second-most populous country, containing 17.7 percent of the global population. In addition to the Indian population, the Indian overseas diaspora also boasts large numbers, particularly in the Arab states of the Persian Gulf and the Western world. While the demonym "Indian" applies to people originating from the present-day Republic of India, it was also formerly used as the identifying term for people originating from Pakistan and Bangladesh during British colonial era until 1947.

Abdul Majid Daryabadi

Abdul Majid Daryabadi

Abdul Majid Daryabadi was an Islamic scholar, philosopher, writer, critic, researcher, journalist and exegete of the Quran in Indian subcontinent in 20th century. He was as one of the most influential Indian Muslim scholar and was much concerned with modernism and comparative religions and orientalism in India. In his early life, he became sceptical of religion and called himself a "rationalist". For almost nine years, he remained away from religion but repented and became a devout Muslim. He was actively associated with the Khilafat Movement, Royal Asiatic Society, Aligarh Muslim University, Nadwatul Ulama, Darul Musannefin Shibli Academy and several other leading Islamic and literary organisations. He was disciple of Ashraf Ali Thanwi and Hussain Ahmed Madani.

Geography

Geography

Geography is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena of Earth. The first recorded use of the word γεωγραφία was as a title of a book by Greek scholar Eratosthenes. Geography is an all-encompassing discipline that seeks an understanding of Earth and its human and natural complexities—not merely where objects are, but also how they have changed and come to be. While geography is specific to Earth, many concepts can be applied more broadly to other celestial bodies in the field of planetary science. One such concept, the first law of geography, proposed by Waldo Tobler, is "everything is related to everything else, but near things are more related than distant things." Geography has been called "the world discipline" and "the bridge between the human and the physical sciences."

Quran

Quran

The Quran, also romanized Qur'an or Koran, is the central religious text of Islam, believed by Muslims to be a revelation from God. It is organized in 114 chapters, which consist of verses. In addition to its religious significance, it is widely regarded as the finest work in Arabic literature, and has significantly influenced the Arabic language.

Lucknow

Lucknow

Lucknow is the capital and the largest city of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh and it is also the second largest urban agglomeration in Uttar Pradesh. Lucknow is the administrative headquarters of the eponymous district and division. Having a population of 2.8 million as per 2011 census, it is the eleventh most populous city and the twelfth-most populous urban agglomeration of India. Lucknow has always been a multicultural city that flourished as a North Indian cultural and artistic hub, and the seat of power of Nawabs in the 18th and 19th centuries. It continues to be an important centre of governance, administration, education, commerce, aerospace, finance, pharmaceuticals, technology, design, culture, tourism, music and poetry.

Tafseer-e-Majidi

Tafseer-e-Majidi

Tafseer-e-Majidi or Tafsirul Quran: Translation and Commentary of the Holy Quran a complete Tafsir written by Abdul Majid Daryabadi. He was influenced by Ashraf Ali Thanwi to write a Tafsir and then he wrote this Tafsir in English first then in Urdu. The Urdu style and methodology adopted in writing this Tafsir were the same as his English Tafsir. The only difference was that this Tafsir was supposed to be comparatively more lengthy. The author himself wrote the Preface on December in 1941. The author observed that to translate the Quran is very difficult. So, he advised to the translators to follow the six main points and various subpoints to translate the Quran into English. Because he observed some problems to translate into English and he told that, there is no language in the world as well as Arabic. The Introduction was written by Abul Hasan Ali Hasani Nadwi on 16 August in 1981.

Methodology

As for his methodology, not only did he incorporate the number of time a particular personality is mentioned in specific chapter & Ruku, but also supplemented it with details ransacked from other divinely inspired books, for example, Bible & other scriptures. The exhaustive details are avoided here, because in another book entitled The Tales of the Holy Quran, he intended to write all these details.[3]

Content

Anthropological Geography of the Prophets

In individual geography, he furnishes details of whereabouts of all the 26 Prophets mentioned in the Quran. He not only presents the contrary views about their location but also prefers one view, for example, describing the opposite views of descent of Prophet Adam either in Celon (Sirāndīp) or in Iraq between two waters of Tigris & Euphrates, he prefers the later view, but this view is not supported by majority. Secondly, he identifies Sirāndīp with Celon (modern day Sri-Lanka), while the modern geographers opine that Sirāndīp is modern day Maldev Islands. The latters view seems correct when the story of Rājah Dāhir, his loot, storm and deviation of the ship bearing the Muslim converts is kept in mind.[4] While alluding to the Prophets abode, he dilates on its present geography & even distance from other cities, for instance, Prophet Isḥāq dwelt at Bi’r Shībā, once a thriving city, near Kinʻān, which lies to south of Jerusalem, to the North of Wādī al-Sabā, & is 28 miles South West to Al-Khalīl.[4] While describing Prophets & others, he alludes to their relation to different geographical important cities or geographical achievements & areas of their empires, for example, the Prophet Dā’ūd made Ḥebraum his capital & then, shifted it to Jerusalem; secondly, Tubba, mentioned in the Qur’ān, whose empire lies to the North of Saba Empire, held Ḥimyar & Hadhar Maut in sway. While his father, says ʻAbd al-Mājid on the authority of Ibn-i Ḥabīb, got a road constructed from Madina to Yemen.[4]

Anthropological Geography of the People

In addition to Prophets, he introduced to good People, for example, Tubba, Zaid, Saul (Ṭālūt).[4] Vicious People like Āzar, Jālūt (Margoliuth), Pharaoh, Qārūn, Devil, Sāmrī, and so forth are also made familiarized.[5] Geography of groups like Aiders to Jesus (Naṣārā), the companions of Prophet Mūsā, Brothers of Prophet Yusūf, idols like Yāʻūq, Yāghūth, Uzzā, Lāt, Manāt, Wad, Suvāʻ, Nassar & Baʻl, etc. are geographically delineated.[5] The geographically represented groups of people like “The People of Ditch”, “The People of Aikah”, “The People of Ḥijr”, “The People of Well”, “The People of Saturday”, “The People of Elephant”, “The People of Town”, “The People of Madyan” & “The People of Cave & Raqīm”, and so forth, are fully introduced.[5] The people mentioned with attributes instead of names are also elaborately described, for example, “the person whom Allāh has blessed”, “the person who was given knowledge”, “the person who passed by a person”, etc. are introduced to establish their historicity. Thus, geography helps establish the historicity of people & tribes.[5]

Tribal Geography

In tribal geography, he furnishes details regarding Quraysh, Thamūd, ʻĀd, Israelites, Yagot (Yājūj), Magot (Mājūj), and so forth.[5] Progeny of different Prophets is given ample space, for example, progeny of Prophet Dā’ūd (Āl-i Dā’ūd), progeny of Prophet Mūsā, of Prophet Lūṭ, of Aram, of Prophet Yaʻqūb, and so forth.[5]

Anthropological Geography of Women

Women or Feminine geography is also emphasized in the book: wives of Prophets & others, for example, of Prophet Lūṭ, Prophet Nūḥ, Pharaoh, ʻImrān, ʻAzīz; mothers like the mother of Prophet Mūsā are geographically delineated to assert their historicity.[5] Some others are expounded by appending possessive cases like his wife, his mother, her mother, and so forth.[5] Hārūn’s sister & Prophet Lūṭ’s daughters are also elaborated.[5]

Non-human Personalities

Non-human personalities like angels (Gibrā’īl, Mikā’īl, Hārūt, Mārūt), Devil or Satan (Iblīs); idols (Lāt, Manāt, etc) are also geographically depicted.[5]

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Adam

Adam

Adam is the name given in Genesis 1-5 to the first human. Beyond its use as the name of the first man, adam is also used in the Bible as a pronoun, individually as "a human" and in a collective sense as "mankind". Genesis 1 tells of God's creation of the world and its creatures, including adam, meaning humankind; in Genesis 2 God forms "Adam", this time meaning a single male human, out of "the dust of the ground", places him in the Garden of Eden, and forms a woman, Eve, as his helpmate; in Genesis 3 Adam and Eve eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge and God condemns Adam to labour on the earth for his food and to return to it on his death; Genesis 4 deals with the birth of Adam's sons, and Genesis 5 lists his descendants from Seth to Noah.

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon and officially the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, is an island country in South Asia. It lies in the Indian Ocean, southwest of the Bay of Bengal, and southeast of the Arabian Sea; it is separated from the Indian subcontinent by the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Strait. Sri Lanka shares a maritime border with India and the Maldives. Sri Jayawardenepura Kotte is its legislative capital, and Colombo is its largest city and financial centre.

Iraq

Iraq

Iraq, officially the Republic of Iraq, is a country in Western Asia. It is bordered by Turkey to the north, Iran to the east, the Persian Gulf and Kuwait to the southeast, Saudi Arabia to the south, Jordan to the southwest and Syria to the west. The capital and largest city is Baghdad. Iraq is home to diverse ethnic groups including Iraqi Arabs, Kurds, Turkmens, Assyrians, Armenians, Yazidis, Mandaeans, Persians and Shabakis with similarly diverse geography and wildlife. The vast majority of the country's 44 million residents are Muslims – the notable other faiths are Christianity, Yazidism, Mandaeism, Yarsanism and Zoroastrianism. The official languages of Iraq are Arabic and Kurdish; others also recognised in specific regions are Neo-Aramaic, Turkish and Armenian.

Maldives

Maldives

Maldives, officially the Republic of Maldives, is an archipelagic state located in South Asia, situated in the Indian Ocean. It lies southwest of Sri Lanka and India, about 750 kilometres from the Asian continent's mainland. The chain of 26 atolls stretches across the Equator from Ihavandhippolhu Atoll in the north to Addu Atoll in the south.

Dahir of Aror

Dahir of Aror

Raja Dahir was the last Hindu ruler of Sindh in present-day Pakistan. In 711 CE his kingdom was invaded by the Umayyad Caliphate led by Muhammad bin Qasim where Dahir died while defending his kingdom. According to the Chachnama, the Umayyad campaign against Arori Raja Dahir was due to a pirate raid off the coast of the Sindhi coast that resulted in gifts to the Umayyad caliph from the king of Serendib being stolen.

Isaac in Islam

Isaac in Islam

The biblical patriarch Prophet Isaac is recognized as a prophet and messenger of God by Muslims. As in Judaism and Christianity, Islam maintains that prophet Isaac was the son of the patriarch and prophet Abraham from his wife Sarah. Muslims hold prophet Isaac in deep veneration because they believe that both prophet Isaac and his older half-brother prophet Ishmael continued their father's spiritual legacy through their subsequent preaching of the message of God after the death of prophet Abraham.Prophet Isaac is mentioned in fifteen passages of the Quran. Along with being mentioned several times in the Quran, Prophet Isaac is held up as one of Islam's prophets.

Jerusalem

Jerusalem

Jerusalem is a city in Western Asia. Situated on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea, it is one of the oldest cities in the world and is considered to be a holy city for the three major Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Both Israelis and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital, as Israel maintains its primary governmental institutions there and the State of Palestine ultimately foresees it as its seat of power. Because of this dispute, neither claim is widely recognized internationally.

David in Islam

David in Islam

Dawud, in Islam is considered a prophet and messenger of God (Allah), as well as a righteous, divinely-anointed monarch of the United Kingdom of Israel. Additionally, Muslims also honor David for having received the divine revelation of the Zabur (Psalms). Dawud is considered one of the most important people in Islam. Mentioned sixteen times in the Quran, David appears in the Islamic scripture as a link in the chain of prophets who preceded Muhammad. Although he is not usually considered one of the "law-giving" prophets, "he is far from a marginal figure" in Islamic thought. In later Islamic traditions, he is praised for his rigor in prayer and fasting. He is also presented as the prototypical just ruler and as a symbol of God's authority on earth, having been at once a king and a prophet.

Drawbacks

The writer did not hail the research conducted by Sulaiman Nadvi concerning “the People of Ḥijr”. He still regards them as Thamūdī not Nibṭī as Nadvī held. He preferred to go with the majority.[5] The modern researchers discern in Madā’n-i Ṣāleḥ & Al-Mābiyāt. The modern researchers opine that Madāi’n-i Ṣāleḥ is not the place where the Prophet Ṣāleḥ resided. A Turkish researcher committed this blunder and all others followed. The place is attributed to another person by the name Ṣāleḥ. The Prophet Ṣāleḥ resided not at Madāi’n-i Ṣāleḥ rather at Al-Mābiyāt, but the author committed error here.[5]

Reception

Mohd Mahboob, a researcher of Aligarh Muslim University wrote about the book,

Daryābādī's trilogy on the Qur'ānic studies enables readers to fathom better the plethora of historical, geographical, and civilizational allusions in the Qurān. These works also set a new trend of the Qur'ānic scholarship in Urdu, as in addition to Tafsīr, other works on the Qur'ānic studies started appearing in Urdu.

— [6]

Source: "Aalamul Quran", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aalamul_Quran.

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See also
References

Citations

  1. ^ Mahboob, Mohd. (2020). Abdul Majid Daryabadis contribution to Quranic studies (PhD). India: Department of Islamic Studies, Aligarh Muslim University. p. 142. hdl:10603/354021.
  2. ^ Mumtaz, Nadia (2021). "Science of Geography in the Holy Quran". The Islamic Culture. Sheikh Zayed Islamic Centre, University of Karachi. 45: 35. ISSN 1813-775X. CC BY icon.svg Text was copied from this source, which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  3. ^ Mumtaz 2021, p. 34–35.
  4. ^ a b c d Mumtaz 2021, p. 33.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Mumtaz 2021, p. 34.
  6. ^ Mahboob 2020, p. 144.

Bibliography

External links

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